Getting tested for sexually transmitted infections (STI)

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When to get tested

You should get tested for STI if:

If you and your partner(s) are tested and have no infections, you're only protected while you have not been:

To have safer sex, always:

You and your partner(s) should all get treated as soon as you or they test positive for an STI.

You can have more than one STI at the same time.

Learn more about:

Where to get tested

If you want to be tested for STI, find a sexual health service near you, such as:

Learn more:

Testing process

Some infections are reportable. This means your local public health unit will receive reports of all positive test results for:

This way, they can monitor the health of the whole community.

Some clinics that offer anonymous HIV testing report results to their public health unit. They do not include any identifying information about you.

No one will know you have the infection except:

A public health nurse may contact you and offer to help with telling your current and past partners that they need to be tested.

What to expect during testing

The health care provider will ask you questions about your sexual activity. This will help them decide what kinds of testing, physical examination and treatment you need. They may ask about:

Each test is different, and will depend on:

Your health care provider may collect a urine sample to test for:

They may collect a blood sample to test for:

They may take cotton swab samples from relevant parts of your body, such as your:

They use these cotton swab samples to test for:

Your health care provider may also:

Your health care provider may recommend other tests depending on the situation.

Tell your health care provider if you want a support person in the room during your examination.

You may see the terms STI and STBBI when reading about getting tested. STBBI stands for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections. The term takes into account that some infections can be transmitted through the blood in a non-sexual context, like HIV and hepatitis C.

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