Annual Report on the Privacy Act 2018 to 2019

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1. Introduction

The Privacy Act provides Canadian citizens and permanent residents with the right of access to, and correction of, personal information about themselves that is under the control of a government institution. It also provides the legal framework for the collection, retention, use, disclosure, disposition and accuracy of personal information in the administration of programs and activities by government institutions subject to the act.

Under the Privacy Act, personal information is defined as “information about an identifiable individual that is recorded in any form.” Examples include information relating to the national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age or marital status of an individual; the education or the medical, criminal, financial or employment history of an individual; the address, fingerprints or blood type of an individual; and, any identifying number, symbol or other particular identifier assigned to an individual.

This report has been prepared and tabled in Parliament in accordance with section 72 of the Privacy Act. It covers the period from to .

2. Mandate of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

As the administrative arm of the Treasury Board, the Secretariat has a dual mandate: to support the Treasury Board as a committee of ministers and to fulfill the statutory responsibilities of a central government agency. The Treasury Board’s mandate is derived from the Financial Administration Act.

To fulfill its mandate, the Secretariat has 3 roles:

  • a challenge and oversight role, which includes supporting Cabinet decision making, reporting on the government’s management and budgetary performance, and developing government-wide management policies and directives
  • a community enabling role, which involves helping organizations improve management performance and program results
  • a leadership role, which involves driving and modelling excellence in public sector practices

The Secretariat is tasked with providing advice and support to Treasury Board ministers in their role of ensuring value-for-money, as well as providing oversight of the financial management functions in departments and agencies.

The Secretariat makes recommendations and provides advice to the Treasury Board on policies, directives, regulations, and program expenditure proposals with respect to the management of the government's resources. Its responsibilities for the general management of the government affect initiatives, issues, and activities that cut across all policy sectors managed by federal departments and organizational entities (as reported in the Main Estimates). The Secretariat is also responsible for the comptrollership function of government.

Within the Secretariat, the Comptroller General of Canada provides government-wide leadership, direction, oversight and capacity building for financial management, internal audit and the management of assets and acquired services. The Chief Human Resources Officer provides government-wide leadership on people management through policies, programs and strategic engagements, and by centrally managing labour relations, compensation, pensions and benefits, and contributing to the management of executives. The Chief Information Officer provides government-wide leadership, direction, oversight and capacity building for information management, information technology, government security (including identity management), access to information, privacy, and internal and external service delivery.

3. Organization

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Office is part of the Ministerial Services Division of the Secretariat’s Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs Sector. This office is responsible for implementing and managing programs and services relating to the Secretariat’s administration of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, as well as providing advice to its employees as they fulfill their obligations under both acts.

In fiscal year 2018 to 2019, the ATIP Office was comprised of a director supported by ATIP officers at various levels and a part-time university student. The office hired 4 consultants (all 4 contracts equivalent to one full-time resource) and a part-time casual employee to assist with privacy policy and to address the backlog of older complex operational files. There were 2 categories of responsibility, which included the following key activities:

ATIP Policy and Processes (3.85 officers, 1 consultant)

  • Provided expertise on privacy policy to internal clients
  • Developed procedures to optimize operations performance
  • Produced privacy awareness and training program material
  • Coordinated and reviewed updates to the Secretariat’s Info Source chapter
  • Oversaw day-to-day issues management
  • Provided advice and review of proactive disclosures and C-58 preparation

Operations (11.85 officers, 3 consultants and 1 part-time student)

  • Provided training and expertise on access to information to internal clients
  • Provided database administration via an intake unit
  • Processed access to information and privacy requests
  • Carried out consultations with government organizations or third parties
  • Responded to calls and informal requests for information
  • Acted as the point of contact to resolve formal complaints by oversight bodies
  • Maintained dialogue with sectors and other federal government institutions
  • Provided advice and review of proactive disclosures and C-58 preparation
  • Prepared the Secretariat’s annual reports to Parliament on the administration of the acts

4. Delegation Order

Delegation orders set out what powers, duties and functions for the administration of the Privacy Act have been delegated by the head of the institution, and to whom.

The President has delegated most of the responsibilities set out in the Privacy Act to the following Secretariat officials: the Secretary of the Treasury Board, the Assistant Secretary of Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs, the Senior Director of Ministerial Services, and the Director of ATIP.

A copy of the approved Secretariat Delegation Order can be found in Appendix B.

5. Interpretation of the statistical report for requests under the Privacy Act

Statistical reporting on the administration of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act has been in place since 1983. The statistical reports prepared by government institutions provide aggregate data on the application of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act legislation. This information is compiled on an annual basis in a statistical information bulletin and is included with the annual reports on access to information and privacy, which are tabled in Parliament by each institution.

The Secretariat’s statistical report on the Privacy Act for fiscal year 2018 to 2019 is provided in Appendix A.

Table 1 presents an overview of the statistics for fiscal year 2018 to 2019 on the Secretariat’s processing of privacy requests in relation to statistics for the previous 3 years.

Table 1. Overview of fiscal year 2018 to 2019
Fiscal year Requests received Requests completed Requests carried forward Number of pages processed Number of pages released On-time compliance ratetable 1 note *
2018 to 2019 77 76 9 10,165 8,842 95%
2017 to 2018 93 93 8 5,089 4,054 98%
2016 to 2017 97 107 8 6,112 3,824 96%
2015 to 2016 129 116 18 6,706 5,744 87%

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note 1

This compliance rate includes all extensions, which were taken in accordance with sub-paragraphs 15(a)(i) and 15(a)(ii) of the Privacy Act.

Return to table 1 note * referrer

In the reporting period from April 1, 2018, to March 31, 2019, the Secretariat received a total of 77 new requests under the Privacy Act. This represents a decrease of 16 requests (17%) from last year’s total of 93. In addition to the new requests, 8 requests were carried forward from the 2017 to 2018 fiscal year.

Many of the new requests filed under the Privacy Act were from current and former federal public service employees. Requests had to do with personnel or staff relations issues that required the Secretariat’s involvement.

In fiscal year 2018 to 2019, the Secretariat’s ATIP Office responded to a total of 76 requests for personal information under the Privacy Act, involving the review of 10,165 pages. Although 17 fewer requests (18% less) were completed compared to last year, the number of pages processed increased significantly, from 5,089 pages reviewed in fiscal year 2017 to 2018, to 10,165 in fiscal year 2018 to 2019, an increase of 100%. This increase is largely the result of 2 voluminous files from previous fiscal years being discontinued by the applicant.

Of the 76 requests completed, 56 were either abandoned by the applicant (11 requests or 15%) or categorized as “no records exist” (45 requests or 59%) as most were related to subjects within the mandates of other federal institutions. In these cases, the ATIP Office communicated with the requester to redirect them to the institution of greater interest as part of its duty to assist.

Of the remaining 20 requests completed, a total of 20 requests (100%) were fully or partially disclosed with a release of 4,681 pages in total. Records were sought and provided on paper in 4 cases and in electronic format in 16 cases.

A total of 9 requests were carried over to the next reporting period. This is one more than last year’s total. Furthermore, 4 requests were late (deemed refusals) compared to last year’s total of 2.

Although the number of staffing activities continued to present a challenge within the ATIP Office again this year, the Secretariat was successful in achieving a 95% on-time compliance rate, similar to the 98% of the previous year.

6. Other requests

During the reporting period, the Secretariat responded to 4 Privacy consultation requests under the Privacy Act from other government institutions involving Secretariat records or issues.

As in previous years, the ATIP Office acted as a source of expertise for Secretariat officials, providing advice and guidance on the provisions of the legislation on over 300 occasions, which was 30 more than the previous year and represents an increase of 11%. The office was consulted regularly on the disclosure and collection of data on a wide range of subjects and provided advice to ensure transparency and compliance with the legislation. This included consultations on publications to be posted on the Open Government website, surveys and forms, proactive disclosures, advice on information management and security of information, and the review of audits to be posted on the Internet.

During the reporting period, the ATIP Office experienced a significant increase in consultation requests for proactive disclosure activities, from 204 in fiscal year 2017 to 2018, to 356 in fiscal year 2018 to 2019, representing an increase of 75%. The ATIP Office anticipates this trend to continue in future years.

Throughout the year, the ATIP Office continued to receive frequent telephone calls and emails from the general public seeking guidance on how to obtain information under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, and on where to forward their requests. Many of these enquiries were redirected to other federal government institutions, and occasionally, to provincial Freedom of Information and Privacy offices.

7. Disposition of completed requests

In fiscal year 2018 to 2019, a total of 76 requests were completed. Table 2 provides an overview of the disposition of the completed requests.

Table 2. Disposition of completed requests under the Privacy Act in fiscal year 2018 to 2019
Number of requeststable 2 note * Disposition
3 (4%) fully disclosed
17 (22%) partially disclosed
0 (0%) exempted in entirety
45 (59%) no records exist
11 (15%) abandoned by applicant

Table 2 Notes

Table 2 Note 1

Percentages have been rounded.

Return to table 2 note * referrer

Given that the President of the Treasury Board is responsible for ensuring compliance with the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act government-wide, the Secretariat often receives requests that fall within the mandates of other federal organizations. Such requests are registered, reviewed and closed after advising the requester of the appropriate organization. In Table 2, these requests are included in the totals for the “No records exist” category.

8. Completion time and extensions

The legislation sets timelines for responding to privacy requests and allows for extensions when the response requires the review of a large amount of information, consultations with other organizations, or extra time for translation purposes.

Table 3 presents the response times for the 76 requests that the Secretariat completed in fiscal year 2018 to 2019.

Table 3. Completion Time and Extensions for Requests under the Privacy Act in fiscal year 2018 to 2019
Number of requeststable 3 note * Completion time
44 (58%) 1 to 15 days
17 (22%) 16 to 30 days
11 (15%) 31 to 60 days
1 (1%) 61 to 120 days
0 (0%) 121 to 180 days
0 (0%) 181 to 365 days
3 (4%) more than 365 days

Table 3 Notes

Table 3 Note 1

Percentages have been rounded.

Return to table 3 note * referrer

The Secretariat received a large number of requests that fell within the mandates of other government organizations; these requests were addressed within the first 15 days following conversations with the requester.

Of the 76 completed requests, 72 (95%) were completed within the prescribed time limits, including all extensions, which were taken in accordance with sub-paragraphs 15(a)(i) and 15(a)(ii) of the Privacy Act. Compared to the previous reporting period, this represents an overall decrease of 3% in the on-time response rate. 4 requests were completed beyond the prescribed time limits. 3 requests were complex and required a review which processed in excess of 1,000 pages. The other request required consultations that could not be completed within the legislated timeframe.

For 5 requests (7%), the Secretariat sought extensions to the prescribed time limits in order to consult with other government organizations.

9. Exemptions invoked

The Privacy Act allows, and in certain instances, requires that some personal information, such as information related to law enforcement investigations, information about other individuals or information that is subject to solicitor-client privilege, be exempted and not released.

In fiscal year 2018 to 2019, the Secretariat invoked a total of 21 exemptions as per specific sections of the Privacy Act, as follows:

  • Section 26: Exempting personal information about individuals other than the requester (16)
  • Section 27: Exempting personal information related to solicitor-client privilege (5)

10. Exclusions invoked

The Privacy Act does not apply to information that is already publicly available, such as government publications and material in libraries and museums. It also excludes material such as Cabinet confidences. Consistent with the act, exclusions were invoked 4 times:

  • Section 70 for confidences of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada (4)

11. Costs

During fiscal year 2018 to 2019, the ATIP Office incurred $348,203 in salary costs and $48,100 in administrative costs (software licences, office equipment and supplies, training) to ensure appropriate implementation of the Privacy Act.

These costs do not include resources expended by the Secretariat’s sectors to meet the requirements of the act.

12. Education and training

During the 2018 to 2019 fiscal year, the ATIP Office continued to expand on its outreach activities by offering training sessions to the Secretariat’s employees on a regular basis. Similar to the previous year, 22 sessions were provided to 599 government officials. Some of these sessions were adapted to the specific needs of divisional teams and sectors of the Secretariat. A total of 9 training sessions were delivered to inform Secretariat officials of the new proposed provisions found within Bill C-58.

Throughout the reporting period, the ATIP Office continued to work in close collaboration with the Information and Privacy Policy Division within the Office of the Chief Information Officer to assist in forwarding Access to Information and Privacy policy development by providing expertise and guidance on various topics.

Again this year, in support of Right to Know Week, the ATIP Office also held an open door day to showcase its services and promote sound information management practices and answer questions about the access to information process. The ATIP Office continued its engagement activities with sector liaison officers to discuss best practices, expectations and the implementation of a number of new initiatives.

To mark Data Privacy Day, the ATIP Office promoted the importance of sound privacy management practices and the shared responsibility of employees for safeguarding personal information in their day-to-day activities. In addition, the ATIP Office prepared a short quiz for TBS employees to test their privacy knowledge and to learn more about privacy protection requirements and the tools and resources available in TBS’s internal Privacy Management Framework.

13. Policies, guidelines, procedures and initiatives

During the 2018 to 2019 reporting period, the ATIP Office implemented a number of initiatives both within its operational unit and with stakeholders in the institution. These initiatives were in keeping with a continued approach to streamlining its operational processes.

The ATIP Office policy unit continued to provide ongoing support to Secretariat programs on open government initiatives, including increased engagement with Canadians and with industry stakeholders. This support also included review and assessment of records destined to be published on the Open Government Portal.

With the proposed proactive publication provisions of Part II of Bill C-58, proactive disclosure was a significant focus of the ATIP Office during the reporting period. Over the course of the year the ATIP Office engaged with Secretariat officials on the proposed provisions, established roles and responsibilities, and developed internal processes in preparation to meet legislated timeframes of Bill C-58.

Over the past 3 years, there has been a notable increase in internal requests from TBS program officials for privacy-related advice and guidance from the ATIP Office. The upward trend can be attributed to the number of new and forward-looking program initiatives involving the potential collection, use and disclosure of personal information, the growing interest in the use of cloud technologies, and the increase in government-wide employee engagement and public outreach. This year, the ATIP Office continued to support TBS program officials in ensuring compliance with privacy legislation and policy requirements by providing privacy advice and developing new tools for TBS’s internal Privacy Management Framework.

In September 2017, the ATIP Office approached the Secretariat’s Internal Audit and Evaluation Bureau to undertake a department-wide privacy audit and evaluation in order to assess the soundness and effectiveness of privacy practices at the Secretariat. Results of this engagement will be available early next fiscal year

Finally, in order to ensure continued compliance with the act and related policies, the ATIP Office disseminated a variety of tools and checklists, and held face-to-face meetings with program officials to ensure compliance with relevant policy and legislative requirements.

14. Complaints, investigations and federal court cases

Requesters are entitled to file a complaint with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) regarding the processing of their request.

Clients of the Secretariat filed 2 new complaints with the OPC in fiscal year 2018 to 2019. Following is a summary of the new complaints received under the Privacy Act.

  • The 2 new complaints received were related to delay and refusal of access. Both complaints remain active in the investigation phase.

There remains 1 active Privacy Act complaint from previous reporting periods.

There remained 10 departmental complaints in relation to the collection of personal information pursuant to the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Standard on Security Screening at the end of fiscal year 2018 to 2019.  These complaints were discontinued on , in light of the recent Federal Court of Appeal decision released in July 2019.

There were no new court cases in fiscal year 2018 to 2019. There have been no court cases against the Secretariat in relation to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act since 2004.

Throughout fiscal year 2018 to 2019, the ATIP Office continued to work in close collaboration with the Secretariat’s Internal Audit and Evaluation Branch on a department-wide privacy audit/evaluation. We look forward to reporting a summary of results for this assessment in next year’s annual report.

15. Monitoring of compliance and requests for corrections

The ATIP Office distributes weekly compliance statistics that are shared with the program areas and senior management for all access to information requests.

This year, TBS assessed 2 requests for correction of personal information over the reporting period. One request was processed with the correction made to the record and the other request was processed with a notation attached to the record.

16. Summary of material privacy breaches

The Secretariat did not incur any material privacy breaches over the reporting period.

17. Privacy Impact Assessments

The ATIP Office provides TBS program officials with support and guidance on the Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) process. In accordance with the TBS Directive on Privacy Impact Assessment, a PIA must be initiated for a program or activity in the following circumstances:

  • when personal information is used for or is intended to be used as part of a decision-making process that directly affects the individual
  • upon substantial modifications to existing programs or activities where personal information is used or intended to be used for an administrative purpose
  • when the contracting out or the transfer of a program or activity to another level of government or to the private sector results in substantial modifications to the program or activities

During fiscal year 2018 to 2019, TBS submitted to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) and to the Information Privacy Policy Division (IPPD) the results of the PIAs that were initiated for 3 initiatives: Common Uses of Social Media Accounts, Talent Cloud (Phase 1), and Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Online Request Service Project. Over the course of the privacy review of the Common Uses of Official Social Media Accounts, a PIA was drafted. This information will be used to inform government-wide procedures as well as notices that will be posted on Government of Canada websites. The procedures and notices have been shared with both the OPC and IPPD, and their feedback will be incorporated. Summaries of the PIA for Talent Cloud (Phase 1) and the ATIP Online Request Service Project are available online.

18. Disclosures under paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act

Subsection 8(2) of the Privacy Act provides limited and specific circumstances under which institutions may disclose personal information without an individual’s consent. Paragraph 8(2)(m) allows for the disclosure of personal information when the public interest clearly outweighs any invasion of privacy or when the disclosure would benefit the individual involved.

In the 2018 to 2019 reporting period, there were no disclosures pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act.

19. Information about programs and information holdings

TBS publishes an inventory of its information holdings, as well as relevant details about personal information under their control.

The primary purpose of this publication is a series of publications containing information about, and collected by, the Government of Canada to assist individuals in exercising their rights under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. It also supports the federal government’s commitment to facilitate access to information regarding its activities.

A description of the Secretariat’s functions, programs, activities and related information holdings can be found in Treasury Board Secretariat - Sources of Federal Government and Employee Information (Info Source).

As part of the annual update of its Info Source chapter, the ATIP Office updated its publication on TBS information holdings based on feedback provided by program sectors and by the Information and Privacy Policy Division during their last annual review. In addition, efforts were made to align the chapter as much as possible with the Canada.ca Content Style Guide, while continuing to meet the Info Source Decentralized Publishing Requirements.

Appendix A: Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Reporting period: 2018-04-01 to 2019-03-31

Part 1: Requests under the Privacy Act

Number of requests
Received during reporting period 77
Outstanding from previous reporting period 8
Total 85
Closed during reporting period 76
Carried over to next reporting period 9

Part 2: Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time

Disposition of requests Completion time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days more than 365 days Total
All disclosed 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3
Disclosed in part 0 6 9 1 0 0 1 17
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 36 9 0 0 0 0 0 45
Request abandoned 8 0 1 0 0 0 2 11
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 44 17 11 1 0 0 3 76

2.2 Exemptions

Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 0
19(1)(b) 0
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 0
22(1)(a)(i) 0
22(1)(a)(ii) 0
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 0
22(1)(c) 0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 0
26 16
27 5
28 0

2.3 Exclusions

Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1) 3
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 1
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0

2.4 Format of information released

Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 1 2 0
Disclosed in part 3 14 0
Total 4 16 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 123 123 3
Disclosed in part 5,048 4,558 17
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 4,994 4,161 11
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
Total 10,165 8,842 31
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100 pages processed 101 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 Pages Processed more than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 3 123 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 10 294 6 1,038 0 0 1 3,226 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 9 0 0 0 0 0 2 4,161 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 22 417 6 1,038 0 0 3 7,387 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal advice sought Interwoven information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 4 0 8 0 12
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 2 0 1 0 3
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 6 0 9 0 15

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
4 3 1 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 1 1
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 3 3
Total 0 4 4

2.7 Requests for translation

Translation requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3: Disclosures under subsections 8(2) and 8(5)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Subsection 8(5) Total
0 0 0 0

Part 4: Requests for correction of personal information and notations

Disposition for correction requests received Number
Notations attached 1
Requests for correction accepted 1
Total 2

Part 5: Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 0 0 2 0
Disclosed in part 4 0 3 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 4 0 5 0

5.2 Length of extensions

Length of extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 4 0 5 0
Total 4 0 5 0

Part 6: Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations

Consultations Other Government of Canada institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 4 71 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 4 71 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 3 62 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 1 9 0 0

6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
Disclosed in part 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7: Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

7.1 Requests with Legal Services

Number of days Fewer Than 100 pages processed 101 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Number of days Fewer Than 100 pages processed 101 to 500 pages processed 501 to 1,000 pages processed 1,001 to 5,000 pages processed More than 5,000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 8: Complaints and investigations notices received

Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
2 0 0 0 2

Part 9: Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs)

Number of PIAs completed: 3

Part 10: Resources related to the Privacy Act

10.1 Costs

Expenditures Amount
Salaries $348,203
Overtime $0
Goods and services $48,100
Professional services contracts
$22,737
Other
$25,363
Total $396,303

10.2 Human Resources

Resources Person years dedicated to privacy activities
Full-time employees 3.85
Part-time and casual employees 0.00
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 1.00
Students 0.00
Total 4.85

Appendix B: Delegation Order

I, undersigned, President of the Treasury Board, pursuant to section 73 of the Privacy Act hereby designate the ATIP Advisors, the Access to Information and Privacy Team Leader, the Access to Information and Privacy Manager, the Access to Information and Privacy Director, the Senior Director of Ministerial Services, the Assistant Secretary, Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs and the Secretary, or persons occupying those positions on an acting basis, to exercise signing authorities or perform any of the President’s powers, duties or functions as head of institution that are specified in the attached Schedule B. This designation replaces all previous delegation orders.

Original signed by

The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos
President of the Treasury Board
Date: 2019-12-13

Schedule B – Sections of the Privacy Act to be delegated
Position Powers, Duties or Functions
Secretary Full authority
Assistant Secretary, Strategic Communications and Ministerial Affairs Full authority
Senior Director, Ministerial Services Full authority except:
Subsections: 33(2), 35(1), 36(3), 37(3)
Director, Access to Information and Privacy Full authority except sections:
Subsections: 33(2), 35(1), 36(3), 37(3)
Manager, Access to Information and Privacy Sections: 14, 15, 26, 27
Team Leader, Access to Information and Privacy Paragraph: 14(a)
Sections: 15
Access to Information and Privacy officers Paragraph: 14(a)

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the President of the Treasury Board, 2019,
ISSN: 2371-3038

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