2013-2014 Departmental Performance Report

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Parole Board of Canada

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness


Table of Contents


Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I - (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II - (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III - (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations which is the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013−14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR's format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization's website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

Chairperson's Message

I am pleased to present the Parole Board of Canada's (PBC) Departmental Performance Report (DPR) for 2013-14.

As part of the criminal justice system, the PBC makes independent, quality conditional release and record suspension decisions and clemency recommendations. It contributes to the protection of society by facilitating, as appropriate, the safe reintegration of offenders into the community. This report demonstrates the Board's continuing commitment to delivering on its established plans and priorities while also responding and adapting to a changing environment.

In 2013-14, the Board successfully delivered on its mandate while at the same time supporting the implementation of new legislation and regulations. The Board focused its efforts on the following:

  • Effectively fulfilling its legislative responsibilities;
  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remained a flexible organization;
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management;
  • Effectively providing services to victims and the public; and
  • Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders.

The Board also continued to manage the workload and cost implications of recent legislative and regulatory amendments. In addition, the Board completed a framework review of its policies and procedures; looked at the effective use of technology; and completed a Renewal Initiative to support the Board in becoming a more effective and efficient organization while respecting its mandate and mission.

In terms of performance results, the Board completed almost 19,600 conditional release reviews (federal and provincial offenders). Multi-year data continued to demonstrate that parole contributes to public safety as over 98% of all releases did not result in a new offence and over 99% did not result in a new violent offence while on parole. The Board also had more than 22,300 contacts with victims, over 4,000 observers at its hearings, and released more than 7,000 decisions through its decision registry.

These impressive accomplishments serve to showcase the dedication and commitment of our Board members and public service employees and reflect the Board's efforts to position itself to respond to a changing environment as it strives to continue to foster safe and secure communities for all Canadians.

I am extremely pleased with the degree of professionalism, efficiency and effectiveness achieved by the Board in the fulfillment of its mandate this past year.

_________________________________
Harvey Cenaiko
Chairperson, Parole Board of Canada

Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Harvey Cenaiko, Chairperson

Ministerial portfolio: Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling Instruments: The legal authority under which the Parole Board of Canada (the PBC or “the Board”) operates includes the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA) and its Regulations, the Criminal Records Act (CRA) and its Regulations, the Criminal Code, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and other legislation.

Year of Incorporation: 1959

Other: The PBC constantly strives to contribute to the Government of Canada's outcome of a safe and secure Canada. The Board contributes to this outcome by making quality conditional release and record suspension decisions and clemency recommendations that result in the safe reintegration of offenders in the community.

The PBC is headed by a Chairperson who reports to Parliament through the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. The Minister, however, does not have statutory authority to give direction to the Chairperson or other members of the PBC in the exercise of their decision-making powers. This structure helps to ensure the impartiality and integrity of the Board's decision-making process.

In making conditional release and record suspension decisions, as well as clemency recommendations, the Board's primary objective is the long-term protection of society. In rendering its decisions, the Board is autonomous and independent. However, its decisions are open and transparent to the public by virtue of its legislation and policies.

The protection of society is the paramount consideration for all decisions taken by the Board. Decisions are limited to only what is necessary and proportionate to the purpose of conditional release.

Outcomes of the PBC's work can be found in its annual Performance Monitoring Report (PMR). The PMR provides performance and statistical information for the past five years for the PBC's two legislative based programs - conditional release, and clemency and record suspensions.

The Board carries out its responsibilities through a national office in Ottawa, as well as six offices in five regions across the country (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies, and Pacific).

PBC Locations

Pacific Regional Office- Abbotsford, British Columbia
Prairies Regional Office- Edmonton, Alberta and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Ontario/Nunavut Regional Office- Kingston, Ontario
National Office- Ottawa, Ontario
Québec Regional Office- Montreal, Québec
Atlantic Regional Office- Moncton, New Brunswick

The Board's regional offices deliver the conditional release program. Conditional release decisions are made by Board members (BMs), who are supported in their decision-making by public service staff. Staff schedule hearings, provide information for decision-making, ensure that information for decision-making is shared with offenders, and communicate conditional release decisions to offenders, Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) representatives and others as required. Regional staff also provide information to victims, make arrangements for observers at hearings, and manage requests for access to the Board's decision registry. In addition, BMs in the Appeals Division at the national office review conditional release decisions upon receipt of an application for appeal to determine if the law and processes were respected.

While the data collection, investigation and assessment work for record suspensions and clemency are conducted at the national office, BMs from all five regions make decisions related to record suspensions and clemency recommendations. Public service employees at the national office deliver the record suspension and clemency program, develop national policies and procedures related to all program areas, coordinate BM appointments and training, deliver a program of public information, and respond to ATIP requests. Other work performed at the national office includes strategic and operational planning, resource management, program monitoring, case reviews and investigations, and an array of internal services.

Consistent with the provisions of the Acts that govern the PBC, BMs are independent in their decision-making responsibilities, and free from outside interference of any kind. As independent decision-makers, BMs are bound by legislation, guided by policy, and are responsible for:

  • Reviewing all information for consideration in conditional release, record suspension and clemency cases;
  • Conducting an in-depth analysis of each case, and requesting additional information, as necessary, to support quality decision-making;
  • Assessing the risk and other factors related to cases, voting independently on the disposition of each case, and providing sound, well-documented, written reasons for decisions; and
  • Ensuring that hearings are conducted in accordance with the duty to act fairly, with respect for all procedural safeguards.

The Chairperson of the PBC is a full-time member of the Board and its Chief Executive Officer. The Chairperson directs the PBC's program delivery in keeping with the Government of Canada's overall plans and priorities. The Chairperson is accountable for the effectiveness and efficiency of the PBC's policies and operations and is assisted in these responsibilities by the Executive Vice-Chairperson, the Vice-Chairperson of the Appeals Division, and the Board's five regional Vice-Chairpersons. The Executive Director General (EDG) is the Board's senior staff member and Chief Operating Officer. The EDG, in support of the Chairperson, provides leadership for strategic and operational planning, resource management, program monitoring and administration, as well as the operation of the national office and the regions.

Organizational Context

Raison d'être and Responsibilities

The PBC is an agency within the Public Safety Portfolio.

The Board is an independent administrative tribunal that has exclusive jurisdiction and absolute discretion under the CCRA to grant, cancel, terminate or revoke day parole and full parole. The PBC may also order (on referral by the CSC) that certain offenders be held in custody until the end of their sentence. This is called detention during a period of statutory release. Further, the Board has the authority to terminate or revoke a period of statutory release. In addition, the Board makes conditional release decisions for federal offenders, those serving sentences of two years or more, and for offenders serving sentences of less than two years in provinces and territories that do not have their own parole boards. Only the provinces of Ontario and Quebec currently have their own parole boards, which make parole decisions for provincial offenders.

The Board has legislated responsibilities related to openness and accountability, which are the provision of information to victims of crime, observers at hearings; access to the PBC's decision registry and delivery of a program of public information.

The Board has exclusive jurisdiction and absolute discretion to order, refuse to order or revoke a record suspension under the CRA. In addition, the PBC is authorized to investigate Royal Prerogative of Mercy (RPM) requests under Section 110 of the CCRA. The Board also provides recommendations on clemency to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

Our Mission

The Parole Board of Canada, as part of the criminal justice system, makes independent, quality conditional release and record suspension decisions and clemency recommendations. The Board contributes to the protection of society by facilitating, as appropriate, the timely reintegration of offenders as law-abiding citizens.

As part of the criminal justice system, the Board contributes to the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society. The word "contributes" is used in the Board's Mission Statement to reflect the fact that it does not work in isolation in the pursuit of this goal.

The Board works with key Portfolio colleagues, provincial parole boards, criminal justice partners, and many other organizations and individuals in the community.

The Mission of the PBC establishes four core values:

  • Contributing to the attainment of a just, peaceful and safe society;
  • Respect for the inherent potential and dignity of all individuals and the equal rights of all members of society;
  • Belief that the contribution of qualified and motivated BMs and staff is essential to promoting the achievement of the Board's Mission; and
  • Commitment to openness, integrity and accountability in the execution of our mandate.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

The PBC's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) reflect the key aspects of its legislated responsibilities for conditional release, record suspensions and clemency, and represent the areas of accountability and performance in which the public and Parliamentarians most frequently express interest. In this context, the Board's strategic outcome is the cornerstone of its public accountability. The PAA includes a single outcome and four programs.

The following illustrates the PBC's complete framework of programs, which contribute to the PBC's single strategic outcome:

Strategic Outcome:

Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Program: 1.1 Conditional Release Decisions;
Program: 1.2 Conditional Release Openness and Accountability;
Program: 1.3 Record Suspension Decisions/Clemency Recommendations; and
Program: 1.4 Internal Services.

Organizational Priorities

The following tables identify the PBC's key organizational priorities for 2013-14, links them to the Board's strategic outcome and programs, and describes the progress made in meeting these priorities.

Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program(s)
Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities Ongoing Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Programs:
  • Conditional release decisions
  • Conditional release openness and accountability; and
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations.
Summary of Progress
In 2013-14, the Board strived to effectively fulfill its legislative responsibilities by achieving the planned activities described below.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Ensure national consistency in decision-making processes. Ongoing work on a number of activities include:
    • Continue updating and providing regular training to Board members (BMs), rooted in evidence-based practices, pertinent to BM activities, and consistent with adult learning principles.
  • Developed and implemented a consolidated, collaborative and consistent program that guided the training of all BMs and ensured that specific needs were met.
  • Continued to identify continuous learning opportunities through consultations, BM evaluations and environmental scans.
  • Coordinated and provided support for the delivery of national training modules in the regions.
  • Assessed the development of learning activities to ensure alignment with BM competencies.
    • Enhance selection and professional standard processes
  • Began to identify ways to streamline and enhance the BM reappointment process. As well, began to review the BM qualification process to ensure the Board is identifying and qualifying skilled and competent candidates for appointment consideration.
  • Started to develop a professional standards guide which will address items such as, authorities, competencies, position descriptions, professional and ethical conduct, training, evaluations, reappointment processes and complaint resolution measures.
  • Completed position descriptions, competency profiles, evaluation processes for BMs and Vice-Chairpersons, training framework, quality assurance framework, and the complaint process.
    • Conduct case reviews and compliance reviews.
  • Compliance reviews of over 300 decisions are underway. Review results will be shared with BMs and staff, and action plans to improve decision-making processes will be developed.
    • Improve program monitoring techniques.
  • Given the Renewal Initiative that is currently underway, the plans for implementing a program monitoring structure have been put on hold.
    • Conduct research on developments in relevant fields such as risk assessment, conditional release, and decision-making processes.
  • Undertook research projects on defining best practices in corrections, determining the effect of the abolition of Accelerated Parole Review (APR) on the Board's workload, and reviewing of the outcome of long-term supervision periods.
    • Develop and refine operational practices.
  • Developed a number of national procedures to support national consistency and training activities, better support staff in their functions, and provide a means to retain corporate memory.
  • Deployed national procedures on the use of video conferencing at hearings and developed procedures on the scheduling of reviews and case assignments, and managing audio recordings of hearings.
  • Refine conditional release and record suspension policies to reflect legislative and regulatory requirements.
  • Refined a number of policies and issued policy circulars on subjects such as information from victims, notification to the offenders about observers at hearings and residency and day parole leave privileges.
  • Re-develop the Policy and Procedures Framework.
  • Started a comprehensive review of the Board's Policy Manual which includes developing a number of national procedures in key areas to support BMs and staff. The review will be completed in the fall of 2014.
  • Refine policies as they pertain to victims.
  • Revised policies and procedures pertaining to victims to clarify who can read a statement at a hearing.
  • In conjunction with CSC, developed a joint registration application for victims and registration letter that was intended to streamline services for victims between the two organizations.
  • Modernize the Board's Offender Management System (OMS).
  • By the end of 2013-14 the multi-year project was in the final stages, and the system is expected to be released later in 2014-15.
  • Continue efforts to achieve record suspension efficiencies through policy refinement, process streamlining, and effective use of technology.
  • Modified record suspension operations to reduce the return rate of applications by at least 10%.
  • Streamlined administrative processes with the implementation of credit card payments.
  • Completed technical amendments to policy to correct terminology associated with record suspensions.
  • Continuously improve and monitor service standards/efficiency in program delivery for record suspension application processing and notification.
  • Systems remain in place to regularly monitor adherence to service standards.
  • Streamline the process for the collection and presentation of data and the investigative process for clemency requests. In addition, modify the Clemency application and consent form to better reflect current requirements.
  • Completed the simplification of investigations, subject interviews, and application forms to better reflect current requirements. Also amended content with plain language to facilitate understanding of the process.
  • Enhance the Pardon and Record Suspension System (PARSS).
  • Completed a number of releases for the system which improved tracking and monitoring of operations.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program(s)
Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization Ongoing Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Programs:
  • Conditional release decisions;
  • Conditional release openness and accountability;
  • Record suspensions decisions/Clemency recommendations; and
  • Internal Services.
Summary of Progress
In 2013-14, the Board worked to strengthen its governance, decision-making practices and supports by achieving the planned activities described below.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Assess current practices, explore innovative and more efficient ways of achieving the PBC's core mandate and mission as it relates to its decision-making models and the operational structures required to support them.
  • The Renewal Initiative Report was approved in December 2013. The report identified 116 recommendations to improve the Board's efficiency and effectiveness. A Renewal Implementation Steering Committee was established and by the end of 2013-14, multiple projects were being led concurrently to improve the Board's ability to deliver on its core mandate and mission.
  • Assess implications of government proposals for reform of corrections and criminal justice, as it pertains to Board policy and procedures, anticipated workload pressures, resource needs, and training requirements for BMs and staff.
  • Continued to pursue efforts to remain abreast of any legislative changes in order to identify any potential direct or indirect impact on BM training needs and/or requirements. As possible shifts emerged, the Board continued initiating discussions with appropriate colleagues and counterparts to further explore immediate and/or foreseeable training needs. When required, the PBC adapted, enhanced or developed training materials (i.e., modules, reference tools) for BMs.
  • A number of legislative amendments were tabled in 2013-14 involving proposed reforms to the CCRA including C-12 Drug Free Prisons Act, C-32 Victims Bill of Rights Act and C-489 An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the CCRA (Restrictions on Offenders.
  • Realized efficiencies with the use of videoconferencing for hearings (e.g., Ontario and Prairies regions respectively conducted 38% and 52% of hearings by videoconference) and work related to the implementation of the e-File project to transition the Board to a fully electronic system. In addition, continued work towards implementation of the Integrated Decisions System (IDS).
  • Conduct initiatives to enhance, communicate and inculcate corporate strategy management practices to better inform decision-makers at all levels of the Board.
  • Updated reporting requirements and timelines necessary for the development of consolidated reporting, and communicated them to senior management to assist in resource allocation decisions.
  • Maintained and updated content on the Board's Planning and Management intranet page (i.e., PBC's Annual Corporate Planning Calendar, Integrated Planning and Reporting process, Corporate Risk information, etc.).
  • Provided senior managers with business models for the 2014-15 Integrated Operational Planning (IOP) process as a tool to further enhance standardization and transparency in the Board's planning and reporting capabilities.
  • Integrate corporate risk management into governance structures and decision-making processes.
  • PBC's 2013-14 Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) was approved. Information contained within the profile was used to help guide senior managers while developing their operational plans for 2014-15.
  • Implement the Management Action Plan prepared in response to the Core Control Audit conducted in 2012-13 by the Office of the Comptroller General to improve internal management procedures.
  • Completed and implemented the Management Action Plan related to the 2012-13 Core Control Audit.
  • Enhance corporate capacity in areas such as planning, security and information management.
  • Enhanced the IOP process by adopting a zero-based approach, utilizing business models and incorporating CRP information.
  • Introduced electronic offender files by developing scanning procedures to digitize documents; implementing a standardized naming convention; and developing a method for BMs to remotely access electronic files and review them on a digital platform.
  • Retrieved legacy pardon granted files from private storage facilities for digitization into the PARSS, which reduced the long-term storage costs for hard copy files.
  • Following closure of Library and Archives Canada's regional service centres, PBC transferred its remaining holdings from three regional offices to private storage facilities. Complete withdrawal expected by March 2015.
  • Enhanced electronic document and file management capability by upgrading versions of Electronic Records and Document Management System (EDRMS).
Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program(s)
Ensuring fair and transparent people management Ongoing Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Programs: 
  • Conditional release decisions;
  • Conditional release openness and accountability;
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations; and
  • Internal Services.
Summary of Progress
In 2013-14, the Board worked to ensure fair and transparent people management by achieving the planned activities described below.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Encourage BMs and staff input with regard to possible future changes and regularly communicate updates within the Board.
  • Held extensive consultations with staff to find ways to modernize the Board's operations. Both members of the executive team and staff were regularly updated on progress made.
  • Work to ensure a sufficient number of qualified individuals are identified for consideration as BM appointees.
  • Started implementing processes to identify and recruit skilled persons to be considered as BMs. The Board also continued to work with the Minister's Office and Privy Council Office to identify and monitor vacancies, as well as to identify suitable candidates.
  • Ongoing work on a number of activities towards improved knowledge management, training/learning and development, systems and tools, and to address organizational needs in a more timely and effective manner. These include:
    • Continue in-depth orientation training for new BMs to provide them with information and resources required to be prepared to assess risk and make quality conditional release decisions.
  • Orientation training for new BMs was offered at regular intervals and incorporated national office elements as well as regional training. Efforts to modernize core training were also ongoing.
    • Provide ongoing training to existing BMs to ensure that they are provided with current and relevant information and resources to continuously improve their decision-making skills.
  • Implemented a revised BM training program which incorporated continuous training and required partnerships to deliver training modules. This approach allowed for consistency while ensuring specific needs of the regional BMs were met. When appropriate, a needs analysis was conducted to establish the training focus.
  • Enhance human resource capacity in areas such as talent management and values and ethics.
  • Resources were assigned to the values and ethics file to update the intranet website and share information with employees.
  • Developed learning and development program frameworks and implemented Performance Management Program framework.
  • Ensure the recruitment, development and retention of a skilled workforce within the PBC.
  • Updated the Integrated Human Resources Plan which provided workforce information and guidance to managers. In addition, managers conducted an annual Human Resources planning exercise with the support of staffing advisors.
  • Began work to standardize, harmonize and document processes in response to the Renewal Initiative and the Human Resources Committee's coordinated effort to ensure succession planning for key positions identified as being at risk.
  • Started to update job descriptions throughout the PBC in response to both the Renewal Initiative and the Common Human Resources Business Process. It is expected that all the required competencies will be up-to-date and learning strategies and material will be developed to fill identified gaps.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program(s)
Effectively providing services to victims and the public Ongoing Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Programs:
  • Conditional release openness and accountability
Summary of Progress
In 2013-14, the Board strived to effectively provide services to victims and the public by achieving the planned activities described below.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Provide annual national specialized training for frontline staff who work with victims.
  • In February of 2014, the Board conducted national training for Regional Communications Officers working directly with victims to help enhance their skills and competencies and ensure effective service delivery to victims.
  • Foster on-going relationships with the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime, victims' non-governmental organizations and other governmental departments and agencies working with victims.
  • Met regularly with the Ombudsman to discuss areas of common interest and victims issues.
  • Maintain quality information services to victims and the public.
  • Worked with CSC to revise registration application form to further streamline and improve services to victims.
  • Collaborated with different criminal justice partners, organized information sessions in academic institutions, and responded timely and accurately to media attention.
  • Continue to work in partnership with CSC to enhance PBC's effectiveness in areas of shared responsibilities regarding the provision of information to victims.
  • Engaged with CSC to identify best practices, resolve issues, and explore opportunities for greater efficiencies and effectiveness. This included streamlining services to victims, such as victim registrations and reactivations.
  • Co-lead with CSC a National Victims Steering Committee composed of senior executives from both organizations. In addition, the two organizations co-lead a number of Regional Victims Advisory Committees, which enhanced cooperation and engagement related to our legislated roles and responsibilities in the area of victims.
  • Update public information products for victims on the conditional release decision-making process and conduct outreach.
  • Updated fact sheets addressed to victims to reflect amendments to legislation and policies.
  • Conducted continuous outreach efforts at the regional and national levels.
  • Participated in conferences and symposiums to keep victims informed and raise awareness.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program(s)
Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders Ongoing Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Programs:
  • Conditional release decisions
  • Conditional release openness and accountability; and
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations
Summary of Progress
In 2013-14, the Board worked to efficiently manage partnerships with stakeholders by achieving the planned activities described below.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Efficiently manage working relationships with criminal justice partners at the national level.
  • Held regular Interlinkages meetings with CSC to strengthen the partnerships between the two organizations.
  • Held regular meetings with Treasury Board Secretariat and Public Safety to address any legislative proposals or other initiatives.
  • Attended various Federal/Provincial/Territorial committees in the area of mental health, women offenders, victims, Aboriginal victims, multiculturalism.
  • Efficiently manage partnerships at the regional level (e.g., regional Interlinkages meetings with CSC, Victim Service Units, Victims Advisory Committees, and provincial/territorial/municipal government departments, non-governmental organizations, etc.).
  • Attended regional Interlinkages and Victim Advisory Committee meetings to address victim issues.
  • Continue to support appropriate and lawful information-sharing with Public Safety Portfolio organizations and central agencies.
  • Through involvement in senior level meetings and steering committees, the Board consulted with CSC regarding various operational and/or policy issues in common to enhance information sharing activities and clarify legislated responsibilities.
  • Meet with the Aboriginal Circle to examine ways to improve access to services for Aboriginal offenders and victims.
  • Held an Aboriginal Circle meeting in May 2013 which made a number of recommendations in the areas of policy, operational procedures, and training for PBC's consideration.
  • Continue to reach out to provincial, territorial and international criminal justice partners, victims, and community partners.
  • Continued to collaborate with Department of Justice, Regional Criminal Justice Joint Committee, Public Safety, and various police organizations across the country.
  • Contributed to outreach activities intended for victims, advocacy groups, communities and a number of criminal justice partners.
  • Work with criminal justice partners in PBC's assessment of record suspension applications.
  • Maintained consistent discussions with law enforcement, courts and other government departments to obtain credible and verifiable information in support of sound decision-making.
  • Work with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in assisting record suspension applicants.
  • Used strong communications tools to inform and support NGOs in assisting applicants.

Risk Analysis

Risk[1] Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Due to numerous priorities there is a risk that the Board will not be able to comply with government-wide policies and requirements. Mitigate
  • The OPIs/OCIs27 will report on non-compliance risks to Senior Management Committee.
  • Develop and implement formalized monitoring function for corporate services.
Conditional release decisions;
Conditional release openness and accountability;
Record suspensions decisions/clemency recommendations; and
Internal services

In 2013-14, the Board continued to examine program spending and re-investment opportunities, identified efficiency measures, and made reallocations against identified priorities. The PBC mitigated and managed the impact of pressures, efficiency measures, and legislative changes in order to achieve the best results for Canadians.

The Board rigorously pursued innovation and improvements to meet workload pressures. Public safety remains the Board's primary consideration in all aspects of decision-making policy, training, and operations.

The Board delivers program areas grounded in legislation: conditional release, record suspensions, and clemency investigations. The PBC also manages a range of internal services that provides critical support for program delivery. The conditional release program was the largest area and accounted for 84% of annual program expenditures (including conditional release, and openness and accountability). 

Conditional Release

The PBC's workloads are shaped by many factors, some of which are beyond its control. Legislation governing the Board (i.e., the CCRA) is prescriptive, specifying when and how the Board conducts its business (e.g., when a review is required by law; and how the review is conducted). In addition, workloads are driven by the actions of offenders, victims and the community. In concrete terms, this means that the PBC must deal with high workload volumes, involving issues critical to public safety, under tight timeframes, amid intense public scrutiny. In 2013-14, the PBC completed almost 19,600 conditional release reviews for federal and provincial/territorial offenders.

The Board made efforts to manage the workload and cost implications of recent legislative and regulatory amendments, such as sharing information with victims of crime; providing information and assistance to those who wish to observe PBC hearings or gain access to the Board's registry of decisions.

Workloads[aa] in the Conditional Release Openness and Accountability program have grown exponentially since the introduction of the CCRA in 1992. In 2013-14 for example, the Board had more than 22,300 contacts with victims, over 4,000 observers at hearings, and released more than 7,000 decisions from the decision registry. As with conditional release decision-making, the need for quality program delivery in this area is critical, given its implications for public confidence in corrections and conditional release. Ongoing public scrutiny and media interest in this area make program effectiveness crucial.

The openness and accountability provisions of the CCRA also continued to present important challenges for the Board with respect to:

  • Sharing information with victims of crime;
  • Providing information and assistance to those who wish to observe PBC hearings or gain access to the Board's registry of decisions; and
  • Delivering a program of public information.

Record Suspensions and Clemency

The PBC's record suspension workload is also shaped by factors beyond its control. Legislation governing the Board's work (i.e., the CRA) is prescriptive, specifying precisely how the Board conducts its business (e.g., admissibility and measuring merit). In addition, workloads are also driven by fluctuating volumes of requests for record suspensions. In concrete terms, this means that the PBC must deal with high workload volumes, involving issues critical to public safety, under legislatively established timeframes (i.e., User Fees Act (UFA), amid intense public scrutiny. In 2013-14, the PBC received a total of 14,254 record suspension applications, accepted 9,533 for processing, and rendered 3,929 decisions.

The Board managed an increase in the user fee collected for record suspensions. Since February 2012, applicants for a record suspension must pay a processing fee of $631. Consequently, the Board must adhere to established service standards prescribed by requirements of the UFA.

Since 2010, the Clemency Unit has seen constant growth in clemency requests. In order to minimize the impact of this increase, human resource strategies and streamlined processes have been adopted and better investigation strategies are being used. The Board managed over 105 active clemency requests in 2013-14.

Strategic Resource Management

The PBC is committed to ensuring a strong, diverse and dynamic workforce that excels in delivering the Board's mandate to Canadians, today and in the years to come. In 2013-14, the Board continued to address the need for strategic management of human, financial, and information and technology resources to support quality program delivery.

A key challenge for the Board is to stabilize its workforce and strengthen succession planning in relation to both its public service staff and its BMs.
It is necessary for the Board to maintain sufficient numbers of BMs, who are Governor-in-Council term appointments. The CCRA specifies that the Board will comprise no more than 60 full-time BMs, and provides for the appointment of part-time members to help manage fluctuating conditional release decision-making workloads. In 2013-14, the Board continued to ensure that it identified sufficient numbers of qualified candidates for consideration for selection as BMs. The Board also provided training and mentoring to ensure that BMs had the knowledge they needed to adhere to legislation and regulations, and assess risk in their decision-making.

Departures of experienced public service staff have a significant impact as they erode corporate memory and diminish critical knowledge of law, policy and training. The effect of this is especially acute in a small organization. In 2013-14, Board staff provided the continuity of knowledge and information essential for support and delivery of programs as corporate information retention strategy. As such, the Board developed and continued to update its Human Resources Plan for dealing with staff turnover.

Timely access to relevant information provides the foundation for quality conditional release, record suspension decision-making and clemency recommendations and ultimately for the Board's continuing contribution to public safety. In addition, the Board must deal with legislated responsibilities for sharing appropriate information with victims of crime, offenders, other criminal justice partners, and the public. In this environment, strategic information management was crucial, requiring the Board to have the automated systems necessary to support effective collection, storage and sharing of information. Additionally, the Board had to put in place the policies and procedures necessary to ensure effective information management. Progress in these areas required the assistance of CSC, the Board's information technology service provider.

For the foreseeable future, the Board will face complex and growing workload pressures in areas of legislated responsibility. For this reason, strong strategic management of financial resources is essential in order to closely monitor impacts and identify opportunities to reallocate and re-invest in the Board's programs in line with changing priorities.

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013-14 Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (actual minus planned)
48,679,516 52,026,894 52,497,599 50,410,477 (1,617,417)
Human Resources (full-time equivalent - FTEs)
2013-14 Planned 2013-14 Actual 2013-14 Difference
(actual minus planned)
497 505 8

 

For an explanation of the variances for the total Department spending, please refer to the Expenditure Profile subsection of this report.

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14 Main Estimates 2013-14 Planned Spending 2014-15 Planned Spending 2015-16 Planned Spending 2013-14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013-14 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012-13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2011-12 Actual Spending (authorities used)
Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities
Conditional Release Decisions 36,489,275 38,901,684 37,848,292 34,299,917 39,294,666 36,601,459 35,653,808 38,243,876
Conditional Release Openness and Accountability 6,504,436 7,019,565 5,961,122 6,836,453 7,012,752 5,552,600 5,562,361 7,087,170
Record Suspensions Decisions/ Clemency Recommendations 558,331 617,489 144,948 568,167 680,693 2,846,012 274,473 1,153,988
Strategic Outcome Subtotal 43,552,042 46,538,738 43,954,362 41,704,537 46,988,111 45,000,071 41,490,642 46,485,034
Internal Services Subtotal 5,127,474 5,488,156 5,599,396 5,238,219 5,509,488 5,509,488 5,021,148 5,703,398
Total 48,679,516 52,026,894 49,553,758 46,942,756 52,497,599 50,410,477 46,511,790 52,188,432
  • Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) figures are as reported in the 2013-14 Main Estimates.
  • Planned Spending figures are as reported in the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities. Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Board's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.
  • Total Authorities reflect 2013-14 Main Estimates plus a net total increase of $3.8 million comprised of Supplementary Estimates and allotment transfers received during the 2013-14 fiscal year, as well as adjustments to statutory amounts to equal actual spending, as reported in the 2013-14 Public Accounts.
  • Actual Spending figures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the 2013-14 fiscal year, as reported in the 2013-14 Public Accounts.
Alignment of 2013-14 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14 Actual Spending
Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities Conditional Release Decisions Social Affairs Safe and secure Canada 36,601,459
Conditional Release Openness and Accountability Social Affairs Safe and secure Canada 5,552,600
Record Suspension Decisions/Clemency Recommendations Social Affairs Safe and secure Canada 2,846,012
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area  (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Social Affairs 46,538,738 45,000,071

Departmental Spending Trend

In 2013-14, the Board's total authorities, consisting of Main Estimates, subsequent to Supplementary Estimates funding, were $52.5M. This consisted of $45.8M of operating resources and $6.7M for the Employee Benefit Plan (EBP). Actual expenditures were $50.4M and resulted in a reported Public Accounts lapse of $2.1M. This lapse is equal to the PBC's 5% maximum carry forward and can be carried forward in total to 2014-15. The Board applied its resources to the four following program areas: Conditional Release Decisions, Conditional Release Openness and Accountability, Record Suspension Decisions/Clemency Recommendations and Internal Services.

Spending Trends

($ thousands)

2010-11 Actual Spending:  45,995 (permanent funding)
2011-12 Actual Spending:  48,054 (permanent funding), 4,134 (temporary funding), 53,188 total
2012-13 Actual Spending: 46,512 (permanent funding)
2013-14 Actual Spending: 49,111 (permanent funding), 1,299 (temporary funding), 50,410 total
2014-15 Planned Spending: 48,167 (permanent funding), 1,387 (temporary funding), 49,554 total
2015-16 Planned Spending: 46,943 (permanent funding)
2016-17 Planned Spending: 46,943 (permanent funding)

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Parole Board of Canada's organizational Vote and statutory expenditures, please consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

Section II - Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

The PBC has a single strategic outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

The following table reports on the indicators and targets from the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) to provide information on whether progress on the Board's strategic outcome was achieved as planned.

Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The percentage of parole releases that did not result in a new conviction. 90% of parole releases are completed successfully[4]. Over 98%
The percentage of record suspension recipients whose record suspensions have not ceased to exist or who have not had their record suspensions revoked for a new offence. 95% of record suspensions remain in force 99%

Programs

PBC programs and priorities are designed to support continuous progress in achieving the strategic outcome. To support this outcome, the PBC has four programs:

  • Conditional release decisions;
  • Conditional release openness and accountability;
  • Record suspensions decisions/clemency recommendations; and
  • Internal services.

The following section describes the PBC's programs and identifies the expected results, performance indicators and targets for each of them. This section also explains how the PBC met the expected results and presents the financial and non-financial resources that were dedicated to each program.

Program 1.1: Conditional Release Decisions

Program Description: Conditional release is based on the principle that community safety is enhanced by gradual release to the community where appropriate. The quality of decisions on the risk of re-offending, in conjunction with effective programs and treatment, and effective community supervision all contribute to the process. This program supports public safety by providing quality decisions on the timing and conditions of release of offenders into the community. Through this program, PBC employees provide timely and accurate information for BM decision-making, and develop effective training and policies that are essential tools for quality risk assessment and decision-making. Effectiveness is assessed by monitoring the outcomes of release on parole.

This program is directly supported by the following priorities identified for 2013-14:

  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities;
  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization; and
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
2013-14 Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2013-14 Difference
actual minus planned)
36,489,275 38,901,684 39,294,666 36,601,459 (2,300,225)

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14 Planned 2013-14 Actual 2013-14 Difference
(actual minus planned
333 325 (8)
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets[5] Actual Results
Conditional release decisions contribute to public safety. The percentage of offenders on parole that do not incur a new violent offence prior to the end of the supervision period. ≥98% Over 99% of releases on parole did not result in a conviction for a new violent offence prior to warrant expiry.
The percentage of offenders who completed their sentence on full parole and who are not re-admitted after release because of a new violent conviction (five years post-warrant expiry). ≥98% Over 99% of offenders who completed their sentences on full parole within the last five years have not re-offended and returned to a federal penitentiary because of a new violent offence.
The percentage of decisions that are not modified by the Appeal Division. ≥95% 82% confirmation rate for conditional release decisions.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Information on performance demonstrates that the Board achieved the priorities and commitments identified in its 2013-14 RPP. In 2013-14, the Board completed almost 19,600 conditional release reviews for federal and provincial offenders.

Multi-year data continues to confirm that parole contributes to public safety. Over 99% of releases on parole did not result in a conviction for a new violent offence prior to warrant expiry, and over 99% of offenders who completed their sentences on full parole within the last five years have not re-offended and returned to a federal penitentiary because of a new violent offence.

Information on re-offending after completion of sentence illustrates that 9 of 10 offenders who reach the end of their sentences on full parole do not return to a federal penitentiary.

The 82% confirmation rate for conditional release decisions is attributable to changes in regard to post suspension reviews and legislative amendments which have resulted in an increase in office versus hearing reviews and a decrease from 2 to 1 board member for certain types of reviews. On-going training initiatives and improvements to procedural supports have been implemented to increase the confirmation rate for conditional release decisions.

For more information, please access the Board's Performance Monitoring Reports.

Program 1.2: Conditional Release Openness and Accountability

Program Description: This program ensures that the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the provisions of the CCRA. This program consists of the provision of information for victims of crime; as well as assistance for victims and other observers at hearings and those who seek access to the Board's registry of decisions. Results for this program are assessed by monitoring the quality and timeliness of information shared. Work in this area recognizes that the PBC operates in a difficult environment in which timely sharing of accurate information is fundamental for effective partnership and public trust

This program is directly supported by the following priorities identified for 2013-14:

  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities;
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management;
  • Effectively providing services to victims and the public; and
  • Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders.
Financial Resources – For Program Level (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14 Difference
(actual minus planned)
6,504,436 7,019,565 7,012,752 5,552,600 (1,466,965)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14 Difference
(actual minus planned)
60 53 (7)

 

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the CCRA. The percentage of victims who are satisfied with the quality and timeliness of information provided by the PBC. ≥80% 89%
The percentage of those who access PBC services who are satisfied with the quality and timeliness of information provided by the PBC. ≥80% The results of past surveys of those who observe hearings and who request access to the decision registry indicated that PBC response times are within acceptable ranges. The PBC did not have the resources to conduct a survey in 2013-14, however there is no indication from correspondence received that there has been any change in satisfaction rates

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Board continued to face important challenges related to openness and accountability provisions of the CCRA, especially with respect to: sharing information with victims of crime and with candidates wishing to observe PBC hearings or gain access to the Board's registry of decisions; and delivery of a program of public information. Workloads in these areas have grown exponentially since the introduction of the CCRA in 1992.

In 2013-14, the Board made more than 22,300 contacts with victims. This number has stabilized over the last five years. Most of these contacts were with victims of violence, such as sexual assault or with the families of murder victims. As with conditional release decision-making, the need for quality program delivery is critical, given its implications for public confidence in corrections and conditional release, particularly due to intense public scrutiny and extensive media interest which make this program effectiveness crucial.

More than 4,000 people observed a Board hearing in 2013-14, reflecting an 80% increase over the last five years. The CCRA permits access to specific decisions and to decisions for research purposes through the Board's registry of decisions. In 2013-14, the Board released over 7,000 decisions from its registry of decisions. Victims were the most frequent requestors of decisions (approximately 55%), followed by the media (approximately 31%).

Program 1.3: Record Suspension Decisions/Clemency Recommendations

Program Description: A record suspension is designed to support the successful reintegration of an individual into society where appropriate. It is a formal attempt to remove the stigma of a criminal record for people found guilty of a federal offence and who, after satisfying their sentence and a specified waiting period, have shown themselves to be law-abiding citizens. Through this program, the PBC screens applications for completeness and eligibility of the applicant, collects information for decision-making and develops policy to guide decision processes. The results of this program are assessed through ongoing review of the average time required to process record suspension applications, and the rates of revocation of record suspensions ordered.

This program is directly supported by the following priorities identified for 2013-14:

  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities;
  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization;
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management; and
  • Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders.

The program is designed to support rehabilitation and community reintegration by providing quality record suspension decisions. The benefits of the program include:

  • Ensuring careful consideration is given to issues of public safety;
  • Providing an opportunity for record suspension recipients to contribute to their communities as law-abiding citizens;
  • Those who receive a record suspension have increased opportunities for employment, housing, insurance, and travel, allowing them to generate revenue, capital and contribute to economic growth; and
  • Most individuals (over 99%) remain crime-free, demonstrating the value of the program as a long-term measure for community reintegration.

The RPM or Clemency is a discretionary power vested in the Office of the Governor General by virtue of the Letters Patent and the Governor in Council, under Sections 748 and 748.1 of the Criminal Code of Canada, who may apply exceptional remedies under exceptional circumstances to deserving cases. Under Section 110 of the CCRA the Board is mandated to conduct investigations on behalf of the Minister.

In addition, Section 109 of the CCRA gives the Board the authority to cancel or vary the unexpired portion of a prohibition order made under Section 259 of the Criminal Code of Canada. These requests are investigated by the Clemency Unit.

Financial Resources – For Program Level (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference (actual minus planned)
Expenses 6,203,131 6,262,289 6,325,493 7,368,352 1,106,063
Revenue (5,644,800) (5,644,800) (5,644,800) (4,522,340) 1,122,460
Total 558,331 617,489 680,693 2,846,012 2,228,523
Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14 Planned 2013-14 Actual 2013-14
Difference (actual minus planned)
50 79 29
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets[6] Actual Results
Record suspension decisions support rehabilitation and community reintegration. The percentage of record suspension recipients whose record suspensions remain in effect. ≥95% Over 99%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During 2013-14, the Board received a total of 14,254 record suspension applications, and accepted 9,533 for processing. This is a significant decrease from the previous year when during the same period, a total of 19,526 record suspension applications were received and 11,291 accepted for processing. This decrease in volume was mainly a result of the amendments to the CRA in March 2012 which extended the waiting periods before an applicant can submit a request and increased the user fee. The Board continued to process record suspension applications according to the following service standards:

  • Applications seeking a record suspension for (an) offence(s) tried summarily will be processed within 6 months of application acceptance;
  • Applications seeking a record suspension for (an) offence(s) tried by indictment will be processed within 12 months of application acceptance; and
  • Applications in which the Board is proposing to refuse to order a record suspension will require up to 24 months after application acceptance to complete.

In 2013-14, the Clemency program received 38 requests for the RPM, one request under Section 109 of the CCRA, and had 105 active files. This is a decrease compared to 2012-13, but overall, there is a consistent increase in clemency data largely attributable to the changes made to the CRA and legislative amendments (i.e., Safe Streets and Communities Act). Most requests are discontinued either because the applicant does not provide sufficient information or proof of excessive hardship to proceed with the request, or the Minister determines that the clemency request does not warrant investigation as the criteria have not been met. During 2013-14, the increase in Clemency volumes had a direct effect on resource demands both financial and human and resources, and required efficient resource management to keep pace with this overall trend of increasing demands.

For more information, please access the Board's Performance Monitoring Reports.

Program 1.4: Internal Services

Program Description: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Official Languages and Employment Equity Services; Security services; Accommodation services; Emergency Management services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

This program is directly supported by the following priorities identified for 2013-14:

  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization; and
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management.

Internal Services strive to:

  • Ensure that the Board's governance structure facilitates the most effective and flexible decision-making possible;
  • Ensure that PBC complies with mandatory legislations and Management Accountability Framework;
  • Ensure that the appropriate human and financial resources are in place to advance the Board's key and ongoing priorities;
  • Generate the most effective, results-based planning to ensure logic and cohesion in all PBC programs;
  • Conduct program monitoring and management reviews to ensure that operations are transparent and accountable;
  • Ensure that the technological tools that are essential to the Board's operations are in place; and
  • Maintain a culture of continuous innovation and improvement.

Reporting internal services through a common government-wide approach to planning, designing, budgeting and reporting allows Canadians to see the full cost and proportion of resources spent in the Board, and across the federal government for support activities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 2013-14
Total Authorities Available for Use
2013-14 Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,127,474 5,488,156 5,509,488 5,410,406 (77,750)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14 Difference
(actual minus planned)
54 48 (6)
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Efficient and effective internal services that support quality program delivery. Services provided meet standards set under Government-wide policies as well as Management Accountability Framework (MAF) expectations. To meet or surpass government standards related to management capacity and practices as outlined and assessed through the MAF. The Board continued to adhere to MAF expectations. Mechanisms are in place and work continued to integrate and enhance MAF elements.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Board made changes to its forecasting process by adding forecasting accuracy targets to managers'/directors' performance agreements. This, coupled with a more rigorous process for analysing in-year resource pressures, contributed to enhanced resource management results.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

The Board's condensed financial statements are shown below.

Actual expenditures for the Board increased in 2013-14 compared to the prior year. The Board had a better understanding of the impact of Budget 2012 measures and managed the spending closer to the forecast. Compared to the planned spending, the Board came within the allowed 5% carry forward of $2.1M.

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Parole Board of Canada Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited) For the Year Ended March 31, 2014 (dollars)
  2013-14
Planned Results
2013-14 Actual 2012-13 Actual
(restated)
Difference
(2013-14 actual minus 2013-14 planned)
Difference
(2013-14 actual minus
2012-13 actual)
Total expenses 63,965,689 61,818,410 57,227,600 (2,147,279) 4,590,810
Total revenues 5,644,800 4,504,253 5,407,779 (1,140,547) (903,526)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 58,320,889 57,314,157 51,819,821 (1,006,732) 5,494,336
Departmental net financial position (221,264) (1,244,475) (1,966,069) (1,023,211) 721,594

Condensed Statement of Financial Position

Parole Board of Canada Condensed Statement of Financial Position
(Unaudited) As at March 31, 2014 (dollars)
  2013-14 2012-13
(restated)
Difference
(2013-14 minus 2012-13)
Total net liabilities 6,706,599 5,928,540 778,059
Total net financial assets 3,714,998 2,426,668 1,288,300
Departmental net debt 2,991,601 3,501,872 (510,271)
Total non-financial assets 1,747,126 1,535,803 211,323
Departmental net financial position (1,244,475) (1,966,069) 721,594

Financial Highlights Chart

Expenses less Revenues- Where Funds Go (pie chart)
  • Conditional Release Decisions- 72%
  • Conditional Release Openness and Accountability- 11%                
  • Record Suspension and Clemency Recommendation (net revenue)- 6%
  • Internal Services- 11%

Total expenses for 2013-14 were $2.1M less than planned results. This is equal to our 5% maximum carry forward and can be carried forward in total to 2014-15. The Board worked on an internally-funded initiative to reduce the pardons backlog resulting in expenditures greater than the revenue it collected.

Financial Statements

The Board's 2013-14 Financial Statements can be found on the PBC website.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the PBC website.

  1. Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy;
  2. Horizontal Initiatives;
  3. Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue; and
  4. User Fees Reporting.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Regular mail: Communications Division
410 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0R1

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary expenditures: Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full-time equivalent: Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-budgetary expenditures: Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes


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