President Meeting with Dr. Pierre Béland, Commissioner, International Joint Commission August 26, 2019

Introduction

Deputy Head

Dr. Pierre Béland was appointed as the Commissioner of the International Joint Commission (IJC) on May 9, 2019.

Dr. Pierre Béland is exercising the Public Service Commission’s (PSC) authority for the first time as Deputy Head (DH). A copy of the New Direction in Staffing (NDS) highlights for DHs is attached as Annex A.

Organizational Context

Mandate

Canada and the United States created the IJC because they recognized that each country is affected by the other’s actions in lake and river systems along the border. The two countries cooperate to manage these waters wisely and protect them for the benefit of today’s citizens and future generations.

The IJC has two main responsibilities: approving projects that affect water levels and flows across the boundary and investigating transboundary issues and recommending solutions. The IJC’s recommendations and decisions take into account the needs presented by a wide range of water uses, including drinking water, commercial shipping, hydroelectric power generation, agriculture, industry, fishing, recreational boating and shoreline property.

Population and Staffing Activities

Population

IJC is a very small organization that has a population of 30 employees (as of March 31, 2019).

Staffing Activities

In the 2018–2019 fiscal year, the organization performed 17staffing actions through its service provider, Public Service and Procurement Canada, detailed as follows:

Please refer to Annex B for additional detail on staffing activities.

Time to Staff

The data is insufficient for providing results on internal and external process times for the IJC.

Staffing Framework

New Direction in Staffing Implementation

Following the implementation of the New Direction in Staffing (NDS), the IJC developed its appointment and staffing policy. This policy, which has been in effect since July 2016, was shared with the PSC.

In January 2019, the IJC shared its sub-delegation instrument and guidelines with the PSC. The PSC provided feedback and commended the IJC for its work on the documents. It should be noted that its instrument meets all the requirements of the Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instrument (ADAI).

Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instrument Annex D Reporting

Use of the Public Service Official Languages Exclusion Approval Order and the Public Service Official Languages Appointment Regulations

IJC reported that the organization made no useof the PSOLEAO and no use of the PSOLAR for the period of April 1, 2018,and March 31, 2019.

Approved Deputy Head Exceptions to the National Area of Selection Requirements for External Advertised Appointment Process

IJC reported that the DH approved 0 exceptionsto the NAOS.

Results of Organizational Cyclical Assessment

The IJC expressed interest in participating in the PSC’s pilot project to perform cyclical assessments of smaller organizations.

Inquiries and Trends

The PSC received a total of 15 requests for information between April 1, 2018, and January 31, 2019. There is a very good relationship between the staffing support advisor (SSA) and the organization’s contacts.

Oversight

Investigations

No investigation for IJC.

Staffing and Non-Partisanship Survey Results (SNPS)

For certain questions, the IJC’s SNPS results diverge with those of other very small organizations and the public service as a whole. It should be noted that the IJC did not receive results for every SNPS question because results are only provided for questions with at least 10 respondents.

Below are the main findings of the IJC’s 2018 SNPS results:

Diversity Profile

Due to the organizations small number of employees, the employment equity statistics have been removed from this report to protect the confidentiality of individual respondents.

Priority Entitlements and Veterans

From April 1, 2018, to July 10, 2019, the IJC appointed one person with a priority entitlement. Over the same period, the IJC submitted 11 requests for priority clearance.

As at June 30, 2019, the IJC had not appointed any member of the Canadian Armed Forces medically released for reasons attributable or not attributable to service since the Veterans Hiring Act came into effect on July 1, 2015.

On July 23, 2019, the IJC had no “active” persons with a priority entitlement in the PSC priority system.

Non-Partisanship in the Public Service

Nick Heisler is the IJC Designated Political Activities Representative (DPAR). The DPAR liaises with the PSC on issues related to political activities and non‑partisanship.

In past years, the PSC has not received any request to stand in an election from an IJC employee. Since April 1, 2015, the PSC has received no federal, provincial, territorial or municipal requests from this organization.

The 2018 SNPS results indicated that 87.5% of IJC employees were aware of their rights and obligations for engaging in political activities, compared to 80.1% across the public service. In addition, 93.8% of employees indicated that they are able to make informed decisions about engaging in political activities, compared to 92.9% in organizations of a similar size and 87.9% in the public service as a whole.

PSC Initiatives

IJC is not part of any PSC-led initiatives at this moment.

Staffing Support

Public Service Commission Representatives and Organizational Contacts

The Staffing Support Advisor (SSA) assigned to this organization is Muriel Ngombo and the primary organizational contacts are Isabelle Reid, Executive Assistant, and Céline Desjardins, Administrative Officer, Human Resources.

Prepared by:

Gaétane Clément,
Staffing Support Advisor

Annexes:

Annex A

A New Direction in Staffing - A merit-based system that is effective, efficient and fair

Appointment Policy

New focus on core requirements to provide sub-delegated persons greater discretion in making an appointment

Delegation

All PSC monitoring and reporting requirements now found in the Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instrument

Monitoring and Reporting

Monitoring built by organizations, targeted to their needs

PSC Oversight

System-wide focus

This document should be read in conjunction with the Public Service Employment Act, the Public Service Employment Regulations, the PSC Appointment Policy and the PSC Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instrument.

Annex B

Figure 1 - Population by tenure as of March 31
Text version
Table 1 - Public Service Employment Act population by tenure as of March 31

Year

Indeterminate
population

Term
population

Casual
population

Student
population

Total
population

As of March 31, 2014

24

1

3

2

30

As of March 31, 2015

24

4

0

2

30

As of March 31, 2016

25

1

2

1

29

As of March 31, 2017

24

1

3

2

30

As of March 31, 2018

23

1

1

5

30

As of March 31, 2019

24

3

0

3

30

* The Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada is the result of an amalgamation of eleven (11) federal administrative tribunals in 2014

Figure 2 - Population by language requirements as of March 31, 2019
Text version
Table 2 - Public Service Employment Act population by language requirements of the position for fiscal year 2018 to 2019

Linguistic requirements of the position

Population as of March 31, 2019

Percentage of population as of March 31, 2019

Bilingual

8

68%

Unilingual

17

32%

Unknown

5

 

Figure 3 - Population by occupational group as of March 31, 2019
Text version
Table 3 - Top occupational groups, as a percentage of the Public Service Employment Act population for fiscal year 2018 to 2019

Occupational group

Population as of March 31, 2019

Percentage of population as of March 31, 2019

AS – Administrative Services

8

30%

PC – Physical Sciences

6

22%

EX – Executive

3

11%

Other

10

37%

Figure 4 - Population by region as of March 31, 2019
Text version
Table 4 - Distribution by region, as a percentage of the Public Service Employment Act population for fiscal year 2018 to 2019

Region

Population as of March 31, 2019

Percentage of population as of March 31, 2019

National Capital Region (NCR)

21

70%

Non-NCR

9

30%

Unknown

0

 

Figure 5 - External indeterminate hires by occupational group, 2018-19
Text version
Table 5 - External indeterminate hires by top occupational groups, for fiscal year 2018 to 2019

Occupational group

Number of indeterminate hiring activities

Percentage of all indeterminate hiring activities

AS – Administrative Services

1

50%

EC – Economics and Social Sciences Services

1

50%

Other

0

0%

Total

0

100%

Figure 6 - Staffing by region
Text version
Table 6 - Percentage of staffing activities in the National Capital Region compared with all other regions by fiscal year

Fiscal year

Percentage of staffing activities in the National Capital Region (NCR)

Percentage of staffing activities in all other regions (Non-NCR)

2014 to 2015

68%

32%

2015 to 2016

63%

37%

2016 to 2017

95%

5%

2017 to 2018

94%

6%

2018 to 2019

82%

18%

Figure 7 - Staffing by process type
Text version
Table 7 - Number and percentage of staffing activities by type of process and fiscal year

Fiscal year

Non-advertised processes (excludes unknowns)

Advertised processes

% of Non- advertised processes

2014 to 2015

2

5

29%

2015 to 2016

0

0

0%

2016 to 2017

0

0

0%

2017 to 2018

1

2

33%

2018 to 2019

2

5

29%

Figure 8 - Staffing by appointment type
Text version
Table 8 - Staffing activities by appointment type and fiscal year

Fiscal year

Promotions

Lateral and downward movements

Appointments to the public service (includes casuals and students)

Acting appointments (excludes appointments of less than 4 months)

Total

2014 to 2015

3

1

17

1

22

2015 to 2016

0

1

15

0

16

2016 to 2017

0

4

15

0

19

2017 to 2018

1

1

14

1

17

2018 to 2019

4

1

12

0

17

Figure 9 - Staffing by tenure
Text version
Table 9 - Staffing activities by tenure and fiscal year

Fiscal year

Indeterminate staffing activities

Term staffing activities

Casual staffing activities

Student staffing activities

Total staffing activities

2014 to 2015

6

4

6

6

22

2015 to 2016

1

2

6

7

16

2016 to 2017

4

2

6

7

19

2017 to 2018

3

2

2

10

17

2018 to 2019

7

2

1

7

17

Key findings - Staffing and non-partisanship survey (2018)

For additional questions, there is no sufficient survey data available for the International Joint Commission

Figure 10 - Student program hires
Text version
Table 10 - Student staffing activities by recruitment program and fiscal year

Fiscal year

Federal Student Work Experience Program

Post-Secondary Co-op/Internship Program

Research Affiliate Program

Total

2014 to 2015

0

6

0

6

2015 to 2016

2

5

0

7

2016 to 2017

5

2

0

7

2017 to 2018

6

4

0

10

2018 to 2019

2

5

0

7

Figure 11 - Staffing by recruitment programs and hiring of former students
Text version
Table 11 - Graduate recruitment program hires and hiring of former students by fiscal year

Fiscal year

Post-Secondary Recruitment Program hires

Hiring of former students

2014 to 2015

0

1

2015 to 2016

0

1

2016 to 2017

0

0

2017 to 2018

0

1

2018 to 2019

0

1

Figure 12 - Internal time to staff Public service median = 176 days 2018-19
Text version
Table 12 - Internal Time to Staff

Number of calendar days

The number of internal appointments for which the TTS-IA was within the specified number of calendar days  for organizations subject to the Public Service Employment Act

0 calendar days

0

0 to 29 calendar days

15

30 to 59 calendar days

124

60 to 89 calendar days

265

90 to 119 calendar days

384

120 to 149 calendar days

354

150 to 179 calendar days

311

180 to 209 calendar days

269

210 to 239 calendar days

234

240 to 269 calendar days

159

270 to 299 calendar days

128

300 to 329 calendar days

102

330 to 359 calendar days

77

360 to 389 calendar days

58

390 to 419 calendar days

51

420 to 449 calendar days

49

450 to 479 calendar days

40

480 to 509 calendar days

38

510 to 539 calendar days

31

540 to 569 calendar days

23

570 to 599 calendar days

21

600 to 629 calendar days

10

630 to 659 calendar days

19

660 to 689 calendar days

3

690 to 719 calendar days

12

720 to 749 calendar days

6

750 to 779 calendar days

5

780 to 809 calendar days

8

810 to 839 calendar days

3

840 to 869 calendar days

10

870 to 899 calendar days

4

900 to 929 calendar days

5

930 to 959 calendar days

4

960 to 989 calendar days

3

More than 990 calendar days

23

Internal Time to Staff

The data is insufficient for providing results on internal process times for the International Joint Commission.

Internal time to staff is calculated as the number of calendar days between the opening date of the advertisement and the date of the first notification.

Internal time to staff for fiscal year 2018 to 2019

The median internal time to staff for the public service (organizations subject to the Public Service Employment Act) for fiscal year 2018 to 2019 is 176 days. The data is insufficient for providing results on internal process times for the International Joint Commission

Figure 13 - External time to staff Public service median = 186 days 2018-19
Text version
Table 13 - External Time to Staff

Number of calendar days

The number of external appointment processes for which the TTS-EA was within the specified number of calendar days for organizations subject to the Public Service Employment Act

0 calendar days

0

0 to 29 calendar days

49

30 to 59 calendar days

82

60 to 89 calendar days

124

90 to 119 calendar days

160

120 to 149 calendar days

181

150 to 179 calendar days

179

180 to 209 calendar days

160

210 to 239 calendar days

139

240 to 269 calendar days

84

270 to 299 calendar days

73

300 to 329 calendar days

61

330 to 359 calendar days

41

360 to 389 calendar days

43

390 to 419 calendar days

49

420 to 449 calendar days

35

450 to 479 calendar days

22

480 to 509 calendar days

27

510 to 539 calendar days

17

540 to 569 calendar days

15

570 to 599 calendar days

14

600 to 629 calendar days

12

630 to 659 calendar days

7

660 to 689 calendar days

5

690 to 719 calendar days

7

720 to 749 calendar days

11

750 to 779 calendar days

3

780 to 809 calendar days

7

810 to 839 calendar days

2

840 to 869 calendar days

2

870 to 899 calendar days

0

900 to 929 calendar days

3

930 to 959 calendar days

1

960 to 989 calendar days

0

More than 990 calendar days

0

External Time to Staff

The data is insufficient for providing results on external process times for the International Joint Commission.

External time to staff is calculated as the number of calendar days between the opening date of the advertisement and the date of the first estimated external hire.

External time to staff for fiscal year 2018 to 2019

The median external time to staff for the public service (organizations subject to the Public Service Employment Act) for fiscal year 2018 to 2019 is 186 days. The data is insufficient for providing results on external process times for the International Joint Commission.

Technical Notes

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