Appendix D: Evaluation of the National Emergency Stockpile System (NESS) – Components

Appendix D: Components of the NESS stockpile

Kit or unit Brief description Type Acquisition Comments

Recommendation #2, Disposal of (a) equipment and supplies that are outdated, and (b) individual social service items and units

Emergency hospitals

These 200 bed hospitals, to be set up in existing buildings such as schools and community centers, were designed to provide self-contained acute and short-term medical care in a worst-case scenario.

Medical

1950s, 1960s

Components currently being assessed and recycled/disposed

Advanced treatment centers (ATC)

These centers were designed to provide early medical and limited surgical procedures in a "field" environment and support the movement of patients to other health care facilities.

Medical

1950s, 1960s

Components to be assessed

Casualty collecting units (CCU)

These units were designed to provide support to the existing health care system by the provision of acute and short-term medical care in a worst-case scenario.

Medical

1950s, 1960s

Components currently being assessed and recycled/disposed

Replaced by mini-clinics

Trauma kits

These kits were designed to consist of first aid, intubation, IV solutions and medical components to support first line response and triage-patient staging (mini clinics, advanced treatment centers, etc.).

Medical

1950s, 1960s

Components currently being assessed and recycled/disposed

Mobile feeding units

These units were designed to provide an emergency feeding capability in a "field" environment, or where normal food services are not available.

Social service

1950s, 1960s

Components currently being assessed and recycled/disposed

Reception centre kits

These kits were designed to provide supplies, and registration and inquiry materials for the setup and operation of the reception functions for evacuation centers/shelters.

Social service

1950s, 1960s and later

Components to be assessed

Quarantine units

These units have the capacity to support up to 300 persons that are suspect of having or have been in contact with an infectious disease and are entering Canada at one of its airports.

Medical

1950s, 1960s and later

Components to be assessed

Various social services supplies

Cots, blankets, pillows, face cloths, generators, batteries, flashlights, survival candles, garbage bags, bottle water, propane lanterns, diapers, registration and inquiry cards, etc.

Social service

1950s, 1960s and later

Components to be assessed

Kit or unit Brief description Type Acquisition Comments

Recommendation #1, Focus on an appropriate public health role when determining future strategic mix of assets

CBRNE antidotes

(chemical, biological, radio-nuclear, explosive)

Antidotes, such as those required for: small pox, botulism and anthrax

Medical

2001-2002 and later

Components are harder to acquire and store (expensive, not widely available, strict licensing restrictions) and/or require a long lead time for procurement

Based on current risk assessment

CBRNE push packs

(chemical, biological, radio-nuclear, explosive)

These push packs are intended as a first response to the risk of a terrorist incident. The contents of a push pack are: Nerve gas antidote auto injector sets, consisting of: Atropen, Combopen, Diazepam and Trainers; Multi-dose Atropine Ampoules (1 mg/ml, 10ml); Ciprofloxacin tablets, 500 mg; Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) pouches; and Potassium iodide tablets, 130 mg.

Medical

2001-2002 and later

Components are harder to acquire and store (expensive, not widely available, strict licensing restrictions) and/or require a long lead time for procurement

Based on current risk assessment

Pandemic response supplies

Supplies include: antiviral agents, antibiotics specific to pandemic response, syringes, ventilators and related oxygen supply equipment, personal protective equipment (masks, face shields, gloves), and other supplies such as gowns, disposable sheets, pillows, needles, syringes, body bags, etc.

Medical

2004-2005 and later

In response to SARS an H1N1 public health events

Mini clinics

These portable clinics supplement existing medical care facilities in a disaster situation that overwhelms their system. It would be located adjacent to these facilities to triage and treat the less seriously injured (see p. 8 for detailed description).

Medical

2009-2010 and later

Replaced the Casualty Collecting Units (CCUs)

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