Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended March 31, 2018

Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the accompanying consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2018, and all information contained in these statements rests with the management of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). These consolidated financial statements have been prepared by management using the Government of Canada’s accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information in these consolidated financial statements. Some of the information in the consolidated financial statements is based on management’s best estimates and judgment, and gives due consideration to materiality. To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, management maintains a set of accounts that provides a centralized record of IRCC’s financial transactions. Financial information submitted in the preparation of the Public Accounts of Canada, and included in IRCC’s Departmental Results Report, is consistent with these consolidated financial statements.

Management is also responsible for maintaining an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR) designed to provide reasonable assurance that financial information is reliable, that assets are safeguarded and that transactions are properly authorized and recorded in accordance with the Financial Administration Act and other applicable legislation, regulations, authorities and policies.

Management seeks to ensure the objectivity and integrity of data in its financial statements through careful selection, training, and development of qualified staff; through organizational arrangements that provide appropriate divisions of responsibility; through communication programs aimed at ensuring that regulations, policies, standards, and managerial authorities are understood throughout IRCC and through conducting an annual risk-based assessment of the effectiveness of the system of ICFR.

The system of ICFR is designed to mitigate risks to a reasonable level based on an ongoing process to identify key risks, to assess effectiveness of associated key controls, and to make any necessary adjustments.

A risk-based assessment of the system of ICFR for the year ended March 31, 2018 was completed in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Financial Management and the results and action plans are summarized in the annex.

The effectiveness and adequacy of IRCC’s system of internal control is reviewed by the work of internal audit staff, who conduct periodic audits of different areas of IRCC’s operations, and by the Departmental Audit Committee, which oversees management’s responsibilities for maintaining adequate control systems and the quality of financial reporting, and which recommends the financial statements to the Deputy Minister of IRCC.

The consolidated financial statements of IRCC have not been audited.

Original signed by Marta Morgan
Marta Morgan
Deputy Minister

Original signed by Christopher Meyers for
Daniel Mills, CPA, CMA
Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief Financial Officer

Ottawa, Canada
August 31, 2018

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Consolidated Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)

As at March 31

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Consolidated Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) As at March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Restated
(note 16)
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (note 4) $ 402,832 $ 309,038
Immigrant Investor Program (note 5) 24,828 59,200
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 26,795 23,329
Deferred revenue (note 6) 478,097 390,694
Employee future benefits (note 7) 22,581 20,731
Total gross liabilities 955,133 802,992
Liabilities held on behalf of Government
Deferred revenue (note 6) (478,097) (390,694)
Total liabilities held on behalf of Government (478,097) (390,694)
Total net liabilities 477,036 412,298
Financial assets
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund 384,867 333,929
Accounts receivable and advances (note 8) 72,989 58,053
Loans receivable (note 9) 57,048 44,741
Inventory held for resale (note 10) 13,135 11,435
Total gross financial assets 528,039 448,158
Financial assets held on behalf of Government
Accounts receivable and advances (note 8) (13,935) (22,194)
Loans receivable (note 9) (57,048) (44,741)
Total financial assets held on behalf of Government (70,983) (66,935)
Total net financial assets 457,056 381,223
Departmental net debt (19,980) (31,075)
Non-financial assets
Prepaid expenses 5,238 3,853
Inventory held for consumption (note 10) 9,790 7,082
Tangible capital assets (note 11) 143,779 153,326
Total non-financial assets 158,807 164,261
Departmental net financial position $ 138,827 $ 133,186

Contractual obligations (note 12)
Contingent liabilities (note 13)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

Original signed by Marta Morgan
Marta Morgan
Deputy Minister

Original signed by Christopher Meyers for
Daniel Mills, CPA, CMA
Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief Financial Officer

Ottawa, Canada
August 31, 2018

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (unaudited)

For the Year Ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (unaudited) for the Year Ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 Planned results 2018 2017
Restated
(note 16)
Expenses
Newcomer Settlement and Integration $ 1,208,022 $ 1,334,264 $ 1,213,015
Passport 461,639 403,585 351,748
Migration Control and Security Management 242,262 267,848 242,897
Health Protection 70,204 138,047 90,097
Family and Discretionary Immigration 76,645 106,060 94,871
Temporary Economic Residents 71,452 96,966 76,786
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 83,638 95,681 88,415
Permanent Economic Residents 78,345 79,838 77,590
Refugee Protection 58,506 72,358 80,107
Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 9,218 14,045 9,497
Internal Services 240,721 273,506 241,302
Total expenses 2,600,652 2,882,198 2,566,325
Revenues
Passport fees 609,077 639,271 658,246
Immigration service fees 468,315 582,515 531,775
Immigration rights and privileges 123,779 141,019 145,064
Citizenship service fees 133,829 55,164 54,387
International Experience Canada 9,938 8,938 10,015
Right of citizenship 23,514 8,702 8,417
Interest on loans 200 237 280
Passport miscellaneous revenues 250 234 271
Other revenues 289 440 410
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (749,913) (788,058)  (740,307)
Total revenues 619,278 648,462 668,558
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,981,374 2,233,736 1,897,767
Government funding and transfers
Net cash provided by Government n/a 1,851,738 1,513,162
Change in due from Consolidated Revenue Fund n/a  50,938 72,076
Services provided without charge by other government departments (note 14) n/a 336,696 340,001
Transfer of the transition payments for implementing salary payments in arrears n/a - (5)
Other transfer of assets from other government departments n/a 5 -
Net revenue of operations after government funding and transfers n/a (5,641) (27,467)
Departmental net financial position - Beginning of year n/a 133,186 105,719
Departmental net financial position - End of year n/a $ 138,827 $ 133,186

Segmented information (note 15)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Consolidated Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt (unaudited)

For the Year Ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Consolidated Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt (unaudited) For the Year Ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Restated
(note 16)
Net revenue of operations after government funding and transfers $ (5,641) $ (27,467)
Change due to tangible capital assets
 Acquisition of tangible capital assets 25,279 29,133
 Amortization of tangible capital assets (34,830) (31,717)
 Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (3) (15)
Net gain or (loss) on disposal of tangible capital assets 2 (276)
 Transfer from other government department 5 -
Total change due to tangible capital assets (9,547) (2,875)
Change due to inventory held for consumption 2,708 1,272
Change due to prepaid expenses 1,385 (120)
Net decrease in departmental net debt (11,095)  (29,190)
Departmental net debt - Beginning of year 31,075 60,265
Departmental net debt - End of year $ 19,980 $ 31,075

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows (unaudited)

For the Year Ended March 31

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows (unaudited) For the Year Ended March 31 (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Restated
(note 16)
Operating activities
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $ 2,233,736 $ 1,897,767
Non-cash items:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (34,830) (31,717)
Net gain (loss) on disposal of tangible capital assets 2 (276)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (note 14) (336,696) (340,001)
Transition payments for implementing salary payments in arrears - 5
Variations in Statement of Financial Position:
Increase in accounts receivable and advances 23,195 17,533
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses 1,385 (120)
Increase (decrease) in inventory held for resale 1,700 (4,244)
Increase in inventory held for consumption 2,708 1,272
Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities (93,794) (29,644)
Decrease (increase) in Immigrant Investor Program 34,372 (35,836)
Decrease (increase) in vacation pay and compensatory leave (3,466) 2,331
Decrease (increase) in employee future benefits (1,850) 6,974
Cash used in operating activities 1,826,462 1,484,044
Capital investing activities
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 25,279 29,133
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (3) (15)
Cash used in capital investing activities 25,276 29,118
Net cash provided by Government of Canada $ 1,851,738 $ 1,513,162

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited)

For the Year Ended March 31

1. Authority and objectives

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) was established under the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act, it is a department named in Schedule I of the Financial Administration Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship.

IRCC administers the Citizenship Act of 1977 and shares responsibility with the Canada Border Services Agency for the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).

Jurisdiction over immigration is a shared responsibility between the federal and the provincial and territorial governments under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Under s. 91(25) of the Constitution Act, 1867, the federal government has jurisdiction over naturalization and aliens.

The Department’s priorities are:

  • Economic growth;
  • Humanitarianism;
  • Enhanced integration;
  • Diversity and attachment;
  • Client service;
  • Efficient processing.

These six priorities are delivered with the following programs.

Permanent Economic Residents: The focus of this program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada.

Temporary Economic Residents: The focus of this program is to establish and apply the rules governing entry into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work and study. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Family and Discretionary Immigration: The program’s objectives are to reunite family members in Canada, and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of IRPA enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the Family Class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents.

Refugee Protection: The Refugee Protection Program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. Overseas, refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada.

Newcomer Settlement and Integration: In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to contribute to Canada’s economic, social, political and cultural development.

Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians: The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. IRCC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship.

Health Protection: This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant entry and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

Migration Control and Security Management: IRCC facilitates the travel of permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access. IRCC also provides assistance to illegal migrants who are deemed destined to Canada, to return them to their home country of origin.

Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda: As part of its mandate, IRCC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues through meetings with multilateral and bilateral partners, membership in international organizations, and participation in regional forums.

Passport: IRCC is accountable for the Passport Program, and collaborates with Service Canada and Global Affairs Canada to provide passport services that enable eligible Canadian travellers to access other countries. Through an extensive service delivery network in Canada and abroad, the program disseminates information, collects and processes Canadian travel document applications, authenticates applicants’ identity and determines eligibility, and issues secure Canadian travel documents. The program also performs activities to ensure that fraud and misuse of travel documents are prevented and detected. The program operates on a full cost-recovery basis from fees charged for travel document services.

Internal Services: Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

2. Summary of significant accounting policies

These consolidated financial statements are prepared using IRCC’s accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

a) Parliamentary authorities

IRCC is mainly financed by the Government of Canada through parliamentary authorities. Financial reporting of authorities provided to IRCC do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament. Note 3 provides a reconciliation between the bases of reporting. The planned results amounts in the “Expenses” and “Revenues” sections of the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position are the amounts reported in the Consolidated Future-oriented Statement of Operations included in the 2017-2018 Departmental Plan. Planned results are not presented in the “Government funding and transfers” section of the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and in the Consolidated Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt because these amounts were not included in the 2017-2018 Departmental Plan.

b) Consolidation

These consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Passport Canada Revolving Fund, for which the deputy head (DH) is accountable. The accounts of the Passport Canada Revolving Fund have been consolidated with those of IRCC, and all inter-organizational balances and transactions have been eliminated.

c) Net Cash Provided by Government

IRCC operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by IRCC is deposited to the CRF, and all cash disbursements made by IRCC are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements, including transactions between departments of the Government.

d) Amount due from or to the CRF

Amounts due from or to the CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the Department is entitled to draw from the CRF without further authorities to discharge its liabilities.

e) Revenues

The recognition of revenues from immigration service fees, citizenship service fees, rights and privileges is deferred until a final decision has been rendered. Revenues from passport fees are recognized upon request for a passport service, which is upon receipt of payment and verification of the passport application for completeness. Other revenues, including International Experience Canada, are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event that gave rise to the revenues takes place.

Revenues that are non-respendable are not available to discharge IRCC’s liabilities. While the DH is expected to maintain accounting control, she has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues. As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of the Government of Canada and are therefore presented in reduction of IRCC’s gross revenues.

Revenues that are respendable are mainly available to discharge the liabilities of the Passport and International Experience Canada programs.

f) Expenses

Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis.

Transfer payments are recorded as an expense when authorization for the payment exists and the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or the entitlements established for the transfer payment program. In situations where payments do not form part of an existing program, transfer payments are recorded as expenses when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the consolidated financial statements. Transfer payments that become repayable as a result of conditions specified in the contribution agreement that have come into being are recorded as a reduction to transfer payment expense and as a receivable.

Vacation pay and compensatory leave are accrued as the benefits are earned by employees under their respective terms of employment. For the last two fiscal years, excess hours of vacation and compensatory leave earned were not automatically cashed out on March 31, but only when specifically requested by employees.

Services provided without charge by other government departments for international immigration and citizenship services, accommodation, employers’ contributions to the health and dental insurance plans, legal services, and workers’ compensation are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated costs.

g) Employee future benefits

  1. Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer pension plan administered by the Government. IRCC’s contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan. IRCC’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.
  2. Severance benefits: The accumulation of severance benefits for voluntary departures ceased for applicable employee groups. The remaining obligation for employees who did not withdraw benefits is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

h) Accounts and loans receivable

Accounts and loans receivable are stated at the lower of cost and net recoverable value. Interest is recognized as revenue and recorded as a receivable when earned. A valuation allowance is recorded for accounts and loans receivable where recovery is considered uncertain. Loans that cannot be recovered are written off after receiving Parliamentary approval in accordance with the Debt Write-off Regulations.

i) Non-financial assets

The costs of acquiring land, buildings, equipment and other capital property are capitalized as tangible capital assets and, except for land, are amortized to expense over the estimated useful lives of the assets, as described in Note 11. All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more are recorded at their acquisition cost. Tangible capital assets do not include immovable assets located on reserves as defined in the Indian Act, works of art, museum collection and Crown land to which no acquisition cost is attributable, and intangible assets.

Inventory consists of forms, informatics equipment and passport material held for future program delivery and not intended for resale, as well as forms and passport material held for resale. All passport material is valued at the lower of cost (using the average cost method) or net realizable value. Informatics equipment and forms are valued at cost using the first in, first out method.

j) Contingent liabilities

Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities that may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. If the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, a provision is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the consolidated financial statements.

k) Transactions involving foreign currencies

Transactions involving foreign currencies are translated into Canadian dollar equivalents using rates of exchange in effect at the time of those transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated in Canadian dollars using the rate of exchange in effect at March 31st. Gains and losses resulting from foreign currency translation are reported on the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position according to the activities to which they relate.

l) Measurement uncertainty

The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes at March 31. The estimates are based on facts and circumstances, historical experience, general economic conditions and reflect the Government’s best estimate of the related amount at the end of the reporting period. The most significant items where estimates are used are the deferred revenues, the liability for employee future benefits, the useful life of tangible capital assets, contingent liabilities and allowance for doubtful accounts. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the consolidated financial statements in the year they become known.

3. Parliamentary authorities

IRCC receives most of its funding through annual parliamentary authorities. IRCC is also responsible for the management of the Passport revolving fund, a continuing non-lapsing authority from Parliament to make payments out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund for working capital, capital acquisitions and temporary financing of accumulated operating deficits. The International Experience Canada program is managed through a budgetary authority. Employee benefits are authorized by a statutory authority. IRCC issues immigration loans through a non-budgetary non-lapsing authority.

Revenues related to immigration and citizenship, including fees, rights and privileges, are deposited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund and are not available for use by the Department. Fees, rights and privileges are collected through the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations as well as through the Citizenship Regulations.

Items recognized in the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, IRCC has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Reconciliation of net cost of operations to current year authorities used (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $ 2,233,736 $ 1,897,767
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (34,830) (31,717)
Net gain (loss) on disposal of tangible capital assets 2 (276)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (336,696) (340,001)
Decrease (increase) in vacation pay and compensatory leave (3,466) 2,331
Decrease (increase) in employee future benefits (1,850) 6,974
Decrease in accrued liabilities not charged to authorities 10,026 2,274
Decrease (increase) in bad debt allowance (446) 1,281
Refund of previous years’ expenditures 3,728 5,631
Decrease in allowance for claims and pending threatened litigation 180 151
Decrease in program expenditures not charged to authorities 481 11,682
Other 62 7
Total items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities (362,809)  (341,663)
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
Acquisition of tangible capital assets 25,279 29,133
Loans issued on behalf of Government 13,178 1,894
Salary overpayments related to pay system implementation 6,738 6,936
Transition payments for implementing salary payments in arrears - 5
Increase (decrease) in inventory held for resale 1,700 (4,244)
Increase in inventory held for consumption 2,708  1,272
Increase (decrease) in prepaid expenses 1,385 (120)
Refunds of previous years’ revenues 8,147 10,615
Other 365 349
Total items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities 59,500 45,840
Current year authorities used $ 1,930,427 $ 1,601,944

b) Authorities provided and used

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Authorities provided and used (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Authorities provided:
Vote 1 - Operating expenditures $ 775,226 $ 704,637
Vote 5 - Capital 37,527 24,875
Vote 7 - Debt write off 397 1,992
Vote 10 - Grants and contributions 1,350,171 1,301,132
Statutory amounts 1,097,345 789,781
Non-budgetary items 78,151 63,445
Less:
Lapsed Vote 1 - Operating expenditures (23,297) (81,819)
Lapsed Vote 5 - Capital (15,470) (4,090)
Lapsed Vote 7 - Debt write off (8) (29)
Lapsed Vote 10 - Grants and contributions (45,714) (113,867)
Lapsed – Statutory Amounts (9) -
Authorities available for future years (1,323,892) (1,084,113)
Current year authorities used $ 1,930,427 $ 1,601,944

4. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

The following table presents details of IRCC’s accounts payable and accrued liabilities:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Accounts payable - Other government departments and agencies $ 56,011 $ 38,846
Accounts payable - External parties 181,209 89,282
Total accounts payable 237,220 128,128
Accrued liabilities 165,612 180,730
Contingent liabilities - 180
Total accounts payable and accrued liabilities $ 402,832 $ 309,038

5. Immigrant Investor Program

The Economic Action Plan 2014 Act, no.1 (Bill C-31) terminated applications in the backlog of the federal Immigrant Investor Program (IIP) and Entrepreneur Program for which a selection decision was not made before February 11, 2014. While the program has been terminated, outstanding investments will continue to be returned to investors over approximately the next five years. The IIP allowed qualified immigrants to gain permanent residence in Canada by making an investment of $800,000 ($400,000 prior to December 1, 2010) in the Canadian economy. The investment is returned to the investor, without interest, five years and two months after initial payment.

After meeting other immigration requirements, applicants to these programs were required to pay their investment to the Receiver General for Canada. IRCC acted as an agent for the approved provincial funds by collecting the investments and distributing them to the participating provinces (British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island) on the first day of the second month following receipt from the investor.

The participating provinces were then responsible for investing their allocations to strengthen their economies and to create or continue employment. They still report to IRCC quarterly, and after the five-year holding period, remit the full amount of the investment back to IRCC. Within 30 days of receipt of the full amount from a participating province, IRCC returns the investment to the investor (without interest).

Ontario retracted from the program in 2017-2018, Nova Scotia in 2016-2017 and New Brunswick in 2015-2016, but they are continuing to repay the investments as they become due.

The value of financial transactions processed during the year is as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Immigrant Investor Program (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Opening balance $ 59,200 $ 23,364
Receipts 389,628 614,624
Payments (424,000) (578,788)
Closing balance $ 24,828 $ 59,200

6. Deferred revenue

The deferred revenue account was established to record immigration service fees, citizenship service fees, and rights and privileges derived from the Immigration and Refugees Protection Act and Regulations and the Citizenship Act and Regulations for services that have yet to be rendered by the Department.

The following table presents details of the deferred revenue account:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Deferred revenue (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Opening balance $ 390,694 $ 410,727
Amounts received 983,408 920,350
Revenue recognized (896,005) (940,383)
Gross closing balance 478,097 390,694
Deferred revenues held on behalf of Government (478,097) (390,694)
Net Closing balance $ - $ -

7. Employee future benefits

a) Pension benefits

IRCC’s employees participate in the public service pension plan (the “Plan”), which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of two percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension Plan benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the Department contribute to the cost of the Plan. Due to the amendment of the Public Service Superannuation Act following the implementation of provisions related to Economic Action Plan 2012, employee contributors have been divided into two groups – Group 1 relates to existing plan members as of December 31, 2012 and Group 2 relates to members joining the Plan as of January 1, 2013. Each group has a distinct contribution rate.

The 2017-2018 expense amounts to $50,813,114 ($48,155,935 in 2016-2017). For Group 1 members, the expense represents approximately 1.01 times (1.12 times in 2016-2017) the employee contributions and, for Group 2 members, approximately 1.00 times (1.08 times in 2016-2017) the employee contributions.

The Department’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the Consolidated Financial Statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.

b) Severance benefits

Severance benefits provided to IRCC’s employees were previously based on an employee’s eligibility, years of service and salary at termination of employment. However, since 2011 the accumulation of severance benefits for voluntary departures progressively ceased for substantially all employees. Employees subject to these changes were given the option to be paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits upon departure from the public service. By March 31, 2018, substantially all settlements for immediate cash out were completed. Severance benefits are unfunded and, consequently, the outstanding obligation will be paid from future authorities.

The changes in the obligations during the year were as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Severance benefits (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year $ 20,731 $ 27,705
Expense for the year 2,909 (5,426)
Benefits paid during the year (1,059) (1,548)
Accrued benefit obligation, end of year $ 22,581 $ 20,731

8. Accounts receivable and advances

The following table presents details of IRCC’s accounts receivable and advances balances:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Accounts receivable and advances (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Receivables - Other government departments and agencies $ 37,786 $ 41,868
Receivables - Salary overpayments 18,863 13,812
Receivables - Other external parties 15,863 2,636
Employee advances 804 494
Subtotal 73,316 58,810
Allowance for doubtful accounts on receivables from external parties (327) (757)
Gross accounts receivable and advances 72,989 58,053
Accounts receivable held on behalf of Government (13,935) (22,194)
Net accounts receivable and advances $ 59,054 $ 35,859

9. Loans receivable

In accordance with the IRPA, IRCC can issue immigration loans up to a maximum of $126,600,000. Since February 28, 1995, all immigration loans bored interest at a rate determined by the Minister of Finance at the beginning of each calendar year. Regulations provided for a period of up to six years for the repayment of the loans and the interest rate on outstanding interest-bearing loans varied from 0.76% to 9.06%. Since February 21, 2018, loans are non-interest bearing and are repayable over one to eight years with a possible deferment of two years. The closing balance of the immigration loans only includes the outstanding principal balance. An allowance for uncollectibility is recorded for loans when recovery is considered uncertain.

The following table presents details of IRCC’s immigration loans balances:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Loans receivable (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Restated
(note 16)
Immigration loans - Opening balance $ 48,449 $ 46,555
Add: New loans issued 26,728 18,714
Less: Repayments of loans (13,204) (15,207)
Less: Loan balances written-off during the year (347) (1,613)
Immigration loans - Closing balance 61,626 48,449
Less: Allowance for uncollectibility (4,578) (3,708)
Loans receivable – Gross closing balance 57,048 44,741
Loans receivable held on behalf of Government (57,048) (44,741)
Net loans receivable $ - $ -

10. Inventory

The following table presents details of the inventory, measured at cost or net realizable value.

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Inventory (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Passport material $ 10,465 $ 9,415
Forms 2,670 2,020
Inventory held for resale 13,135 11,435
Passport material 3,041 3,444
Informatics equipment 6,591 3,407
Forms 158 231
Inventory held for consumption 9,790 7,082
Total inventory $ 22,925 $ 18,517

11. Tangible capital assets

Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

Table: Tangible capital assets
Asset class Amortization period
Machinery and equipment 15 years
Informatics hardware 5 years
Software (purchased and developed) 3 to 10 years
Office furniture 10 years
Vehicles 8 years
Leasehold improvements Lesser of remaining term of the lease or useful life of the improvement

Assets under construction are recorded in the applicable asset class in the year they are put into service and are not amortized until then.

Cost

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Cost (in thousands of dollars)
  Opening balance Acquisitions AdjustmentsFootnote 1 Disposals and write-offs Closing Balance
Machinery and equipment $ 1,993 $ - $ - $ - $ 1,993
Informatics hardware 5,788 306 - (65) 6,029
Software (purchased and developed) 368,131 - 25,830 - 393,961
Office furniture 1,465 185 30 (19) 1,661
Vehicles 581 65 - (48) 598
Assets under construction 1,107 24,723 (25,830) - -
Leasehold improvements 7,259 - - - 7,259
Total cost $ 386,324 $ 25,279 $ 30 $ (132) $ 411,501

Accumulated amortization

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Accumulated amortization (in thousands of dollars)
  Opening balance Amortization AdjustmentsFootnote 1 Disposals and write-offs Closing balance
Machinery and equipment $ 1,630 $ 40 $ - $ - $ 1,670
Informatics Hardware 4,284 998 - (65) 5,217
Software (purchased and developed) 218,537 33,648 - - 252,185
Office Furniture 840 109 25 (18) 956
Vehicles 448 35 - (48) 435
Assets under construction - - - - -
Leasehold improvements 7,259 - - - 7,259
Total accumulated amortization $ 232,998 $ 34,830 $ 25 $ (131) $ 267,722

Net book value

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Net book value (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Machinery and equipment $ 323 $ 363
Informatics hardware 812 1,504
Software (purchased and developed) 141,776 149,594
Office furniture 705 625
Vehicles 163 133
Assets under construction - 1,107
Leasehold improvements - -
Net Book Value $ 143,779 $ 153,326

12. Contractual obligations

The nature of IRCC’s activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby IRCC will be obligated to make future payments in order to carry out its transfer payment programs or when the services/goods are received.

Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Contractual obligations (in thousands of dollars)
  2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 and thereafter Total
Transfer payments $ 1,211,650 $ 1,024,755 $ 490,253 $ 490,253 $ 490,253 $ 3,707,164
Capital 8,510 - - - - 8,510
Operating and maintenance 51,389 506 426 404 143 52,868
Passport - Operating and maintenance 51,088 27,064 26,963 4,420 4,393 113,928
Total $ 1,322,637 $ 1,052,325 $ 517,642 $ 495,077 $ 494,789 $ 3,882,470

13. Contingent liabilities

Claims have been made against IRCC in the normal course of operations. These claims include items with pleading amounts and others for which no amount is specified. While the total amount claimed in these actions is significant, most of their outcomes are not determinable. IRCC records an allowance for claims and litigation where it is likely that there will be a future payment and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made. No such allowance has been recorded as at March 31, 2018 ($180,000 as at March 31, 2017). Claims and litigations for which the outcome is not determinable and a reasonable estimate can be made by management amount to $60,500,000 as at March 31, 2018 ($4,000 as at March 31, 2017).

14. Related party transactions

IRCC is related as a result of common ownership to all government departments, agencies, and Crown corporations. Related parties also include individuals who are members of key management personnel or close family members of those individuals, and entities controlled by, or under shared control of, a member of key management personnel or a close family member of that individual.

IRCC enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.

a) Common services provided without charge by other government departments

During the year, IRCC received services without charge from certain common service organizations, related to accommodation, the employers’ contributions to the health and dental insurance plans, legal services, and workers’ compensation coverage. Additionally, Global Affairs Canada provides international immigration and citizenship services at missions abroad. These services provided without charge have been recorded at the carrying value in IRCC’s Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Common services provided without charge by other government departments (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
International immigration and citizenship services $ 221,161 $ 218,172
Employers’ contributions to health and dental insurance plans 48,279 41,049
Accommodation 39,868 43,322
Legal services 27,298 37,314
Workers’ compensation 90 144
Total $ 336,696 $ 340,001

The Government has centralized some of its administrative activities for efficiency, cost-effectiveness purposes and economic delivery of programs to the public. As a result, the Government uses central agencies and common service organizations so that one department performs services for all other departments and agencies without charge. The costs of these services, such as the payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Services and Procurement Canada, audit services provided by the Office of the Auditor General and information technology infrastructure services provided by Shared Services Canada are not included in IRCC’s Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position.

b) Other transactions with other government departments and agencies

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: Other transactions with other government departments and agencies (in thousands of dollars)
  2018 2017
Expenses $ 363,455 $ 313,524
Revenues 3,836 3,946

Expenses disclosed in (b) exclude common services provided without charge, which are already disclosed in (a).

15. Segmented information

Presentation by segment is based on IRCC’s program alignment architecture. The presentation by segment is based on the same accounting policies as described in the Summary of significant accounting policies in note 2. The following table presents the expenses incurred and revenues generated for the main programs, by major object of expenses and by major type of revenue. The segment results for the period are as follows:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: 1 of 2 Segmented information (in thousands of dollars)
  SettlementFootnote 1 PassportFootnote 2 MigrationFootnote 3 HealthFootnote 4 FamilyFootnote 5 TemporaryFootnote 6 CitizenshipFootnote 7
Transfer payments
Non-profit organization $ 577,018 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ -
Other levels of government within Canada 641,540 - - - - - -
Individuals 62,775 - - - - - -
Other countries and international organizations 10,274 - 1,001 - - - -
Total transfer payments 1,291,607 - 1,001 - - - -
Operations and administration
Salaries and employees benefits 35,885 70,947 195,446 13,458 94,117 68,429 81,808
Professional and special services 2,061 239,359 37,285 123,619 4,147 16,413 4,509
Transportation and communication 859 36,466 6,019 294 1,986 2,599 1,315
Utilities, materials and supplies 142 38,451 1,191 111 555 1,140 485
Accommodation 2,360 4,469 7,024 513 4,407 2,671 5,711
Amortization of tangible capital assets 606 3,096 19,731 - 778 5,148 1,482
Rentals of equipment 24 6,400 70 15 26 13 209
Information services 24 2,788 37 28 25 543 78
Repairs and maintenance 22 1,530 35 9 18 9 83
Other 674 79 9 - 1 1 1
Total Operations and administration 42,657 403,585 266,847 138,047 106,060 96,966 95,681
Total Expenses 1,334,264 403,585 267,848 138,047 106,060 96,966 95,681
Revenues
Passport fees earned - 639,271 - - - - -
Immigration service fees - - 280,929 - 57,033 131,523 -
Immigration rights and privileges - - - - 10,018 39,975 -
Citizenship service fees - - - - - - 55,164
International Experience Canada - - - - - 8,938 -
Right of citizenship - - - - - - 8,702
Interest on loans 237 - - - - - -
Passport miscellaneous revenues - 234 - - - - -
Other revenues 4 - 7 4 - 28 23
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (241) - (280,934) (3) (67,051) (171,526) (63,889)
Total Revenues - 639,505 2 1 - 8,938 -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $ 1,334,264 $ (235,920) $ 267,846 $ 138,046 $ 106,060 $ 88,028 $ 95,681
Table: 2 of 2 Segmented information (in thousands of dollars)
  PermanentFootnote 8 RefugeeFootnote 9 InfluenceFootnote 10 InternalFootnote 11 2018 2017
Transfer payments
Non-profit organization $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 577,018 $ 529,273
Other levels of government within Canada - - - - 641,540 535,892
Individuals - - - - 62,775 95,377
Other countries and international organizations - - 3,532 - 14,807 15,987
Total transfer payments - - 3,532 - 1,296,140 1,176,529
Operations and administration
Salaries and employees benefits 67,724 62,115 9,420 176,573 875,922 767,143
Professional and special services 3,868 3,572 373 49,117 484,323 403,767
Transportation and communication 2,194 2,634 313 3,789 58,468 54,757
Utilities, materials and supplies 629 637 41 5,120 48,502 46,688
Accommodation 3,582 2,920 358 12,682 46,697 51,356
Amortization of tangible capital assets 1,611 404 - 1,974 34,830 31,717
Rentals of equipment 172 35 7 14,301 21,272 17,146
Information services 47 30 1 4,753 8,354 8,397
Repairs and maintenance 5 10 - 5,170 6,891 8,380
Other 6 1 - 27 799 445
Total Operations and administration 79,838 72,358 10,513 273,506 1,586,058 1,389,796
Total Expenses 79,838 72,358 14,045 273,506 2,882,198 2,566,325
Revenues
Passport fees earned - - - - 639,271 658,246
Immigration service fees 101,483 11,547 - - 582,515 531,775
Immigration rights and privileges 91,026 - - - 141,019 145,064
Citizenship service fees - - - - 55,164 54,387
International Experience Canada - - - - 8,938 10,015
Right of citizenship - - - - 8,702 8,417
Interest on loans - - - - 237 280
Passport miscellaneous revenues - - - - 234 271
Other revenues - - - 374 440 410
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (192,509) (11,547) - (358) (788,058) (740,307)
Total Revenues - - - 16 648,462 668,558
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $ 79,838 $ 72,358 $ 14,045 $ 273,490 $ 2,233,736 $ 1,897,767

16. Adjustment to prior year’s results

In 2017-2018, IRCC reviewed the accounting presentation of its loans receivable which qualify as financial assets held on behalf of Government. This change has been applied retroactively and comparative information for 2016-2017 has been restated. The following table presents the effect of this adjustment:

(in thousands of dollars)

Table: (in thousands of dollars)
  2017 as previously stated Effect of the adjustment 2017 Restated
Consolidated Statement of Financial Position
Financial assets held on behalf of Government $ (22,194) $ (44,741) $ (66,935)
Departmental net financial asset (net debt) 13,666 (44,741) (31,075)
Consolidated Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position
Net revenue of operations after government funding and transfers (30,960) 3,493 (27,467)
Departmental net financial position - Beginning of year 146,967 (41,248) 105,719
Departmental net financial position – End of year 177,927 (44,741) 133,186
Consolidated Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt
Net decrease in departmental net debt (32,683) 3,493 (29,190)
Departmental net debt – Beginning of year 19,017 41,248 60,265
Departmental net debt – End of year (13,666) 44,741 31,075
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
Variations in Statement of Financial Position :
Increase (decrease) in loans receivable 3,493 (3,493) -
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 1,516,655 (3,493) 1,513,162

17. Comparative information

Certain comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
Annex to the Statement of Management Responsibility Including Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Fiscal year 2017-2018

1. Introduction

This document provides summary information on the measures taken by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (“IRCC” or “the Department”) to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting (ICFR), including information on internal control management, assessment results and related action plans.

Detailed information on IRCC’s authority, mandate, and program activities can be found in its latest Departmental Results Report and in its most recent Departmental Plan.

2. Departmental System of Internal Control over Financial Reporting

2.1 Internal Control Management

The department has a well-established governance and accountability structure to support departmental assessment efforts and oversight of its system of internal control. A departmental internal financial control management framework, approved by the Deputy Head, is in place and includes:

  • organizational accountability structures as they relate to internal financial control management to support sound financial management and reporting, including roles and responsibilities for senior managers in their areas of responsibility for control management;
  • values and ethics, including a recently renewed departmental code of conduct and a values and ethics champions network;
  • on-going communication and training on statutory requirements, policies, and procedures for sound financial management and control; and,
  • at least semi-annual monitoring and regular updates on internal financial control management as well as the reporting of annual assessment results and related action plans to the Deputy Head, departmental senior management and the Departmental Audit Committee.

The Departmental Audit Committee provides advice to the Deputy Head on the adequacy and functioning of the department’s risk management, control and governance frameworks and processes.

IRCC’s senior management recognizes the importance of setting the tone from the top to help ensure that staff at all levels understand their roles in maintaining effective systems of ICFR and are equipped to exercise these responsibilities effectively. The Department’s focus is on ensuring that risks are managed well through a responsive and risk-based control environment that enables continuous improvement and innovation.

2.2 Service Arrangements Relevant to Financial Statements

The Department relies on other organizations for the processing of certain transactions that are recorded in its financial statements as follows:

Common arrangements:
  • Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) centrally administers the payments of salaries and the procurement of goods and services, as per the Department’s Delegation of Spending and Financial Authority Instrument, and also provides accommodation services;
  • Treasury Board Secretariat provides the Department with information used to calculate various accruals and allowances, such as the accrued severance liability;
  • The Department of Justice provides legal services to IRCC; and,
  • Shared Services Canada (SSC) provides IT infrastructure services to the Department in the areas of data centre and network services. The scope and responsibilities are addressed in the interdepartmental arrangement between SSC and IRCC.
Specific arrangements:
  • The Department of Global Affairs Canada (GAC) provides common administrative services and support for the Immigration Program outside Canada, under a memorandum of understanding with IRCC. Common administrative services include accommodations, revenues and payments processing, accounting and telecommunications. Program support is offered by both Canada-based officers and locally engaged staff in missions abroad. GAC also prepares periodic financial reports for IRCC staff on the revenues collected and the expenses incurred directly in the field;
  • The Department of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) provides passport delivery and processing services to IRCC. These services are governed by a service level agreement with IRCC which ensures optimal and sound financial management of the Passport Program and the recovery of costs associated with Passport Service Delivery and Operations, Receiving Agent Services, Transition and Modernization costs and Internal Services provided by Service Canada, an initiative operating within ESDC;
  • VFS Global and Computer Sciences Canada Inc. both manage visa application centres that deliver visa application intake services and the collection of related application fees abroad. As a result, reliance is placed on the control procedures of these external service providers; and,
  • Medavie-Blue Cross provides claims administration for the Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP). The IFHP reimburses service providers for emergency and essential health-care services in cases where eligible clients, such as refugees, do not qualify for provincial, territorial or private health coverage. As a result, reliance is placed on the control procedures of Medavie Blue-Cross.

3. Departmental Assessment Results during Fiscal Year 2017-2018

The key findings and significant adjustments required from the current year’s assessment activities are summarized below.

New or significantly amended key controls: In the current year, IRCC continued to expand its network of on-line application and fee collection services. The design of any new or amended key controls within this business process was thoroughly analyzed prior to its implementation, and their operating effectiveness will be assessed during the next fiscal year, according to IRCC`s ongoing monitoring program. The Department has continued to adjust following implementation, in recent years, of the Treasury Board Pay Transformation Initiative and of the related Phoenix Pay System. It progressed significantly in the assessment of the modified key financial controls within the salaries and employee benefits business process in 2017-18, and the corresponding results will be disclosed in next year’s annex. There were no significantly amended key controls in all other existing business processes that required a reassessment in 2017-18.

Ongoing monitoring program: As part of its rotational ongoing monitoring program, the Department completed its reassessment of information technology (IT) general controls under departmental management and of the financial controls embedded within the following business processes: IRCC costing processes (except for the Passport Program), transfer payments to service provider organizations (at NHQ and a Canadian regional office), non-salary operating expenses at NHQ (for two significant branches), Interim Federal Health Program expenses, services provided without charge by another department, and all significant business processes at two Canadian case processing locations and two international missions. For the most part, the key controls that were tested performed as intended, with remediation required in the following areas:

  • existence of documentary evidence of the application of certain key controls, such as significant reviews, reconciliations and approvals;
  • performance of review of certain documents, transactions and reconciliations;
  • documentation of significant financial procedures and controls; and,
  • enhancement of access restrictions to relevant IT applications

Management action plans addressing the remediation requirements were developed by the business process owners and several have already been implemented. The remaining action plans will be operationalized within a reasonable timeframe.

Furthermore, in 2017-18, the Department substantially advanced its reassessment of the financial controls embedded within the following business processes: costing related to the Passport Program, salaries and employee benefits, accounts payable, accrued liabilities and payments, and all significant business processes at a Canadian case processing location and an international mission. This reassessment work will be completed in 2018-19, and its results will be disclosed in next year’s annex.

In order to generate efficiencies, the planned reassessment of the financial controls embedded within the grants to individuals – Resettlement Assistance Program was deferred and will be performed concurrently with an internal audit during the 2018-19 fiscal year.

4. Departmental Action Plan

4.1 Progress during Fiscal Year 2017-18

IRCC continued to conduct its ongoing monitoring according to the previous fiscal year’s rotational plan as shown in the following table:

Progress during Fiscal Year 2017-18
Rotational Ongoing Monitoring Plan for Current Year Status
Interim Federal Health Program expenses, and services provided without charge by another department Completed as planned; remedial actions also completed.
IT general controls under departmental management, IRCC costing processes (except for the Passport Program), transfer payments to service provider organizations (at NHQ and a Canadian regional office), non-salary operating expenses at NHQ (for two significant branches), and all significant business processes at two Canadian case processing locations and two international missions Completed as planned; remedial actions substantially advanced.
Costing related to the Passport Program, salaries and employee benefits, accounts payable, accrued liabilities and payments, and all significant business processes at a Canadian case processing location and at an international mission Assessment work substantially completed in 2017-18, and results to be reported in 2018-19.
Grants to individuals – Resettlement Assistance Program Assessment work deferred to 2018-19

In 2017-18, IRCC assessed the design of any new or amended key controls while rationalizing its revenue management business process through the expansion of on-line fee collection services. It also followed-up on all financial controls that required enhancements as a result of prior year monitoring, and determined that these controls were being duly strengthened within appropriate timelines.

4.2 Action Plan for the Next Fiscal Year and Subsequent Years

IRCC’s rotational ongoing monitoring plan over the next three years, subject to an annual revalidation of the high risk processes and controls and related adjustments to the plan as required, is shown in the following table:

Rotational Ongoing Monitoring Plan
Key control areas Fiscal year 2018-19 Fiscal year 2019-20 Fiscal year 2020-21
Entity-level controls No Yes No
IT general controls under departmental management No Yes No
Budgeting and forecastingFootnote ** No Yes No
CostingFootnote ** No No No
Financial closing and reporting Yes No No
Adjusting journal entries No Yes No
Revenue processes at NHQ Yes No No
Transfer payments to service provider organizations (at NHQ and selected Canadian regional offices) Yes Yes Yes
Transfer payments to other levels of government Yes No No
Grants to individuals – Resettlement Assistance Program Yes No Yes
Salaries and employee benefitsFootnote * No Yes No
Non-salary operating expense processes at NHQ Yes Yes Yes
Interim Federal Health Program expenses Yes No Yes
Services provided without charge by other departments Yes No Yes
Immigrant loans Yes No Yes
Capital assets Yes No No
Accounts payable, accrued liabilities and paymentsFootnote * No No Yes
Canadian case processing centres – All significant revenue and expense business processes Yes Yes Yes
International missions – All significant revenue and expense business processesFootnote *** No No No

In addition to the ongoing monitoring rotational plan, IRCC plans to continue addressing any outstanding remediation resulting from its reassessments of the existing financial controls.

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