What to do if you’re inadmissible

If you have a valid reason to travel to Canada

If you’re otherwise inadmissible but have a reason to travel to Canada that is justified in the circumstances, you may be issued a temporary resident permit.

To be eligible for a temporary resident permit, your need to enter or stay in Canada must outweigh the health or safety risks to Canadian society, as determined by an immigration or a border services officer. Even if the reason you’re inadmissible seems minor, you must demonstrate that your visit is justified.

There is no guarantee that you’ll be issued a temporary resident permit.

How to apply for a temporary resident permit

If you’re eTA-required

If you’re a citizen of an eTA-required country, your application for an eTA was refused, you may be issued a temporary resident permit. This depends on the nature and circumstances of the inadmissibility and the why you need to travel to Canada.

The visa office responsible for your country or region may have its own application form for temporary resident permits. You should check the visa office to find out exactly how to apply.

If you’re visa-required

You must apply for a visitor visa and include supporting documents to explain why you’re inadmissible and why it may be justified for you to enter Canada.

You may have to attend an interview so that an officer can assess your application.

How long you can stay in Canada

A temporary resident permit is usually issued for the length of your visit to Canada—for example, 1 week to attend a conference. You must leave Canada by the expiry date of the permit, or get a new permit before your current one expires.

This permit may be cancelled by an officer at any time.

The permit is no longer valid once you leave Canada, unless you have specifically been authorized to leave and re-enter.

Fees

You must pay a fee (CAN$200) to cover the cost of processing your application for a temporary resident permit. The fee will not be refunded if the permit is refused.

If you’ve committed or been convicted of a crime

You have a few options to overcome your criminal inadmissibility.

Penalties for driving while impaired

If you drive while impaired by alcohol or drugs, including cannabis, you may be inadmissible for serious criminality. This means you won’t be able to enter or stay in Canada unless we issue you a temporary resident permit.

Find out more about the new penalties.

Features

Find out if you are eligible

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