Language training options for newcomers to Canada

This video provides newcomers with an overview of the language training options available in Canada through the Settlement Program of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. For more information, and to register for the option that is best for you, visit Canada.ca/newcomerservices.

Language training options for newcomers to Canada

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Transcript: “Language training options for newcomers to Canada”

Video length: 5:48 minutes

Light, upbeat music plays.

A man in front of an empty office smiles at the camera.

Narrator: Bienvenue au Canada! Welcome to Canada!

A woman in a classroom smiles at the camera.

The shot changes to a second man, who is in a computer lab, smiling at the camera.

The shot changes again to a view of an airport in the evening.

Narrator: Canadians welcome newcomers in both of our official languages: English and French.

People pulling luggage walk in an area.

Text appears: “Some of the people who appear in this video are actors.”

Two Canadian flags on poles float in the wind.

Narrator: The Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Settlement Program can help you learn one or both of Canada’s official languages and help you to get settled in Canada, in many different ways.

The men and the woman from earlier are in a computer lab with other people.

The first man and another woman write on a piece of paper.

The shot changes to a professor interacting with her students in a classroom.

Narrator: For example, it can help you meet the language requirements for Canadian citizenship.

A man and a woman talk in a boardroom. The woman takes notes.

Narrator: Improving English or French language skills can also help you find a job, and allow you to connect to people in your community and feel more at home.

Newcomers talking to each other in a computer lab.

People write in a classroom.

Narrator: Everyone has different needs for language learning.

Blurred Canadian flags float in the background.

Text appears: “Types of language training”

Narrator: That’s why the Government of Canada provides different types of language training for adult permanent residents and protected persons

Along with smaller shots of people writing in a classroom, different text appears on the screen.

Narrator: formal language training

Text appears: “Formal language training”

Narrator: job-related language training, also called employment-related language training

Text appears: “Employment or job-related language training”

Narrator: and informal language learning opportunities, such as conversation circles.

Text appears: “Informal language learning”

Students talk to each other in a classroom.

Students and the professor interact in a classroom.

Narrator: This language training is provided at no cost to you, and is delivered by service provider organizations across the country. It’s important to get assessed, to make sure you choose the option that’s right for your language level and learning needs.

Students talk to one another in a classroom.

Along with 4 images of students working in a classroom, the following text appears on the screen: “Formal language training”.

Narrator: Through the Settlement Program, formal language training is delivered as Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (or LINC) in English, and Cours de langue pour les immigrants au Canada (or CLIC) in French.

Text appears: “Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC)”

Text appears: “Cours de langue pour les immigrants au Canada (CLIC)”

Students interact with the professor.

A newcomer writes on a piece of paper.

Narrator: It provides a unique combination of language training, with real-life settlement themes and meaningful tasks, such as visiting a doctor, talking to your child’s teacher, or preparing your résumé. This will help you learn the language skills you need to find work and settle in your community.

A woman types on her laptop.

Newcomers interact in a classroom.

Narrator: Classes are taught by qualified, professional instructors who provide feedback on your progress. English classes use the Canadian Language Benchmarks (or CLB), which provide a common framework for describing and measuring language skills of adult immigrants living and working in Canada.

Text appears: “Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB)”

A man and a woman talk in a boardroom. The woman takes notes.

A newcomer writes on a piece of paper.

The same woman from earlier types on her laptop.

Narrator: French classes use Les Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (or NCLC).

Text appears: “Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC)”

The professor talks to different students.

Narrator: Classes are designed to be flexible. You could be learning in a classroom setting, online, or with a mix of both. It could be near your work or in your community, or through online learning. It could be full-time or part-time, during the day, evenings or weekends.

Blurred Canadian flags float in the background.

Narrator: You can choose the course that works best from what is available at the service provider organizations near you.

Text appears: “Why take Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) or Cours de langue pour les immigrants au Canada (CLIC)”?

Narrator: LINC or CLIC courses may be right for you if:

Different images, including text, appear on the screen.

Narrator: You want to improve your understanding of life in Canada, and

Text appears: “Housing and neighbourhood: how to find a place to live”

Narrator: You want to improve your English or French language skills.

Text appears: “Canadian culture and history: learning about Indigenous Peoples, Canadian identity and multiculturalism”

Text appears: “Education: school system for children and adults”

Several people converse actively in a boardroom.

Narrator: Some courses are more focused on improving skills newcomers need to help find a job, or on building their language skills while they work, in addition to addressing settlement needs.

A newcomer sits at a desk, working on a computer.

Text appears: “Employment or job-related language training”

Narrator: Job-related language training will help you build communication skills and learn the terminology you will need at work. Examples include workplace communication skills, interview practice, and how to interact with people from different cultures and backgrounds in a professional environment.

An employer gives the newcomer employee a folder.

The same newcomer employee talks to a woman in a boardroom.

Narrator: In some cases, courses may also be specific to your occupation. If you need to improve your interview and job search skills, you can enroll in job-related language training.

Blurred Canadian flags float in the background.

Text appears: “Why take employment or job-related language training?”

Narrator: This type of language training may be right for you if:

Different images, including text, appear on the screen.

Text appears: “Focus on improving language skills to find a job”

Narrator: You need to focus on job-related language training to be employed

Text appears: “Develop specific language skills for work”

Narrator: or you already have a job, and need to improve your workplace communication skills.

Students interact with the professor in a classroom.

Narrator: Another type of language support is called informal language learning. By participating in informal conversation circles, you can improve your conversation skills and make new friends.

Text appears: “Informal language learning”

Students interact in a computer lab.

Narrator: This allows you to learn and practise your language skills in an informal setting, instead of structured lessons in a classroom. There are no formal feedback or assessment requirements.

Through the Settlement Program, you will work with a volunteer, facilitator or moderator, to find the right informal language learning for you.

Images and text appear on the screen. The text disappears, then new text appears.

Text appears: “These may include: conversation circles, community events, drop-in workshops, discussion groups or group study, one-on-one learning, self-study.”

Narrator: These may include conversation circles, community events, drop-in workshops, discussion groups or group study, one-on-one learning, or self-study.

Students interact in a computer lab.

Narrator: At some of these sessions, you can meet other newcomers and learn from their experience in Canada, while you learn useful words and phrases that will help you to get settled in your community.

Two women walk along a downtown street.

The shot changes to the blurred Canadian flags floating in the background.

Narrator: Informal language learning may be right for you if:

Text appears: “Why take informal language learning?”

Different images, including text, appear on the screen.

Text appears: “Learn outside a formal classroom”

Narrator: You prefer to learn outside a formal classroom,

Text appears: “Practise and improve listening and speaking skills”

Narrator: want to learn through cultural experiences, creative activities, social interaction, and personal interests or hobbies. Or, you want to improve your listening and speaking skills.

The professor interacts with students in a classroom.

The music’s tempo increases.

Narrator: There are a wide variety of language training types to suit your needs as a newcomer to Canada.

A woman talks to a newcomer in a boardroom.

The shot changes to people talking in a boardroom.

Narrator: Get started as soon as possible with a language assessment at a local service provider organization, so that you can register for the option that is best for you.

The woman who was in the classroom at the start of the video speaks to the camera.

Woman: Welcome!

The man who was in the computer lab at the start of the video speaks to the camera.

Second man: Bienvenue!

The man who was in front of the empty office at the start of the video speaks to the camera.

First man: Welcome to Canada!

The screen fades to white.

A cursor flies across the screen, and the following text appears: “To find a service provider near you, visit: Canada.ca/newcomerservices”.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada corporate signature appears, along with the copyright message: “Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, 2019.”

The Canada wordmark appears on a white background.

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