ARCHIVED - Current Funding Opportunities

 

Invitation to Submit an Application

Cancer Program - Community-Based Programming
Priority: Cancer Screening and Early Detection among Underserved Populations
This Invitation to Submit an Application (ISA) is now CLOSED
The following is for information purposes only

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is pleased to invite eligible organizations to submit a proposal to its Cancer Program for funding under the Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Initiative. This Invitation to Submit an Application (ISA) is for projects starting in the 2011-2012 fiscal year that may be up to two years in duration.

Context

Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada. According to the Canadian Cancer Statistics 2010, more than 76,200 cancer-related deaths are expected in 2010. Another estimated 173,800 new cases will be diagnosed and that number will continue to rise nationwide as the Canadian population ages. Cancer costs the Canadian heath care system more than $2.6 billion annually in direct health care costs.Footnote 1 Prevention is viewed as key to mitigating the increasing number of cancer cases and reducing the economic impact of the disease.

The Government of Canada's response to cancer prevention and control is the implementation of the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC is a comprehensive pan-Canadian approach to addressing cancer in Canada. The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) was created in 2006 to lead the implementation of the CSCC in collaboration with key cancer players (F/P/T governments and NGOs). PHAC's Cancer Program is coordinated with CPAC to complement their work in cancer prevention and control and to avoid duplication of efforts. PHAC works with many stakeholders to implement initiatives that help address gaps in: cancer information and surveillance; early detection and screening; and the prevention and control of cancer. The direction of this solicitation was shaped by a review of current data and research and through a stakeholder consultation with the cancer community held in February 2010.

Focus of the 2011 Cancer Program Solicitation

Solicitation Priority: Removing Barriers, Raising Awareness and/or Promoting Participation in Cancer Screening and Early Detection among Underserved Populations

The health literature defines "underserved populations" as groups whose demographic, geographic, or economic characteristics impede or prevent their access to health care services.Footnote 2

Studies have found that underserved populations are less likely to participate in screening, have later-stage cancer diagnosis, and as a result, are more likely to experience unfavourable outcomes from the disease. The aim of this solicitation is to support projects that focus on removing barriers, raising awareness and/or promoting participation of these groups in cancer screening and early detection.

Projects submitted for consideration must focus on ALL three of the following:

  • cancer screening and early detection;
  • underserved populations; and
  • removing barriers, raising awareness, and/or promoting participation.

Cancer Screening and Early Detection

Secondary prevention of cancer is traditionally viewed in public health as detecting the disease at an early stage, before it is symptomatic, in order to permit timely intervention to slow or stop its progression.Footnote 3 Secondary prevention of cancer typically involves screening tests such as a mammogram for breast cancer or a fecal occult blood test for colorectal cancer, but can also include teaching people about the early signs of the disease. Recognizing possible symptoms and taking action results in early detection and diagnosis. This usually results in improved likelihood of successful treatment, which translates into fewer cancer-related deaths.

There are several different types of screening, as follows:

  • mass screening involves screening a large population;
  • multiple or multiphasic screening involves the use of a variety of screening tests applied on the same occasion (e.g. annual health check-up);
  • proactive or systematic screening invites members of at-risk populations for screening at appropriate intervals; and
  • case-finding (opportunity screening) is a form of screening restricted to patients who consult a health practitioner for some other health-related purpose.

Project objectives must be consistent with screening practice guidelines/recommendations that are widely accepted by experts, such as the Canadian Task Force on Preventative Health Care and the US Preventive Services Task Force. For more information, please visit the website www.canadiantaskforce.ca .

Underserved Populations

Underserved population groups that are less likely to participate in cancer screening and early detection include, but are not limited to:

  • Newcomers and immigrants;
  • Rural and remote Canadians;
  • People with disabilities;
  • Segments of the population with low income, low literacy and/or low education levels; and
  • First Nations living off-reserve, Inuit and Métis
Newcomers and Immigrants
  • Research has found that immigrant status and cultural origin have been associated with lower rates of mammography and cervical screening, especially if newcomers have arrived from countries without screening programs. For example, first and second generation Asian-Canadians have lower cervical cancer screening rates than native-born Canadians. While barriers to screening appear to be somewhat similar among various immigrant groups, it is important to note that each group is unique and may have distinct health beliefs and practices. Language is one of the most significant barriers to screening for newcomer and immigrant populations. Language barriers can result in inadequate comprehension during diagnosis and disparities in test ordering and diagnostic evaluations.
Rural and Remote Canadians
  • Research has found that geographic distance, lack of transportation, and lack of health care providers often preclude access to cancer screening for women from rural towns or farms. For example, mammography screening is used significantly less in Atlantic Canada and the far Northern regions than it is in Canada as a whole. Availability of cancer information and cancer knowledge among residents may be limited in rural and remote communities. Broadly speaking, in rural and remote areas there is a lack of preventative, diagnostic services and an underservicing of special-needs groups, such as people with disabilities and new immigrants.
People with Disabilities
  • Research has found that people with pre-existing physical and/or intellectual disabilities are less likely to be screened for cancer. For example, women with disabilities are less likely to have a mammogram and are at risk of being diagnosed at a more advanced stage of disease. People with disabilities may experience many barriers, including physical (e.g. inaccessible facilities or examination tables), procedural (e.g. inaccessible medical equipment) and attitudinal barriers (e.g. lack of 'inclusive' health care). Social isolation, low literacy, learning or intellectual disabilities may contribute to low awareness of services. People with disabilities may be dispersed in large communities or in less densely populated areas, making it difficult to develop and target necessary resources, tools and expertise required to ensure equitable access to screening.
Segments of the Population with Low Income, Low Literacy and/or Low Education Levels
  • Research has found that people living in lower socioeconomic status environments are less likely to participate in cancer screening. Women with lower income, less education, and lower literacy levels have less utilization of mammography and cervical cancer screening. For example, in women aged 20 to 69 years, there is a trend of increased utilization of Pap testing as income increases. Both men and women of lower socioeconomic status report less use of colorectal cancer screening.
First Nations Living Off-Reserve, Inuit and Métis
  • Research has found that cancer screening rates among First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations is community-specific, whereby some communities are vastly underscreened and others meet or exceed the rate for Canadians in general. Screening rates also vary based on the cancer site. Participation for cervical and breast cancer screening is improving in most First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations, while colorectal cancer screening presents certain practical and cultural challenges. Further, studies have shown that rates of colorectal cancer are rising rapidly among First Nations and Inuit populations. Aboriginal populations tend to present with later-stage cancers and have higher mortality rates from preventable cancers. This population group experiences multiple barriers to screening participation in Canada, including: different cultural concepts of cancer and its prevention; lack of culturally suitable services; lack of awareness and knowledge about screening; high health professional staff turnover and shortages; and rural and remote geographic location.

Removing Barriers, Raising Awareness and/or Promoting Participation for Cancer Screening and Early Detection

The types of projects that can be funded include, but are not limited to: tools, resources, models, demonstration or pilot projects, knowledge transfer, best and promising practices, qualitative research and evaluation studies, and training modules.

Projects must focus on removing barriers, raising awareness and/or promoting participation of underserved groups in cancer screening and early detection. This can include a range of project ideas, but are not limited to:

  • Educational materials and sensitivity/cultural training for health professionals to better understand and promote 'inclusive' care and respect for diversity.
  • Resources and materials in languages or health literacy levels appropriate to target underserved populations.
  • Innovative and novel models to engage underserved populations.
  • Tools to effectively evaluate programs reaching underserved populations.
  • Adapting and replicating best practice models for use by other provinces, communities, or organizations.
  • Documenting and assessing existing programs to reach underserved populations to meet their diverse and challenging needs.
  • Sharing best or promising practices to raise awareness of cancer screening and early detection among underserved populations.

Scope of Projects

Project objectives must be consistent with screening practice guidelines/recommendations that are widely accepted by experts, such as the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care and the US Preventative Services Task Force. For more information, please visit the website www.canadiantaskforce.ca .

Projects must be developed with input and participation of the target underserved population. Community involvement and engagement is key to successful project development and implementation.

Results of projects must have national implications and benefits. This can include being national in scope in terms of partners, benefits to the target population, and replicating results in other parts of the country.

Projects must demonstrate the use and transfer of information and knowledge that expands beyond local or regional areas.

Preference will be given to proposals that demonstrate multi-sectoral engagement or involvement. Applicants are strongly encouraged to partner with organizations working in sectors other than cancer. Effective cancer prevention initiatives are enhanced through multi-sectoral responses, involving players such as non-governmental organizations, governments (municipal, provincial/territorial and federal), workplaces, industry, health services, social services, and educational institutions.

Project Funding and Duration

Funding will be for projects starting in the 2011-2012 fiscal year. Funding will be in the form of grants or contributions up to a maximum value of $500,000 per year, and project duration will be up to a maximum of two years (24 months). PHAC will determine if successful projects will be in the form of a grant or a contribution agreement based on an assessment of the proposed project and the funding available.

This Invitation to Submit an Application (ISA) is now CLOSED
The following is for information purposes only

Official Languages

The federal government is committed to enhancing the vitality of the English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada (Francophones living outside the province of Quebec and Anglophones living in the province of Quebec), supporting and assisting their development, and fostering the full recognition and use of both official languages in Canadian society. All project materials (e.g. resources, reports, announcements) for public distribution must be produced in both official languages and project activities must be conducted in the target population's official language of choice.

Lobbyists Registration Act and Regulations

Recent amendments to the Lobbyists Registration Act and Regulations have broadened the definition of lobbying. We encourage applicants to review the revised Act and Regulations to ensure compliance. For more information, visit the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists Web site at http://www.ocl-cal.gc.ca/eic/site/lobbyist-lobbyiste1.nsf/eng/home or contact the Office of the Registrar of Lobbyists directly.

Application Requirements

Only proposals that are completed in full will be considered. Please note: applicants are required to use the templates provided as separate attachments. Applications submitted using any other forms or formats will not be accepted.

Your application package must include the following:

  • Application for Funding Form (PDF Document - 1.42 MB - 10 pages)
  • Detailed description of your project proposal (Use the required templates):
  • Evidence or your organization's eligibility (i.e. copy of your certificate of status, incorporation documents (letters patent), provincial/territorial papers, Board of Directors list, Terms of Reference or governing structure)
  • Copy of documentation confirming status of funding from other sources (if applicable)
  • Signed official letters of support from partners demonstrating partnership commitment to the proposed project, describing the type and nature of the contribution
  • One original, 5 copies and one virus free copy of the application package on (CD/DVD)
  • Signed official letter from the sponsoring organization, demonstrating agreement to sponsor the project

Please refer to the Cancer Program Community-Based Programming "Guidelines for Applicants" to ensure your package is complete. These provide you with detailed information on what the application should include and outline the required format for your proposal.

The deadline for submissions is June 17, 2011. The Public Health Agency of Canada will NOT accept applications by email or by facsimile, or postmarked after the deadline.

PHAC is under no obligation to provide funding, or enter into an agreement as a result of this Invitation to Submit an Application. PHAC also reserves the right to: reject any or all proposals received in response to this invitation; accept any proposal in whole or in part; and cancel and/or re-issue this Invitation to Submit a Proposal at any time. PHAC will not reimburse for costs incurred in the preparation and/or submission of an application.

Proposal Review Process

Upon receipt of your application, an acknowledgement will be sent. The review and approval process will take a minimum of 12 weeks. Proposals will be screened for eligibility and completeness. During the review process you may be contacted to provide additional information. You will be notified of the results once a final decision is made.

Questions and Answers Teleconference

All applicants are invited to participate in a teleconference facilitated by PHAC officials. The teleconference will be an opportunity to seek clarification regarding the application process and is scheduled to be held May 17, 2011 at 1:00 pm E.S.T. and will be repeated on June 7, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. by dialing: 1-877-413-4792 conference code 2916642.

Deadline and Submission Process

Deadline for Submissions - June 17, 2011

The Public Health Agency of Canada will NOT accept applications by email or by facsimile, or postmarked after the deadline.

Due to the Canada Post strike, we recommend sending your complete application package by courier postmarked by the deadline of June 17, 2011.

Please send one original, 5 copies and one virus free copy of your complete application package on (CD/DVD) postmarked by the deadline date of June 17, 2011 by courier to:

Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control
8th Floor - 785 Carling Avenue, Address Locator 6808B
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K9


Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: