Annual Report on the Administration of the Privacy Act April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Privacy Act (the Act) came into force on July 1, 1983.

The Act provides the legal framework for the collection, retention, use, disclosure, disposition and accuracy of personal information in the administration of programs and activities by federal government institutions. It also provides Canadian citizens and permanent residents with a right of access to, and correction of, their own personal information under the control of a federal institution with certain specific and limited exceptions.

Section 72 of the Act requires that the head of every federal government institution prepare an annual report, for submission to Parliament, on the administration of the Act within the institution. Every report shall be laid before each House of Parliament within 3 months after the financial year that the report refers to, or, if that House is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 sitting days of the next session.

This annual report provides a summary of the management and administration of the Act within the Public Service Commission of Canada for fiscal year 2018–19. This report is also available on the publications page of our website.

Part I – General information on the Public Service Commission of Canada

1. Raison d’être

The President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) in accordance with the Financial Administration Act, and for tabling the PSC’s annual report in Parliament. The PSC reports independently on its mandate to Parliament.

For over a century, the PSC has been mandated to promote and safeguard merit-based appointments and protect the non-partisan nature of the federal public service. Under the delegated staffing system set out in the Public Service Employment Act, the PSC fulfills its responsibilities by providing policy guidance and expertise, conducting oversight, delivering innovative staffing and assessment services, and reporting to Parliament on the performance of the staffing system and on non-partisanship in the public service. These are key factors in building and maintaining a public service that delivers results for Canadians.

Core responsibility

Through policy direction and guidance, the PSC supports departments and agencies in the hiring of qualified individuals into and within the public service, helping to shape a workforce reflecting Canada’s diversity. It also delivers recruitment programs and assessment services supporting the strategic recruitment priorities of the Government of Canada and the renewal of the public service, leveraging modern tools to provide Canadians with barrier-free access to public service jobs.

The PSC oversees public service hiring, ensuring the integrity of the hiring process. It provides guidance to employees regarding their rights and obligations related to political activities, and renders decisions on political candidacy, respecting employees’ rights to participate in political activities while protecting the non-partisan nature of the public service.

2. Program inventory

The program inventory is a list of all programs that support the delivery of our departmental results. It describes how the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) achieves its results by identifying how resources contribute to them. While programs are very similar to our sectors, they were not designed to reflect that structure. For instance, a program’s departmental result can rely on the work of more than one sector.

The PSC has 3 programs, each with a vice-president who is responsible for ensuring its success.

Program – Policy Direction and Support

The Policy Direction and Support Program exists to support departments and agencies in hiring qualified individuals into and within the public service, and in experimenting and innovating with their staffing approaches and supporting strategies to help them meet their business needs and achieve their diversity and employment equity objectives. This program establishes government-wide direction on staffing through regulations and policy. It also provides guidance to organizations to enable legislative, regulatory and policy compliance, including the provision of expert advice. This program also assesses public servants' requests for permission to become candidates for elected office, and conducts outreach to ensure public servants know their rights and obligations regarding political activities.

Program – Recruitment and Assessment Services

The Recruitment and Assessment Services Program exists to support departments and agencies in hiring qualified individuals into and within the public service, helping to shape a workforce reflecting Canada’s diversity. This program delivers recruitment programs, student programs, as well as assessment and accommodation services, and administers legislated priority entitlements. Through outreach and the use of modern tools, online systems and technology, it provides Canadians with barrier-free access to public service jobs. This program also collaborates with departments and agencies to create and implement innovative staffing and assessment approaches to meet the strategic recruitment priorities of the Government of Canada and the renewal of the public service.

Program – Oversight and Monitoring

The Oversight and Monitoring Program exists to ensure the integrity of the merit-based public service hiring process and to identify areas for continuous improvement. The program performs audits and investigations and conducts surveys to monitor organizational compliance with staffing legislation, regulations and policies, and to provide a system-wide view of the public service staffing environment. This program also monitors and analyzes hiring data and conducts research to provide departments and Canadians with an informed view of the dynamics of public service hiring.

Part II – Annual report on the Privacy Act

1. Organization of delegation and activities

1.1 Delegation order

The President of the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) is designated as the head of the government institution for the administration of the Privacy Act (the Act).

Pursuant to section 73 of the Act, deputy heads may delegate any of their powers, duties or functions under the Act by signing an order authorizing one or more officers or employees at the appropriate level to exercise or perform the powers, duties or functions of the head specified in the order.

A large portion of the powers, duties and functions of the President, under the Act, are delegated to the Chief of Staff, who is the designated Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Coordinator for the PSC. Operational responsibility for the application of the Act resides with the ATIP Manager, who has partial delegation. Partial delegation under the Act is granted to the Departmental Security Officer, to disclose personal information pursuant to s 8(2)(m) of the Act. This delegation occurs in specific circumstances related to security, when the information was obtained outside of the PSC’s program activities. See Annex A – Delegation instrument.

1.2 The Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator

The ATIP Coordinator is responsible for developing, coordinating and implementing effective policies, guidelines, systems and procedures to ensure requests are processed efficiently under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act (the acts).

The Coordinator is also responsible for developing, coordinating and implementing policies, systems and procedures that are required by both acts as well as Treasury Board of Canada policies and directives. The activities of the Coordinator include:

1.3 The Access to Information and Privacy Office

The ATIP Office supports the ATIP Coordinator in administering the provisions of the acts and related TBS policies for the PSC. The Office currently comprises a manager, 2 analysts and one administrative assistant, and it falls under the Corporate Secretariat.

The analysts are responsible for processing requests and consultations under both the acts, preparing responses to complaints, reviewing the PSC’s Info Source chapter and supporting all other ATIP responsibilities. The analysts provide privacy advice and support in the evaluation of program activities and help create privacy compliance documents, such as privacy notice statements and privacy impact assessments. They also help departmental officials manage privacy breaches and disclosures of personal information.

The ATIP Office delivers general and customized training sessions for our employees.

It also reviews its policies and procedures to improve the support it provides to its sector liaison officers, and to promote a better understanding of their roles, responsibilities and obligations related to processing requests under both acts.

1.4 Access to information and privacy liaison officers

The ATIP Office processes requests with the assistance of liaison officers, who are employees knowledgeable of their sector’s activities. There is one liaison officer for each sector as well as for the Corporate Secretariat and for the Chief Audit and Evaluations Executive. In addition to acting as the point of contact between their area and the ATIP Office, the liaison officers are responsible for:

Liaison officers play an important role in ensuring that the PSC conducts a thorough and complete search of its record holdings when processing requests.

2. Statistical report: interpretation

Over the last reporting period, the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) received a total of 124 requests submitted under both acts and responded to 124 requests. This number represents an 18% decrease in requests received compared to the previous year. When compared to our historical average, which excludes a temporary surge in 2015–17, these 124 requests represent a 20% increase.

Total access to information and privacy request - Text version
Total Access to Information and Privacy Requests
Fiscal Year Received Completed
2009-10 69 81
2010-11 66 66
2011-12 74 69
2012-13 101 96
2013-14 73 82
2014-15 56 53
2015-16 1216 1097
2016-17 3188 3303
2017-18 151 158
2018-19 124 124

2.1 Requests under the Privacy Act

From April 1, 2018, to March 31, 2019, the PSC received 49 new requests under the Access to Privacy Act (the Act), in addition to one request that was carried over from the previous period. This represents a 4% decrease in requests received compared with the previous year.

The PSC responded to 47 requests during the reporting period, requiring the review of 4 054 pages of records. Three requests were ongoing at the end of the reporting period and were carried forward to the next one.

Privacy Requests - Text version
Fiscal Year Received Completed
2009-10 31 30
2010-11 28 26
2011-12 28 29
2012-13 32 31
2013-14 18 19
2014-15 16 17
2015-16 1 036 919
2016-17 3 062 3 175
2017-18 51 54
2018-19 49 47

2.2 Nature of requests

The nature of the 47 requests closed during this reporting period break down as follows:

2.3 Inter-organizational consultations

The PSC received one request for consultation from another government agency during this reporting period; none were carried over from the previous reporting period. The processing of this request required a review of 5 pages. No consultations were outstanding at the end of the period; none were carried over into the 2019–20 reporting period.

In response to the sole consultation completed during the reporting period, the PSC had no objection to the disclosure of the records.

The PSC consulted other government departments and agencies once in relation to the processing of a single request completed during this reporting period.

2.4 Informal requests

In an attempt to improve and facilitate access, the PSC promotes informal methods of access whenever possible. Requesters may, in some cases, obtain access to their personal information on an informal basis by contacting the manager of the program area that controls the records. In these instances, the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office provides assistance and advice, as required.

2.5 Disposition of requests completed

For the 47 requests closed during this reporting period, information was released either in whole or in part in 20 cases, representing 42.5% of the requests. The remaining 27 requests were either abandoned (51.1 %) or no records existed (6.4%). Out of the 24 requests that were abandoned during the reporting period, 19 were intended for another government institution, and were informally transferred with the consent of the requester.

Response to completed requests - Text version
Disposition Percentage
All disclosed 19.1%
Disclosed in part 23.4%
No records exist 6.4%
Abandoned 51.1%

2.6 Exemptions invoked

Sections 18 through 28 of the Act set out the exemptions intended to protect information pertaining to a particular public or private interest. During the reporting period, the most frequently invoked exemptions were section 26 [personal information of another individual] and section 27 [solicitor-client privilege].

2.7 Exclusions invoked

Sections 69 and 70 of the Act outline certain types of information that it does not apply to. These exclusions relate to published material, library and museum material, material placed in Library and Archives Canada by or on behalf of third parties, some materials relating to the Canada Broadcasting Corporation and Cabinet confidences.

The PSC did not invoke any exclusions during the reporting period.

2.8 Extensions of time limits

Extensions of the 30-day statutory response time are permissible under section 15 of the Act. A request may be extended in accordance with multiple provisions of this section. During the reporting period, a total of 4 extension provisions were invoked in the processing of requests completed during the reporting period.

2.9 Completion time

Of the 47 closed requests, the PSC responded to 41 within 30 days or less, representing 82% of all the requests completed; 3 requests (6.3 %) were completed within 31 to 60 days, 3 (6.3%) within 61 to 120 days, and none required more than 120 days to process. Of these, 46 (98 %) were closed within the allowable time limit. Where the 30th day of a request falls on a weekend or a statutory holiday, a request is still deemed to be completed on time if the response is issued during the next available working day.

2.10 Translation

The PSC did not receive any requests for translation of personal information pursuant to paragraph 17(2)(b) of the Act.

2.11 Format of information released

Regarding the 20 requests for which information was released in whole or in part, information for 7 requests (35%) was provided on paper; information regarding the rest, 13 requests (65%), was provided electronically.

2.12 Corrections and notations

The PSC did not receive any requests for the correction of personal information in accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Act.

2.13 Costs

During the reporting period, the ATIP Office spent $142,919 on salaries and $27,445 on goods and services, including $26,633 for professional service contracts, for the administration of the Act.

The salary and professional service costs represented 2.09 full-time equivalent employees.

3. Summary of Access to Information and Privacy Office activities

3.1 Development of policies, directives, guidelines and other key documents

In this reporting period, the Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office engaged a consultant to complete a policy suite review. This resulted in a new Privacy Management Framework that replaced 5 separate policy instruments. This review also produced a new Standard for the Management of Privacy Breaches, and a Directive on Privacy Protocols.

Also during this reporting period, the ATIP Office created a privacy impact assessment work plan to conduct assessments on existing programs across the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) over the next 5 years.

3.2 Advice and training

Advice

In addition to processing Access to Information Act and Privacy Act (the Act) requests, the ATIP Office provides advice to Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) managers and employees, as well as to other organizations and members of the public regarding a variety of issues and questions related to both acts.

Requests for guidance and advice were of the following nature:

Participation in the governance process

The ATIP Coordinator is a member of the Executive Management Committee, the Integration Committee, the Resource Management Committee and the Departmental Open Government Advisory Group. The ATIP Manager is a member of the Information Management and Information Technology Committee, the Security Committee and the Open Data Core Project Team. Additionally, the ATIP Office sits as a non-voting member of the Project Review Committee and the IT Business Operations Team. The ATIP Office also acts in an advisory capacity on the Code for Canada project panel and the GC Jobs Transformation Core Management Committee.

Active participation in these committees and various other working groups allows the ATIP Office to:

Open government

Our Open Government Implementation Plan outlines a set of activities and deliverables to meet our requirements under the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Directive on Open Government. The plan’s goal is for the PSC to develop the internal mechanisms necessary to maximize the release of government information and data of business value. As a member of the Open Government Advisory Council and the Open Data Core Project Team, the ATIP Office provides ongoing strategic advice regarding privacy, confidentiality, and security concerns.

The PSC has implemented business processes for Open Information and Open Data, which incorporate a review by the ATIP Office. This review considers the principles of exemptions defines in the Act to protect sensitive information prior to publication.

Internal reporting

The PSC has a stable and effective ATIP program. The ATIP Office meets with individual senior executives to address specific issues, and reports to senior management on significant issues in an ad hoc manner, when required.

All privacy breaches are reported to the President as they are identified. Privacy breaches are also reported to the departmental Security Committee and the Information Management and Information Technology Committee on a quarterly basis.

The ATIP Office also provides annual updates to the Executive Management Committee on the administration of the ATIP program and the status of privacy impact assessments.

Training

The ATIP Office continues to deliver core training for supervisors and managers. The primary goal of this training program is to ensure that managers are fully aware of their responsibilities under both acts and related internal policies.

The Canada School of Public Service’s “Fundamentals of Access to Information and Privacy” self-directed course is also recommended for all employees.

3.3 Tracking system and imaging software

The ATIP Office continues to use AccessPro Case Management and AccessPro Redaction. With the eventual department-wide migration to Windows 10, the latest release of AccessPro Suite is being tested prior to deployment within the ATIP Office.

3.4 Collection, use and disclosure of personal information

3.4.1 Personal information banks

During this reporting period, the PSC reviewed 77 personal information banks to ensure that they were aligned with the departmental program inventory.

3.4.2 Exempt banks

The PSC does not have any exempt banks. There were no denials of access under subsection 18(2) of the Act.

3.4.3. Disclosure under subsection 8(2) of the Act

Personal information under the control of a government institution should not, without the consent of the individual to whom it relates, be disclosed by the institution except in accordance with subsection 8(2) of the Act.

Paragraph 8(2)(e) of the Act allows for the disclosure of personal information, without the consent of the individual, upon request from an investigative body for the purpose of enforcing a law or carrying out a lawful investigation. No personal information was disclosed using this provision during the reporting period.

Paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Act concerns cases where, in the opinion of the head of the institution, the public interest in disclosure clearly outweighs any invasion of privacy that could result from the disclosure or where disclosure would clearly benefit the individual to whom the information relates. The PSC invoked this provision twice during the reporting period.

One disclosure was in the best interest of the public, and the personal information was disclosed to another federal government institution. The second disclosure was in the best interest of the individual, and was made to the RCMP. In both cases, the Privacy Commissioner was notified after the disclosure.

3.4.4 Review of documents

The ATIP Office regularly reviews certain documents prior to disclosure in order to identify personal information that may have been included. These reviews ensure that proper procedures for release of these documents are followed and respect the provisions of the Act.

In order to protect the privacy of participants in internal investigations, the ATIP Office offers a service to review investigation reports before they are communicated to concerned individuals.

3.5 Privacy breaches

There were 6 confirmed privacy breaches during this reporting period. Five of these involved human error and issues stemming from the PSC’s email transformation initiative, switching to the @canada.ca email domain. One of these was caused by a lack of awareness of the requirements of the Act and the Public Service Employment Act. This lack of awareness was addressed in formalized training delivered to the program area where the breach occurred. All 6 of these breaches have been reported to Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner.

The PSC Policy on Privacy Breaches does not distinguish between material and immaterial privacy breaches. Therefore, all privacy breaches are reported to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and TBS. However, the PSC’s proposed Standard on Breach Management takes a new approach to weigh materiality, and only requires that material privacy breaches be reported to TBS and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner. As such, a shift in reporting is expected during the 2019–20 fiscal year.

At the time of drafting of this report, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner had responded to one of these privacy breaches.

3.6 Annual report on the status of privacy impact assessments

In June 2018, the ATIP Office presented the third annual and redesigned Status Report on privacy impact assessments to the Executive Management Committee. The purpose of this year’s report is to:

During the last reporting period, the ATIP Office presented a privacy impact assessment architecture report to senior management for their approval. This end-state model supports the comprehensive identification and management of privacy risks across all of our program activities, and aided in the creation a 5-year privacy impact assessment work plan that maps out when each program area will undergo an assessment. This work plan prioritizes program areas that collect and/or use personal information considered to be high risk.

4. Complaints

4.1 Number of complaints

During the reporting period, 3 complaints were submitted to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner regarding the processing of Privacy Act requests.

4.2 Nature of complaints

The following complaints were received during the reporting period:

4.3 Complaints closed

During the reporting period, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner confirmed that one investigation was deemed not-founded.

5. Court cases

No court actions were filed against the Public Service Commission of Canada during the reporting period.

6. Privacy impact assessments

The Directive on Privacy Impact Assessment came into effect in April 2010. The goal of the directive is to allow government institutions to identify whether a program or a service delivery initiative involving the collection, use or disclosure of personal information, as defined in the Privacy Act, complies with privacy principles. Privacy impact assessments also aim to avoid or mitigate any identifiable risks to privacy. The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office provides advice and guidance to Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) managers throughout the privacy impact assessment production process, including the review of privacy impact assessment reports and liaison with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner.

Summaries of completed privacy impact assessments are posted on our website.

The PSC’s Personnel Psychology Centre and Investigations Directorate are currently both finalizing privacy impact assessment reports. The ATIP Office will continue to support the program areas to finalize these reports.

Annex A – Delegation instrument

Privacy Act – Delegation Order

The President of the Public Service Commission of Canada, as head of the government institution, hereby designates pursuant to section 73 of the Privacy Act (the Act), the persons holding the positions set out below, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers, duties or functions of the President vested in them by the Act.

Position Sections of the Privacy Act
Chief of Staff/Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator Act: (8)(2)(j), 8(4), 8(5), 9(1), 9(4), 10, 14, 15, 17(2)(b), 17(3)(b), 18(2), 19-22, 22.3-28, 31, 33(2), 35(1), 35(4), 36(3), 37(3), 51(2)(b), 51(3), 72(1)

Regulations: 9, 11(2), 11(4), 13(1), 14
Manager, Access to Information and Privacy Act: 15, 17(2)(b), 17(3)(b)
Regulations: 9, 11(2)
Vice-President Corporate Affairs Sector and Departmental Security Officer (DSO) A limited delegation is granted to the position identified herein to exercise the authority disclose personal information in accordance with subparagraphs 8(2)(m)(i) and 8(2)(m)(ii) of the Privacy Act.

This delegation is limited to circumstances where the disclosure relates to security matters that do not originate from Public Service Commission of Canada Program areas.

The DSO will work in collaboration with the Access to information and Privacy coordinator who has the delegated authority to act pursuant to subsection 8(5) of the Privacy Act in providing notice of disclosure to the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

This delegation is effective as of the 30th day of the month of July, 2018.

Signature of President Patrick Borbey dated july 30th 2018

Appendix A

Privacy Act

8(2)(j) Disclosure for research purposes
8(4) Copies of requests under 8(2)(e) to be retained
8(5) Notice of disclosure under 8(2)(m)
9(1) Record of disclosures to be retained
9(4) Consistent uses
10 Personal information to be included in personal information banks
14 Notice where access requested
15 Extension of time limits
17(2)(b) Language of access
17(3)(b) Access to personal information in alternative format
18(2) Exemption (exempt bank) - Disclosure may be refused
19(1) Exemption - Personal information obtained in confidence
19(2) Exemption - Where authorized to disclose
20 Exemption - Federal-provincial affairs
21 Exemption - International affairs and defence
22 Exemption - Law enforcement and investigation
22.3 Exemption - Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act
23 Exemption - Security clearances
24 Exemption - Individuals sentenced for an offence
25 Exemption - Safety of individuals
26 Exemption - Information about another individual
27 Exemption - Solicitor-client privilege
28 Exemption - Medical record
31 Notice of intention to investigate
33(2) Right to make representation
35(1) Findings and recommendations of Privacy Commissioner (complaints)
35(4) Access to be given
36(3) Report of findings and recommendations (exempt banks)
37(3) Report of findings and recommendations (compliance review)
51 (2)(b) Special rules for hearings
51(3) Ex parte representations
72(1) Report to Parliament

Privacy Regulations

9 Reasonable facilities and time provided to examine personal information
11(2) Notification that correction to personal information has been made
11(4) Notification that correction to personal information has been refused
13(1) Disclosure of personal information relating to physical or mental health may be made to a qualified medical practitioner or psychologist for an opinion on whether to release information to the requestor
14 Disclosure of personal information relating to physical or mental health may be made to a requestor in the presence of a qualified medical practitioner or psychologist

Annex B – Annex B – 2018–2019 Annual Privacy Act Statistical Report

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Public Service Commission (PSC)

Reporting period: 2018-04-01 to 2019-03-31

Part 1: Requests Under the Privacy Act

Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 49
Outstanding from previous reporting period 1
Total 50
Closed during reporting period 47
Carried over to next reporting period 3

Part 2: Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of Requests Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 3 5 1 0 0 0 0 9
Disclosed in part 0 6 2 3 0 0 0 11
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3
Request abandoned 23 1 0 0 0 0 0 24
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 26 15 3 3 0 0 0 47
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests
18(2) 0 22(1)(a)(i) 0 23(a) 0
19(1)(a) 0 22(1)(a)(ii) 0 23(b) 0
19(1)(b) 0 22(1)(a)(iii) 0 24(a) 0
19(1)(c) 0 22(1)(b) 0 24(b) 0
19(1)(d) 0 22(1)(c) 0 25 0
19(1)(e) 0 22(2) 0 26 8
19(1)(f) 0 22.1 0 27 2
20 0 22.2 0 28 0
21 0 22.3 0
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests Section Number of Requests
69(1)(a) 0 70(1) 0 70(1)(d) 0
69(1)(b) 0 70(1)(a) 0 70(1)(e) 0
69.1 0 70(1)(b) 0 70(1)(f) 0
70(1)(c) 0 70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 6 3 0
Disclosed in part 1 10 0
Total 7 13 0
2.5 Complexity
2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of Requests Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Disclosed Number of Requests
All disclosed 243 177 9
Disclosed in part 3811 2683 11
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 24
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
Total 4054 2860 44
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100
Pages Processed
101-500
Pages Processed
501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More Than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 9 177 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 4 111 4 800 2 1059 1 713 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned  24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 37 288 4 800 2 1059 1 713 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation Required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 1 0 0 0 1
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 0 0 1
2.6 Deemed refusals
2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of Requests Closed Past the Statutory Deadline Principal Reason
Workload External Consultation Internal Consultation Other
1 1 0 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of Days Past Deadline Number of Requests Past Deadline Where No Extension Was Taken Number of Requests Past Deadline Where An Extension Was Taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 1 1
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121  to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 1 1
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French  0 0 0
French to English  0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3: Disclosures Under Subsections 8(2) and 8(5)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Subsection 8(5) Total
0 2 2 4

Part 4: Requests for Correction of Personal Information and Notations

Disposition for Correction Requests Received Number
Notations attached 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Total 0

Part 5: Extensions

5.1  Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of Requests Where an Extension Was Taken 15(a)(i)
Interference With Operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or Conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 0 0 1 0
Disclosed in part 3 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 3 0 1 0
5.2 Length of extensions
Length of Extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 3 0 1 0
Total 3 0 1 0

Part 6: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations
Consultations Other Government of Canada Institutions Number of Pages to Review Other Organizations Number of Pages to Review
Received during the reporting period 1 5 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 1 5 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 1 5 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions
Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121  to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121  to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7: Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

7.1 Requests with Legal Services
Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000
Pages Processed
1001-5000
Pages Processed
More than 5000
Pages Processed
Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed Number of
Requests
Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 8: Complaints and Investigations Notices Received

Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
3 1 1 0 5

Part 9: Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs)

Number of PIA(s) completed 0

Part 10: Resources Related to the Privacy Act

10.1  Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries  $142,919
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $27,445
• Professional services contracts $26,633  
• Other $812
Total $170,364
10.2  Human Resources
Resources Person Years Dedicated to Privacy Activities
Full-time employees 1.99
Part-time and casual employees 0.00
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.10
Students 0.00
Total 2.09

Note: Enter values to two decimal places.

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