2011- 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program Projects - Funded projects

The Canadian Diabetes Strategy (CDS) is a national initiative that works with the provinces and territories, various national health bodies and interest groups across the country working together to prevent diabetes, particularly among vulnerable and high-risk populations, and to promote early detection and management of the disease.

The purpose of the CDS is to articulate and establish effective diabetes prevention and control strategies for Canada. This work involves building on what has already been accomplished and carrying it forward creatively. With access to the collective knowledge and experience of its various partners, the CDS is well positioned to determine where the needs and gaps lie, and to ensure that resources are deployed accordingly.

Funding Projects

2011 - 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program projects

The funding priorities of the 2011 - 2012 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program were to support the development of tools and approaches for the screening and early detection of gestational and type 2 diabetes and for the development of tools to help Canadians self-manage all types of diabetes.

In addition, the solicitation priorities addressed the secondary complications of diabetes including: cardiovascular disease; kidney disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic foot ulcers and wounds; and mental health/mental illness among Canadians living with diabetes.

These priorities were established in consultation with stakeholders. Highlights, including objectives, results and lessons learned, are provided for 10 diabetes projects.

Canadian Association of Wound Care: Peer Education Program (PEP) Talk: Healthy Feet and You
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC) is a not-for-profit organization of healthcare professionals, researchers, corporate supporters, patients and caregivers dedicated to the advancement of wound care in Canada.
Partners: Foot Care Nurses of Canada; Diabetes Educator Section and the Clinical Scientific Section of the Canadian Diabetes Association; Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation; Canadian Medical Association; Canadian Federation of Podiatric Medicine and Continuing Care Association of Nova.
Duration: April 2011 to March 2013
Objectives: To empower people with diabetes to self-manage their foot care, and connect them with community resources or screening, preventative foot care and overall diabetes management to prevent limb loss.
Highlights: Approximately 15% of those with diabetes have foot problems at a cost of more than $150 million to the health care system. Foot ulcers often lead to complications such as foot or leg amputations. PEP Talk: Diabetes, Healthy Feet & You was developed as a self-management educational workshop program conducted by lay Peer Leaders to empower people living with diabetes to adopt self –management behaviours that can help them prevent diabetic foot ulcers by increasing their knowledge of risk factors and linking them to resources in the diabetes community. During the project, a Canadian network of 40 volunteer Diabetes Foot Ulcer Prevention Peer Educators was developed and trained in 10 communities across Canada. These volunteers worked in their communities to develop an outreach action plan to connect, educate, and support people living with diabetes. Their work was supported by an on-line discussion forum for health professionals, Peer Educators and patients, as well as provided access to on-line tools, leaflets and posters. Published results demonstrated that 97% of peer leaders and community workshop participants changed their self-management behaviours (including: checking their feet more frequently, wearing shoes inside the house, and checking their blood sugar) with over 54,000 visits to the web site.
For more information: Please visit the Canadian Association of Wound Care website.

 

Canadian Diabetes Association: The Diabetes GPS
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) is a not-for-profit organization that works in communities across Canada to improve the life of people with diabetes through a network of volunteers, employees and healthcare professionals.
Partners: Advisory Group of healthcare professionals and local community representatives from the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority; United Way of Peel Region; Manitoba Public Health and Primary Health Care; Diabetes Care Program of Nova Scotia; Canadian National Institute for the Blind; regional CDA offices.
Duration: April 2011 to September 2013
Objectives: To transform some of the Canadian Diabetes Association's popular tools and facts sheets for Chinese, South Asian and African/Caribbean audiences to enhance their capacity to: self-manage; reduce risk and complications; and lead to more sustainable community programs that promote long-term healthy living choices.
Highlights: The Canadian Diabetes Association’s Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada provide evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals on all aspects of diabetes care. This project involved adapting the Guidelines with a focus towards meeting the needs of specific high risk populations and developing and posting tools – fact sheets and an interactive microsite (The Diabetes GPS ) in eight languages – for the launch of the new Guidelines in 2013. The new materials were shared with 380 participants at fifteen health expos across the country and marketed via partners.  Over 2, 200 individuals from the African Caribbean, Chinese and South Asian communities received the information that was found to be culturally relevant and having a positive impact on well-being and ability to self-manage their diabetes.
For more information: Please visit the Canadian Diabetes Association website.

 

Canadian Ethnocultural Council: Early Detection of Diabetes in High Risk Immigrant Communities
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Ethnocultural Council (CEC) is a not-for-profit organization representing over 30 national ethno-cultural organizations, which in turn represent over 2,000 local chapters in Canada.
Partners: Vietnamese Canadian Federation; the National Council of Trinidad and Tobago Organizations; Christian Cultural Association of South Asians; Yee Hong Centre for Geriatric Care in Toronto; Chinese Health Support Centre in Vancouver; Projenesis Iberoamerican Organization in Ottawa; Calgary Catholic Immigrant Society.
Duration: April 2011 to March 2013
Objectives: To develop and increase the knowledge-base for early detection of diabetes in at-risk ethno-cultural communities; document best practices; raise awareness; develop and increase skills on techniques and approaches to early detection and self- management; and enhance intercultural collaboration.
Highlights: Many immigrants to Canada – including people of South Asian, Southeast Asian, Chinese, African, and Hispanic origin -- are at high risk of developing diabetes. The project aimed to develop and increase the knowledge base for early detection of diabetes in six at-risk ethno-cultural communities across Canada by producing the Community Guide on Diabetes: Sample Programs for Early Detection and Management .The community guides were tailored to meet the specific needs of these communities as well as focus on new immigrants. Summary flyers in nine languages (Chinese, French, Punjabi, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Tamil, Urdu, and Vietnamese) were also produced and workshops were conducted with high-risk ethnic communities.  Among the outcomes were positive changes in knowledge about diabetes prevention, early detection, and management.
For more information: Please visit the Canadian Ethnocultural Council website .

 

Canadian National Institute for the Blind: Diabetes and Vision Loss Knowledge Expansion Program
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian National Institute for the Blind is a national, community-based not-for-profit organization that provides the services and support necessary for people to enjoy a good quality of life and enhanced independence while living with vision loss.
Partners: Canadian Diabetes Association; Vision Institute of Canada; Canadian Association of Social Workers (Health Section); Canadian Council of the Blind.
Duration: April 2011 to March 2013
Objectives: To increase knowledge, skills and comfort level of health care practitioners who interact with diabetic Canadians who are blind or partially sighted, and to provide support to Canadians who are affected by vision loss as a result of diabetes.
Highlights: Diabetic retinopathy -- damage to the retina caused by complications of diabetes -- affects 500,000 Canadians.   This project increased knowledge on how to prevent and treat vision loss by creating a suite of resources (in both official languages), in print and web formats, for Canadians with diabetes/diabetic retinopathy, their caregivers and diabetes educators.  Eight webinars in both official languages on four topics (diabetic retinopathy basics; practical tips and strategies to support patients; managing diabetes with vision loss; and adjusting to vision loss) were conducted.  Online resources included an overview of risk factors for developing diabetic retinopathy, prevention tips, treatments, tools to help people adapt to vision loss, resources for emotional support, and recordings of the webinars.  High traffic (2,702 visits) to the online resources within 3 months of the launch, suggested that the information provided was useful and relevant. Resources were developed to meet the need for information, including the first-of-its-kind bilingual diabetic retinopathy patient support guide and a fully-accessible bilingual website Eye Connect: Diabetic Retinopathy for diabetic retinopathy information and support.
For more information: Please visit the Canadian National Institute for the Blind website .

 

Canadian Pharmacists Association: Diabetes Strategy for Pharmacists - CANRISK: The Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Tool
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Pharmacists Association is a national not-for-profit organization that advocates for pharmacists and supports its members to advance the profession and enhance patient outcomes by providing them with the tools, information and leadership they need.
Partners: Canadian Diabetes Association; Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health; Heart and Stroke Foundation; Certified Diabetes Educators across Canada; previous external advisory committee members; pharmacy regulators; academics.
Duration: April 2011 to March 2013
Objectives: To provide support tools and approaches for pharmacists to implement diabetes screening services that will help improve the health of Canadians.
Highlights: This project trained pharmacists on support tools and approaches to implement type 2 diabetes screening services to improve the health of Canadians. The tools supported screening and early detection (through CANRISK, a Canadian tool available in 13 languages), self-management and prevention of diabetes-related complications. Eight surveys were conducted during this project to measure awareness, uptake (practice change), satisfaction, cost effectiveness of training, dissemination effectiveness, and root causes for use of the CANRISK tool. Data suggests an increase in levels of awareness and increased uptake of the CANRISK tool that will lead to its use in community pharmacies thereby providing Canadians with an early opportunity to make lifestyle modifications.
For more information: Please visit the Canadian Pharmacists Association website .

 

Hypertension Canada: “Getting to the Heart of the Matter” Cardiovascular Screening Initiative
Lead/Recipient: Hypertension Canada is a new organization that brought together three organizations (Blood Pressure Canada, Canadian Hypertension Society and Canadian Hypertension Education Program). The organization aims to educate Canadians about the prevention and control of high blood pressure.
Partners: Aga Khan Foundation; Regional Health Boards in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec; Canadian Diabetes Association; Heart and Stroke Foundation.
Duration: April 2011 to March 2013
Objectives: To increase awareness about the risks associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease; provide culturally specific support for appropriate lifestyle changes.
Highlights: Diabetes rates among Canadians of South Asian origin are one of the highest in the country (23%) and rates of undiagnosed diabetes are estimated to be three time higher in this population than in the rest of Canada. Hypertension Canada implemented a diabetes and cardiovascular disease screening program among this population and offered a range of follow-up services to help South Asian communities improve their health through lifestyle and medication changes. Results showed increased awareness of the risks associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease and the provision of culturally specific support for appropriate lifestyle changes.
For more information: Please visit Hypertension Canada website .

 

The Kidney Foundation of Canada: National Education and Targeted Screening Program
Lead/Recipient: The Kidney Foundation of Canada is a national not-for-profit organization committed to reducing the burden of kidney disease.  The Foundation provides education and support to those suffering from kidney failure and related disorders such as hypertension, diabetes, urinary tract infections and kidney stones.
Partners: Safeway Pharmacies; provincial health authorities; local diabetes community and education centres.
Duration: April 2011 to March 2013
Objectives: To assist at-risk groups and vulnerable populations to become informed and aware about diabetes and kidney disease and committed to managing their health.
Highlights: Early diagnosis of kidney disease in high-risk populations, such as those with diabetes, delays disease progression and reduces the burden of end-stage renal disease. This project involved developing and implementing a kidney disease screening and education program targeted to individuals from populations (Asian, Aboriginal, Hispanic, South Asian or African) who have or are at a high risk of developing diabetes. The project involved twenty-five screening clinics with approximately 500 individuals from high-risk populations being screened for diabetes and kidney disease. Participants received one-on-one counseling with a nurse who also provided information and educational materials. The majority of participants (75%) indicated that they had started immediately to make changes to improve their health as a result of the clinics.
For more information: Please visit the Kidney Foundation of Canada website.

 

Canadian Diabetes Association: Hispanic Nutrition Tool Just the Basics
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Diabetes Association provides educational services to people with diabetes in an effort to help them lead healthy lives.
Partners: Registered dieticians and diabetes educators who are engaged with Hispanic Canadians through a variety of organizations which serve this population
Duration: January 2011 to July 2012
Objectives: To create and disseminate a nutrition resource for use by Latin American populations in Canada.
Highlights: The incidence of pre-diabetes and diabetes, and the risk factors for the disease, in Latin American populations in Canada is significantly higher than the general population. This project sought to increase access to relevant information by creating and disseminating a nutrition resource for use by those populations and supporting educational materials to assist healthcare professionals and community health care workers to effectively use the adapted resources. As of August 2012, approximately 5,000 copies of Just the Basics had been disseminated in each of three languages (English, Spanish and Portuguese) and an additional 375 copies in French. Feedback indicated that this resource provided Hispanic Canadians with diabetes or at risk of developing diabetes with culturally relevant information about eating a healthier diet and food portion sizes and engaging in more physical activity to better manage or prevent diabetes.
For more information: Please visit the Canadian Diabetes Association website

 

Development of Measurement and Evaluation Tools for Community-based Primary and Secondary Diabetes Prevention Programs
Lead/Recipient: Active Living Coalition for Older Adults
Partners: Bruyère Academic Family Health, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging, Canadian Coalition for Seniors' Mental Health, Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology, Dietitians of Canada – Eat Right Ontario, First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program, National Indian & Inuit Community Health Representatives Organization, Schlegel-University of Windsor Research Institute for Aging, School of Public Health - University of Alberta, Sheridan Elder Research Centre.
Duration: November 2009 to March 2012
Objectives: To develop measurement and evaluation tools for primary and secondary prevention of type 2 diabetes for measuring program effectiveness and impact of the interventions.
Highlights: This project filled a gap in the prevention and treatment of diabetes by developing and disseminating two tools (in English and in French) to support non-clinical community-based leaders offering primary and secondary diabetes prevention programs to measure the impacts of the interventions on individual risk factors. The tools developed were Your Passport to Healthy Living for older adults to increase physical activity and nutrition and The Community leaders Guidebook for community leaders to support the use of the Passport in six-week workshops. Use of the tools resulted in: increased knowledge about diabetes; increased exercise; improved eating habits; weight loss; stable blood sugars; and decreased blood pressure.
For more information: Please visit the Active Living Coalition for Older Adults website

 

Get Fit for Active Living with Diabetes , Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging (CCAA)
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging is a not-for-profit national research and education centre within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Western Ontario that conducts research and program development for improved physical ability and healthy aging for older adults.
Partners: Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes Education Centres across Canada, Diabetes Nurse Educators, Fitness Leaders and Seniors.
Duration: November 2009 to March 2012
Objectives: Adaption of an existing CCAA program, Get Fit for Active Living, for older people living with diabetes and share the program with diabetes educators and community partners across Canada.
Highlights: The risk of developing type2 diabetes is significantly increased once an individual reaches the age of 55.  This project involved adapting an existing program, Get Fit for Active Living , into a cost-effective eight-week education and exercise program for older people living with diabetes to promote a long-term healthy lifestyle through physical activity and healthy eating.  In all, 97 Get Fit for Active Living with Diabetes facilitators across Canada were trained, 249 older adult participants took the 8-week program, and all measures of participant fitness improved significantly, including upper and lower body strength, cardiorespiratory endurance, upper and lower body flexibility, agility, balance, and anthropometric measurements.
For more information: Please visit the Get Fit for Active Living - Diabetes Project website

2009 - 2010 and 2010 - 2011 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program projects

The funding priorities of the 2009 - 2010 and 2010 - 2011 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program were to support the development of tools and approaches for the screening and early detection of gestational and type 2 diabetes and for the development of tools to help Canadians self-manage all types of diabetes.

In addition, both these solicitations priorities addressed cardiovascular disease and mental health/mental illness among Canadians with diabetes as secondary complications of diabetes.

These priorities were established in consultation with stakeholders.

 

Active Living Coalition for Older Adults Inc.: Development of Measurement and Evaluation Tools for Community-Based Programs
Lead/Recipient: Active Living Coalition for Older Adults Inc. is a partnership of organizations and individuals having interest in the field of aging; the organization encourages older Canadians to maintain and enhance their well-being and independence through a lifestyle that embraces daily physical activities.
Partners: Canadian Diabetes Association; Canadian Hypertension Education Program; Canadian Dieticians Association; Heart and Stroke Foundation.
Funding: $407,710
Duration: November 2009 to March 2012
In Brief: This project is developing tools to measure the effectiveness of prevention methods in reducing the risk of diabetes and diabetic complications among Canadians.  These tools – a Leader’s Manual and a self-assessment tool for older adults – will be pilot tested and made available to community leaders and program participants.
For more information: http://www.alcoa.ca

 

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health: Discussion Forums on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose - Pilot Project
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, a national body that provides Canada’s federal, provincial and territorial health care decision- makers with credible, impartial advice and evidence-based information about the effectiveness and efficiency of drugs and other health technologies
Partners: Canadian Medical Association; Canadian Academic Detailing Collaboration; Dalhousie University Continuing Medical Education; other experts in the diabetes field.
Funding: $313,279
Duration: November 2009 – March 2011
In Brief: This project will coordinate and implement a series of discussion forums on self-management of diabetes across the country, which will provide a broad perspective on the importance of all methods of managing diabetic complications.
For more information: http://www.cadth.ca

 

Canadian Association of Wound Care: Best Practices for Diabetes Foot Care Self-Management Tools
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Association of Wound Care is a non-profit organization of healthcare professionals, researchers, corporate supporters, patients and caregivers dedicated to the advancement of wound care in Canada.
Partners: An Expert Advisory Group (healthcare professionals, government representation and diabetes case managers in multiple regions of Canada); patient focus groups made up of people living with diabetes from across the country.
Funding: $433,399
Duration: November 2009 to September 2011
In Brief: Educational materials on best practices to reduce foot complications for people with diabetes are being created in this project.  These materials are being made available in person to patients and also via the web. The tools, which assist patients in identifying their risk for neuropathy, foot ulcerations and amputations, will be available in English, French, Arabic, Cantonese, Gujarati, Hindi, Japanese, Mandarin, Punjabi, Spanish, Tamil, Urdu and Vietnamese.
For more information: http://cawc.net

 

Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging (CCAA): Get Fit for Active Living with Diabetes (GFAL-D)
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging (CCAA) is a not-for-profit national research and education centre within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Western Ontario that conducts research and program development for improved physical ability and healthy aging for older adults.
Partners: Diabetes Education Centres in Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia and Ontario, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, Quebec and Saskatchewan.
Funding: $571,161
Duration: November 2009 to March 2012
In Brief: This project addresses an important dimension of self-management for people with diabetes - increased physical activity.  The project is adapting the existing Get Fit for Active Living Program for Canadians with or at risk for diabetes. The 8-week exercise and education program helps older adults get started on a regular exercise program and lead a more physically active and healthy lifestyle. In the latter part of the project, the program is being disseminated, implemented and evaluated on a larger scale across Canada to measure the project outcomes within the older adult population.
For more information: http://www.uwo.ca

 

Canadian Diabetes Association : Diabetes Information Source Canada (DISC)
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Diabetes Association provides educational services to people with diabetes in an effort to help them lead healthy lives.
Partners: Diabetes educators and other healthcare professionals.
Funding: $171,500
Duration: December 2009 to April 2010
In Brief: The project: updated and translated into French the Best Practices in Diabetes Education; ensured compliance of all materials on the CDA website with the scientific evidence from the 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada; transformed CDA professional publications by making them available online; and provided translational diabetes research into best practices to primary healthcare professionals treating people with diabetes.
For more information: http://www.diabetes.ca

 

Canadian Diabetes Association: Learning Series e-Learning Platform
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Diabetes Association provides educational services to people with diabetes in an effort to help them lead healthy lives.
Partners: Diabetes Education Centres; local health integration networks/health authorities; primary care physicians; community groups in high risk populations.
Funding: $58,181.00
Duration: November 2009 to March 2010
In Brief: The project created a web-based education program to inform Canadians about diabetes, how to self-manage their disease, and how to avoid or minimize complications. The Learning Series had been delivered using face-to-face presentations but was adapted in this project into an interactive, web-based, program featured on the Canadian Diabetes Association’s website. The program will be available in English, French, Chinese, Arabic and low literacy formats featuring culturally appropriate terms and photographs created for South Asian and Aboriginal populations.
For more information: http://www.diabetes.ca

 

Canadian Diabetes Association:  World Diabetes Congress workshops
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Diabetes Association provides educational services to people with diabetes in an effort to help them lead healthy lives.
Partners: National Aboriginal Diabetes Association; Diabète Québec; American Diabetes Association.
Funding: $143,033
Duration: August 2009 to March 2010
In Brief: The funding enabled the Canadian Diabetes Association to organize learning events at the 20th World Diabetes Congress that was held in Montreal, Quebec, October 18-22. The learning events highlighted Canadian expertise in three areas: best practices in diabetes education; the Canadian Diabetes Association’s 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines; and support for young adults living with diabetes with an emphasis on the role of public policy.
For more information: http://www.diabetes.ca

 

Canadian Pharmacists Association: Diabetes Strategy for Pharmacists
Lead/Recipient: Canadian Pharmacists Association advocates for pharmacists and supports its members to advance the profession and enhance patient outcomes.
Partners: Canadian Diabetes Association; Certified Diabetes Educators who were involved in developing the Diabetes Strategy for Pharmacists.
Funding: $320,500
Duration: November 2009 to September 2011
In Brief: This project first trained 500 pharmacists across Canada in the care of patients with or at risk of developing diabetes using educational materials created by the Canadian Pharmacists Association’s Diabetes Strategy. These materials, which guide pharmacists in helping people with or at risk of developing diabetes, are being disseminated widely to support live and online diabetes patient care workshops by pharmacists for pharmacists.  A diabetes services practice tool is also being developed for pharmacists.
For more information:

http://www.pharmacists.ca

2008 - 2009 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program project

Priority Areas for funding in 2008 – 2009 were:

  • Preventing diabetes among high risk groups; and
  • Supporting approaches for the early detection of type 2 diabetes and the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.


Canadian Pharmacists Association: National Diabetes Strategy for Pharmacists
Lead/Recipient: The mandate of the Canadian Pharmacists Association is to advance the profession of pharmacy so as to contribute to the health of Canadians.
Partners: Canadian Optimal Medication Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS); Canadian Pharmacists Journal (CPJ); Canadian Diabetes Association.
Funding: $491,730
Duration: March 2008 to March 2009
In Brief: The objective of the project was to increase pharmacist awareness, knowledge and skills related to diabetes prevention, screening and management.  The activities of the project included: developing and distributing the first pharmacist specific practice guidelines and accompanying best practices tools and resources for the prevention, detection and management of diabetes; creating pharmacist champions by identifying pharmacists from various practice settings to act as local champions and encourage the adoption of the guidelines and best practices; developing and implementing educational and skill development workshops; and exploring potential changes to the Canadian Diabetes Educator designation to increase pharmacist participation.
For more information: http://www.pharmacists.ca

 

2007 - 2008 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program projects

Priority Areas for funding in 2007 – 2008 were:

  • Preventing diabetes among high risk groups; and
  • Supporting approaches for the early detection of type 2 diabetes and the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.


Active Living Coalition for Older Adults: Active Living and Diabetes: Building on Our Success
Lead/Recipient: The Active Living Coalition for Older Adults plays a leadership role in building a society where all older Canadians lead active lifestyles thereby contributing to their physical and overall well-being.
Partners: Non-government organizations such as Older Adults Centres' Association of Ontario and the Canadian Red Cross Society; university research groups such as Waterloo Research Institute for Aging; disease-specific organizations such as the Manitoba Cardiac Institute and Osteoporosis Society of Canada.
Funding: $299,400
Duration: February 2007 to February 2008
In Brief: This project developed a comprehensive action plan to address national, regional and local issues related to older adults and diabetes.  Project activities included: the establishment of a national project advisory committee; consultations with regional and provincial partners; hosting on-site meetings with regional and provincial partners to collaborate and identify common issues; developing a summary of proposed national capacity enhancement activities; developing regional workplans; coordinating a national meeting to share the regional workplans; and creating a comprehensive national plan.  The results of the project included: the development of a national framework to implement best practices related to seniors and active living/healthy eating/diabetes; regional work plans to implement these issues; strengthened and expanded networks and partnerships among the Active Living Coalition for Older Adults and its partners.
For more information: http://www.alcoa.ca

 

Canadian Diabetes Association:  A Framework to Identify Promising or Best Practices in Diabetes Education
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) is a not-for-profit organization that works in communities across Canada to improve the life of people with diabetes through a network of volunteers, employees and healthcare professionals.
Partners: Canadian Public Health Association; College of Family Physicians of Canada; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences; Canadian Homecare Association; other Canadian Diabetes Association program areas and chapters such as Diabète Québec.
Funding: $300,000
Duration: February 2007 to February 2008
In Brief: The objectives of the project were to increase the knowledge and capacity to implement best and promising practices for diabetes education among diabetes health care professionals.  Through this project a literature review of scientific and clinical evidence was conducted; criteria for identifying the core elements of a promising or best practice in diabetes education were developed; examples of existing diabetes education practices that met the core elements for consideration as a promising or best practice were identified; an accountability framework for evaluating existing diabetes education in a consistent manner was established; and future research opportunities were identified.
For more information: http://www.diabetes.ca

 

Canadian Ethnocultural Council: Strategic Engagement of High-Risk in Ethnocultural Communities on Diabetes Awareness
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Ethnocultural Council works towards the elimination of racism and promotes the understanding of the multicultural reality of Canada.
Partners: Organizational members of the Canadian Ethnocultural Council, including:  Hispanic, African, Asian and South Asian community organizations; Ottawa Community Housing Corporation; Association of Canadian Studies; Association for Canadian Studies; Canadian Diabetes Association.
Funding: $272,000
Duration: February 2007 to February 2008
In Brief: Through this project, ethnocultural organizations, whose members represent high risk populations; raised awareness and knowledge of pre-diabetes, diabetes and its complications among children and youth; supported approaches for early detection; and developed a network of continued collaboration for prevention.  This was accomplished by developing a community outreach process with community stakeholders; conducting stakeholder focus groups in four communities across Canada; hosting a symposium; developing a resource guide; and hosting a national community briefing. The project activities were undertaken within the Hispanic, African, Asian and South Asian cultural communities in four cities in Canada.
For more information: http://www.ethnocultural.ca

 

Canadian Public Health Association: A Tool for Strengthening Chronic Disease Prevention and Management through Dialogue, Planning and Assessment
Lead/Recipient: The mandate of the Canadian Public Health Association is to represent public health in Canada.  The Association constitutes a special national resource in Canada that advocates for the improvement and maintenance of personal and community health according to the public health principles of disease prevention, health promotion and protection, and healthy public policy.
Partners: Provincial/territorial public health associations; chronic disease alliances/coalitions such as Blood Pressure Canada, Champlain Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Network and Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance of Canada; non-government organizations such as the Canadian Diabetes Association and the Heart and Stroke Foundation; local diabetes or heart health programs; universities such as the University of Ottawa Heart Institute; regional health authorities or public health units; family medicine, community health centres and clinics.
Funding: $327,900
Duration: March 2007 to March 2008
In Brief: For this project the Canadian Public Health Association: piloted a self-assessment tool to examine system capacity for successful integrated chronic disease prevention and management; worked within three regions of Canada, conducting workshops to demonstrate and apply the tool; and developed an implementation plan that outlined stakeholder roles and responsibilities for integrated chronic disease prevention and management. The results of the project included: more collaboration among diabetes stakeholders; increased knowledge of system capacity for integrated chronic disease prevention and management; and the promotion of a system approach to chronic disease prevention.
For more information: http://www.cpha.ca

 

Canadian Diabetes Association: Policy Consensus Conferences: (1) Weight and (2) Serious Complications of Diabetes
Lead/Recipient: The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) is a not-for-profit organization that works in communities across Canada to improve the life of people with diabetes through a network of volunteers, employees and healthcare professionals.
Partners: Diabète Québec; Kidney Foundation;  Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance of Canada; CNIB; Heart and Stroke Foundation; Assembly of First Nations; National Aboriginal Diabetes Association; Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation; Active Healthy Kids Canada; Canadian Cancer Society; Arthritis Society;  Canadian Institute of Health Research; Mouvement de la Santé / Fondation Changnon; other healthy living and obesity prevention organizations.
Funding: $380,000
Duration: September 2007 to March 2008
In Brief: The objectives of the project were to increase public, professional and policy-maker awareness of the impact of television and marketing on the increasing rates of unhealthy weight amongst Canadian children and youth; to increase public, professional  and policy-maker awareness of the impact of diabetes-related complications; and to increase support for a chronic disease management approach.  These objectives were achieved through a Policy Consensus Conference on the impact of marketing/advertising on the weight of children/youth and a Policy Summit on the serious complications of diabetes.
For more information: http://www.diabetes.ca/

2006 - 2007 Canadian Diabetes Strategy Community-Based Program project

Priority areas for funding 2006 - 2007 were:

  • Preventing diabetes among high risk groups; and
  • Supporting approaches for the early detection of type 2 diabetes and the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.


Active Living Alliance for Canadians with a Disability: Prevention, Detection and Management of Diabetes for Canadians with a Disability
Lead/Recipient: The mandate of the Active Living Alliance for Canadians with a Disability is to promote and facilitate wellness of Canadians with a disability through healthy active living.
Partners: Members of the organization's Diabetes Steering Committee, including: provincial active living alliances; provincial recreation associations; municipalities, such as the city of Edmonton; national associations such as the Canadian Public Health Association and the Canadian Therapeutic Recreation Association.
Funding:  $155,000
Duration: April 2006 to March 2007
In Brief: In this project the organization: conducted a literature review to examine the relationship between diabetes and disabilities; developed a public awareness package containing information and resources on diabetes prevention, early detection, and management for Canadians with a disability; developed a diabetes information package for practitioners working with Canadians with a disability; integrated diabetes information into existing programming; and shared information and resources across the Alliance network.  The project produced web-based information on diabetes tailored to Canadians with a disability, a nutrition component for Alliance youth programs, and information kits on diabetes and disabilities for both practitioners and Canadians with a disability.
For more information: http://www.ala.ca
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