Express Entry Year-End Report 2018

Express Entry Year-End Report 2018 (PDF, 1.12 MB)

Overview of Express Entry

Launched in January 2015, Express Entry is Canada’s flagship application management system for the following economic immigration categories: the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, Canadian Experience Class, and a portion of the Provincial Nominee Program. As described below, Express Entry provides the Government of Canada with the means to manage the intake of applications for permanent residence under these specific economic immigration categories, while also facilitating the selection of individuals who are most likely to succeed in Canada.

As with previous Express Entry year-end reports, this Report provides an overview of Express Entry, as well as data from 2018 across all stages of the Express Entry continuum, including profile submissions, invitations to apply, applications, processing times, and admissions. A section with gender-disaggregated data is also included.

How Express Entry works

The Express Entry system manages applications for permanent residence through a two-step process. First, individuals express their interest in immigrating to Canada by completing an online profile, which is then screened electronically to determine if the individual is eligible for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, or the Canadian Experience Class.Footnote 1 Individuals who meet the eligibility criteria for at least one of these programs are placed in the Express Entry pool and are assigned a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score based on the information in their profile compared to a transparent scoring criteria, including factors such as education, language ability, and work experience. Candidates in the pool are ranked against one another based on their CRS score.

Second, every few weeks, a Ministerial Instruction is published specifying the number of invitations to apply (ITA) for permanent residence that will be sent to candidates in the Express Entry pool on a specific date.Footnote 2 The Ministerial Instruction may also specify that the ITA round will target one or more of the Express Entry economic immigration categories. For a given round, invitations are issued to candidates, in descending CRS score rank order, until the maximum number of invitations specified in the associated Ministerial Instruction is met.Footnote 3 The profiles of candidates who do not receive an ITA, or decline an ITA, remain in the pool for up to 12 months. Candidates who receive an ITA but do not react are withdrawn from the pool.

Candidates that receive an ITA have 60 days to submit an online application for permanent residence to IRCC.Footnote 4 Upon receipt, an immigration officer assesses the application to verify the applicant’s CRS score and program eligibility, and to ensure the principal applicant and any accompanying family members are not inadmissible. If the immigration officer is satisfied that all conditions have been met and that the principal applicant and any accompanying family members are not inadmissible, they are approved for a permanent resident visa. Applicants and their accompanying family members become permanent residents when they are admitted to Canada.

The processing standard for applications sourced via Express Entry is six months for 80% of cases. Processing time is measured beginning from the day a complete application is received until a final decision is made by an immigration officer.

The CRS is the backbone of the Express Entry application management system. A CRS score comprises two components—core points and additional points. A candidate without an accompanying spouse can receive a maximum of 600 points under the core component, depending on the person’s human capital characteristics (i.e. age, education, official language proficiency, and work experience).Footnote 5 These factors predict greater potential for success in the Canadian labour market.

Under the additional points component, a candidate can receive points for having a provincial/territorial nomination (600 points), arranged employment (50 or 200 points), Canadian post-secondary education credentials (15 or 30 points), French language proficiency (15 or 30 points), or a sibling in Canada (15 points). With the exception of points awarded for a provincial/territorial nomination, which is high enough to guarantee a candidate an ITA in the following round, additional points increase the probability that a given candidate will receive an ITA without guaranteeing that outcome.

Candidates in the Express Entry pool must update their profile to reflect any change in circumstances and this action can trigger a recalculation of the CRS score. Some updates are automatically triggered when milestones, such as a birthday or expiry of language test results, are reached. Accordingly, candidates can take steps to increase their CRS score, thereby increasing the probability they will be selected to receive an ITA. For example, a candidate could increase their proficiency in an official language, secure arranged employment, or provide an educational credential assessment for education acquired abroad.

The maximum CRS score a candidate can achieve is capped at 1,200 points—600 points under the core component and 600 points under the additional points component. All information provided at the profile stage for the purpose of generating a CRS score is self-reported and must be supported with appropriate documentation from the candidate at the application stage or the application could be refused.

Profiles submitted to the Express Entry pool

In 2018, nearly 280,000 Express Entry profiles were submitted through the system, which represents an increase of more than 10% from 2017 (Table 1).Footnote 6 Among profiles submitted in 2018, 70% were eligible for at least one of the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, or the Canadian Experience Class, compared to 65% of submitted profiles that were eligible in 2017. The proportion of submitted profiles eligible for at least one of the three streams has increased steadily since Express Entry was first introduced in 2015.

Table 1: Profiles submitted to Express Entry, 2017 and 2018

Profile outcome 2017 2018
Total Profiles submitted 250,156 278,590
Number of ineligible profiles 87,747 82,931
Ineligible percent 35% 30%
Number of eligible profile 162,409 195,659
Eligible percent 65% 70%

Among individuals who submitted profiles that were eligible in 2018, a majority (71%) did not claim any type of additional points at the time of submission (Table 2). Siblings in Canada (12%) and Education in Canada (11%) were the most frequent type of additional point type claimed in 2018. The sharp increase in proportion of eligible profiles with additional points for having a sibling in Canada (from 7% in 2017 to 12% in 2018) and for being proficient in FrenchFootnote 7 (from 2% in 2017 to 4% in 2018) is at least partly a reflection of introducing these point types in June 2017.

Table 2: Eligible profiles submitted by additional point type, 2017 and 2018 (not mutually exclusive)

Additional point type 2017 number % 2018 number %
No additional points 119,172 73% 138,137 71%
Arranged employment 9,173 6% 9,693 5%
Education in Canada 23,506 14% 22,451 11%
French-language proficiency 2,437 2% 7,180 4%
Siblings 11,561 7% 23,588 12%
Total 162,409 0 195,659 0

Composition of the Express Entry pool

The distributions of CRS scores for candidate profiles in the pool on January 3, 2018, and on January 3, 2019, are presented in Table 3. On January 3, 2019, candidate CRS scores were concentrated in the 350 to 449 range. It’s important to note that the Express Entry pool is dynamic and the distribution of CRS scores changes every time an eligible profile is submitted, updated, or expires.

Table 3: CRS score distribution in the Express Entry pool

CRS score range Number of candidates on January 3, 2018 Number of candidates on January 3, 2019
>1000 36 35
950 - 999 76 85
900 - 949 69 83
850 - 899 17 20
800 - 849 1 8
750 - 799 1 10
700 - 749 3 4
650 - 699 0 2
600 - 649 0 2
550 - 599 10 9
500 - 549 97 101
450 - 499 1,177 1,684
400 - 449 20,404 31,181
440 - 449 1,355 775
430 - 439 4,224 9,769
420 - 429 4,167 6,314
410 - 419 4,889 6,857
400 - 409 5,769 7,466
350 - 399 28,983 37,574
390 - 399 5,254 7,204
380 - 389 5,707 7,461
370 - 379 6,283 8,203
360 - 369 5,917 7,457
350 - 359 5,822 7,249
300 - 349 17,385 21,110
340 - 349 5,189 6,562
330 - 339 4,418 5,436
320 - 329 3,557 4,231
310 - 319 2,532 2,936
300 - 309 1,689 1,945
250 - 299 1,976 2,302
200 - 249 466 496
150 - 199 279 190
100 - 149 84 63
<100 23 18
Total 71,087 94,977

As displayed in Table 4, the majority of profiles in the pool as of January 3, 2019, had not claimed additional points. Most others had claimed only one type of additional points, most often for “siblings in Canada” or “education in Canada.” Less than 2% of profiles in the pool on this date claimed more than one additional point type. The CRS scores of profiles with only points for “arranged employment” were concentrated in a lower range (1-300) compared to the CRS scores of profiles with a other types of additional points.

Table 4: Total profiles in the pool as of January 3, 2019, by CRS score and additional point type (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type 1-299 300-349 350-399 400-449 450-499 500-549 550-599 600-1200 Total
Candidates without additional points 1,750 17,566 30,074 22,420 918 4 0 0 72,732
One additional point type

Provincial Nominee

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 246 246

Arranged employment

673 341 368 435 101 26 3 2 1,949

Education in Canada

42 340 1,500 3,796 362 46 0 0 6,086

French-language proficiency

16 158 595 698 52 10 0 0 1,529

Siblings in Canada

417 2,569 4,711 3,101 155 1 0 0 10,954
Two additional point types

Arranged employment and education in Canada

4 9 19 121 37 1 4 0 195

Arranged employment and French-language proficiency

3 5 16 12 1 3 0 1 41

Arranged employment and siblings in Canada

149 45 41 68 6 0 0 0 309

Education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 2 6 13 1 0 1 0 23

Education in Canada and siblings in Canada

9 33 130 360 43 6 0 0 581

French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

6 41 110 144 6 1 0 0 308
Three additional point types

Arranged employment, education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

Arranged employment, education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 4 9 1 2 0 0 16

Arranged employment, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

Education in Canada, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2
All additional point types 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Total 3,069 21,110 37,574 31,181 1,684 101 9 249 94,977

Results of Express Entry 2018 Invitation to Apply rounds

As displayed in Table 5, Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) held 27 ITA rounds and issued 89,800 invitations in 2018. The increase in invitations issued in 2018 compared to 2017, when 86,022 invitations were issued, is in line with the rise in the Federal High Skilled admission target set out in the 2018 Immigration Levels PlanFootnote 8.

In 2018, more than half of the total invitations issued were for the Federal Skilled Workers Program (53%), and about one third under the Canadian Experience Class (34%).

On May 30, 2018, only candidates from the Provincial Nominee Program and the Federal Skilled Trades Program were invited. On September 24, 2018, only candidates from the Federal Skilled Trades Program were invited. These program‑specific ITA rounds were conducted in line with the associated Ministerial Instruction. Excluding these two ITA rounds, the CRS cut-off score ranged from 439 to 456 in 2018.

Table 5: Invitations issued to candidates in 2018 by economic immigration program

Invitation to apply date CRS cut-off Canadian Experience Class Provincial /Territorial Nominees Federal Skilled Workers Skilled Trades Total
Jan-10 446 984 378 1,388 0 2,750
Jan-24 444 979 360 1,411 0 2,750
Feb-07 442 1,077 433 1,490 0 3,000
Feb-21 442 945 510 1,544 1 3,000
Mar-14 456 1,069 625 1,306 0 3,000
Mar-26 446 1,006 248 1,746 0 3,000
Apr-11 444 1,480 346 1,674 0 3,500
Apr-25 441 1,196 272 2,031 1 3,500
May-09 441 1,371 328 1,800 1 3,500
May-23 440 1,093 325 2,082 0 3,500
May-30 288 0 200 0 500 700
Jun-13 451 1,359 468 1,923 0 3,750
Jun-25 442 1,321 344 2,085 0 3,750
Jul-11 442 1,537 497 1,716 0 3,750
Jul-25 441 1,190 450 2,110 0 3,750
Aug-08 440 1,382 338 2,030 0 3,750
Aug-22 440 1,273 346 2,131 0 3,750
Sep-05 440 1,413 365 2,122 0 3,900
Sep-19 441 1,220 378 1,902 0 3,500
Sep-24 284 0 0 0 400 400
Oct-03 445 1,314 542 2,044 0 3,900
Oct-15 440 1,302 356 2,242 0 3,900
Oct-29 442 1,168 577 2,155 0 3,900
Nov-15 449 1,260 533 2,107 0 3,900
Nov-28 445 1,184 465 2,251 0 3,900
Dec-12 445 1,319 711 1,870 0 3,900
Dec-19 439 1,129 407 2,363 1 3,900
Total 0 30,571 10,802 47,523 904 89,800

Socio-demographic characteristics of invited candidates

Invitations issued by socio-demographic characteristics remained relatively stable from 2017 (Table 6). Across both years, more than half of invitations were issued to candidates between the age of 20 and 29, which is the age category associated with the highest number of points under the CRS. In both years, a large majority of invitations were issued to candidates that had a post-secondary credential of three years or longer, a Master’s degree or entry-to-practice professional degree. There was a small increase in the proportion of invitations issued to candidates with less than one year of Canadian work experience.

Table 6: Invitations issued by socio-demographic factors, 2017 and 2018

Socio-demographic factor 2017 Number % 2018 Number %
Age

<20

11 0% 10 0%

20-29

44,809 52% 46,028 51%

30-34

27,214 32% 30,281 34%

35-39

10,556 12% 10,045 11%

40-44

2,341 3% 2,246 3%

45+

1,091 1% 1,188 1%

Total

86,022 100% 89,800 100%
Highest level of education

High School or less

1,247 1% 1,441 2%

One or two year post-secondary credential

4,851 6% 4,291 5%

Post-secondary credential of three years or longer

40,459 47% 37,635 42%

Master's Degree or entry-to-practice professional degree

36,270 42% 43,008 48%

PhD

3,195 4% 3,425 4%

Total

86,022 100% 89,800 100%
Canadian work experience

No work experience or less than one year

46,380 54% 53,460 60%

1 year

24,793 29% 24,964 28%

2 years

10,655 12% 8,456 9%

3 years

2,806 3% 1,790 2 %

4 years

745 1% 613 1%

5 years or more

643 1% 517 1%

Total

86,022 100% 89,800 100%
Foreign work experience

No work experience or less than one year

22,160 26% 18,938 21%

1 year

6,082 7% 7,292 8%

2 years

5,840 7% 6,909 8%

3 years

9,458 11% 12,136 14%

4 years

8,371 10% 9,871 11%

5 years or more

34,111 40% 34,654 39%

Total

86,022 100% 89,800 100%

The five most common countries of residence among invitations issued remained the same from 2017 (Table 7) to 2018 (Table 8). The proportion of invitations issued to candidates who indicated Canada as the country of residence declined by 5% since 2017, but continues to represent nearly half of all invitations issued.

Table 7: Invitations issued by most common countries of residence, 2017

Country Number %
Canada 42,238 49%
India 14,909 17%
United States 5,831 7%
Nigeria 2,910 3%
United Arab Emirates 2,438 3%
United KingdomFootnote 9 1,558 2%
Pakistan 1,329 2%
China 985 1%
South Africa, Republic of 893 1%
Saudi Arabia 794 <1%
Singapore 699 <1%
Australia 672 <1%
Egypt 532 <1%
Brazil 520 <1%
Bangladesh 511 <1%
Philippines 501 <1%
Other 8,704 10%
Total 86,022 100%

Table 8: Invitations issued by most common countries of residence, 2018

Country Number %
Canada 40,046 45%
India 17,445 19%
United States 10,084 11%
Nigeria 3,718 4%
United Arab Emirates 2,050 2%
Pakistan 1,370 2%
United Kingdom 1,186 1%
China 872 1%
Australia 814 <1%
Saudi Arabia 724 <1%
South Africa, Republic of 610 <1%
Morocco 583 <1%
Cameroon 524 <1%
Bangladesh 520 <1%
Iran 497 <1%
Singapore 493 <1%
Other 8,264 9%
Total 89,800 100%

As with country of residence, the five most common countries of citizenship among invitations issued did not change from 2017 (Table 9) to 2018 (Table 10). India remained the most common country of citizenship by a significant margin.

Table 9: Invitations issued by most common countries of citizenship, 2017

Country Number %
India 36,308 42%
China 7,467 9%
Nigeria 5,129 6%
Pakistan 3,337 4%
United Kingdom 2,659 3%
United States 2,046 2%
Brazil 1,686 2%
Iran 1,379 2%
Australia 1,281 1%
Ireland, Republic of 1,280 1%
Korea, South 1,251 1%
France 1,248 1%
Egypt 1,217 1%
Philippines 1,146 1%
Bangladesh 1,063 1%
Other 17,525 20%
Total 86,022 100%

Table 10: Invitations issued by most common countries of citizenship, 2018

Country Number %
India 41,675 46%
China 6,248 7%
Nigeria 6,025 7%
Pakistan 3,112 3%
United Kingdom 2,553 3%
Brazil 1,840 2%
United States 1,803 2%
France 1,365 2%
Iran 1,299 1%
Korea, South 1,256 1%
Ireland, Republic of 1,176 1%
Australia 1,099 1%
Bangladesh 1,026 1%
Egypt 926 1%
Philippines 909 1%
Other 17,488 19%
Total 89,800 100%

The most prevalent occupations among invitations issued also remained relatively consistent from 2017 (Table 11) to 2018 (Table 12). Occupations in information technology, and business and financial services continued to dominate, with about one third of invitations issued indicating an occupation in these areas.

Table 11: Most common occupations among invitations issued, 2017

Occupation Number %
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 5,199 6%
2173 Software engineers and designers 4,873 6%
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers 3,423 4%
1111 Financial auditors and accountants 2,392 3%
1241 Administrative assistants 1,914 2%
1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations 1,887 2%
4011 University professors and lecturers 1,825 2%
1112 Financial and investment analysts 1,760 2%
1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting 1,636 2%
0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers 1,501 2%
Other 59,612 69%
Total 86,022 100%

Table 12: Most common occupations among invitations issued, 2018

Occupation Number %
2173 Software engineers and designers 6,126 7%
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 5,429 6%
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers 3,450 4%
1111 Financial auditors and accountants 2,483 3%
1241 Administrative assistants 2,335 3%
1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations 2,049 2%
4011 University professors and lecturers 1,942 2%
1112 Financial and investment analysts 1,921 2%
1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting 1,915 2%
0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers 1,775 2%
Other 60,375 67%
Total 89,800 100%

Additional points claimed by candidates who received an ITA

Although nearly half of invitations issued were based on human capital attributes alone, additional points influenced the composition of invitations issued in 2018 (Table 13). Among eligible profiles,Footnote 10 5% of CRS scores included education in Canada points; among invitations issued, 25% of CRS scores included this additional point type, which was the most commonly claimed. Five percent of eligible profiles were awarded Arranged Employment points, compared to 10% of invitations issued. Regarding additional points for proficiency in French, 4% of eligible profiles were awarded the points, compared to 5% of invitations issued. Eligible profiles and invitations issued were equally likely to claim points for having a sibling in Canada (12%). Twelve percent of invitations were for the Provincial Nominee Program.

Table 13: Number of invitations issued claiming additional points by type, 2018 (not mutually exclusive)*

Additional point type Number %
No Additional Points 42,568 47%
Provincial Nominees 10,802 12%
Arranged Employment 9,308 10%
Education in Canada 22,897 25%
French-language proficiency 4,623 5%
Siblings in Canada 10,479 12%
Total 89,800 0

Among those who did receive additional points, most invitations issued to candidates claiming only one type of additional points (Table 14). In addition, the 745 invitations issued to candidates who had a CRS score below 400—which would include only those individuals eligible for the Federal Skilled Trades Program—were more likely to have claimed one or more additional point types (88%) compared to all others (53%). Arranged employment was the most common additional point type claimed.

Table 14: Invitations issued by CRS score and additional point type (mutually exclusive), 2018

Additional point type 1-299 300-349 350-399 400-449 450-499 500-549 550-599 600-1200 Total
Candidates with no additional points 17 40 35 12,135 29,772 567 2 0 42,568
One additional point type

Provincial Nominee

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,802 10,802

Arranged employment

77 243 156 759 3,006 1,144 366 129 5,880

Education in Canada

0 4 12 4,758 10,882 1,014 17 0 16,687

French-language proficiency

0 0 2 450 1,876 605 38 0 2,971

Siblings in Canada

2 5 4 1,564 4,371 51 1 0 5,998
Two additional point types

Arranged employment and education in Canada

0 6 15 291 782 95 28 4 1,221

Arranged employment and French-language proficiency

1 0 4 12 42 76 45 18 198

Arranged employment and siblings in Canada

22 68 30 94 225 67 34 6 546

Education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 21 89 64 11 0 185

Education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 1 554 1,329 193 6 0 2,083

French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 92 261 101 6 0 460
Two additional point types

Arranged employment, education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 6

Arranged employment, education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 1 38 98 15 1 3 156

Arranged employment, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 1 1 6 2 1 11

Education in Canada, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 0 15 8 3 0 26
All additional point types 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2
Total 119 366 260 20,769 52,750 4,011 562 10,963 89,800

Additional points: Arranged employment

Table 15 and Table 16 show the most common occupations among invitations issued to candidates who claimed arranged employment points and were invited to apply in 2017 and 2018, respectively. In both years, no single occupation is dominant and there is a mix of occupations with respect to the level of education required.

Table 15: Most common occupations among arranged employment points holders upon invitation, 2017

Occupation Number %
2173 Software engineers and designers 498 6%
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers 444 5%
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 427 5%
6311 Food service supervisors 372 5%
4011 University professors and lecturers 365 4%
6322 Cooks 362 4%
5241 Graphic designers and illustrators 338 4%
0013 Senior managers - financial, communications and other business services 258 3%
0213 Computer and information systems managers 193 2%
6211 Retail sales supervisors 179 2%
Other 4,759 58%
Total 8,195 100%

Table 16: Most common occupations among arranged employment points holders upon invitation, 2018

Occupation Number %
2173 Software engineers and designers 691 9%
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers 575 7%
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 450 6%
6322 Cooks 440 5%
4011 University professors and lecturers 414 5%
6311 Food service supervisors 412 5%
5241 Graphic designers and illustrators 296 4%
0013 Senior managers - financial, communications and other business services 243 3%
0213 Computer and information systems managers 227 3%
0016 Senior managers - construction, transportation, production and utilities 171 2%
Other 4,101 51%
Total 8,020Footnote 11 100%

Additional points: Canadian education points

Table 17 displays the number of invitations issued to candidates who claimed additional points for education in Canada according to the level of study. The number of invitations issued to candidates who claimed points for having completed a one or two-year post-secondary credential (11,248) was roughly the same as the number that received points for having a higher level of Canadian education (11,649).

Table 17: Invitations issued by education in Canada points and level of study, 2018

Additional point type Invitations
No points 66,903
1 Year Post-Secondary Credential 3,776
2 Year Post-Secondary Credential 7,472
Bachelor's or 3 Year Post-Secondary Credential 6,258
Master's of First Professional Degree 4,910
Doctoral Degree 481
Total 89,800

Additional points: French-language proficiency

Table 18 displays the number of invitations issued to candidates who received an invitation to apply for permanent residence and who received additional points for being a French Speaker. Most candidates did not present evidence to indicate that they spoke French at or above Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 7 and were therefore unable to claim points in this area. Among those who did claim points in this area, there were roughly twice as many invitations issued to candidates proficient in French who also spoke English at a CLB 5 level or above (3,082) than those who also spoke English at a CLB 4 level or below (1,541).

Table 18: Invitations issued by French Speaker points, 2018Footnote 12

Canadian language benchmark Number %
CLB 6 or less in French 85,177 95%
CLB 7 or more in French and CLB 4 or less in English 1,541 2%
CLB 7 or more in French and CLB 5 or more in English 3,082 3%
Total 89,800 100%

Applications for permanent residence through Express Entry

A grand total of 122,247 applications for permanent residence were sourced through Express Entry in 2018 (Table 19). This number includes principal applicants and their accompanying family members.

Table 19: Applications for permanent residence through Express Entry, 2018

Quarter Canadian Experience Class Federal Skilled Workers Federal Skilled Trades Provincial Nominees Total
Q1 6,377 10,782 280 4,695 22,134
Q2 8,342 14,412 159 4,797 27,710
Q3 10,188 20,010 559 5,491 36,248
Q4 9,376 20,142 551 6,086 36,155
Total 34,283 65,346 1,549 21,069 122,247

As displayed in Table 20, more than half of the candidates who submitted an application for permanent residence through Express Entry in 2018 indicated Ontario as the province of destination, while nearly one fifth indicated British Columbia.

Table 20: Applications received for permanent residence through Express Entry by province of destination, 2018

Province/Territory Number %
Newfoundland and Labrador 298 <1%
Nova Scotia 3,532 3%
Prince Edward Island 546 <1%
New Brunswick 1,979 2%
Ontario 78,838 64%
Manitoba 2,218 2%
Saskatchewan 3,708 3%
Alberta 8,868 7%
British Columbia 22,153 18%
Nunavut 7 <1%
Northwest Territories 48 <1%
Yukon 52 <1%
Total 122,247 100%

Express Entry processing times

In 2018, IRCC met the Express Entry processing standard of finalizing 80% of all applications sourced via Express Entry within six months. The processing time was measured from the day a complete application is received until the time a final decision is made by an immigration officer. Table 21 displays the average time (months) that IRCC took to process applications under each Program.

Table 21: Processing Times for Express Entry applications finalized by year and immigration category, in months

Express Entry Program 2015 2016 2017 2018
Canadian Experience Class 3 6 4 5
Federal Skilled Workers 5 6 4 6
Provincial/Territorial Nominees 4 5 6 6
Federal Skilled Trades 5 6 6 7
For all Programs 4 6 5 5

Admissions

In 2018, 92,231 applicants and their families were admitted into Canada as permanent residents through Express Entry (Table 23). By comparison, 65,423 applicants and their families were admitted in 2017 (Table 22). This increase was the result of a large number of Federal High Skilled clients who were processed in 2017 but admitted in 2018, as well as additional Provincial Nominee clients processed and admitted in 2018 In line with the intentions cited among applicants, more than half of persons admitted in 2018 were destined for Ontario and about one fifth were destined for British Columbia.

Table 22: Admissions (total persons) through Express Entry, 2017

Province/Territory of destination PNP CEC, FSW and FST All programs
Newfoundland and Labrador 8 198 206
Prince Edward Island 740 79 819
Nova Scotia 1,851 418 2,269
New Brunswick 1,250 189 1,439
Ontario 4,422 31,679 36,101
Manitoba 48 493 541
Saskatchewan 2,154 716 2,870
Alberta 2 8,687 8,689
British Columbia 3,019 9,384 12,403
Yukon 6 17 23
Northwest Territories 32 23 55
Nunavut 0 8 8
Total 13,532 51,891 65,423

Table 23: Admissions (total persons) through Express Entry, 2018

Province/Territory of destination PNP CEC, FSW and FST All programs
Newfoundland and Labrador 44 200 244
Prince Edward Island 384 86 470
Nova Scotia 2,605 650 3,255
New Brunswick 1,521 355 1,876
Ontario 7,504 52,157 59,661
Manitoba 74 887 961
Saskatchewan 1,733 1,011 2,744
Alberta 0 6,907 6,907
British Columbia 4,075 11,960 16,035
Yukon 14 25 39
Northwest Territories 8 28 36
Nunavut 0 3 3
Total 17,962 74,269 92,231

The most common countries of citizenship among total people admitted to Canada (Table 24 and Table 25) generally mirrors those of invited candidates (as displayed in Table 9 and Table 10). Nearly half of all people admitted in 2018 had Indian citizenship (Table 25).

Table 24: Admissions (total persons) by most common 10 countries of citizenship, 2017

Country of Citizenship Number %
India 26,331 40%
China, People's Republic of 5,737 9%
Nigeria 2,878 4%
United States of America 2,848 4%
Pakistan 1,523 2%
United Kingdom 2,380 4%
Philippines 2,683 4%
Brazil 1,434 2%
Egypt 740 1%
France 1,169 2%
Other 17,700 27%
Total 65,423 100%

Table 25: Admissions (total persons) by most common 10 countries of citizenship, 2018

Country of Citizenship Number %
India 39,677 43%
China, People's Republic of 5,885 6%
Nigeria 6,653 7%
United States of America 3,580 4%
Pakistan 3,525 4%
United Kingdom 2,658 3%
Philippines 1,485 2%
Brazil 2,213 2%
Egypt 1,775 2%
France 1,326 1%
Other 23,454 25%
Total 92,231 100%

Gender analysis

This section provides 2018 Express Entry data, disaggregated by gender. As for the previous section, the data tables are ordered by stages along the Express Entry continuum, from profile submission, to invitation, application, and admission.

The Express Entry profile builder requests a candidate’s personal details, such as gender and date of birth, as shown on the candidate's passport, travel document, or national identity document. When candidates create their MyCIC account, they indicate their gender from among three different response options: male, female, and unspecified. Unspecified gender is only reported for initial Express Entry stages from profile submission to invitation. There is no single interpretation of unspecified gender as it may be selected for a variety of reasons but could include a non-binary gender.

Profiles Submitted to the Express Entry Pool

As displayed in Table 26 to Table 29, in 2018, more profiles were submitted by men (169,114) than women (109,410). Women submitted a slightly higher proportion of total profiles in 2018 (39%) compared to 2017 (36%). A higher proportion of profiles submitted by women were eligible for at least one program (74%) compared to those submitted by men (68%) but it is unclear if this is due to a single person submitting more than one profile.

Table 26: Profiles submitted to the Express Entry for men by year

Profiles submitted by outcome 2017 2018
Total Profiles submitted 160,569 169,114
Number of ineligible profiles 60,732 54,401
Ineligible percent 38% 32%
Number of eligible profile 99,837 114,713
Eligible percent 62% 68%

Table 27: Profiles submitted to the Express Entry for women by year

Profiles submitted by outcome 2017 2018
Total Profiles submitted 89,530 109,410
Number of ineligible profiles 26,982 28,487
Ineligible percent 30% 26%
Number of eligible profile 62,548 80,923
Eligible percent 70% 74%

Table 28: Profiles submitted to the Express Entry for people of unspecified gender by year

Profiles submitted by outcome 2017 2018
Total Profiles submitted 57 66
Number of ineligible profiles 33 43
Ineligible percent 58% 65%
Number of eligible profile 24 23
Eligible percent 42% 35%

Table 29: Profiles submitted to the Express Entry by year, total for all gender labels

Profiles submitted by outcome 2017 2018
Total Profiles submitted 250,156 278,590
Number of ineligible profiles 87,747 82,931
Ineligible percent 35% 30%
Number of eligible profile 162,409 195,659
Eligible percent 65% 70%

Composition of Express Entry pool

As of January 3, 2019, there were 94,977 candidate profiles in the Express Entry pool (Table 27). Of these, 41% (39,273) were submitted by women, 59% (55,690) were submitted by men while <1% of profiles were submitted with an unspecified gender. The highest concentration of CRS scores was between 350 and 449 for both men and women.

Table 30: CRS score distribution of profiles in the Express Entry pool on January 3, 2019, by gender

CRS score range Men Women Unspecified Total
>1000 15 20 0 35
950 - 999 40 45 0 85
900 - 949 47 36 0 83
850 - 899 13 7 0 20
800 - 849 6 2 0 8
750 - 799 7 3 0 10
700 - 749 4 0 0 4
650 - 699 1 1 0 2
600 - 649 1 1 0 2
550 - 599 8 1 0 9
500 - 549 63 38 0 101
450 - 499 974 709 1 1,684
400 - 449 17,934 13,240 7 31,181
440 - 449 434 341 0 775
430 - 439 5,700 4,066 3 9,769
420 - 429 3,562 2,751 1 6,314
410 - 419 3,923 2,932 2 6,857
400 - 409 4,315 3,150 1 7,466
350 - 399 21,524 16,046 4 37,574
390 - 399 4,089 3,115 0 7,204
380 - 389 4,224 3,237 0 7,461
370 - 379 4,761 3,441 1 8,203
360 - 369 4,243 3,213 1 7,457
350 - 359 4,207 3,040 2 7,249
300 - 349 12,942 8,166 2 21,110
340 - 349 3,844 2,717 1 6,562
330 - 339 3,342 2,093 1 5,436
320 - 329 2,607 1,624 0 4,231
310 - 319 1,878 1,058 0 2,936
300 - 309 1,271 674 0 1,945
250 - 299 1,493 809 0 2,302
200 - 249 397 99 0 496
150 - 199 157 33 0 190
100 - 149 47 16 0 63
<100 17 1 0 18
Total 55,690 39,273 14 94,977

Tables 31 to Table 34 display the number of profiles submitted by gender who were in the Express Entry pool, in 2018, with and without additional points, by CRS score. Men and women claimed no additional points for their profiles 71% of the time. Education in Canada and siblings in Canada were the most common additional point type claimed by both men and women.

Table 31: Eligible profiles submitted by additional point type for women, 2018 (not mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 57,107 71%
Arranged employment 2,698 3%
Education in Canada 9,256 11%
French-language proficiency 3,191 4%
Siblings 10,913 13%
Total 80,923 0

Table 32: Eligible profile submitted by additional point type for men, 2018 (not mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 81,019 71%
Arranged employment 6,995 6%
Education in Canada 13,191 11%
French-language proficiency 3,987 3%
Siblings 12,669 11%
Total 114,713 0

Table 33: Eligible profile submitted by additional point type for people of unspecified gender, 2018 (not mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 11 48%
Arranged employment 0 0%
Education in Canada 4 17%
French-language proficiency 2 9%
Siblings 6 26%
Total 23 0

Table 34: Eligible profile submitted by additional point type, total of all gender labels, 2018 (not mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 138,137 71%
Arranged employment 9,693 5%
Education in Canada 22,451 11%
French-language proficiency 7,180 4%
Siblings 23,588 12%
Total 195,659 0

Results of Express Entry Invitation Rounds

Tables 35 to Table 38 show the distribution of invitations issued by gender in each economic program under Express Entry in 2018. Overall, men received more than half of invitations issued (58%). The invitation by program pattern was similar for men and women—both genders received invitations under Federal Skilled Workers Program most often and under Federal Skilled Trades Program least often. Men received more invitations than Women in every economic program; this difference was especially pronounced under the Federal Skilled Trade Program and least pronounced under the Federal Skilled Workers Program. Invitations issued to candidates with an unspecified gender were mostly under the Federal Skilled Workers Program. A candidate may receive more than one invitation in a year but the vast majority only receive one.

Table 35: Invitations issued in 2018, by economic immigration program, women

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 3,870 10%
Federal Skilled Workers 21,289 57%
Canadian Experience Class 11,988 32%
Federal Skilled Trades 175 0%
Total 37,322 100%

Table 36: Invitations issued in 2018, by economic immigration program, men

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 6,932 13%
Federal Skilled Workers 26,229 50%
Canadian Experience Class 18,582 35%
Federal Skilled Trades 729 1%
Total 52,472 100%

Table 37: Invitations issued in 2018, by economic immigration program, unspecified gender

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 0 0%
Federal Skilled Workers 5 83%
Canadian Experience Class 1 17%
Federal Skilled Trades 0 0%
Total 6 100%

Table 38: Invitations issued in 2018, by economic immigration program, total for all gender labels

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 10,802 12%
Federal Skilled Workers 47,523 53%
Canadian Experience Class 30,571 34%
Federal Skilled Trades 904 1%
Total 89,800 100%

In 2018, among invitations issued, a higher proportion of men (56%) than women (44%) did not claim an additional points-type (Table 39 and Table 40). Among invitations issued to men and women who claimed additional points, the most common type of points claimed was for having Education in Canada. The largest proportional gender difference between men and women in terms of additional point types claimed was for Arranged Employment (claimed by 72% of men and 28% of women) and for being a Provincial Nominee (claimed by 64% of men and 36% of women).

Table 39: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by additional point type, women (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 18,775 50%
Provincial Nominees 3,870 10%
Arranged employment 2,629 7%
Education in Canada 9,283 25%
French-language proficiency 2,057 6%
Siblings in Canada 4,841 13%
Total 37,322 0

Table 40: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by additional point type, men (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 23,792 45%
Provincial Nominees 6,932 13%
Arranged employment 6,679 13%
Education in Canada 13,610 26%
French-language proficiency 2,565 5%
Siblings in Canada 5,638 11%
Total 52,472 0

Table 41: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by additional point type, unspecified gender (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 1 17%
Provincial Nominees 0 0%
Arranged employment 0 0%
Education in Canada 4 67%
French-language proficiency 1 17%
Siblings in Canada 0 0%
Total 6 100%

Table 42: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by additional point type, total of all gender labels (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type Number %
No additional points 42,568 47%
Provincial Nominees 10,802 12%
Arranged employment 9,308 10%
Education in Canada 22,897 25%
French-language proficiency 4,623 5%
Siblings in Canada 10,479 12%
Total 89,800 0

Table 43 displays the number of invitations issued to women with and without additional points, by CRS score. Table 44 and Table 45 display the same information for men and unspecified respectively.

Table 43: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by CRS score and additional point type, women (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type 1-299 300-349 350-399 400-449 450-499 500-549 550-599 600-1200 Total
Candidates with no additional points 2 1 3 5,388 13,139 240 2 0 18,775
One additional point type

Provincial Nominee

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,870 3,870

Arranged employment

15 48 31 180 755 342 92 30 1,493

Education in Canada

0 1 1 1,960 4,539 367 8 0 6,876

French-language proficiency

0 0 0 201 834 292 9 0 1,336

Siblings in Canada

0 0 0 779 2,176 24 0 0 2,979
Two additional point types

Arranged employment and education in Canada

0 3 6 114 302 35 9 0 469

Arranged employment and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 2 13 24 20 1 60

Arranged employment and Siblings in Canada

4 16 5 33 90 31 6 1 186

Education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 10 44 37 7 0 98

Education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 233 547 85 6 0 871

French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 38 134 52 1 0 225
Three additional point types

Arranged employment, education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

Arranged employment, education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 17 37 4 1 3 62

Arranged employment, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 0 1 3 2 1 7

Education in Canada, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 0 9 2 2 0 13
All additional point types 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Total 21 69 46 8,955 22,620 1,539 166 3,906 37,322

Table 44: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by CRS score and additional point type combination, men (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type 1-299 300-349 350-399 400-449 450-499 500-549 550-599 600-1200 Total
Candidates with no additional points 15 39 32 6,746 16,633 327 0 0 23,792
One additional point type

Provincial Nominee

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6,932 6,932

Arranged employment

62 195 125 579 2,251 802 274 99 4,387

Education in Canada

0 3 11 2,797 6,343 644 9 0 9,807

French-language proficiency

0 0 2 249 1,041 313 29 0 1,634

Siblings in Canada

2 5 4 785 2,195 27 1 0 3,019
Two additional point types

Arranged employment and education in Canada

0 3 9 177 480 60 19 4 752

Arranged employment and French-language proficiency

1 0 4 10 29 52 25 17 138

Arranged employment and Siblings in Canada

18 52 25 61 135 36 28 5 360

Education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 11 45 27 4 0 87

Education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 1 321 782 108 0 0 1,212

French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 54 127 49 5 0 235
Three additional point types

Arranged employment, education in Canada and French-language proficiency

0 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 5

Arranged employment, education in Canada and siblings in Canada

0 0 1 21 61 11 0 0 94

Arranged employment, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 4

Education in Canada, French-language proficiency and siblings in Canada

0 0 0 0 6 6 1 0 13
All additional point types 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Total 98 297 214 11,812 30,129 2,469 396 7,057 52,472

Table 45: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates with and without additional points, by CRS score and additional point type, unspecified (mutually exclusive)

Additional point type 1-299 300-349 350-399 400-449 450-499 500-549 550-599 600-1200 Total
Candidates with no additional points 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
One additional point type

Provincial Nominee

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Arranged employment

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Education in Canada

0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 4

French-language proficiency

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

Siblings in Canada

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Two additional point types 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Three additional point types 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All additional point types 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 2 1 3 0 0 6

Tables 46 to Table 48 display the country of residence for invitations issued in 2018 for women, men, and people of unspecified gender respectively. The pattern of most common country of residence was similar for men and women, although a higher proportion of men resided in Canada and the United States, whereas a slightly higher proportion of women resided in India and Nigeria.

Table 46: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates by their most common country of residence, women

Country of residence Number %
Canada 15,309 41%
India 8,234 22%
United States 3,455 9%
Nigeria 2,148 6%
United Arab Emirates 911 2%
Pakistan 534 1%
United Kingdom 521 1%
China 465 1%
Australia 341 1%
South Africa, Rep. of 295 1%
Morocco 254 1%
Cameroon 243 1%
Other 4,621 12%
Total 37,322 100%

Table 47: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates by their most common country of residence, men

Country of residence Number %
Canada 24,736 47%
India 9,211 18%
United States 6,629 13%
Nigeria 1,570 3%
United Arab Emirates 1,139 2%
Pakistan 836 2%
United Kingdom 665 1%
Saudi Arabia 511 1%
Australia 473 1%
China 407 1%
Morocco 329 1%
Bangladesh 315 1%
Other 5,651 11%
Total 52,472 100%

Table 48: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates by their most common country of residence, unspecified gender

Country of residence Number %
Spain 3 50%
Canada 1 17%
Philippines 1 17%
Algeria 1 17%
Total 6 100%

Tables 49 to51 display the country of citizenship for invitations issued for women,men and people of unspecified gender respectively, in 2018. The pattern of most common country of citizenship was similar for men and women, although a higher proportion and absolute number of men than women had Indian citizenship, and a slightly higher proportion and absolute number of women than men had Chinese and Nigerian citizenship.

Table 49: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates by their most common country of citizenship, women

Country of citizenship Number %
India 15,723 42%
China 3,454 9%
Nigeria 3,145 8%
United Kingdom 982 3%
Pakistan 964 3%
Brazil 722 2%
United States 720 2%
Korea, South 688 2%
France 588 2%
Iran 507 1%
Philippines 489 1%
Australia 442 1%
Other 8,899 24%
Total 37,322 100%

Table 50: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates by their most common country of citizenship, men

Country of citizenship Number %
India 25,952 49%
Nigeria 2,880 5%
China 2,794 5%
Pakistan 2,147 4%
United Kingdom 1,571 3%
Brazil 1,118 2%
United States 1,083 2%
Iran 792 2%
France 777 1%
Ireland, Republic of 750 1%
Bangladesh 681 1%
Australia 657 1%
Other 11,274 22%
Total 52,472 100%

Table 51: Invitations issued in 2018 to candidates by their most common country of citizenship, unspecified gender

Country of citizenship Number %
Spain 3 50%
Pakistan 1 17%
Philippines 1 17%
Algeria 1 17%
Total 6 100%

Table 52 to Table 54 display the number of invitations issued according to their occupation, to women, men and unspecified, respectively. The most common occupation among women invited to apply for permanent residence was administrative assistant; among men, software engineers and designers was most common whereas administrative officer was the most common occupation claimed for unspecified individuals. Although the different prevalence of occupations among invited men and women is interesting, it is important to note that the occupations listed in these tables capture the occupations of only a minority of invited women (32%) and men (36%).

Table 52: Invitations issued in 2018 by occupation, women

Occupation Number %
1241 Administrative assistants 1,734 5%
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 1,592 4%
2173 Software engineers and designers 1,552 4%
1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations 1,243 3%
1111 Financial auditors and accountants 1,225 3%
1221 Administrative officers 952 3%
4011 University professors and lecturers 944 3%
0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers 873 2%
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers 870 2%
1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting 783 2%
Other 25,554 68%
Total 37,322 100%

Table 53: Invitations issued in 2018 by occupation, men

Occupation Number %
2173 Software engineers and designers 4,574 9%
2171 Information systems analysts and consultants 3,837 7%
2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers 2,580 5%
1111 Financial auditors and accountants 1,258 2%
1112 Financial and investment analysts 1,190 2%
2132 Mechanical engineers 1,167 2%
1122 Professional occupations in business management consulting 1,132 2%
0213 Computer and information systems managers 1,077 2%
4011 University professors and lecturers 998 2%
2133 Electrical and electronics engineers 925 2%
Other 33,734 64%
Total 52,472 100%

Table 54: Invitations issued in 2018 by occupation, unspecified

Occupation Number %
1221 Administrative officers 3 50%
0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers 1 17%
6221 Technical sales specialists - wholesale trade 1 17%
1311 Accounting technicians and bookkeepers 1 17%
Total 6 100%

Applications for Permanent Residence through Express Entry

Table 55 and Table 56 display the number of people represented in applications received for permanent residence (including principal applicants and any accompanying family members), by economic program, by annual quarter, and by the applicant’s gender.

Table 55: Permanent residence applications received through Express Entry for women (total persons) by economic immigration program

Quarter Canadian Experience Class Federal Skilled Workers Federal Skilled Trades Provincial Nominees Total
Q1 2,272 5,070 52 1,579 8,973
Q2 2,808 6,734 39 1,652 11,233
Q3 3,632 9,549 105 1,958 15,244
Q4 3,397 9,989 135 2,324 15,845
Total 12,109 31,342 331 7,513 51,295

Table 56: Permanent residence applications received through Express Entry for men (total persons) by economic immigration program

Quarter Canadian Experience Class Federal Skilled Workers Federal Skilled Trades Provincial Nominees Total
Q1 4,105 5,707 228 3,116 13,156
Q2 5,533 7,669 120 3,144 16,466
Q3 6,551 10,429 454 3,530 20,964
Q4 5,972 10,134 416 3,761 20,283
Total 22,161 33,939 1,218 13,551 70,869

Admissions

In line with the gender breakdown for invitations to apply, men represented 60% of all principal applicant admissions in 2018 (Table 61), compared to 64% in 2017 (Table 58). The largest gender difference in principal applicant admissions in 2017 and in 2018 was under the Federal Skilled Trades Program; the smallest gender difference was under the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

Table 57: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by economic immigration program in 2017, women

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 2,398 35%
Federal Skilled Workers 4,321 41%
Canadian Experience Class 7,084 34%
Federal Skilled Trades 97 13%
Total 13,900 36%

Table 58: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by economic immigration program in 2017, men

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 4,511 65%
Federal Skilled Workers 6,122 59%
Canadian Experience Class 13,565 66%
Federal Skilled Trades 647 87%
Total 24,845 64%

Table 59: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by economic immigration program in 2017, total for men and women

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 6,909 100%
Federal Skilled Workers 10,443 100%
Canadian Experience Class 20,649 100%
Federal Skilled Trades 744 100%
Total 38,745 100%

Table 60: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by economic immigration program for women, 2018

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 2,945 34%
Federal Skilled Workers 10,364 44%
Canadian Experience Class 7,183 38%
Federal Skilled Trades 57 15%
Total 20,549 40%

Table 61: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by economic immigration program for men, 2018

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 5,600 66%
Federal Skilled Workers 13,322 56%
Canadian Experience Class 11,936 62%
Federal Skilled Trades 323 85%
Total 31,181 60%

Table 62: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by economic immigration program, total for men and women, 2018

Express Entry program Number %
Provincial Nominees 8,545 100%
Federal Skilled Workers 23,686 100%
Canadian Experience Class 19,119 100%
Federal Skilled Trades 380 100%
Total 51,730 100%

As displayed in Table 63, among the principal applicants admitted to Canada in 2018, men and women were most likely to be destined for Ontario and least likely to be destined for Yukon. The gender difference was largest among principal applicants who planned to live in Newfoundland and Labrador (70% men; 30% women) although a very small proportion of principal applicants were destined for the province (less than 1%).

Table 63: Admissions of principal applicants under Express Entry by province and gender, 2018

Province/Territory Women number % Men number % Total number %
Newfoundland and Labrador 43 30% 102 70% 145 100%
Prince Edward Island 104 34% 199 66% 303 100%
Nova Scotia 574 38% 936 62% 1,510 100%
New Brunswick 240 34% 470 66% 710 100%
Ontario 13,240 39% 20,529 61% 33,769 100%
Manitoba 227 42% 317 58% 544 100%
Saskatchewan 432 37% 735 63% 1,167 100%
Alberta 1,449 41% 2,059 59% 3,508 100%
British Columbia 4,218 42% 5,799 58% 10,017 100%
Yukon 13 42% 18 58% 31 100%
Northwest Territories 8 32% 17 68% 25 100%
Nunavut 1 100% 0 0% 1 100%
Total 20,549 40% 31,181 60% 51,730 100%

As displayed in Table 64, Indian citizenship was most common among both men and women admitted to Canada in 2018 as principal applicants, and a considerably larger proportion of all Indian principal applicants were men (66%). The gender difference among principal applicants admitted to Canada in 2018 was largest among those who held citizenship from Pakistan (71% men) and smallest among those who held citizenship from Nigeria (50% men). For each country of citizenship listed, men represented a greater proportion of principal applicant admissions compared to women, with the exception of Jamaica (67% women), the Philippines (61% women), China (55% women), and Korea (51% women).

Table 64: Principal applicant admissions by most common country of citizenship and gender, 2018

Country of citizenship Women number % Men number % Total number %
India 7,900 34% 15,183 66% 23,083 100%
China, People's Republic of 2,359 55% 1,935 45% 4,294 100%
Nigeria 1,545 50% 1,567 50% 3,112 100%
Pakistan 508 29% 1,262 71% 1,770 100%
United Kingdom 584 37% 980 63% 1,564 100%
Brazil 407 36% 715 64% 1,122 100%
United States of America 419 40% 617 60% 1,036 100%
Iran 351 38% 582 62% 933 100%
Ireland, Republic of 286 36% 505 64% 791 100%
Korea, Republic of 385 51% 377 49% 762 100%
France 331 44% 423 56% 754 100%
Philippines 457 61% 293 39% 750 100%
Egypt 213 30% 502 70% 715 100%
Bangladesh 215 31% 469 69% 684 100%
Australia 272 42% 379 58% 651 100%
South Africa, Republic of 240 47% 266 53% 506 100%
Russia 258 53% 233 47% 491 100%
Jamaica 276 67% 138 33% 414 100%
Ukraine 195 47% 218 53% 413 100%
Mexico 135 34% 259 66% 394 100%
Other 3,213 43% 4,278 57% 7,491 100%
Total 20,549 40% 31,181 60% 51,730 100%

Conclusion

As demonstrated through this report, Express Entry continues to provide a pathway to permanent residence for a range of highly skilled candidates, in a timely manner. IRCC will continue to monitor Express Entry results, at the same time as it maintains its focus on improving and innovating processes and policies, with the aim of ensuring that Canada continues to benefit from immigrants with the diverse skills and experience needed to grow our economy.

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