Internal Audit of the Immigration Program at the Canadian Embassy in Dakar, Senegal

Internal Audit & Accountability Branch
June 2016

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Background

Canada is represented in Senegal by an Ambassador located in Dakar. The immigration program at the Canadian Embassy in Dakar is managed by an Immigration Program Manager. The Dakar visa office serves a population in excess of 216 million people across 16 countries, which include: Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Cape Verde; Central African Republic; Chad; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo (Kinshasa); Ivory Coast; Gabon; Gambia; Guinea-Bissau; Guinea-Conakry; Mali; Mauritania; Niger; and Senegal.

The Dakar visa office was established in 2011 and delivers the full suite of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada programs. As of August 2015, the Dakar visa office was comprised of 20 indeterminate employees - six Canada-Based Officers and 14 Locally-Engaged Staff. The number of permanent Locally-Engaged Staff and Canadian-Based Officers has doubled since the office opened in 2011.

Audit Objective and Scope

The audit objective was to assess the Dakar visa office’s management control processes and activities. Specifically, the audit focused on the following:

  • Governance framework over formal agreements related to the administration of the immigration program;
  • Risk management and quality assurance practices to support program delivery; and
  • Internal controls over administrative, financial and operational activities.

The audit scope covered the time period July 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015 for the review of completed immigration files and the review of financial and administrative expenditures. Current quarter cost recovery reconciliations and controlled documents inventory counts were performed in real time during the audit site visit to Dakar in November 2015.

Conclusion

The management control processes and activities in place at the Dakar visa office generally supported immigration program administration and delivery. Formal agreements with key partners were in place and the provision of services by the Visa Application Centers was being monitored by visa office staff. Application processing was conducted in accordance with legislative requirements and was supported by risk management and quality assurance tools and practices. A number of quality assurance activities were performed to monitor and review visa application processing, with corrective measures taken as required. Program administration activities were generally conducted in compliance with applicable policies and procedures. Public sector values and ethics were promoted by the Program Manager.

Some opportunities for improvement were identified. These related to ensuring that all staff completed mandatory values and ethics training; strengthening the implementation of the agreements in place with Global Affairs Canada related to financial arrangements, remote printing, and information technology network performance. In addition, the Program Manager has the opportunity to develop stronger controls related to system access, information management practices, business continuity planning, and elements of the management of controlled documents and cost recovery functions.

Management has accepted the audit findings and developed an action plan to address the recommendations.

Background

Introduction

Canada is represented in Senegal by an Ambassador located in Dakar. The immigration program at the Canadian Embassy in Dakar is managed by an Immigration Program Manager (IPM). The Dakar visa office serves a population in excess of 216 million people across 16 countries, which include: Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Cape Verde; Central African Republic; Chad; Congo (Brazzaville); Democratic Republic of Congo (Kinshasa); Ivory Coast; Gabon; Gambia; Guinea-Bissau; Guinea-Conakry; Mali; Mauritania; Niger; and Senegal.

The Dakar visa office was established in 2011 and delivers the full suite of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) programs. As of August 2015, the Dakar visa office was comprised of 20 indeterminate employees - six Canada-Based Officers and 14 Locally-Engaged Staff. The number of permanent Locally-Engaged Staff and Canadian Based Officers has doubled since the office opened in 2011.

The Dakar visa office receives applications from eight Visa Application Centers (VACs) located in cities within eight of the countries that it serves. Applications are submitted to the nearest VAC and are sent to the Dakar visa office for processing.

Operating environment

Dakar visa office staff work in a complex environment that includes processing applications from people who live in 16 countries within a region where there is a high perception of corruption. Since 2011, there have been a number of events that have impacted program delivery including the closing of the Conakry VAC due to the Ebola crisis in 2015 and the installation of biometrics equipment at seven VAC locations.

The visa office has experienced an increase in temporary resident visa applications. For example, comparing temporary resident visitor visa application data for 2014 to 2015, there was an increase from 9,491 in 2014 to 11,763 in 2015.

Immigration program staff conducts their work in accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, other relevant Acts of Parliament, departmental guidance, policies and procedures as well as a suite of internal administrative controls that have been put in place to support application processing.

Audit Objective, Scope and Methodology

Audit objective and scope

The audit objective was to assess the Dakar visa office’s management control processes and activities. Specifically, the audit focused on the following:

  • Governance framework over formal agreements related to the administration of the immigration program;
  • Risk management and quality assurance practices to support program delivery; and
  • Internal controls over administrative, financial and operational activities.

The audit scope covered the time period July 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015 for the review of completed immigration files and the review of financial and administrative expenditures. Current quarter cost recovery reconciliations and controlled documents inventory counts were performed in real time during the audit site visit to Dakar in November 2015.

Methodology

An audit site visit was conducted in November 2015.  The following audit procedures were performed:

  • Interviews were conducted with functional authorities at IRCC headquarters in Ottawa and with Dakar visa office staff;
  • A sampling strategy was developed to determine the number of files to be reviewed as part of the audit;
  • File reviews of 141 applications to assess processing compliance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA);
  • File reviews, reconciliations and inventory counts of controlled documents;
  • Review and analysis of documentation such as financial policies, human resources and training files, monitoring reports, and business continuity plans; and
  • A walkthrough of the visa office was performed to observe the overall processes in place.

The audit observations, conclusions and recommendations are based on the work performed. 

Statement of Conformance

The audit is in conformance with the Internal Auditing Standards for the Government of Canada as supported by the results of the quality assurance and improvement program.

Audit Findings and Recommendations

Governance framework

Criteria. It was expected that a governance framework over formal agreements related to immigration program administration were in place. Specifically, agreements were in place and monitored to ensure that program accountabilities related to key immigration program delivery partners were implemented.

Conclusion. Formal agreements with key partners were in place and generally being monitored by visa office staff. The IPM ensured that VAC monitoring was being performed in accordance with departmental obligations. Areas for improvement were identified to strengthen the implementation of the agreements in place with Global Affairs Canada (GAC) related to financial arrangements, remote visa printing, and information technology network performance. There was also an opportunity for improvement to ensure that visa office staff take mandatory values and ethics training.

Visa Application Centre monitoring

VACs provide administrative support services to applicants related to the submission of their applications. In accordance with the IRCC global contract with the supplier for VAC services, there is a requirement for IRCC on-going oversight of VAC operations with respect to performance and compliance with service standards. The Dakar visa office provides oversight of eight VACs in the region.

Dakar visa office officials are required to obtain monthly quality assurance reports from the VACs related to their performance. Reports were obtained from seven of the eight VACs in the region as one VAC had been closed during the Ebola crisis that affected the region in 2015. Dakar visa office officials also conducted two VAC site visit reviews during the audit scope period.

Memorandum of Understanding with GAC

Financial arrangements

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is in place between IRCC and GAC for the delivery of common services to the visa office at the Embassy. The main GAC point of contact related to the implementation of the MOU is the Management Consular Officer (MCO). The financial components of the MOU specify that the IPM should be provided with a detailed monthly summary of the immigration related financial transactions that have been entered in the Embassy’s financial system. In addition, monthly bank statements are to be provided as supporting evidence that data (currency amounts) for immigration funds collected by the VACs have been entered into the financial system. The IPM must review the financial system generated visa office financial transaction summary report to verify and certify that currency amounts are accurate, or reasonable in the case of non-reconcilable funds, and sign the monthly certification of deposits.

At the time of the audit site visit in November 2015, visa office officials indicated that monthly visa office financial transaction summaries and bank statements for the Dakar office had not been provided to them since April 2014 and that they had not been provided for Kinshasa related financial transactions since October 2014. As a result, the IPM had not completed the required monthly certifications related to financial transactions related to application fees paid via direct deposit in Dakar and Kinshasa since the dates mentioned above.

This is important given that the Dakar visa office receives approximately $2.2 million in revenue each year from application fees and has banking arrangements with eight banks in the region. Without the ability to perform reconciliations of financial transactions to applications received, the IPM cannot be satisfied as to the accuracy of visa office finances.

Internet bandwidth

GAC, in collaboration with Shared Services Canada, provides information technology services, including the provision of Internet, to the visa office as per the MOU. Visa office staff indicated that they experience computer network performance and connectivity issues related to Internet bandwidth. The network performance has a direct impact on application processing efficiency and the ability of visa officers to be actively engaged in the IRCC modernization initiatives such as the processing of electronic applications. It was explained that these issues have been regularly communicated and a solution has been proposed and requires resolution at the GAC – IRCC Headquarters level.

Remote visa printing

As per an MOU about remote printing between GAC and IRCC, GAC officers are authorized to print approved visas to be placed in traveler’s passports at five offices in the region where there is no IRCC presence. This is to be done in accordance with specified criteria as agreed upon between the Head of Mission in the remote printing office and the designated responsible visa office’s IPM. This arrangement is for visa printing only. The visa application decision-making process is the sole responsibility of IRCC visa officers. A sample of 31 remote printed visas was assessed to determine whether they had been printed in compliance with terms and conditions. In total, for 16 of the 31 remote printed visas the applicant’s profile met the specific criteria while in 15 cases the applicant’s profile did not or there was insufficient documentation on file to support the decision.

Recommendation 1. The IPM should work in collaboration with the Director General, International Region Branch and the Mission Management Consular Officer to develop a strategy to ensure that the visa office is receiving the services from GAC that are included in the relevant agreements and that remote printing of visas are performed in accordance with MOU guidelines.

Values and Ethics

Public sector values and ethics are an integral element of governance. The IPM reinforced the importance of values and ethics and promoted an ethical culture through regular email communiqués sent to employees, as well as through discussions at an all staff retreat in December 2014. All employees working for the visa office had signed off that they read and understood the Code of Conduct upon commencing their employment in the visa office.

In support of the promoting values and ethics on an ongoing basis, GAC provides access to on-line mandatory, annual values and ethics training to all Embassy staff. Only 29 percent of visa office employees had completed the training at the time of the audit.

Recommendation 2. The IPM should ensure that all visa office employees complete the mandatory GAC on-line values and ethics training on an annual basis.

Risk management and quality assurance

Criteria. It was expected that risk management and quality assurance practices were in place to support program delivery and application processing.

Conclusion. Program application processing was supported by risk management and quality assurance tools and practices. The IPM assessed key risk areas and developed mitigation strategies to maintain program integrity. A number of quality assurance activities were performed to monitor and review application processing, with corrective measures taken as required. One area for improvement was identified related to visa office business continuity planning.

Risk management and quality assurance activities

Risk management practices supported application review and decision-making. The IPM identified key risks in departmental planning documents and established mitigation strategies related to processing high-risk applications. For example, a Temporary Resident Risk Matrix was developed to address risks related to persons that had travelled to Canada from the region on temporary resident visas that claimed refugee status when they were in Canada. This matrix aided visa officers in application decision-making based on a number of high-risk factors.

In addition, quality assurance activities were performed to validate risk mitigation and management strategies related to application processing practices. Based on the results of these activities, the IPM took action to address issues and risks when required. For example, as a result of a quality assurance review of student permit applications, processing procedures were strengthened related to reviewing banking documentation. The Dakar visa office performs at least two quality assurance exercises each year as per IRCC Program Integrity guidance.

Emergency management and business continuity

The development and implementation of emergency management and business continuity plans at Canadian missions is led by GAC officials. As a part of annual updates to the Dakar Embassy-wide Business Continuity Plan, the IPM is responsible for filling out Critical Function Sheets, which identify how to restore and keep immigration services operating in the event of a service interruption or crisis.

At the time of the audit site visit in November 2015, a GAC official provided a draft Mission Security Plan – Fire and Emergency Evacuation that was dated January 2015. The visa office call list had been updated to communicate with visa office staff in the event of an emergency situation occurring. Some of the visa office information including the IRCC Critical Function Sheets had not been updated since 2011 and did not reflect the current operational environment. Critical information such as the impact of service interruptions, maximum allowable downtime and an identified crisis management team are important to continuing the provision of immigration services in times of crisis or emergency.

Recommendation 3. The IPM should ensure that the Critical Function Sheets are up to date and provided to the Mission Security Officer for inclusion into the Mission Business Continuity Plan to ensure that key immigration services may continue in times of crisis or emergency.

Internal controls over program administration and operational activities

Criteria. It was expected that an internal control framework over administrative, financial, and operational activities for the immigration program would be in place. Specifically:

  • System and workplace access controls were in place and working as intended;
  • Applications were processed in accordance with legislation, policies and procedures;
  • Internal controls were in place to safeguard the handling of controlled documents;
  • Financial management controls were in place to ensure effective and sound stewardship of funds; and
  • Human resources were managed to support the delivery of the immigration program.

Conclusion. Application processing was conducted in accordance with legislative requirements and controlled documents were managed as per departmental policies. Internal controls in place over program administration were generally implemented in compliance with applicable policies and procedures. Public sector values and ethics were promoted by the IPM. Opportunities for improvement were identified related to system access controls, information management practices, strengthening elements of the cost recovery function, and controlled document management.

System access controls

In terms of system controls, officer decision-making authorities in the Global Case Management System (GCMS) were in accordance with operational guidelines and position requirements. There was an opportunity for improvement related to GCMS system access controls. This related to the number of user accounts that were active relative to the number of employees that were working in the visa office. Approximately 27 of the 64 active user accounts were for staff that no longer required access due to their current work related responsibilities. Since only IRCC Headquarters officials have authority to deactivate GCMS accounts, the GCMS Manager was working with IRCC Headquarters to deactivate accounts for departing Locally-Engaged Staff and to remove Dakar as a position on active GCMS accounts for Canada-Based Officers leaving the mission for another office.

Access controls related to the Controlled Key Forms Inventory Tracking System (CKFITS) – the information system used to record and submit controlled document inventories – were valid for current employees who were required to use the system. As well, access controls for current employees required to use the Integrated Payment and Revenue Management System (IPRMS) - IRCC’s system for recording, managing and controlling fees overseas – were in compliance with expectations. However, there were instances where user access accounts should have been deleted for previous employees that no longer worked in the visa office (one IPRMS user account and nine CKFITS user accounts). The administration of system access controls is important to protect program integrity. By having more active user accounts than employees, there is a risk that the system could be used inappropriately and not in accordance with operating policies and procedures.

Information management

Dakar visa office space limitations have led to a situation where application files have had to be stored in four separate locations on the Embassy’s property – three of which are outside the immigration section. At the time of the audit site visit, application files were being stored on shelves and tables, and in unlabeled or mislabeled boxes. Furthermore, one of the storage locations was outside of the mission’s operational zone.

The current information storage practices do not safeguard applicant’s personal information or provide easy access to application files. These are two important information management elements. The impact of the current process is related to locating and retrieving files which could impact on responding to applicants should questions arise regarding their application. The visa office was unable to provide the audit team with 44 of the 90 files that were requested as part of the testing of application files. Forty-four different files were requested to replace the originals that could not be located by the visa office staff.

The IPM has been working with GAC officials to find a solution to the space limitations within the immigration annex of the Embassy property. In the meantime, despite the current space limitations, consistent labeling and storage options would strengthen application file management practices and safeguard personal information.

Recommendation 4. The IPM should implement an application filing system to safeguard personal information and support efficient application file management and access.

Application processing

The Dakar visa office has standard operational procedures in place to support application processing and officer decision-making. In addition, the IPM sends regular communiqués to visa officers to provide program instructions related to application processing. A sample of permanent and temporary resident applications was reviewed as part of the audit. Application decisions were adequately documented, sufficient controls were in place to ensure admissibility requirements were met, and delegated authorities for decisions were appropriate and in accordance with requirements.

Internal controls over controlled documents

Counterfoils and seals are controlled documents that are issued as a visa in a traveler’s passport or single journey travel document. In accordance with the IRCC Forms Management manual, the Forms Control Officer stores the controlled document inventory in a secure office accessible by pass code. All visas issued by the Dakar visa office are recorded in the forms control log book. As part of the log book, the officer must account for daily use of controlled documents – including spoiled and cancelled visas. Photocopies of visas that had been cancelled after being placed in a traveler’s passport were not included in the log book. Although not mandatory, this is a good practice that is in place at other visa offices and provides an accounting for the cancelled visas. Subsequent to the audit site visit, the IPM has put this practice in place in the visa office.

The Form Control Officer provides quarterly inventory reports to IRCC Headquarters via the CKFITS. Reconciliation between the inventories of controlled forms on hand and those reported through CKFITS was performed during the audit site visit in November 2015. The results demonstrated that there were variances between the number of counterfoils available at the visa office and the numbers reported in CKFITS. Specifically, there was a greater quantity of counterfoils in stock reported in CKFITS than the actual quantity on site. All of the counterfoils that were falsely reported in CKFITS as available were traced back to the control log book and confirmed as having been issued, spoiled, or cancelled. Therefore, this was a reporting matter and not an inventory management error.

As mentioned earlier in this report, GAC officers are authorized to print approved visas to be placed in traveler’s passports at five offices in the region where there is no IRCC presence. The main objective of remote printing is to provide Canada’s network of missions with the flexibility to further facilitate a whole-of-government approach to achieving mission objectives while ensuring the integrity of the immigration program. In order for the five authorized locations to remotely print visas, the Dakar visa office must transfer a quantity of controlled documents to each office and record the transfer in its tracking system. Each remote printing office is also responsible for tracking their inventory of controlled documents in CKFITS.

Our review identified one instance where a negative inventory of counterfoils was reported from a remote printing office for two consecutive quarters. IRCC Headquarters CKFITS officials confirmed that these reporting issues could relate to a system flaw which may lead to inaccurate inventory reports related to transfers of controlled documents between offices. Specifically, for transfers made near the end of a quarter, inventory quantities may be understated in CKFITS as they are showing as transferred out of one office but not yet recorded as transferred into the receiving office’s inventory. This situation results in the quarterly inventory reconciliations erroneously marking counterfoils as missing from a visa office. The inventory reconciliation is normally resolved in CKFITS the following quarterly report once the receiving office confirms reception of the transferred inventory. IRCC Headquarters CKFITS officials also cited a known issue with opening balances initially recorded in CKFITS when it was first implemented. IRCC Headquarters CKFITS officials indicated that both issues were resolved in early 2016 as a result of a system update and restating of opening balances.

Recommendation 5. The IPM should ensure that any quarterly inventory reporting discrepancies between the physical controlled documents on hand and the quantities reported in CKFITS are investigated and resolved in a timely manner for both the Dakar visa office and for all remote printing offices.

Cost recovery controls

Application fees received by the Dakar visa office can be paid in five different currencies. The Cost Recovery Officer is expected to monitor currency exchange rate fluctuations in order to ensure that the fees applicants pay for immigration services in a foreign currency are equal to the value of the service as established by regulation in Canadian dollars. The fee schedule may remain in effect until there is a variance of more than five percent for a certain period of time between the fee in the foreign currency and the fee in Canadian dollars. This period varies from mission to mission and is established by the Cost Recovery Officer in consultation with mission consular colleagues.

During the audit scope period, foreign currency fluctuation reviews were not being performed on a consistent basis and as a result, the fees charged for services in the foreign currencies accepted as payment had not been updated since February 2015. The exchange rate variance remained greater than five percent for nine months during the period from July 2014 to September 2015. This means that for the six month period after the February 2015 currency rate adjustment, the variance was greater than the five percent criterion.

Visa office officials informed us that there was a backlog in the processing of refunds to applicants in cases where an overpayment has occurred. The IPM identified that there have been logistical challenges related to issuing refunds. The Dakar visa office handles both reconcilable and non-reconcilable funds. Reconcilable funds are those that can be directly matched to an application based on online payments or certified cheques. Non-reconcilable funds are direct deposits to the mission’s designated bank accounts, which takes time to trace an individual transaction to the deposit.

Recommendation 6. The IPM should review and update cost recovery procedures in place at the Dakar visa office to ensure that refunds are provided to applicants in a timely manner.

Administrative expenditures were compliant with departmental guidance

Internal controls over administrative expenditures were in place to ensure that overtime, travel and hospitality transactions were processed in compliance with applicable policies and regulations. A sample of travel, hospitality, and overtime claims was reviewed. Overall, procedures related to the administration of these claims were compliant with departmental requirements.

Conclusion

The management control processes and activities in place at the Dakar visa office generally supported immigration program administration and delivery. Formal agreements with key partners were in place and the provision of services by the Visa Application Centers was being monitored by visa office staff. Application processing was conducted in accordance with legislative requirements and was supported by risk management and quality assurance tools and practices. A number of quality assurance activities were performed to monitor and review visa application processing, with corrective measures taken as required. Program administration activities were generally conducted in compliance with applicable policies and procedures. Public sector values and ethics were promoted by the IPM.

Some opportunities for improvement were identified. These related to ensuring that all staff completed mandatory values and ethics training; and strengthening the implementation of the agreements in place with GAC related to financial arrangements, remote printing, and information technology network performance. In addition, the IPM has the opportunity to develop stronger controls related to system access, information management practices, business continuity planning, and elements of the management of controlled documents and cost recovery functions.

Management has accepted the audit findings and developed an action plan to address the recommendations.

Appendix A – Management Response and Action Plan

Recommendation 1

The IPM should work in collaboration with the Director General, International Region Branch and the Mission Management Consular Officer to develop a strategy to ensure that the visa office is receiving the services from GAC that are included in the relevant agreements and that remote printing of visas are performed in accordance with MOU guidelines.

Management Response

Management accepts this recommendation.

Capacity of partners is a significant corporate risk, and on-going engagement between IRCC International Region, GAC, IRCC Systems Information Management Branch, and Shared Services Canada will be required to ensure that IRCC is receiving services as agreed and that relevant procedures are being followed.

Management action plan items to address this recommendation will be completed by April 2017.

OPI: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Due Date: April 30, 2017

Recommendation 2

The IPM should ensure that all visa office employees complete the mandatory GAC on-line values and ethics training on an annual basis.

Management Response

Management accepts this recommendation.

Public Service values and ethics are promoted on an ongoing basis within the Dakar Immigration program. Completing the GAC online values and ethics training course will provide IRCC Locally-Engaged Staff another opportunity to reinforce the concepts they have already learned within the Immigration context. Dakar IRCC Locally-Engaged Staff are registering for MyAccounts with the Canada School of Public Service and, barring technical difficulties, will complete the appropriate online training for their level of access by July 15, 2016.

Management action plan items to address this recommendation will be completed by July 15, 2016.

OPI: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Due Date: September 1, 2016

Recommendation 3

The IPM should ensure that the Critical Function Sheets are up to date and provided to the Mission Security Officer for inclusion into the Mission Business Continuity Plan to ensure that key immigration services may continue in times of crisis or emergency.

Management Response

Management accepts this recommendation.

While Critical Function Sheets exist for the Dakar Immigration Program, they have not been recently updated. The necessary changes are minimal, but it is important that these documents are updated to reflect the current operational environment.

Management action plan items to address this recommendation will be completed by August 30, 2016.

OPI: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Due Date: August 30, 2016

Recommendation 4

The IPM should implement an application filing system to safeguard personal information and support efficient application file management and access.

Management Response

Management accepts this recommendation.

The Dakar Immigration Program has had serious challenges managing the inventory of retired files due to the mission’s physical limitations. While a secure and effective permanent filing system cannot be implemented until mission storage deficiencies are addressed by GAC, the program will implement an efficient temporary application file management and access system to respond to current deficiencies.

Management action plan items to address this recommendation will be completed by September 30, 2016.

OPI: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Due Date: September 30, 2016

Recommendation 5

The IPM should ensure that any quarterly inventory reporting discrepancies between the physical controlled documents on hand and the quantities reported in CKFITS are investigated and resolved in a timely manner for both the Dakar visa office and for all remote printing offices.

Management Response

Management accepts this recommendation.

The technical difficulties with CKFITS have been resolved, which now allows greater accuracy in inventory reporting. As of April 15, 2016, Dakar has re-entered all of its forms control information into the system and the inventory in the system now reflects the physical inventory on site. Dakar conducts daily forms reconciliation and will take steps to ensure that by September 30, 2016 all affiliated Forms Control Officers are instructed to systematically review CKFITS inventory to ensure no counterfoils are unaccounted in the system.

Management action plan items to address this recommendation will be completed by September 30, 2016.

OPI: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Due Date: September 30, 2016

Recommendation 6

The IPM should review and update cost recovery procedures in place at the Dakar visa office to ensure that refunds are provided to applicants in a timely manner.

Management Response

Management accepts this recommendation.

Dakar’s multiple banking agreements and non-reconcilable system creates an environment prone to excess fee payments. To ensure refunds are processed in a timely manner, Dakar will use IRCC Financial Policy Manual and IRCC/GAC’s Standard Financial Procedures for the Collection of Fees Abroad to create internal procedures that will reduce the current processing times. Although a number of the steps required to complete a refund are outside the control of the Dakar Immigration program, by September 1, 2016, the appropriate steps to initiate a refund for overpayments/refund requests will be taken within 3 months of receipt. Appropriate follow-up with GAC or IRCC will be taken within 5 working days of the receipt of address confirmation from clients.

Management action plan items to address this recommendation will be completed by September 1, 2016.

OPI: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
Due Date: September 1, 2016

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: