Healthy Living and Chronic Disease (HLCD) - List of Funded Projects for 2012-2014

Projects on Removing Barriers, Raising Awareness and Promoting Cancer Screening and Early Detection among Underserved Populations

The Public Health Agency of Canada's (PHAC) Cancer Program aimed to prevent and control cancer, particularly among vulnerable and underserved populations, and to promote early detection and screening. PHAC's Cancer Program worked with the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) to ensure complementary efforts in cancer prevention and control. The Program priority was to support evidence-based initiatives, approaches and models which can be used, adapted and shared to increase access, raise awareness and promote behaviour change in order to prevent cancer among Canadians.

Raising Awareness, Removing Barriers and Promoting Participation in Cancer Screening and Early Detection Among Seniors

Lead/Recipient:

The British Columbia Psychogeriatric Association (BCPGA) works to enhance interdisciplinary services, education, and research in support of the mental health needs of the elderly and their caregivers. Their work includes supporting seniors' mental health in cancer care.

Partners:

The British Columbia Psychogeriatric Association partnered with national, provincial, and local organizations including: Canadian Pensioners Concerned (CPC); BC Cancer Agency; University of Northern BC (UNBC); Northern Health Authority (NHA); Prince George Council of Seniors; and Sudbury Regional Hospital (SRH) - Regional Cancer Program in Ontario.

Funding:

$321,954

Duration:

May 11, 2012 to March 31, 2014

In brief:

This project completed an environmental scan, a literature review, focus groups, and key informant interviews to identify the barriers to cancer screening. Resources were developed (i.e. fact sheets, DVD, project manual and a facilitator's guide) to encourage seniors to participate in screening and to inform health care providers of the barriers. Peer-to-peer facilitated discussions about cancer screening was carried out by seniors in community organizations across BC and ON; and a best practices report was shared with Provincial/Territorial (P/T) cancer screening programs and health care providers. This project improved the understanding of the attitudes and beliefs of seniors about screening and the methods that can increase their participation. The project also resulted in more effective promotion of cancer screening by health care providers and greater participation by seniors.

Gathering Wisdom: Engaging Aboriginal Women in an Early Detection and Breast Cancer Screening Education Program

Lead/Recipient:

Breast Cancer Action Nova Scotia (BCANS) is a survivor driven group focussing on the concerns and needs of those affected by breast cancer through support, education and networking.

Partners:

BCANS partnered with provincial and local organizations including: Native Council of Nova Scotia; Cancer Care Nova Scotia; Nova Scotia Breast Screening Program; Native Women's Association; Bear River First Nation Health Centre; Micmac Native Friendship Society; Colchester East Hants Health Authority; and Halifax Regional Municipality Urban Aboriginal Network.

Funding:

$453,179

Duration:

June 6, 2012 to March 31, 2014

In brief:

This project completed an environmental scan to identify gaps in breast cancer screening for Aboriginal women; developed a breast cancer education strategy, including culturally appropriate breast cancer screening resources and a training manual; and trained Aboriginal women from across the province as "Master Trainers" in breast cancer screening education. Two province-wide multigenerational gatherings of Aboriginal women were held to deliver the resources; and health care providers were educated about culturally appropriate breast cancer screening. The results of the project were better understanding of the importance of breast cancer screening and increased screening participation by Aboriginal women. Health care providers also had greater knowledge of the unique needs of Aboriginal women in order to promote culturally appropriate breast cancer screening.

Cancer Screening and Early Detection for Women with Disabilities and People with Intellectual Disabilities

Lead/Recipient:

Canadian Association for Community Living (CACL) works to ensure that all people have the same rights, access and opportunities as others and have the needed supports to do so. The DisAbled Women's Network (DAWN) Canada, which works to ensure women with disabilities have access to the needed services, supports and opportunities as others, will be an equal partner in the project.

Partners:

Provincial and territorial Associations for Community Living (ACLs); affiliates of DAWN Canada; and various national, provincial/territorial and local health and social services organizations.

Funding:

$886,654

Duration:

May 11, 2012 to March 31, 2014

In brief:

This project included an environmental scan to identify the gaps in cancer screening for people with disabilities; the development and delivery of a disability-sensitive educational toolkit, facilitator guide, training, and best practices workshops for health care providers; and the development of plain language cancer screening information workshops and resources for people with disabilities. The results of the project were a better understanding of cancer screening gaps for people with disabilities and increased awareness of disability-sensitive, accessible practices among health care providers. The project also resulted in an increased understanding of the importance of cancer screening among people with disabilities and greater participation in screening.

Screening Saves Lives: Expansion of a Lay Health Educator Program to Increase Screening Rates in LGBTQ Communities

Lead/Recipient:

Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) is a national, community-based organization that works to eradicate cancer and enhance the quality of life of people living with cancer. The Canadian Cancer Society, Ontario Division conducted this project.

Partners:

National, provincial and territorial CCS divisions; Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP); Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care; Cancer Care Ontario; Peel Public Health; Toronto Public Health; York Region Public Health; Toronto Central local health integration network (LHIN); Greater Toronto Area Cancer Prevention and Screening Network; Women's Health in Women's Hands; Rainbow Health Ontario; Ottawa Senior Pride Network; and Pink Triangle Services.

Funding:

$581,212

Duration:

June 15, 2012 to June 30, 2014

In brief:

This project promoted participation in cancer screening among LGBTQ individuals and raise awareness of the barriers facing these individuals among health care providers. Activities included identifying barriers and adapting program resources and lay health educator training to meet the needs of LGBTQ communities; recruiting and training volunteers as lay health educators; conducting outreach activities to promote cancer screening among LGBTQ communities; developing and implementing a social media campaign; and conducting knowledge exchange activities to share the model and findings. The results of this project were an increased understanding among health care providers and cancer stakeholders of the barriers to cancer screening for LGBTQ individuals as well as the tailoring of resources and training tools to meet the specialized needs of LGBTQ communities. The project also resulted in increased awareness of the importance of cancer screening and greater participation in screening among individuals from LGBTQ communities.

Je suis invitée! Et toi?

Lead/Recipient:

Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont delivers public health services in Montreal and plays an important role in the delivery of breast cancer screening services to the population. The hospital provided medical, research and evaluation staff to the project.

Partners:

Direction de la santé publique de l'Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal (ASSSM); Canadian Cancer Society (CCS); Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA); Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ); Centre d'étude et d'intervention en relations interculturelles (CEIRI); Centres de santé et de services sociaux (CSSS) in Montreal; Réseau FADOQ (Fédération de l'Âge d'Or du Québec); Maison d'Haiti as well as other local cultural and women's organizations.

Funding:

$899,080

Duration:

November 14, 2012 to March 31, 2015

In brief:

This project addressed barriers to breast cancer screening through an initiative supporting tailored and accessible breast cancer screening information for women with low levels of literacy. Activities included the launch of a regional initiative where adapted materials and tools were developed to invite immigrant and low income women with poor literacy to participate in screening; a communications campaign geared to women with low levels of literacy; the development of a network of peer educators representing the target group and local organizations that worked in communities to promote breast cancer screening; and the development of best practices in cancer screening that were shared with various public health audiences across Canada through local presentations and a national forum. The result of the project is access to information and tools about breast cancer screening that are clear, simple and adapted to populations with low levels of literacy. The project also fostered a better understanding of the benefits of breast cancer screening and increased participation in screening among the targeted underserved communities.

Mobilizing Newcomers and Immigrants to Cancer Screening Programs

Lead/Recipient:

London Health Sciences Centre (c/o South West Regional Cancer Program) is committed to improving health and delivering value for citizens of London, the South West Region and beyond. The South West Regional Cancer Program is committed to prevention, screening and detection of cancer, providing the highest quality comprehensive care possible and to supporting families and patients throughout the continuum of care.

Partners:

London Cross Cultural Learner Centre; London Intercommunity Health Centre; Middlesex-London Health Unit; Canadian Cancer Society Elgin-Middlesex Unit; and the Integrated Cancer London Community Advisory Committee.

Funding:

$648,240

Duration:

June 12, 2012 to June 30, 2014

In brief:

This project developed, delivered and evaluated an evidence-based cancer prevention and screening service delivery model targeted to newcomer and immigrant populations that were underserved (i.e. Nepalese, Iraqi, Spanish, and Arabic). Focus group sessions were held to identify cancer screening barriers among newcomers and immigrants, and existing cancer awareness tools and resources were adapted and new ones developed as needed. Peer health educators were trained from the target population group to deliver cancer prevention and screening education sessions to newcomers and immigrants within their communities, and training for health care providers and cancer service providers were conducted to ensure culturally-sensitive care. This project resulted in increased awareness about cancer risk and prevention among newcomers and immigrants and increased participation in cancer screening among the target populations.

Creating Access to Screening and Training in the Living Environment (CASTLE)

Lead/Recipient:

The McMaster University School of Nursing is committed to creativity, innovation and excellence in teaching, research and scholarship. The Central West Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Network (CWCPEDN) partnered with McMaster University in this project.

Partners:

Canadian Cancer Society; Ontario Breast Screening Program; Cancer Care Ontario; Brock University-School of Nursing; and over 40 local health, social service and housing organizations representing the six project community locations, among others. Private sector partners include the Hamilton Street Railway, The Hamilton Spectator and Spallaci Homes.

Funding:

$912,341

Duration:

May 25, 2012 to June 30, 2014

In brief:

This project developed an innovative, tailored approach to raising awareness and promoting participation in cancer screening among members of low income communities. This was achieved through peer-to-peer workshops on cancer screening to be delivered in 18 low-income housing settings (e.g. shelters, housing units) across six communities in Central-West Ontario. An inventory was developed of cancer screening and related health services for each participating community, and a multi-sectoral network of stakeholders was established. A social media campaign was also undertaken. This project increased understanding of the importance of cancer screening and greater screening participation by members of low income communities, and community organizations, health care providers and cancer stakeholders have a greater understanding of the barriers to cancer screening faced by people in this population.

Inuit Cancer Project

Lead/Recipient:

Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada fosters greater awareness of the needs of Inuit women, promotes equality and social improvements, and encouraged their participation in the community, regional and national life of Canada.

Partners:

Government of Nunavut Department of Health and Social Services; Nunatsiavut Government Department of Health and Social Development; Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services; Nunavut Status of Women Council; Inuvialuit Regional Corporation; Inuit Taparit Kanatami; and the Canadian Cancer Society.

Funding:

$629,576

Duration:

April 30, 2012 to March 31, 2014

In brief:

This project increased Inuit knowledge about cancer prevention and cancer screening practices and improved the capacity of community health representatives (CHRs) and health care providers working with Inuit populations. This was achieved through the development of culturally appropriate cancer awareness tools and a toolkit to assist CHRs and health care providers to deliver cancer information effectively. The project was implemented in 52 Inuit communities across two provinces and two territories: Nunavut, Nunavik (Quebec), Nunatsiavut (Newfoundland), and Inuvialuit (Northwest Territories). An environmental scan and knowledge-attitude-behavior (KAB) focus groups sessions were used to identify the most effective ways to raise cancer awareness and encourage cancer screening among Inuit populations. Plain-language culturally appropriate cancer awareness tools to support Inuit populations, a toolkit and an Inuktitut cancer glossary were developed to assist CHRs and health care providers to deliver cancer information effectively. In addition, a terminology forum was held with language experts to ensure that cancer-related terms have suitable Inuktitut-equivalent wording for health literacy. This project increased health literacy about cancer and understanding of the importance of cancer screening and early detection among Inuit populations.

A Participatory Approach to Improving Cancer Screening and Early Detection Among Individuals with Incarceration Experience

Lead/Recipient:

University of British Columbia (UBC) Collaborating Centre for Prison Health and Education (CCPHE) is committed to encouraging and facilitating collaborative opportunities for health, education, research and services to enhance the social well-being and reintegration of individuals in custody, their families and communities.

Partners:

Health Canada's First Nations Inuit Health Branch; Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry; John Howard Society; Women in2 Healing; Long Term Inmates Now Living in the Community (L.I.N.C.); Aboriginal Program of the Provincial Health Services Authority; and the BC Cancer Agency.

Funding:

$323,891

Duration:

May 29, 2012 to March 31, 2014

In brief:

This project raised awareness and increased cancer screening among individuals with incarceration experience. The target population was engaged in the development of project tools and the delivery of peer coaching workshops to encourage other members of the target group to get screened. The project was implemented in urban and rural areas of British Columbia and involved the development of a DVD on cancer screening among individuals with incarceration experience, providing skills development training and peer coaching to the target population, and the development of a manual to encourage replication of the project. The tools developed as a result of this project were culturally appropriate and relevant to the target group (i.e. low literacy, Aboriginal populations). This project increased knowledge of the importance of cancer screening, increased participation in cancer screening among individuals with incarceration experience, and increased awareness among health care providers of the barriers faced by individuals with incarceration experience.

Enhanced Access to Cancer Screening for Rural Albertans

Lead/Recipient:

Alberta Health Services (AHS) provides a patient-focused, quality health system that is accessible and sustainable for all Albertans. The Screening Programs of AHS led the project.

Partners:

Alberta Health Services partnered with provincial and local organizations including: Health Canada - First Nations and Inuit Health Alberta Region; Métis Nation of Alberta; Hutterite colony representatives; Alberta Breast Cancer Screening Program; Alberta Cervical Cancer Screening Program; Alberta Colorectal Cancer Screening Program; Alberta Cancer Foundation; University of Calgary - Institute of Population and Public Health; Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta; Calgary Laboratory Services; Primary Care Networks; DynaLIFE Diagnostic Laboratory Services; and provincial cancer screening programs that offer breast screening through mobile mammography (British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec, Ontario, and Nova Scotia).

Funding:

$479,266

Duration:

December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2015

In brief:

This project was developing and piloting an integrated cancer screening model, including the design and implementation of community-based education programs in rural and remote communities and the development and delivery of a knowledge transfer webinar to share the model with provinces that offer mobile breast screening to encourage expanded cancer screening (colorectal and cervical) in rural and remote regions across Canada. A bilingual project manual was developed to encourage replication of the model. This project resulted in increased awareness and participation in cervical and colorectal cancer screening for rural and remote Albertans.

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