Complete text - 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities - Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada,
represented by the President of the Treasury Board, 2015

Catalogue No. BT1-23E-PDF
ISSN: 2292-6402

Table of Contents

Minister's Message

The Honourable Scott Brison

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

I am pleased to present the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. We are committed to offering Canadians a government that will do things differently — both in terms of what we do and how we do it.

As President of the Treasury Board, I have a mandate to lead the management agenda and oversee the implementation and delivery of Cabinet approved initiatives. The Secretariat will support me in delivering key elements of my mandate:

  • enhancing the openness and transparency of Government;
  • taking steps to ensure better services for Canadians;
  • improving oversight and reporting to Parliament;
  • aligning resources with priorities to maximize results for Canadians;
  • developing a high-performing workforce that meets the needs of the future; and
  • creating a more open, agile and collaborative Secretariat.

The 2016-2017 Report on Plans and Priorities of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat provides information on how the department will support the Government on achieving our agenda in the coming year, and I am fully confident that the Secretariat is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year’s report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and I are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government’s progress on delivering real change for Canadians. In the future, the Secretariat’s reports to Parliament will focus more transparently on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow the Secretariat’s progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister’s mandate letter to me.

The Honourable Scott Brison
President of the Treasury Board

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Scott Brison, President of the Treasury Board

Institutional Head: Yaprak Baltacioglu, Secretary of the Treasury Board

Ministerial Portfolio: The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the Canada School of Public Service. Operating at arm's length and reporting to Parliament through the President of the Treasury Board are the Public Sector Pension Investment Board, the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada and the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada.

Enabling Instrument: Financial Administration Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. F-11

Year Established: 1966

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (Secretariat) is the administrative arm of the Treasury Board, and the President of the Treasury Board is the Minister responsible for the Secretariat. The Secretariat supports the Treasury Board by making recommendations and providing advice on program spending, regulations and management policies and directives, while respecting the primary responsibility of deputy heads in managing their organizations, and their roles as accounting officers before Parliament. In this way, the Secretariat helps to strengthen government performance, results and reporting and supports good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians.

Responsibilities

The Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in each of its roles (see the text box "Treasury Board Roles"). Within the Secretariat, the Comptroller General of Canada provides government-wide leadership, direction, oversight and capacity building for financial management, internal audit and the management of assets and acquired services. The Chief Human Resources Officer provides government-wide leadership on people management through policies, programs and strategic engagements and by centrally managing labour relations, compensation, pensions and benefits, and contributing to the management of executives. The Chief Information Officer provides government-wide leadership, direction, oversight and capacity building for information management, information technology, government security (including identity management), access to information, privacy, and internal and external service delivery.

The Treasury Board portfolio consists of the Secretariat and the Canada School of Public Service. The Public Sector Pension Investment Board, the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada and the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada are arm's length organizations that report to Parliament through the President of the Treasury Board.

When working with federal organizations, the Secretariat plays three central agency roles:

  • A challenge and oversight role that includes supporting Cabinet decision making, reporting on the government's management and budgetary performance, and developing government-wide management policies and directives;
  • A community enabling role to help organizations improve management performance and program results; and
  • A leadership role in driving and modelling excellence in public sector management and in launching government-wide horizontal initiatives that target administrative efficiencies and value for money.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

The Strategic Outcome that the Secretariat strives to achieve and the programs that contribute to it are as follows:

Organizational Priorities

The President of the Treasury Board has a mandate to lead the government's management agenda and oversee the implementation and delivery of Cabinet-approved initiatives. The Secretariat is supporting this mandate through initiatives under the following six priorities.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the President of the Treasury Board's mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Priority 1: Open and Transparent Government
Description

The Government of Canada has committed to governing openly and transparently. The Secretariat is supporting this commitment by leading efforts to improve Canadians' access to government information and to their own personal information held by government, and to provide better opportunities for engaging with government. Greater openness and transparency will help keep the government focused on Canadians' values and expectations.

Priority Type Footnote 2

New

Key Facts
  • Out of 280 government organizations, 45 have published over 100,000 data sets.
  • In 2014–15, government organizations processed over 67,000 access to information requests involving 9.9 million pages, and 67,000 personal information requests involving 7.3 million pages.
Key Supporting Initiatives for Priority 1
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Accelerate and expand open data initiatives and make government data available digitally and open by default. Ongoing 1.3.4 Transformation Leadership
Work with the Department of Justice Canada and the Privy Council Office (Democratic Institutions) to review and propose changes to the Access to Information Act, including empowering the Information Commissioner of Canada to order the release of government information, and expanding the coverage of the Act to apply appropriately to the Prime Minister's Office, ministers' offices and administrative institutions that support Parliament and the courts. 1.2.3 Information Management and Information Technology Policy
Improve Canadians' access to their personal information. Ongoing 1.2.3 Information Management and Information Technology Policy
Modernize the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada to reflect the modern digital environment. 1.2.4 Externally Facing Policy
Strengthen oversight of government advertising. To be determined 1.2.4 Externally Facing Policy
Priority 2: Better Service for Canadians
Description

The Government of Canada has committed to meeting the rising expectations of citizens and businesses for better quality and more accessible government services. The Secretariat is supporting this commitment by helping to improve the government's online service through various initiatives, including rigorously tracking the performance of key services. It is also leading efforts to ensure that the government's back office functions are aligned and modernized to support better services for Canadians.

Priority Type

New

Key Facts
  • Federal public servants administer over 1,600 programs for Canadians.
  • In 2014, public servants:
    • assisted over 8 million people at some 700 in-person service locations;
    • received close to 74 million calls through government call centres.
  • In 2014, 290 million visits were made to government websites.
Key Supporting Initiatives for Priority 2
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Develop a new service strategy that aims to create a single online window for all government services. 1.2.4 Externally Facing Policy
Work with service delivery departments to establish new performance standards, and set up a mechanism to rigorously assess and report publicly on the performance of key government services. 1.2.4 Externally Facing Policy
Ensure successful implementation of initiatives to transform enterprise-wide back office functions. Ongoing 1.3.4 Transformation Leadership
Priority 3: Better Oversight, Information and Reporting to Parliament
Description

The Government of Canada has committed to improving financial oversight and to using the best available information. The Secretariat will work to improve the alignment and quality of financial information provided to Parliament and will update Treasury Board policies to take a more modern approach to comptrollership.

Priority Type

New

Key Fact
  • In 2015–16, the Government of Canada planned to spend approximately $246 billion.
Key Supporting Initiatives for Priority 3
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Work with the Privy Council Office to improve reporting to Parliament by strengthening the oversight of taxpayer dollars and the clarity and consistency of financial reporting, and by ensuring consistency and maximum alignment between the Budget and the Estimates, and the Estimates and the Public Accounts. 1.1.2 Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management
Improve departmental costing analysis for all proposed legislation and programs through a standardized approach to estimating the cost of proposals. Ongoing 1.1.1 Cabinet Decision Support
Modernize the Government of Canada's approach to comptrollership. 1.2.1 Financial Management Policy
Priority 4: Aligning Resources for Results
Description

The Government of Canada has committed to aligning resources with results that have the greatest positive impact on the lives of Canadians. The Secretariat will play a lead role in promoting new approaches to programs and policies across government and will work at changing the management culture in order to enhance the quality and use of data and performance information government-wide.

Priority Type

New

Key Facts
  • The Treasury Board reviews approximately $6 billion to $8 billion in new funding requests every year.
  • The Treasury Board has over 200 policy instruments currently in place.
Key Supporting Initiatives for Priority 4
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Work with departments to ensure that a fixed percentage of program funds is devoted to experimenting with new approaches to existing problems, and to measuring program impacts. Ongoing 1.1.2 Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management
Work with departments to improve their use of evidence and data, and instill a stronger culture of performance measurement, evaluation and innovation in program and policy design and delivery. Ongoing 1.2.5 Organizational Management Policy
Renew the Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures and the Treasury Board submission guidance to improve information on resource allocation, performance measurement and reporting to Parliament and Canadians. 1.1.1 Cabinet Decision Support
Work with Public Services and Procurement Canada to modernize procurement by implementing practices that are simpler and less administratively burdensome and that better support broader economic, social and green goals. 1.2.1 Financial Management Policy
Streamline the Treasury Board policy suite, providing incentives and rules that have clear accountabilities and that are easy to find and to understand. 1.2 Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Priority 5: Workforce of the Future
Description

The Government of Canada has committed to working with the public service to provide effective and professional services for Canadians. This includes efforts to reinforce the core public service values of official languages, respectful workplace and diversity. The Secretariat will help the Government of Canada fulfill its role as a modern employer by supporting good faith collective bargaining and by leading action to create a healthy, harassment-free workplace.

Priority Type

New

Key Facts
  • The federal government is the largest employer in Canada, with more than 193,000 employees in the core public administration.
  • Women represent 38 per cent of Governor in Council appointees in the core public administration, and 39 per cent of assistant deputy ministers and 36 per cent of deputy ministers in the federal public service.
  • Federal services are delivered through 11,500 offices: 34 per cent offer bilingual services, 54 per cent offer services only in English, and 12 per cent offer services only in French.
  • The Secretariat is negotiating the renewal of 27 collective agreements with 15 bargaining agents.
Key Supporting Initiatives for Priority 5
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Align with the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace. Ongoing 1.2.2 People Management Policy
Take action to support the Government of Canada's commitment to transparent, merit-based appointments, to help ensure gender parity and that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are better reflected in positions of leadership. Ongoing 1.2.2 People Management Policy
Take action to ensure that the public service is a workplace free from harassment and sexual violence. Ongoing 1.2.2 People Management Policy
Ensure that all federal services are delivered in full compliance with the Official Languages Act, supported by Canadian Heritage. Ongoing 1.2.2 People Management Policy
Bargain in good faith with the Government of Canada's public sector unions. Ongoing 1.3.2 Labour Relations
Support the introduction of a new labour relations regime for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Ongoing 1.3.2 Labour Relations
Priority 6: An Open, Agile and Collaborative Secretariat
Description

The Secretariat has committed to creating a more open, agile and collaborative organization that fosters respect and innovation, empowers employees to excel in their work, and maximizes benefits for Canadians. To accomplish this, the Secretariat has developed This is TBS, an umbrella initiative that brings together all of the Secretariat's internal transformational initiatives under three streams of work: supporting a high-performing workforce; fostering a more dynamic open and networked workplace; and adopting lean and efficient business practices. These initiatives support Blueprint 2020 commitments.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives for Priority 6
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department's Program Alignment Architecture
Support a high-performing workforce that is agile and that operates within a respectful and healthy work environment each and every day. Ongoing 1.5.4 Human Resources Management Services
Foster a more dynamic, open and networked workplace, which includes renewing and consolidating office space within Workplace 2.0 standards and re-engineering back office technology to better manage information.

1.5.6 Information Management Services

1.5.7 Information Technology Services

1.5.8 Real Property Services

Adopt lean and efficient business practices that create opportunities for transferring skills and knowledge, streamlining processes, and empowering employees. Ongoing

1.5.1 Management and Oversight Services

1.5.2 Communications Services

1.5.4 Human Resources Management Services

1.5.5 Financial Management Services

1.5.6 Information Management Services

Risk Analysis

In advancing the key commitments outlined by the new government, the Secretariat faces a number of risks. There is a strategy risk that the Secretariat has accepted in order to generate greater results for Canadians, and there are external risks that come from the environment in which the Secretariat operates. External risks are harder to mitigate and require building resiliency in the controls and processes of the organization. Additional attention and leadership on the part of the Secretariat will be required if the external risks identified below do materialize.

Strategy Risk

At the outset of the government mandate, the expectation for achieving results is high, including delivery of a comprehensive and ambitious management agenda. For many priority initiatives, the Secretariat not only needs to rethink how the government operates to achieve sustainable results, but must also consider the wide range of stakeholder views on what success looks like. In addition, many commitments require significant interdepartmental cooperation. These factors create a risk that, despite the Secretariat's solid track record, some of the Secretariat's priorities may not yield the desired results or may not be implemented at the expected pace. The Secretariat is managing this risk through careful planning, project management and oversight.

External Risks

The Secretariat is currently operating in an environment where it will require targeted resources to deliver on a number of its priority initiatives. Given the challenging economic forecast for Canada and the reduction in revenues due to dropping oil prices, there is a risk that resources may need to be aggressively redirected to stimulate the economy. To support the management agenda, the Secretariat would have to reallocate resources to priority areas. The Secretariat will manage the risk of losing fiscal flexibility by closely monitoring expenditures, measuring performance and reviewing results.

Technological and social changes create new ways of working, which could have an impact on the agility of the public service and affect the Government of Canada's position as a modern employer. To attract, retain and mobilize the necessary skills and talent to meet the needs of government departments, the rigidities in the system will need to be addressed, including employee mobility within and across public-private sectors and improved flexibility in work arrangements. The Secretariat is managing this risk by identifying and defining skill gaps and promoting assignments in priority areas.

The Secretariat's commitment to providing better services for Canadians relies heavily on the use of technology. However, the rapid pace of technological change and the increased frequency and sophistication of cyber-threats could compromise the government's information systems, infrastructure and data, resulting in potentially significant disruptions to government programs and service delivery. To address this ongoing risk, the Secretariat, as the lead on information technology (IT) security policy and directives, will continue to work on many fronts with other federal departments to counter these threats proactively. The Secretariat is standardizing incident coordination and developing tools and policies to increase the resiliency of IT systems.

The Secretariat will focus on the four key risks described above. For each of the risks, a response strategy has been developed that includes specific mitigation measures. These risks and their mitigation measures will be monitored regularly throughout the year.

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Strategy Risk

Slow Pace of Implementation

If the Secretariat is not able to implement its priority initiatives effectively, they may not yield sustainable results or may take longer than expected to deliver.

To manage this risk, the Secretariat will need to enhance management's focus on delivery, results and accountability. This includes:

  • Developing project charters that outline specific activities and deliverables, key performance indicators, clear roles and responsibilities, and realistic timelines, along with appropriate monitoring and controls;
  • Engaging key partners throughout the project life cycle through existing governance structures; and
  • Establishing regular stock-taking meetings to ensure that plans are being followed and that delays are managed in a timely fashion.

1.1 Decision-Making Support and Oversight

1.2 Management Policies Development and Monitoring

1.3 Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

External Risks

Loss of Fiscal Flexibility

There is a risk that a global economic slowdown could impact the Canadian economy and require the Secretariat to significantly redirect resources in order to be able to deliver on its priority initiatives.

The Secretariat will work to reduce the impact of this risk by:

  • Monitoring expenditures closely to inform the allocation of strategic resources;
  • Reviewing program and tax expenditures with the Deputy Minister of Finance, and assessing departments' capability to deliver priority programs;
  • Establishing a risk allowance in the procurement process to address changes in substantive estimates; and
  • Developing contingency plans or scalable options for each of the Secretariat's priority initiatives.
1.1 Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Inability to Attract and Align Talent to Needs

As technological and social changes create new ways of working, government departments may find that the rigidities in the system make it increasingly difficult to attract and mobilize highly talented individuals.

The Secretariat will take steps to facilitate an agile workforce by:

  • Revising the Treasury Board's human resources management policies to ensure that requirements support a high-performing, agile workforce;
  • Working with partner departments to improve recruitment, training and development programs;
  • Launching a one-year, interdepartmental pilot project of internal micro-missions to respond to management's need for temporary and skilled employees; and
  • Streamlining processes and projects within the Secretariat. This will require change management and dedicated resources for lean processes and projects, with minimal impact on normal operations.
1.2 Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Cyber-Security Breach

Constantly evolving cyber-threats targeted at government departments may compromise government information systems, infrastructure and data, requiring the Secretariat to coordinate and respond to potentially significant service disruptions.

The Secretariat will continue to work on numerous fronts with other government departments to mitigate the risk of rapidly evolving cyber-threats. Efforts will focus on:

  • Standardizing incident coordination capability;
  • Developing information management strategies and initiatives for departments, in order to minimize the risk to Government of Canada information holdings;
  • Developing tools for federal organizations to build programs and services that are secure and resilient;
  • Conducting oversight and monitoring jointly delivered by the Secretariat and lead security agencies (including Communications Security Establishment Canada and Shared Services Canada);
  • Supporting Public Safety Canada in reviewing existing measures to protect Canadians and our critical infrastructure from cyber-threats in collaboration with other departments; and
  • Overseeing the successful completion of initiatives to transform enterprise-wide back office functions, including Shared Services Canada's Transformation Plan.

1.2 Management Policies Development and Monitoring

1.3 Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
6,570,806,029 6,570,806,029 6,573,186,816 6,564,300,694
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
1802 1795 1776
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–14
Expenditures
2014–15
Expenditures
2015–16
Forecast Spending
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Note: Any minor numerical differences are due to rounding.
Strategic Outcome: Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians
Decision-Making Support and Oversight N/A N/A 48,531,026 49,543,385 50,579,535 49,568,557 49,973,390
Management Policies Development and Monitoring N/A N/A 75,282,673 67,614,269 68,090,606 68,236,105 66,819,202
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery N/A N/A 85,859,822 53,732,931 53,256,595 52,997,096 53,642,559
Strategic Outcome: Government is well managed and accountable, and resources are allocated to achieve results
Management Frameworks 57,875,343 54,481,225 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
People Management 57,834,089 128,785,777 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Expenditure Management 35,573,464 30,431,157 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Financial Management 31,291,934 31,231,325 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Subtotal  182,574,830  244,929,484  209,673,521  170,890,585  171,926,736  170,801,758  170,435,151
Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments 2,629,221,633 2,898,360,909 5,415,825,870 6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397
Internal Services Subtotal 80,724,486 78,399,289 78,500,313 66,661,047 65,624,896 69,130,661 60,611,147
Total 2,892,520,949 3,221,689,682 5,703,999,704 6,570,806,029 6,570,806,029 6,573,186,816 6,564,300,694

In 2015–16, the Secretariat revised its Program Alignment Architecture to better reflect core business activities and support the achievement of expected results. Due to significant differences between the Secretariat's previous and current program architectures, the historical spending trend has not been restated in the 2013–14 and 2014–15 expenditure columns.

The table above outlines:

  • Actual spending for 2013–14 and 2014–15, as reported in the Public Accounts;
  • Forecast spending for 2015–16, which reflects the authorities received to date, including in-year contributions from other government departments for the Secretariat-led Government-Wide Back Office Transformation Initiative; and
  • Planned spending for 2016–17, 2017–18 and 2018–19, which aligns with government commitments as set out in ministerial mandate letters.

Additional details regarding planned spending are provided in Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome.

The Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments program is the largest portion of the Secretariat's planned spending. On average, the Treasury Board approves approximately 56 per cent of this program's spending to transfer to other federal organizations for items such as government contingencies, government-wide initiatives, compensation requirements, operating and capital budget carry forward, and paylist expenditures (Central Votes 5, 10, 15, 25, 30 and 33). The Secretariat's total funding available for use is reduced accordingly. The remaining 44 per cent pertains to public service employer payments, used to pay the employer's share of contributions to employee pensions and benefits plans, including statutory payments.

Actual spending increased by $329 million from 2013–14 to 2014–15. This was primarily to address a funding shortfall within the Service Income Security Insurance Plan (SISIP) to provide benefits for the increased number of medically released Canadian Armed Forces members following the Afghanistan mission, and to implement approved benefit changes to the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) totalling $269 million. In addition, there was an increase of $61.6 million, mostly attributable to new funding received for the payout of an out-of-court settlement to eligible claimants under the White class action lawsuit launched against the Crown in Buote Estate v. Canada, 2014 FC 773 (CanLII), which involved the elimination of the Pension Act offset provision under the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Long Term Disability Insurance Plan.

Forecast spending for 2015–16 is expected to increase by $2.5 billion, as compared with 2014–15 actual spending. Approximately $2.3 billion is largely a result of funding in Central Votes not yet allocated by the Treasury Board to other organizations. The total amount is included in the Secretariat's reference levels at the beginning of the fiscal year; as amounts are requested by organizations and eventually allocated to them, the total amount is reduced accordingly. The remaining $0.2 billion is attributable mostly to funding received in 2015–16 to help restore the SISIP to a healthy financial position and to contingency funding for the PSHCP.

Planned spending is expected to increase by $867 million in 2016–17 compared with forecast spending for 2015–16, primarily to reflect funding in the Central Votes at full reference levels, offset by the 2015–16 SISIP and PSHCP funding noted above.

Planned spending is expected to decrease by $6.5 million from 2016–17 to 2018–19, mostly due to the sunsetting of the Workspace Renewal Initiative and the reprofiling of the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy to accommodate project timelines impacted by ongoing collective bargaining.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016-17
Planned Spending
Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians Decision-Making Support and Oversight Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 50,579,535
Management Policies Development and Monitoring Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 68,090,606
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 53,256,595
Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 6,333,254,397
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Note: The figures above do not include Internal Services.
Economic affairs N/A
Social affairs N/A
International affairs N/A
Government affairs 6,505,181,133

Departmental Spending Trend

Figure 1. 2016–17 Planned Spending Total $6.6 billion
Figure 1
Figure 1. 2016–17 Planned Spending Total $6.6 billion - Text version
Central Votes Public Service Employer Payments and Statutory Votes Management Policies Development and Monitoring Internal services Government-Wide Programs Design and Delivery Decision Making Support and Oversight
54.08% 42.31% 1.04% 1.00% 0.81% 0.77%

The Secretariat's total planned spending is $6.6 billion for fiscal year 2016–17. This includes $3.6 billion, or 54.1 per cent, in Central Votes (on approval of the Treasury Board) to supplement the appropriations of departments. Most of the remaining balance, $2.8 billion, or 42.31 per cent, is related to the Secretariat's role in supporting the Treasury Board as employer of the core public administration.

These funds are used for:

  • public service pension, benefits, and insurance plans, including payment of the employer's share of health, income maintenance, and life insurance premiums;
  • payments in respect of provincial health insurance;
  • payments of provincial payroll taxes and the Québec sales tax on insurance premiums; and
  • funding to address actuarial deficits in the Public Service Pension Fund.

The remaining amount, $0.2 billion or 3.6 per cent, is directly related to the operations of the Secretariat and its four other programs: Decision-Making Support and Oversight, Management Policies Development and Monitoring, Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery, and Internal Services.

Figure 2. Departmental Spending Trend for Program Expenditures (Vote 1)
Figure 2
Figure 2. Departmental Spending Trend for Program Expenditures (Vote 1) - Text version
  2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Sunset Programs – Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 29,075,263 27,477,862 27,662,650 28,020,193 27,981,239 27,895,587
Voted 234,224,053 295,850,911 260,551,184 209,531,439 211,951,180 203,150,710
Total 263,299,316 323,328,773 288,173,834 237,551,632 239,932,419 231,046,297

The Secretariat's operating expenditures include salaries, non-salary costs to deliver programs, and statutory items related to the employer's contributions to the Secretariat's employee benefit plans.

Total program expenditures increased by $60 million between 2013–14 and 2014–15, mostly attributable to new funding received for the payout of an out-of-court settlement to eligible claimants under the White class action lawsuit. The subsequent decrease between 2014–15 actual spending and 2015–16 forecast spending was mostly related to the payout of the same out-of-court settlement, offset by contributions received from other government departments for the Government-Wide Back Office Transformation Initiative.

The decrease of $51 million between 2015–16 and 2016–17 is largely attributable to contributions received for the Government-Wide Back Office Transformation Initiative; new funding received for the same out-of-court settlement to the remaining eligible claimants under the White class action lawsuit; and operating budget carry forward (eligible lapsing funds from the previous fiscal year).

Program expenditures are expected to decrease by $6.5 million from 2016–17 to 2018–19, mostly due to the sunsetting of the Workspace Renewal Initiative and the reprofiling of the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy to accommodate project timelines that have been impacted by ongoing collective bargaining.

Figure 3. Public Service Employer Payments (Vote 20) and Various Statutory Items – Spending Trend Graph
Figure 3
Figure 3. Public Service Employer Payments (Vote 20) and Various Statutory Items – Spending Trend Graph - Text version
  2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Sunset Programs – Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 443,088,925 444,049,205 443,000,000 443,000,000 443,000,000 443,000,000
Voted 2,186,132,708 2,454,311,704 2,719,270,604 2,337,061,397 2,337,061,397 2,337,061,397
Total 2,629,221,633 2,898,360,909 3,162,270,604 2,780,061,397 2,780,061,397 2,780,061,397

Expenditures for public service employer payments and statutory items represent the employer's share of contributions required by the insurance plans sponsored by the Government of Canada. These amounts also include statutory items for payments under the Public Service Pension Adjustment Act (PSPAA) and employer contributions made under the Public Service Superannuation Act (PSSA), the Employment Insurance Act and related acts.

Public service employer payments increased by $269 million from 2013–14 to 2014–15. This increase was mostly to address a funding shortfall within the Service Income Security Insurance Plan (SISIP) to provide benefits to the increased number of medically released Canadian Armed Forces members following the Afghanistan mission. It was also due to the implementation of benefit changes to the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) negotiated in 2014, which included increased premiums for pensioners with a view to achieving a 50-50 cost-sharing ratio with pensioners by .

Planned expenditures for public service employer payments are anticipated to increase by $264 million from 2014–15 to 2015–16. The planned increase addresses an existing funding deficit to restore the Service Income Security Insurance Plan (SISIP) to a surplus position; puts in place contingency funding for the Public Service Health Care Plan (PSHCP) in the event of increases in the volume of claims or the cost per claim of the plan; and allows for resultant increases in payroll taxes from the eventual renewal of collective bargaining agreements. These increases are partially offset by an expenditure decrease under the Public Service Management Insurance Plan following implementation of the Premium Rate Holiday, which took effect on , and was extended on .

Subsequent planned expenditures for 2016–17 are anticipated to decrease by $382 million from 2015–16. This decrease represents the lump sum payment under SISIP in 2015–16 that returned the plan to a surplus position, and the contingency funding for Vote 20.

Planned spending between 2016–17 and 2018–19 is expected to remain unchanged.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Good governance and sound stewardship to enable efficient and effective service to Canadians

Performance Measurement
Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada's ranking in The World Bank's Worldwide Governance Indicators for the third indicator, Governance Effectiveness Top ten among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries Annually

Program 1.1: Decision-Making Support and Oversight

Description

Through the Decision-Making Support and Oversight program, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its roles as management board of the Government of Canada and as expenditure manager in the government-wide expenditure cycle. The objective is to support the government in promoting value for money and results for Canadians in programs and operations.

The Secretariat achieves program results by providing independent strategic advice, analysis, guidance and oversight of programs, operations, and expenditures. It reviews departmental submissions, provides recommendations to the Treasury Board, and coordinates and reports on the allocation of expenditures across government organizations and programs.

Figure 4A. Decision-Making Support and Oversight as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending
Figure 4A
Figure 4A. Decision-Making Support and Oversight as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 21%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 29%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 22%
Internal Services 28%
Figure 4B. Decision-Making Support and Oversight as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs
Figure 4B
Figure 4B. Decision-Making Support and Oversight as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 22%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 27%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 20%
Internal Services 31%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 19 note *
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 19 Notes
Table 19 Note *

Planned spending has been adjusted at the program level to align with government commitments, as set out in the President of the Treasury Board's mandate letter.

Return to table 19 note * referrer

49,543,385 50,579,535 49,568,557 49,973,390
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
392 388 390
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The Secretariat promotes value for money and results for Canadians in programs and operations Federal organizations agree that the Secretariat provides an effective challenge function 70%
Planning Highlights

For 2016–17, the Secretariat will increase its efforts to promote value for money and results for Canadians in its programs and operations. The primary focus of this program will be to work with central agencies to implement budget measures in a timelier manner and to help improve parliamentary scrutiny of government spending. The program will also support the use of innovative approaches to policy and program delivery to address existing problems.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Cabinet Decision Support
Description

Through the Cabinet Decision Support sub-program, the Secretariat supports decision making by providing advice regarding resource allocation, risks, compliance with rules and policies, and alignment with the Government of Canada's objectives and priorities. The objective is to provide the Treasury Board and other Cabinet committees with the best possible advice and analysis regarding departmental submissions to achieve results for Canadians.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by reviewing and providing advice and guidance on Treasury Board submissions and Memoranda to Cabinet. The Secretariat plays a challenge function role in reviewing Cabinet proposals, including performance strategies and implementation plans. It also supports the Treasury Board as a committee of ministers in considering Governor in Council regulations and Orders in Council.

Figure 5A. Cabinet Decision Support as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Decision-Making Support and Oversight
Figure 5A
Figure 5A. Cabinet Decision Support as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Decision-Making Support and Oversight - Text version
Cabinet Decision Support 66%
Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management 34%
Figure 5B. Cabinet Decision Support as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Decision-Making Support and Oversight
Figure 5B
Figure 5B. Cabinet Decision Support as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Decision-Making Support and Oversight - Text version
Cabinet Decision Support 66%
Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management 34%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 24 note *
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 24 Notes
Table 24 Note *

Variances are explained at the sub-program level only when significant.

Return to table 24 note * referrer

33,600,020 33,507,728 33,615,327
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
256 259 259
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Table 26 Notes
Table 26 Note *

Baseline data will be collected over the course of the 2016–17 fiscal year, in order to establish and report on targets in the Secretariat's next Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to table 26 note * referrer

Cabinet makes decisions that are supported by evidence Per cent of applicable Cabinet documents that have quality performance, evaluation, and costing information (as per the Secretariat's guidance) 100%
Costing information is transparent and of a high quality to support decision making Accuracy of estimated costs presented to Parliament, compared with actual costs To be determinedtable 26 note *
Planning Highlights

Cabinet and Parliament require accurate and timely performance and financial information in order to make informed decisions. At present, less than half of large departments are using information from their performance measurement frameworks and strategies, their evaluations and other results-based management tools to support their proposals to Cabinet. In addition, the capacity to identify the costs of legislative and program proposals varies among departments.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Renew the Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures and the Treasury Board submission guidance to improve information on resource allocation, performance measurement and reporting to Parliament and Canadians.
  • Improve departmental costing analysis for all proposed legislation and programs through a standardized approach to estimating the cost of proposals.
Sub-Program 1.1.2: Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management
Description

Through the Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management sub-program, the Secretariat provides advice and analysis related to government expenditures, including compensation. It also supports decision making by providing reliable, detailed and timely information to Parliament and to the public, and by reporting on spending and resource allocation. The objective is to promote accountability and transparency in the management of government expenditures.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by working closely with federal departments and most Crown corporations, and by conducting research and analysis on expenditure trends to support expenditure planning, resource allocation and results-based management and decision making.

Expenditures on whole-of-government reporting to Parliament and to Canadians are also included under this sub-program.

The primary legislation underpinning this sub-program's activities is the Financial Administration Act, as well as the Appropriation Acts associated with the Estimates.

Figure 6A. Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Decision-Making Support and Oversight
Figure 6A
Figure 6A. Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Decision-Making Support and Oversight - Text version
Cabinet Decision Support 66%
Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management 34%
Figure 6B. Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Decision-Making Support and Oversight
Figure 6B
Figure 6B. Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Decision-Making Support and Oversight - Text version
Cabinet Decision Support 66%
Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management 34%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
16,979,514 16,060,829 16,358,063
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
136 129 130
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Table 31 Notes
Table 31 Note *

Baseline data will be collected over the course of the 2016–17 fiscal year, in order to establish and report on targets in the Secretariat's next Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to table 31 note * referrer

Government expenditures are timely and managed in an effective manner The Consolidated Financial Statements of the Government of Canada receive an unmodified opinion from the Auditor General of Canada Yes, 100% of the time
Per cent of applicable budget measures that are reflected in the Estimates within one fiscal year 100%
Resources are aligned with priorities Total spending allocated to priorities and to experimentation To be determinedtable 31 note *
Planning Highlights

Opportunities exist to implement budget measures faster, and to improve the information available for Parliament's scrutiny of government spending.

At present, some time may elapse between when an initiative is announced and when the organization receives its funding. In addition, the problems that federal programs seek to address are often complex and do not lend themselves to obvious solutions. These problems could benefit from program and policy innovation, informed by ongoing testing and measurement of potential new approaches. There is an opportunity to explore specific incentives or requirements to ensure that departments test, measure and learn from new approaches.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Work with the Privy Council Office to improve reporting to Parliament by strengthening the oversight of taxpayer dollars and the clarity and consistency of financial reporting, and by ensuring consistency and maximum alignment between the Budget and the Estimates, and the Estimates and the Public Accounts.
  • Work with other departments to ensure that a fixed percentage of program funds is devoted to experimenting with new approaches to existing problems, and to measuring program impacts.

Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring

Description

Through the Management Policies Development and Monitoring Program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its role of establishing principles for sound governance and management by setting government-wide policy direction in targeted areas. The objective is to have a sound management policy framework for the Government of Canada.

The Secretariat achieves program results by communicating clear management expectations to deputy heads and by adopting principles-based and risk-informed approaches to monitoring policy compliance. The Secretariat provides reviews, leads implementation, and supports and monitors policies and departmental performance under several of areas of management. The Secretariat also engages with functional communities and undertakes outreach and monitoring to promote policy compliance and build the capacity of functional communities.

This program is underpinned by legislation such as the Financial Administration Act and the Public Service Employment Act.

Figure 7A. Management Policies Development and Monitoring as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending
Figure 7A
Figure 7A. Management Policies Development and Monitoring as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 21%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 29%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 22%
Internal Services 28%
Figure 7B. Management Policies Development and Monitoring as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs
Figure 7B
Figure 7B. Management Policies Development and Monitoring as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 22%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 27%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 20%
Internal Services 31%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 34 note *
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 34 Notes
Table 34 Note *

Planned spending has been adjusted at the program level to align with government commitments, as set out in the President of the Treasury Board's mandate letter.

Return to table 34 note * referrer

67,614,269 68,090,606 68,236,105 66,819,202
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
493 483 477
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
A streamlined policy suite that supports modern management Per cent of policy instruments that have been streamlined 90%
Per cent of departments that have implemented renewed policies within expected timelines 90%
Per cent of organizations that agree that the new policy suite is streamlined 75%
Planning Highlights

The Secretariat currently supports more than 200 Treasury Board policy instruments, including 8 frameworks, 74 policies, 73 directives and 79 standards. This creates a situation where rules and incentives lack clear accountabilities and are hard to find and apply.

The planned priority initiative is:

  • Streamline the Treasury Board policy suite, providing incentives and rules that have clear accountabilities and that are easy to find and to understand.
Sub-Program 1.2.1: Financial Management Policy
Description

Through the Financial Management Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides direction to federal organizations on proper stewardship of taxpayers' dollars and government assets. It works to strengthen financial management, management of real property and materiel, investment planning and project management, and procurement across the federal public service. The objective is to promote sound stewardship and value for money and provide direction on standardizing the management of public resources, including in the areas of financial management and assets and acquired services, across the Government of Canada.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by developing and maintaining policies, guidance and practices; nurturing sustainable and professional communities (e.g., finance, procurement, materiel management, real property); monitoring departmental performance and compliance; and helping to improve the overall efficiency of government operations. The work includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

The primary legislation issuing program authority is the Financial Administration Act.

Figure 8A. Financial Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 8A
Figure 8A. Financial Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 20%
People Management Policy 36%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 18%
Externally Facing Policy 14%
Organizational Management Policy 12%
Figure 8B. Financial Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 8B
Figure 8B. Financial Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 37%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 16%
Externally Facing Policy 15%
Organizational Management Policy 14%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
13,356,119 13,369,822 13,563,737
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
89 88 88
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Financial management policies are effective in promoting sound stewardship and value for money across the Government of Canada Per cent of organizations that have implemented an ongoing risk-based monitoring program for all three control areas to support the effectiveness of their internal controls over financial reporting 80%
Per cent of organizations that met key policy requirements for management of acquired services and assets 80%
In collaboration with Public Services and Procurement Canada, government procurement is easier and delivers better value for dollars spent Per cent of all department contracts that used mandatory and non-mandatory standing offers 20%
Per cent of contracts over $25,000 awarded through competitive processes 80%
Planning Highlights

Treasury Board policies related to procurement and certain areas of financial management are outdated and do not support intelligent risk taking and innovation. This affects the delivery of many Government of Canada programs and services, as well as the work of more than 22,000 public servants who are involved in reviewing and reporting on financial transactions and managing assets.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Modernize the Government of Canada's approach to comptrollership.
  • Work with Public Services and Procurement Canada to modernize procurement by implementing practices that are simpler and less administratively burdensome and that better support broader economic, social and green goals.
Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy
Description

Through the People Management Policy sub-program, the Secretariat supports activities of the Treasury Board in its role as the employer of the core public administration. It provides government-wide leadership through enabling policy frameworks, strategic engagements and infrastructure for human resources services, to achieve high performance and leadership excellence in people management. It enables prudent fiscal management of resources in the areas of classification, total compensation (collective bargaining, wages and salaries, terms and conditions of employment, pensions and benefits) and labour relations.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by developing and monitoring the implementation of policy frameworks for executive management, classification, values and ethics and official languages. It establishes people management performance indicators; assesses and reports on organizations' performance in people management; and collects and provides data on the public service. Its work includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

This sub-program is underpinned by legislation such as the Financial Administration Act, the Public Service Labour Relations Act, the Public Service Employment Act and the Official Languages Act.

Figure 9A. People Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 9A
Figure 9A. People Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 20%
People Management Policy 36%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 18%
Externally Facing Policy 14%
Organizational Management Policy 12%
Figure 9B. People Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 9B
Figure 9B. People Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 37%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 16%
Externally Facing Policy 15%
Organizational Management Policy 14%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
24,603,257 25,874,680 24,322,840
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
183 184 181
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
A safe and respectful public service workplace Per cent of employees who indicate that, overall, their organization treats them with respect Improvement over 2014 PSES results
Per cent of employees who indicate that their organization works hard to create a workplace that prevents harassment Improvement over 2014 PSES results
Per cent of employees who indicate that they can initiate a formal recourse process without fear of reprisal Improvement over 2014 PSES results
The public service and its leaders reflect Canada's diversity

Per cent of executive employees (compared with workforce availability) who self-identify as:

  • a visible minority
  • a woman
  • an Aboriginal person
  • a person with a disability
Improvement over previous year
Per cent of offices delivering bilingual federal services, where required by regulation 90%
A healthy public service workplace that supports mental health Per cent of the public service population on disability due to mental health–related claims Comparable to large employers in Canada
Planning Highlights

The public service faces a number of workforce management challenges that need to be addressed:

  • Mental health—47 per cent of disability claims in 2014 were related to mental health.
  • Diversity and discrimination—three of the four employment equity groups (women, visible minorities and Aboriginal peoples) are under-represented among public service executives; female, visible minority, Aboriginal peoples and disabled employees continue to indicate that they have faced discrimination in the workplace (8 per cent, 13 per cent, 15 per cent and 26 per cent of each group, respectively).
  • Harassment—19 per cent of employees report that they have been harassed in the workplace.
  • Official languages—out of 11,500 federal service locations, 34 per cent provide bilingual services as per regulations; this does not include online services, toll-free telephone lines and other types of service delivery available in both official languages across Canada at all times.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Align with the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace.
  • Take action to support the Government of Canada's commitment to transparent, merit-based appointments, to help ensure gender parity and that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are better reflected in positions of leadership.
  • Take action to ensure that the public service is a workplace free from harassment and sexual violence.
  • Ensure that all federal services are delivered in full compliance with the Official Languages Act, with the support of Canadian Heritage.
Sub-Program 1.2.3: Information Management and Information Technology Policy
Description

Through the Information Management and Information Technology Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides strategic direction and leadership for the enterprise and to federal organizations on record keeping, data management, web content management, access to information and privacy protection, and management of cyber-security and information technology. The objective is to enable information to be safeguarded as a public trust and managed as a strategic asset.

The Secretariat promotes open information and allows Canadians to exercise their right to access and use information, while protecting personal information against unauthorized collection, use and disclosure. Continual improvement of information management and information technology across the Government of Canada is encouraged by promoting principles and directives that support the achievements of the Government of Canada's enterprise transformation objectives, and enable departments to meet priorities.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by developing and maintaining policy instruments, encouraging collaboration between government institutions, monitoring and overseeing departmental policy performance, and providing leadership. The work includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

Figure 10A. Information Management and Information Technology Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 10A
Figure 10A. Information Management and Information Technology Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 36%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 18%
Externally Facing Policy 14%
Organizational Management Policy 12%
Figure 10B. Information Management and Information Technology Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 10B
Figure 10B. Information Management and Information Technology Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 37%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 16%
Externally Facing Policy 15%
Organizational Management Policy 14%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
12,188,949 11,831,816 11,953,497
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
78 75 74
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targetstable 51 note * Date to Be Achieved
Table 51 Notes
Table 51 Note *

Baseline data will be collected over the course of the 2016–17 fiscal year, in order to establish and report on targets in the Secretariat's next Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to table 51 note * referrer

Federal institutions manage information and technology effectively

Per cent of organizations that have implemented strategies and plans to effectively manage

  • information
  • cyber-threats
  • technology
To be determined
Canadians have timely access to government information and their personal information held by government Per cent of access to information requests received within established timelines 85%
Per cent of personal information requests received within established timelines 85%
Planning Highlights

About 240 institutions are subject to the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act. In the face of the growing number and complexity of requests, maintaining service standards remains challenging.

The Access to Information Act has not been substantially amended since 1983 and does not reflect modern technology. There are opportunities to strengthen the Access to Information and Privacy programs to enhance the openness of government, and to make it easier for Canadians to access government information and their personal information held by government.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Work with the Department of Justice Canada and the Privy Council Office (Democratic Institutions) to review and propose changes to the Access to Information Act, including empowering the Information Commissioner of Canada to order the release of government information, and expanding the coverage of the Act to apply appropriately to the Prime Minister's Office, ministers' offices and administrative institutions that support Parliament and the courts (subject to Cabinet and funding approvals).
  • Improve Canadians' access to their personal information (subject to Cabinet and funding approvals).
Sub-Program 1.2.4: Externally Facing Policy
Description

Through the Externally Facing Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides strategic direction and guidance to federal organizations to effectively manage Government of Canada communications and services to Canadians. In addition, it supports good regulatory practices for the benefit of citizens and stakeholders. The objectives are to promote high-quality, beneficial, consistent and open relationships and interactions between the Government of Canada and citizens and other stakeholders, and to support implementation of the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by providing strategic direction and guidance in the areas of Government of Canada services, communications and regulations, and by monitoring organizational policy compliance. The work includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

Figure 11A. Externally Facing Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 11A
Figure 11A. Externally Facing Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 36%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 18%
Externally Facing Policy 14%
Organizational Management Policy 12%
Figure 11B. Externally Facing Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 11B
Figure 11B. Externally Facing Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 37%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 16%
Externally Facing Policy 15%
Organizational Management Policy 14%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 54 note *
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 54 Notes
Table 54 Note *

The decrease in planned spending and FTEs is related to a decrease in funding for the Web Renewal Initiative.

Return to table 54 note * referrer

9,489,857 8,755,733 8,540,856
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
76 69 66
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targetstable 56 note * Date to Be Achieved
Table 56 Notes
Table 56 Note *

Baseline data will be collected over the course of the 2016–17 fiscal year, in order to establish and report on targets in the Secretariat's next Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to table 56 note * referrer

Canadians can actively engage with the federal government through multiple digital channels Per cent of engagement through multiple digital channels To be determined
Integrity of government advertising is strengthened Per cent of Canadians who perceive government advertising as fair and non-partisan To be determined
Improved online federal government service delivery Per cent of priority federal government services that are available online To be determined
Degree of client satisfaction with federal government services (quality, timeliness and efficiency) To be determined
Per cent of priority services in key departments that meet established service standards To be determined
Planning Highlights

Citizens and businesses expect better quality and more accessible services from the Government of Canada, yet a number of services still cannot be completed online. Government communications could be more responsive to the rapidly changing needs of citizens by using technology to connect and interact with citizens about government initiatives, policies, programs and services.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Modernize the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada to reflect the modern digital environment.
  • Strengthen oversight of government advertising.
  • Develop a new service strategy that aims to create a single online window for all government services (subject to Cabinet and funding approvals).
  • Work with service delivery departments to establish new performance standards, and set up a mechanism to rigorously assess and report publicly on the performance of key government services (subject to Cabinet and funding approvals).
Sub-Program 1.2.5: Organizational Management Policy
Description

Through the Organizational Management Policy sub-program, the Secretariat provides leadership and direction in the areas of results-based management, risk management, internal audit, evaluation and non–information technology security. The Secretariat develops policies that support the ongoing improvement of the relevance, effectiveness and value for money of programs and operations across the Government of Canada. Through the Management Accountability Framework, it provides strategic direction to support and improve the practices and accountability of deputy heads across departments. The objective is to promote effective and standard corporate management practices across the Government of Canada.

The Secretariat achieves sub-program results by developing and maintaining policy instruments and engaging with functional communities to build capacity and promote management excellence. It also monitors policy compliance in the area of corporate management. The work includes community development, learning and outreach activities.

Figure 12A. Organizational Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 12A
Figure 12A. Organizational Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 20%
People Management Policy 36%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 18%
Externally Facing Policy 14%
Organizational Management Policy 12%
Figure 12B. Organizational Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring
Figure 12B
Figure 12B. Organizational Management Policy as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Management Policies Development and Monitoring - Text version
Financial Management Policy 18%
People Management Policy 37%
Information Management and Information Technology Policy 16%
Externally Facing Policy 15%
Organizational Management Policy 14%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
8,452,423 8,404,054 8,438,272
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
67 67 67
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Organizational management policies promote effective and consistent corporate management practices across the Government of Canada Organizations agree that the Secretariat's policy centres for organizational management provide useful tools and guidance 70%
Per cent of federal organizations that have received a “generally conforms” on a practice inspection of their internal audit function 95%
Performance information is used by departments to inform management practices and processes

Per cent of departments that use performance information to

  • identify risks
  • establish priorities
  • support resource allocations
100%
Planning Highlights

The use of quality data and evidence in Cabinet decision making requires strengthened government-wide expertise in results measurement and a strong commitment throughout the organization to collect, store, analyze and use data effectively. The latest Management Accountability Framework results reveal the need for consistency in departments' use of performance information to identify risks, establish priorities, and support resource allocations.

The planned priority initiative is:

  • Work with departments to improve their use of evidence and data, and instill a stronger culture of performance measurement, evaluation and innovation in program and policy design and delivery.

Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery

Description

Through the Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery program, the Secretariat designs and delivers activities, systems, services and operations with, for, or on behalf of other organizations in the Government of Canada. It also establishes a platform for transformational initiatives. The objective is to provide consistent and cost-controlled operations across the Government of Canada.

The Secretariat achieves program results by developing and delivering solutions where whole-of-government leadership is required, or where transformation and standardization can be achieved to improve quality and value for money.

Figure 13A. Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending
Figure 13A
Figure 13A. Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 21%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 29%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 22%
Internal Services 28%
Figure 13B. Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs
Figure 13B
Figure 13B. Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 22%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 27%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 20%
Internal Services 31%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 64 note *
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 64 Notes
Table 64 Note *

Planned spending has been adjusted at the program level to align with government commitments, as set out in the President of the Treasury Board's mandate letter.

Return to table 64 note * referrer

53,732,931 53,256,595 52,997,096 53,642,559
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
354 356 349
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Table 66 Notes
Table 66 Note *

Baseline data will be collected over the course of the 2016–17 fiscal year, in order to establish and report on targets in the Secretariat's next Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to table 66 note * referrer

The Secretariat promotes consistency in systems and operations across the Government of Canada Employees agree that they have the necessary tools to do their jobs Improvement over 2014 PSES results
Per cent of organizations that agree that the Secretariat provides effective guidance with respect to enterprise-wide systems and operations To be determinedtable 66 note *
Planning Highlights

For 2016–17, in addition to setting government-wide policy direction in key management areas, the Secretariat will lead a number of priority initiatives to help design and deliver activities, systems, services and operations with, for, or on behalf of other organizations in the Government of Canada.

This program will focus on renewing outstanding collective bargaining agreements, accelerating the open data initiative, and continuing to transform enterprise-wide back office functions.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Pensions and Benefits
Description

Through the Pensions and Benefits sub-program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board as sponsor and manager of the federal public service pension plan and group benefit plans. The objective is to provide consistent, sustainable and well-managed pensions and benefits to employees across the core public service.

The Secretariat oversees administration of the public service pension plan, providing direction to Public Services and Procurement Canada. Working with major insurance companies, it undertakes management and oversight responsibilities for other federal benefit programs. The scope of the Pensions and Benefits Sector includes policy and program development for public service pensions, benefit plans, and disability and sick leave management (Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy).

The Secretariat also manages stakeholder relations, provides information to pension and benefit plan members on entitlements, and communicates changes to the public service pension and benefits plans. The Secretariat supports the Secretary and the Treasury Board in setting the terms and conditions relating to eligibility, premiums, contributions, and other arrangements.

The Secretariat is managing insurance benefit plans for employees, pensioners and dependants, which cover health care, dental and disability. The work includes oversight of plan contracts, communications, and initiatives for managing costs.

Figure 14A. Pensions and Benefits as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 14A
Figure 14A. Pensions and Benefits as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 16%
Labour Relations 38%
Government-Wide Operations 19%
Transformation Leadership 27%
Figure 14B. Pensions and Benefits as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 14B
Figure 14B. Pensions and Benefits as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 34%
Labour Relations 23%
Government-Wide Operations 26%
Transformation Leadership 17%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 69 note *
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 69 Notes
Table 69 Note *

The change in planned spending is due to temporary funding for the Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy.

Return to table 69 note * referrer

9,896,977 12,500,625 10,009,953
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
131 135 126
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Modern pension and benefit plans that help make the government a modern employer Per cent of key government partners that agree that the Secretariat provides quality tools and guidance in the area of pensions and benefits 80%
Planning Highlights

The Secretariat will continue to strengthen its mandate related to the management and oversight of the pension and group benefit plans for the public sector, notably in the area of plan comparability, affordability and sustainability.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Labour Relations
Description

Through the Labour Relations sub-program, the Secretariat supports the Treasury Board in its role as employer by overseeing labour management and compensation operations for the core public administration.

The Secretariat negotiates collective agreements with employee bargaining agents and oversees employer representation at recourse for labour relations, classification, pay equity, staffing and terms and conditions of employment. It also provides advice and guidance to departments on labour relations and compensation issues.

This sub-program is underpinned by legislation, such as the Financial Administration Act, the Public Service Labour Relations Act, and the Public Service Employment Act.

Figure 15A. Labour Relations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 15A
Figure 15A. Labour Relations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 16%
Labour Relations 38%
Government-Wide Operations 19%
Transformation Leadership 27%
Figure 15B. Labour Relations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 15B
Figure 15B. Labour Relations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 34%
Labour Relations 23%
Government-Wide Operations 26%
Transformation Leadership 17%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 74 note *
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 74 Notes
Table 74 Note *

The change in planned spending and FTEs is related to fluctuations in workload related to labour relations activities.

Return to table 74 note * referrer

20,180,576 18,619,047 19,393,577
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
80 73 73
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Consistent and coherent compensation advice provided to organizations Per cent of compensation decisions that are aligned with the principles of the Treasury Board's Policy Framework for the Management of Compensation 90%
Labour relations programs help government organizations to effectively execute their responsibilities Per cent of government organizations that agree that the advice and support provided by the Secretariat's labour relations programs assist them in the execution of their responsibilities 70%
Good faith bargaining expectations are met Number of founded bad faith bargaining complaints Reduction from previous year
Planning Highlights

The current round of collective bargaining negotiations started in . The Secretariat is negotiating the renewal of 27 collective agreements with 15 bargaining agents in the core public administration, and 32 collective agreements with 5 bargaining agents for the 14 separate agencies, excluding the Canadian Forces Non-Public Funds.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Bargain in good faith with the Government of Canada's public sector unions.
  • Support the introduction of a new labour relations regime for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Sub-Program 1.3.3: Government-Wide Operations
Description

Through the Government-Wide Operations sub-program, the Secretariat provides other departments with access to shared operations, services, and information technology (IT) systems. The Secretariat also provides support to small departments where specific expertise is required or capacity limitations exist, in order to generate cost savings. The Secretariat develops and maintains IT tools that promote a more collaborative and efficient public service. The objective is to improve the efficiency of government organizations.

Activities under this sub-program are performed with groups of government organizations to facilitate government business. These services and systems are developed and maintained by the Secretariat, sometimes in partnership with other organizations.

Figure 16A. Government-Wide Operations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 16A
Figure 16A. Government-Wide Operations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 16%
Labour Relations 38%
Government-Wide Operations 19%
Transformation Leadership 27%
Figure 16B. Government-Wide Operations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 16B
Figure 16B. Government-Wide Operations as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 34%
Labour Relations 23%
Government-Wide Operations 26%
Transformation Leadership 17%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
10,085,537 10,680,686 10,816,980
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
91 93 93
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Government-wide operations are managed effectively Per cent of targeted organizations that have implemented services and systems developed or mandated by the Secretariat 100%
Per cent of public servants using collaborative tools (e.g., GCconnex, GCpedia) developed by the Secretariat 55%
Planning Highlights

The Secretariat will continue its ongoing work of providing departments with access to shared operations, services and information technology systems.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership
Description

Through the Transformation Leadership sub-program, the Secretariat reviews existing administrative systems and processes, and provides the platform for transformational initiatives across the Government of Canada for improvements, primarily (but not exclusively) in back office functions. The objective is to achieve better value for money and services by redesigning and transforming Government of Canada operations where the benefits outweigh the costs.

The Secretariat develops and pilots leading-edge enterprise tools, systems, and services to initiate change and identify lessons learned to support government-wide implementation.

Figure 17A. Transformation Leadership as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 17A
Figure 17A. Transformation Leadership as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned spending for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 16%
Labour Relations 38%
Government-Wide Operations 19%
Transformation Leadership 27%
Figure 17B. Transformation Leadership as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
Figure 17B
Figure 17B. Transformation Leadership as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs for Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery - Text version
Pensions and Benefits 34%
Labour Relations 23%
Government-Wide Operations 26%
Transformation Leadership 17%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 84 note *
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 84 Notes
Table 84 Note *

The change in planned spending is related to fluctuations in funding for the Government-Wide Back Office Transformation Initiative and Open Government.

Return to table 84 note * referrer

13,093,505 11,196,738 13,422,049
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
52 55 57
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targetstable 86 note * Date to Be Achieved
Table 86 Notes
Table 86 Note *

Baseline data will be collected over the course of the 2016–17 fiscal year, in order to establish and report on targets in the Secretariat's next Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to table 86 note * referrer

Canadians have better access to government data Per cent of federal data publicly released To be determined
Transformational initiatives improve Government of Canada operations Per cent of targeted departments leveraging enterprise back office systems To be determined TBD
Planning Highlights

Although the government releases more information than ever before, an untapped wealth of information could be used to increase transparency, build public trust and spur innovation. Opportunities also exist to improve the ability of the government to manage in a way that is informed by reliable, enterprise-wide data, business analytics and performance information.

Transformation of the back office processes in the areas of human resources management, financial management and information management will facilitate coherent and consistent government operations and processes that support service delivery to Canadians and ultimately make data more accessible to parliamentarians.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Accelerate and expand open data initiatives and make government data available digitally and open by default (subject to Cabinet and funding approvals).
  • Ensure successful implementation of initiatives to transform enterprise-wide back office functions (subject to Cabinet and funding approvals).

Program 1.4: Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments

Description

The Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments program accounts for funds that are held centrally to supplement other appropriations, from which allocations are made to, or payments and receipts are made on behalf of, other federal organizations. These funds supplement the standard appropriations process and meet certain responsibilities of the Treasury Board as the employer of the core public administration, including employer obligations under the public service pension and benefits plans.

The administration of these funds falls under the Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management sub-program and the People Management Policy sub-program, but their financial resources are shown separately in the Secretariat's Program Alignment Architecture for visibility and reporting purposes.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397 6,333,254,397

This program consists of two components:

1) Government-Wide Funds (Central Votes)
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 88 note *
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 88 Notes
Table 88 Note *

Government-wide funds include funding to support other federal organizations for expenditures such as paylist requirements (to cover parental benefits and severance payments); compensation adjustments (to adjust for salary increases); operating budget carry forward (to carry forward eligible lapsing funds from the previous fiscal year); and capital budget carry forward (to carry forward lapsing capital funds from the previous fiscal year).

Return to table 88 note * referrer

3,553,193,000 3,553,193,000 3,553,193,000 3,553,193,000
2) Public Service Employer Payments and Various Statutory Items
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
2,780,061,397 2,780,061,397 2,780,061,397 2,780,061,397
Human Resources (FTEs for both components)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
N/A N/A N/A
Performance Measurement (for both components)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Allocations and payments managed by the Secretariat are made as required Per cent of allocations and payments made 100%
Planning Highlights

The Secretariat will continue to deliver on legislative requirements related to Treasury Board Vote 20 – Public Service Employer Payments. Related information on planned spending is presented in Section III: Supplementary Information. Other contingency funds are available to other government departments, if required, and expenditures are identified under their programs (ongoing).

Internal Services

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided for a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Figure 18A. Internal Services as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending
Figure 18A
Figure 18A. Internal Services as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned operational spending - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 21%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 29%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 22%
Internal Services 28%
Figure 18B. Internal Services as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs
Figure 18B
Figure 18B. Internal Services as a proportion of the Secretariat's 2016–17 planned FTEs - Text version
Decision-Making Support and Oversight 22%
Management Policies Development and Monitoring 27%
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery 20%
Internal Services 31%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) table 94 note * table 94 note **
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
Table 94 Notes
Table 94 Note *

Planned spending has been adjusted at the program level to align with government commitments, as set out in the President of the Treasury Board's mandate letter.

Return to table 94 note * referrer

Table 94 Note **

The change in planned spending is due to a temporary funding increase in 2017–18 and the subsequent sunsetting of these funds in 2018–19 for the Workspace Renewal Initiative.

Return to table 94 note ** referrer

66,661,047 65,624,896 69,130,661 60,611,147
Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
563 568 560
Planning Highlights

The Secretariat has an ambitious agenda to deliver, which includes multiple complex priority initiatives that need to be completed within very short time frames. This requires strong leadership and employees who have the right skills and competencies to excel in their work. It also requires an agile and collaborative organization with lean and efficient business practices that foster innovation and intelligent risk taking, and that get faster and better results for invested efforts. To succeed, the Secretariat will build on This is TBS, which includes Blueprint 2020 initiatives to further accelerate its internal transformation.

The planned priority initiatives are:

  • Support a high-performing workforce that is agile and that operates in a respectful and healthy work environment each and every day.
  • Foster a more dynamic, open and networked workplace, which includes renewing and consolidating office space within Workplace 2.0 standards, and re-engineering back office technology to better manage information.
  • Adopt lean and efficient business practices that create opportunities for transferring skills and knowledge, streamlining processes, and empowering employees.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the Secretariat's operations. The expense and revenue forecasts are prepared on an accrual accounting basis. As a result, the figures presented here will differ from the figures presented elsewhere in the report, which are prepared on an expenditure basis.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations with associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Secretariat's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)

Financial Information 2015–16
Forecast Results
2016–17
Planned Results
Difference
(2016–17 Planned Results minus
2015–16 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 3,464,823,600 3,046,425,303 (418,398,297)
Total net revenues (13,276,138) (11,848,562) 1,427,576
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 3,451,547,462 3,034,576,741 (416,970,721)

Total expenses are forecasted to decrease by $418.4 million (12.1 per cent) in 2016–17. The decrease is mainly due to funding received in 2015–16 to help restore the Service Income Security Insurance Plan to a healthy financial position. Total net revenues are forecasted to decrease by $1.4 million (10.5 per cent) in 2016–17, mainly due to a decrease in recoveries related to the public service pension plan. As a result, the net cost of operations is forecasted to decrease by $417 million (12.1 per cent) in 2016–17 compared with 2015–16.

Total expenses include approximately $3.2 billion in 2015–16 and $2.8 billion in 2016–17 for public service employer payments. These funds are used for government-wide programs such as the employer's share of the Public Service Health Care Plan, the Public Service Dental Care Plan, other insurance and pension programs, as well as contributions to the public service pension plan and the Retirement Compensation Arrangement in respect of actuarial deficits.

The balance of the expenses relates to departmental expenses, including salary costs and payments for goods and services. Revenues of approximately $12 million to $13 million per year derive from the provision of internal support services to other departments and the recovery of costs related to pension administration services provided to the public service pension plan.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication.

The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
90 Elgin Street
Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R5
Telephone: 613-369-3200
Toll free: 1-877-636-0656
Teletypewriter (TTY): 613-369-9371
Email: info@tbs-sct.gc.ca
Website: www.tbs-sct.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Includes operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report (DPR)
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. DPRs are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charged against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures
Includes net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
Is what an organization did with its resources to achieve its results; how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve; and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and will tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important, or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. RPPs are tabled in Parliament each spring.
result
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead, they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
whole-of-government framework
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Includes operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report (DPR)
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. DPRs are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charged against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures
Includes net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
Is what an organization did with its resources to achieve its results; how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve; and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and will tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important, or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. RPPs are tabled in Parliament each spring.
result
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead, they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
whole-of-government framework
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Future-Oriented Statement of Operations
For the Year Ending

Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Future-Oriented Statement of Operations
For the Year Ending

(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast Results
2015–
Planned Results
2016–

Notes:

The accompanying notes form an integral part of this future-oriented statement of operations.

Expenses
Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments (Note 6)
3,166,489 2,780,700
Decision Making Support and Oversight
52,701 52,966
Management Policies Development and Monitoring
81,516 72,241
Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery
77,460 63,212
Internal Services
86,658 77,307
Total expenses 3,464,824 3,046,426
Revenues
Recovery of pension administration costs
8,745 7,347
Internal support services
5,978 5,978
Parking fees – Government-wide
3,209 3,369
Other
73 35
Gross revenues
18,005 16,729
Revenues earned on behalf of government
(4,728) (4,880)
Total net revenues 13,277 11,849
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 3,451,547 3,034,577

1. Departmental Strategic Outcomes and Programs

For more information on the Secretariat's strategic outcomes and programs refer to Section II of the Report on Plans and Priorities.

2. Methodology and Significant Assumptions

The future-oriented statement of operations has been prepared on the basis of government priorities and departmental plans as described in the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

The information in the forecast results for fiscal year 2015- and planned results for fiscal year 2016- are based on the activities and initiatives included in the forecast spending and planned spending amounts that are presented in the departmental RPP, expressed in terms of accrual accounting.

As of , the main assumptions underlying the forecasts are as follows:

  • The Secretariat's mandated activities will remain substantially the same as for the previous year;
  • Expenses and revenues, including the determination of amounts internal and external to the government, are based on historical experience. The general historical pattern is expected to continue.

3. Variations and Changes to the Forecast Financial Information

Forecasts have been made for 2015- and 2016-. Actual results achieved for both years are likely to vary from the forecast information presented, and this variation could be material.

In preparing this future-oriented statement of operations, the Secretariat has made estimates and assumptions concerning the future. These estimates and assumptions may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

Factors that could lead to material differences between the future-oriented statement of operations and the departmental financial statements include the following:

  • The timing and amount of acquisitions and the disposal of property, plant and equipment may affect gains or losses and the amortization expense;
  • Implementation of new collective agreements;
  • Further changes to the operating budget through funding of additional new initiatives or technical adjustments later in the year.

Once the Report on Plans and Priorities is presented, the Secretariat will not be updating the forecasts for any changes in financial resources made in ensuing supplementary estimates. Variances will be explained in the Secretariat's Departmental Performance Report.

4. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The future-oriented statement of operations has been prepared using Government of Canada accounting policies which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

a) Expenses

Expenses are recorded on an accrual basis and are recorded when goods are received or services are rendered. These expenses include:

  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation and legal services at their estimated cost.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave when earned by employees under their respective terms of employment.
  • Amortization of tangible capital assets which is recorded on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of each asset. Tangible capital assets are capitalized at their acquisition cost. 

b) Revenues

Revenues are accounted for in the period in which the related transactions or the event that gives rise to the revenues occurred.

Revenues that are non-respendable are not available to discharge the Secretariat's liabilities. While the Secretary is expected to maintain accounting control, she has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues. As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of the Government of Canada and are therefore presented as a reduction of the entity's gross revenues.

5. Parliamentary Authorities

The Secretariat receives most of its funding through expenditure authorities provided by Parliament. Financial reporting of authorities provided to the Secretariat do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Items recognized in the Future-Oriented Statement of Operations in one year may be funded through parliamentary authorities in prior, current, or future years. Accordingly, the Secretariat has a different net cost of operations for the year on an expenditure basis as compared to an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

a) Reconciliation of net cost of operations to requested authorities
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast Results
2015–
Planned Results
2016–
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 3,451,547 3,034,577
Adjustment for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
Amortization of tangible capital assets
(3,619) (4,726)
Net loss on disposal and write-off of tangible capital assets
(84) 0
Services provided without charge by other government departments
(20,862) (16,124)
Change in vacation pay and compensatory leave liabilities
(32) 89
Change in accrued liabilities
15,729 533
Other
474 (75)
Total items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities (8,394) (20,303)
Adjustment for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
Acquisition of tangible capital assets
7,168 3,257
Transition Payments for implementing salary payments in arrears
46 0
Change in prepaid expenses
77 82
Total items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities 7,291 3,339
Requested authorities 3,450,444 3,017,613
b) Authorities requested
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast Results
2015–
Planned Results
2016–
Authorities requested:
Vote 1 – Program expenditures
303,094 209,531
Vote 5 – Government contingencies
750,000 750,000
Vote 10 – Government-wide initiatives
2,090 3,193
Vote 20 – Public service insurance
2,719,271 2,337,061
Vote 25 – Operating budget carry forward
451,599 1,600,000
Vote 30 – Paylist requirements
941,087 600,000
Vote 33 – Capital budget carry forward
108,778 600,000
Subtotal 5,275,919 6,099,785
Statutory amounts:
Employer contributions made under the Public Service Superannuation Act, other retirement Acts, and the Employment Insurance Act
443,000 443,000
Contributions to employee benefit plans
27,541 27,937
President of the Treasury Board – Salary and motor car allowance
82 84
Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets
50 37
Subtotal 470,673 471,058
Less:
Authorities to transfer or lapse:
Vote 1 – Program expenditures
(42,544) 0
Vote 5 – Government contingencies
(750,000) (750,000)
Vote 10 – Government-wide initiatives
(2,090) (3,193)
Vote 20 – Public service insurance
0 0
Vote 25 – Operating budget carry forward
(451,599) (1,600,000)
Vote 30 – Paylist requirements
(941,087) (600,000)
Vote 33 – Capital budget carry forward
(108,778) (600,000)
Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets
(50) (37)
Subtotal (2,296,148) (3,553,230)
Requested authorities 3,450,444 3,017,613

The authorities presented reflect current forecasts of statutory items, approved initiatives included and expected to be included in Estimates documents, and (when reasonable estimates can be made) estimates of amounts to be allocated from Treasury Board Central Votes.

6. Government-Wide Funds and Public Service Employer Payments

The Government of Canada sponsors defined benefit pension plans covering most of its employees. The Secretariat also funds payments to, or in respect of, the following:

  • Employer's share of contributions to the Public Service Death Benefit Account;
  • Employer's share of Canada/Québec Pension Plan contributions and Employment Insurance premiums;
  • Employer's share of health, disability, and life insurance premiums and related Québec sales tax;
  • Employer's share of the Québec Parental Insurance Plan premium;
  • Claims and related costs under the Public Service Dental Care Plan and the Pensioners' Dental Services Plan;
  • Provincial payroll taxes in respect of employees who work in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Newfoundland and Labrador. The payroll tax is levied on employers in each of the provinces to help fund the respective health plans; and
  • Returns to certain employees of their share of the Employment Insurance premium reduction.

Generally, Public Service Pension Plan contributions, Public Service Death Benefit Account contributions, Canada/Québec Pension Plan contributions, and Employment Insurance premiums are recovered from all departments, agencies, and revolving funds, based on salaries and wages incurred. Contributions to health care plans are recovered from certain departments, agencies and all revolving funds, based on a percentage of salaries and wages incurred.

The table on the following page presents a breakdown by major category:

The following table presents a breakdown by major category:
(in thousands of dollars)
  Forecast Results
2015–
Planned Results
2016–

Table 7 Notes

Table 7 Note 1

These amounts include contributions to the Public Service Pension Plan and Retirement Compensation Arrangement, the Canada/Québec Pension Plan, Employment Insurance and the Public Service Death Benefit Account.

Return to table 1 note 1 referrer

Table 7 Note 2

This amount consists mainly of contributions to health, dental and disability plans including any related taxes or premiums payable to Canadian provinces.

Return to table 1 note 2 referrer

Expenses:
Employer's contributions to government employee benefit plans (statutory) table 1 note 1
3,476,570 3,657,687
Public Service Health Care Plan claims (Vote 20)
1,176,730 1,174,770
Group disability and life insurance premiums (Vote 20)
941,622 541,979
Provincial payroll taxes (Vote 20)
548,084 541,622
Public Service Pension Plan and Retirement Compensation Arrangement in respect of actuarial deficits (statutory)
443,000 443,000
Public service and pensioners' dental care plan claims (Vote 20)
443,522 479,479
Provincial health and Québec Parental Insurance Plan premiums (Vote 20)
75,975 78,807
Other expenses (Vote 20)
9,307 10,103
Total expenses 7,114,810 6,927,447
Recoveries:
Employer's contributions to government employee benefit plans recovered from government departments and agencies (statutory)
3,476,570 3,657,687
Employee, pensioner and employer contributions to group insurance plans (Vote 20) table 1 note 2
471,751 489,060
Total recoveries 3,948,321 4,146,747
Net expenses 3,166,489 2,780,700

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (Secretariat) supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities in this supplementary information table.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy presents the planned contributions and expected results for Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. It covers the Secretariat's performance indicators and targets, in particular, those related to Electronic Waste, Managed Print, Paper Consumption, Green Meetings and Green Procurement. 

Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of , the Government of Canada continues to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context
This target applies to procurement activities generated to support departmental operations at the Secretariat.
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Program 1.5: Internal Services
Performance Measurement
Expected result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of materiel and services

Performance Indicator Targeted performance level
Department approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of . This target was achieved as of .
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2016-17.

13 specialists

92%

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year.

A total of 6 managers and functional heads

100%

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Departmental green procurement target

By , 100 per cent of vehicles purchased will be right-sized for operational needs and are the most fuel efficient vehicle in their class in the Government Motor Vehicle Ordering Guide, or are an alternative fuel vehicle

Performance Indicator Targeted performance level
Number of vehicle purchases that meet the target relative to the total number of all vehicle purchases in the given year.

100%

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Departmental green procurement target

By , purchases will be monitored to ensure a higher recycled content, and there will be an increase in green purchases.

Performance Indicator Targeted performance level
By , 95 per cent of copy paper will contain a minimum of 30-per-cent recycled content and will be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of its production.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

By , 90 per cent of toner cartridges will be recycled at end of life.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Departmental green procurement target

By , the initiation of a contract under the Secretariat's authority will not require paper.

Performance Indicator Targeted performance level
Functional specialists in procurement will receive an electronically approved Contract Initiation Form and will no longer require wet ink signatures. 95% of new contracts initiated in 2016–17 at Protected B level or lower will not require a paper-based form.
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Best Practice

7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"

Best Practice

7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.

Seeking to maintain "Achieved"
Additional activities Targeted performance level
Ensure green procurement training for employees that manage low dollar value acquisitions.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

100% of low dollar value authority holders are informed of the Secretariat's green procurement targets and resources, such as Public Services and Procurement Canada's Office of Greening Government Operations.

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of , the Government of Canada updated and adopted policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Scope and Context
This target applies to select Internal Services areas that support departmental operations at the Secretariat.
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
Program 1.5: Internal Services

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact

Performance Indicator Targeted performance level
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by . Seeking to maintain “Achieved”
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices.

Seeking to obtain “Achieved”

Engage the administrative services community on addressing the challenges and opportunities in greening government operations.

7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Adhere to asset and materiel life-cycle management guidance outlined in the Secretariat's approved Asset Management Framework.

7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (e.g., printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).

Printer ratios: Maintain an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Green meetings: Give 100% of employees access to a mobile device (tablet or laptop) in order to reference meeting material digitally and avoid printing.

Seeking to obtain “Achieved”

Paper usage: Reduce paper consumption by sustaining a target reduction of 25% from the baseline set in 2011–12 (increased from the earlier target of 20%).

Seeking to obtain “Achieved”

7.3.1.4. Minimize the number of information technology (IT) assets per employee.

Seeking to obtain “Achieved”

Provide a maximum of two network access devices per employee, when an employee adopts mobile computing and telephony (laptop or tablet and mobile phone)—excluding employees who have elevated security or network access requirements.

7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage.

Seeking to obtain “Achieved”

Set 100% of multi-functional devices to hibernate when not in use.

7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Adhere to e-waste guidance outlined in the Secretariat's approved Asset Management Framework.

7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Adhere to reuse and recycling guidance outlined in the Secretariat's approved Asset Management Framework.

7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings and improve space utilization in special purpose buildings.

Seeking to obtain “Achieved”

65% of the Secretariat's staff is accommodated in accordance with the Government of Canada's Workplace 2.0 office space utilization standard. The Secretariat has no special purpose buildings.

7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management.

Seeking to maintain “Achieved”

Adhere to the Treasury Board Directive on Fleet Management: Executive Vehicles, subsection 5.4, for the purchase and use of vehicle fleets.

Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million

General Information
Name of transfer payment program
  • International Federation of  Accountants (IFAC)
  • Voted
End date
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Vote 1
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture
  • Program 1.1: Decision-Making Support and Oversight; Sub-Program 1.1.2: Expenditure Analysis and Allocation Management (76%)
  • Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.1: Financial Management Policy (24%)
Main objective The International Federation of Accountants, through its ongoing policy work undertaken by the International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board, will develop high-quality accounting standards for use by public sector entities.
Planned spending for 2016– $200,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation 2010–
General targeted recipient groups Non-profit organizations

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative
Workplace Wellness and Productivity Strategy (WPS) – Modernizing Disability and Sick Leave Management
Lead department
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (Secretariat)
Federal partner organizations

Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)Footnote 3: The result of the collective bargaining process will determine if TBS will require PSPC – Acquisitions Branch expertise in procuring a new short-term disability plan. Its Accounting, Banking and Compensation Branch will support development of the technological systems solution required for interoperability with the People Soft–based absence management system and the human resources and pay systems in the federal public service.

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) – Labour: This organization identifies options for improving the administration of occupational claims under the Government Employees Compensation Act.

Health Canada: This organization's activities support the provision of an updated Policy on Employee Assistance Program and related departmental advice, particularly related to wellness and mental health. Its activities also support a streamlined application process for medical retirement under the Public Service Superannuation Act.

Non-federal and non-governmental partner(s)
Not applicable
Start date of the horizontal initiative
End date of the horizontal initiative
Ongoing

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)

The amount of $25 million of total funding has been allocated over a four-year period for the Secretariat, PSPC, ESDC and Health Canada to carry out a range of activities in support of modernizing the current system for disability and sick leave management. The total allocated funding includes an amount of $21 million in funding from the fiscal framework, along with $3.9 million from existing departmental reference levels.

For WPS specifically, a reprofiling exercise was performed to bring forward unspent amounts from previous years (2013–, 2014–, 2015–) and anticipated surplus amounts for 2016–, 2017–, 2018– and 2023–. The approved reprofiled amount was $2.7 million, of which $1.7 million will be spent in 2017–, and $0.8 million in 2018–. The remaining $0.2 million will be reprofiled in 2023– and will be used to assess elements of the project.

The total planned spending in 2016– for WPS is approximately $3.09 million, which includes the reprofiled amount as well as projected WPS-related expenditures from various sectors of the Secretariat.

Funding contributed by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Description of the horizontal initiative

The objective of the initiative is to modernize the management of disability and sick leave in the federal public service. Several structural problems in relation to the existing disability management framework have been identified. These include lack of active case management with return-to-work support, gaps in income coverage during disability, and increasing system costs.

A business case was developed to identify options for addressing the structural gaps in the current system based on leading industry practices and those adopted by other public jurisdictions. Funding for the initiative was subsequently earmarked in the fiscal framework and supplemented by resources from existing departmental reference levels.

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Sub-program 1.3.1: Pensions and Benefits

Shared outcomes

The targeted result to be achieved by the Secretariat and its partners, including public service bargaining agents, is the modernization of key elements of the disability and sick leave management regime in the federal public service with a view to creating a seamless, integrated and sustainable system to support employee wellness and productivity. The project will assist in the prevention and improved management of employee disability and will return a higher percentage of employees back to work than is currently the case.

Governance structures

In , the Secretariat was mandated to lead the project in collaboration with its federal partners PSPC, ESDC (then known as Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC)), and Health Canada. In the fall of 2013, the government approved the overall funding and the project implementation plan.

A project charter and brief were prepared for the initiative and were reviewed by senior officials from each of the partner organizations. These documents provide details on the initiative and spell out the roles, responsibilities and deliverables of each of the partners.

In addition, the WPS initiative put in place a detailed governance structure to support effective, collaborative and timely decision making for resolving emerging issues. The governance structure includes oversight at the highest levels, including an Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee and a working-level group of work stream committees covering each of the initiative’s major activities.

The chair of each of the work stream committees is responsible for monitoring work, directing corrective actions to be taken when required, reporting regularly on progress, and submitting deliverables as completed to the project management office. The latter has core responsibility for monitoring progress, directing any required corrective actions and approving deliverables. As the senior project director is responsible for project progress overall, he or she is the chair of the project management office.

Planning highlights for 2016–

In 2016–, the focus of the initiative will be to support the collective bargaining process, including the review of options and designs for a short-term disability plan. Continuous reporting and monitoring of the initiative (as described above) ensures that progress is closely tracked using evidence-based information.

Results to be achieved by non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Contact information

William Leffler, Acting Senior Director

Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer
8th Floor, 140 O’Connor Street, L’Esplanade Laurier, East Tower
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5

Federal organizations Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Contributing programs and activities Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars) 2016– Planned spending (dollars) 2016– Expected results 2016– Performance indicators 2016– Targets

Table 10 Notes

Table 1 Note 1

Includes a transfer of funds to Health Canada of $40,000 annually, for each of the four fiscal years of the project.

Return to table 1 note * referrer

Table 1 Note 2

Reflects a revised estimate of planned spending, based on the reprofiling of resources to accommodate project schedule changes as a result of ongoing collective bargaining.

Return to table 1 note referrer

Table 1 Note 3

Performance indicators and performance targets for the WPS are strongly linked to the outcomes of public service–wide collective bargaining, which resumed in . The Secretariat and its partners will be better positioned to specify this performance information by .

Return to table 1 note referrer

Secretariattable 1 note * 1.3.1: Pensions and Benefits N/A 15,623,157 3,092,515table 1 note Project leadership; coordination and oversight; plan design and policy development; input into the bargaining agent engagement, negotiation and consultation process; and change management activities TBD – table 1 note TBD – table 1 note
PSPC Acquisitions N/A 5,227,999 746,066 Support for the development of the Request for Information (RFI) #4 and Request for Proposals (RFPs) for procurement of short-term and long-term disability plans; dependent on collective bargaining outcomes TBD – table 1 note TBD – table 1 note
Federal Pay and Pension Administration N/A     Activities in support of implementing pay and pension information system changes required for the short-term and long-term disability plans TBD – table 1 note TBD – table 1 note    
ESDC Labour N/A 2,412,000 641,592 Activities focused on modernizing systems and arrangements involving occupational injury or illness claims filed under the Government Employees Compensation Act, in order to reduce reporting times and improve data collection and information available to departments and agencies TBD – table 1 note TBD – table 1 note
Health Canada Specialized Health Services N/A 1,747,682 425,758

Activities in support of an updated Policy on Employee Assistance Program and related departmental advice;

Activities in support of a streamlined application process for medical retirement under the Public Service Superannuation Act

TBD – table 1 note TBD – table 1 note
Total for all federal organizations 25,010,838 4,905,931 Not applicable

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

A. Internal audits

The Report on Plans and Priorities includes internal audits that are currently underway or planned for 2016– and 2017–. Additions and adjustments to the internal audits listed below may occur in order to address emerging risks and priorities of the Secretariat.

Title of internal audit Internal audit type Status Expected completion date
Low Dollar Value Contracting Acquisition Services In progress
Information Technology Security (coordinated with Shared Services Canada) Information Technology Services In progress
Information Management Within the Secretariat Information Management Services Planned (recurring in 2016– and 2017–) and
The Secretariat’s Internal Control Framework for the Public Service Dental Care Plan Public Service Employer Payments Planned
Employee Performance Management Processes Within the Secretariat Human Resources Management Services Planned
Information Technology Security Information Technology Services Planned (recurring in 2016– and 2017–) and
The Secretariat’s Single Window Model for Treasury Board Submissions (joint project with the evaluation function) Decision-Making Support and Oversight Planned

The requirement to remain responsive and flexible to the Secretariat’s evolving needs limits the audit function’s ability to forecast plans beyond the 2016– time frame. Future risk-based audit planning exercises will identify projects for 2016– and 2017– based on risk assessments, departmental priorities and resource capacity closer to these respective years.

B. Evaluations

The following evaluations are planned over the next three fiscal years. Additions or adjustments will be made to address emerging priorities.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Title of the evaluation Planned evaluation start date Planned deputy head approval date
  • Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy
  • Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery; Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership
Evaluation of Human Resources Services Modernization
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy Evaluation of the Secretariat’s Centralized Language Training Program
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy Evaluation of the Public Service Employee Survey
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.2: People Management Policy Evaluation of the Classification Program
Program 1.2: Management Policies Development and Monitoring; Sub-Program 1.2.5: Organizational Management Policy Evaluation of the Management Accountability Framework
Program 1.3: Government-Wide Program Design and Delivery; Sub-Program 1.3.4: Transformation Leadership Evaluation of the Web Renewal Initiative

The requirement to remain responsive and flexible to the Secretariat’s evolving needs limits the evaluation function’s ability to forecast plans beyond the 2016– time frame. Future risk-based audit planning exercises will identify projects for 2017– and 2018– based on risk assessments, departmental priorities and resource capacity closer to these respective years.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Privacy statement

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: