Appendix C1 - Benchmark Index by Function - Program/Service Delivery to Canadians - Executive Group Benchmark (10-B-1)

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 10-B-1

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister, Claims and Indian Government

General Accountability

Is accountable for the negotiation and settlement of comprehensive, specific and special claims, and self-government agreements in respect of Aboriginal rights and for the Department's position on litigation against the Crown or where the Crown is impugned, to enhance the government's capacity to meet its constitutional obligations to First Nations.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 15 positions at the first managerial level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The others are the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), Northern Affairs; the ADM, Lands and Trust Services; the ADM, Policy and Strategic Direction; the ADM, Corporate Services; and the Director, Departmental Secretariat. In addition, there are 9 Regional Directors General reporting to the Deputy Minister.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the ADM, Claims and Indian Government, are as follows:

Director General, Comprehensive Claims, (staff of 45) is responsible for developing the comprehensive claims program and funding arrangements; and overseeing the claims process and tri-partite claims negotiations and resolution.

Director General, Self-Government Negotiations,(staff of 55) is responsible for the negotiation of self-government agreements across Canada to implement government policy regarding the inherent right of self-government; and ensuring that proper legislation, implementation plans and financial transfer agreements are put in place to ensure that Canada fulfills its obligations under the agreements.

Director General, Claims Implementation, (staff of 40) is responsible for the negotiation of implementation agreements; representing the Government of Canada on multi-stakeholder implementation committees created and mandated through land claim agreements and implementation plans; and directing the financial coordination, monitoring and reporting activities required for the implementation of claim settlement and related self-government agreements.

Director General, Specific Claims, (staff of 59) is responsible for the management of all specific claims activities, including the identification, study, development and implementation of new government policies and changes to existing policies.

Director, Research and Assessment, (staff of 6) is responsible for the development of broad frameworks, criteria and standards for the review, research and assessment of all claims; for extensive consultation across the sector for the identification of research needs and the development of strategies to anticipate and meet those needs; and for the management of extensively outsourced research services.

Director, Litigation Support, (staff of 5) is responsible for developing the Department's position on litigation where the Department is impugned and on all litigation that the Department brings against others; for developing strategic case management frameworks; for developing litigation policies and procedural frameworks; and for developing mediation and alternative dispute resolution policies and service delivery mechanisms.

Nature And Scope

The Department is responsible for two separate yet equally important mandates: meeting the federal government's constitutional, treaty, political and legal responsibilities to First Nations, Inuit and Notherners; and supporting First Nations and Inuit in developing healthy, sustainable communities and in achieving their economic and social aspirations.

The ADM is accountable for leading federal efforts that will lead to ministerial direction to review and settle existing and potential claims of all kinds (comprehensive, specific, special claims and self-government agreements). In meeting this challenge, which is a government priority, the incumbent is called upon to lead the development and implementation of strategies, approaches and initiatives to settle outstanding Aboriginal claims through a fair and equitable process. The incumbent must lead the negotiation and settlement of claims, which represent 20% of the provincial land mass and are further complicated by Canada's vast geography and associated economic, cultural and political diversity.

The ADM ensures that a multitude of public and private interests are respected in the resolution of these claims, which can cover rights to land-based territory, offshore areas, land use, subsurface rights, environmental management, resource revenue-sharing, economic development and other areas defined during the preliminary negotiation phase. In developing and advancing the government's position with respect to comprehensive claims, the incumbent must take into account the broad scope, high visibility and significant impact that the claims have on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike. The incumbent must assess the impact of the government's position with respect to the comprehensive claims that cover half of Canada's landmass, include areas densely populated by non-Aboriginal peoples, and involve complex federal-provincial/territorial issues.

The Assistant Deputy Minister is accountable for ensuring results-oriented management of specific claims, which arise when the government has not fulfilled its obligations under treaties, the Indian Act or other agreements. In developing the government's position with respect to each specific claim, the incumbent oversees negotiations with each province-which provides the land-and the review and renewal of specific claims policy, in the context of the entire array of departmental and governmental policies governing the claims process.

In addition to the domestic impact, self-government agreements have significant international implications for Canada because Aboriginal groups have observer status on United Nations committees and are pursuing the recognition of rights through international law and other international processes.

As the government focal point for the resolution of both comprehensive and specific claims, the ADM faces a significant challenge in managing the intricacies of self-government negotiations in a modern federation and in ensuring harmony in the relations and efforts of the federal and Aboriginal governments. The incumbent develops partnership arrangements with the Department of Justice for the development and defence of the departmental legal position on policy and technical issues, or on litigation against the Crown, where the Department is impugned, and all litigation that it brings against others. The incumbent makes difficult and politically sensitive decisions to terminate unproductive negotiations.

The ADM manages a broad range of implementation activities. The incumbent must ensure that discrete implementation plans are negotiated and mirror the spirit and intent of the terms and conditions of negotiated agreements and that the Institutions of Public Government and other implementing bodies established to administer the resource co-management rights operate with probity and fulfill their obligations in terms of managing funds and delivering the program for which they were formed. The ADM develops an overall strategy; advises on contentious policy questions; represents the Department's positions to central agencies and other government departments, the provinces and territories, private sector interests, the Minister, Cabinet and parliamentary committees; and establishes a climate conducive to productive negotiations. In meeting this challenge, the incumbent is called upon to develop and implement strategies, approaches and initiatives to address public policy issues that have received more intense public, political and media attention against the backdrop of recent disputes and high-profile situations.

The ADM is given broad latitude by the Deputy Minister in decision-making, particularly in providing a response capacity for high-profile and frequently sensitive claims negotiation or litigation cases that are of concern to the Minister and could be a source of embarrassment to the government if not handled strategically. The incumbent provides expert, sound and immediate advice on complex and/or contentious issues relating to comprehensive and specific claims to the Minister, Deputy Minister and central agency executives.

As the spokesperson for the Minister and the government on claims and self-government issues, the ADM uses expert interpersonal skills to serve as an advocate, mediator and diplomat. At the political level, the incumbent appears before a number of parliamentary committees and at caucus meetings. He or she also is expected to promote and defend departmental strategies and priorities in the regions and with provincial and territorial governments, especially as regards devolution and cost-sharing issues. The incumbent is required to broker resolution to conflicting agendas and complex policy and program inconsistencies and to network with other government departments to resolve conflicts with respect to responsibility for First Nations, the use of renewable and non-renewable resources, co-management arrangements and fiduciary responsibility.

As the Department's most senior authority on comprehensive claims issues, the incumbent consults and confers extensively among the Department's Executive Group to provide authoritative advice and recommendations. In a collegial manner, represents and asserts the government's position on Aboriginal claims policy across all sectors. The incumbent plays a key role in policy decisions made by the Deputy Minister and Minister and, consequently, has substantial influence on the federal government's directions in relation to forging a new relationship with the Aboriginal peoples of Canada.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 210
Operating budget: $7.3 million
Claims contingency liability: $1.2 billion

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Promotes a productive climate for claims negotiation by coordinating departmental and other federal interests to advance the government's agenda for the resolution of comprehensive and specific claims made by Aboriginal peoples.
  2. Leads the development of plans, policies, strategies, systems, budgets and criteria to facilitate the equitable and timely settlement of comprehensive, specific and special claims and self-government agreements.
  3. Exercises leadership in establishing relationships of trust and integrity in the negotiation process by brokering agreements between federal, provincial/territorial Aboriginal groups and other stakeholders and by facilitating greater media and general public understanding of claims policies, processes and issues.
  4. Oversees the effective implementation of negotiated agreements, monitoring of funding arrangements and financial transfers, and the establishment of Institutions of Public Government.
  5. Represents the Department at conferences and in negotiations and consultations with Aboriginal groups, other levels of government, and other departments and interest groups.
  6. Provides authoritative advisory services to the Departmental Executive Committee and to the Minister and Deputy Minister on claims and Aboriginal government issues and on the management of crisis situations and highly visible and politically sensitive issues.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister, Claims and Indian Government

Know-How

G
Mastery of the variety, complexity, interrelationships and interdependencies of issues surrounding Aboriginal claims; and in-depth knowledge of the federal government's objectives, the broad constitutional and legal implications of political, social and economic developments across Canada as they relate to Aboriginal groups, and of the machinery of government processes related to claims settlement and self-government negotiations.
IV
Manages the Department's participation in litigation related to claims settlement and Indian self-government activities and provides federal leadership in guiding and harmonizing all related federal initiatives and activities.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to ensure harmony in the relations between and efforts of the federal and Aboriginal governments and to broker agreements between federal, provincial/territorial and other stakeholders.
1056
The high number reflects the complexity and the horizontality of the issues managed and the leadership skill required to resolve contentious issues through fair and equitable processes.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking within broadly defined concepts and the politico-legal framework provided by the government's Agenda for the settlement of claims in the development of policy and program initiatives and the harmonization of federal and provincial strategies, policies and approaches.
4
Significant analytical, interpretative, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to manage the intricacies of claim settlement and self-government negotiations in a modern federation, and to ensure that legal and constitutional requirements are met in the relations between and efforts of the federal and Aboriginal governments.
(66) 700
High percentage reflects the uniqueness of the challenge of each claim and the requirement to embody constitutional and legal considerations in their settlement.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Deputy Minister, operates with only general guidance in carrying out policy and program responsibilities. As the Department's most senior authority on comprehensive claim issues, shapes and represents the government's position on Aboriginal claims policy across all sectors.
6C
Contributory impact on the results of the negotiation process. The proxy selected is a contingency and settlements liability proxy of $1.2 billion (constant).
700
Low number is consistent with the position's government-wide harmonizing role in claims and self-government settlements and the size of the proxy selected.

Summary

GIV3 1056
G4(66) 700
G6C 700
Total = 2456 0
Assistant Deputy Minister Claims And Indian Government Number: 10 - B - 1
Org Chart of ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER CLAIMS AND INDIAN GOVERNMENT
Figure: 10 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 10 – B – 1

Assistant Deputy Minister, Claims And Indian Government

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 14 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Claims and Indian Government are 4 Directors General and 2 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Northern Affairs
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Lands and Trust Services
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy and Strategic Direction
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services
  • Director, Departmental Secretariat
  • 9 Regional Directors General
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Claims and Indian Government
    • 4 Directors General for :
      • Comprehensive Claims
      • Self-Government Negotiations
      • Claims Implementation
      • Specific Claims
    • 2 Directors for :
      • Research and Assessment
      • Litigation Support

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 9-B-1

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations

General Accountability

Is accountable for directing the implementation of citizenship and immigration legislation and regulations and for developing and implementing operational policies, strategies, plans, guidelines, standards, processes and procedures for the delivery of the Department's citizenship, settlement, selection, integration, enforcement and refugee programs through foreign missions and domestic regional offices.

Organization Structure

This is one of nine senior executive positions at the first level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The others are Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), Human Resources; ADM, Policy and Program Development; ADM, Strategic Directions and Communications; ADM, Centralized Service Delivery and Corporate Services; Assistant Deputy Attorney General; the Ombudsman; the Global Case Management System Business Executive Director; and the Director, Client Service Project.

Specific functions of the senior positions reporting to the ADM, Operations, are as follows:

Five Regional Directors General (Atlantic; Quebec; Ontario; Prairies and Northern Territories; and British Columbia and Yukon) (total staff of 2,549) each is responsible for developing and implementing regional operational policies, guidelines, processes and procedures for the delivery of the Department's citizenship and immigration legislative, regulatory and program responsibilities for an assigned geographical area.

Director General International Region, (363 Canadian staff, plus approximately 1,000 locally engaged staff) is responsible for developing and implementing operational policies, guidelines, processes and procedures governing all aspects of the Department's immigration legislative, regulatory and program operations abroad, including immigrant and refugee selection, visitor visa screening, student and temporary workers programs, intelligence gathering and interdiction of illegal migration, liaison and reporting, and development and coordination of security control and enforcement functions overseas.

Director, Strategic Operations, (staff of 14) is responsible for developing and recommending strategic operating plans and processes for the Operations Sector and for monitoring their implementation.

Nature And Scope

The Department is assigned by Parliament the responsibility for the administration of both the Citizenship Act and the Immigration Act and for the administration of regulations issued under those two acts. Its objective is to ensure that the movement of people into Canada and membership in Canadian society contribute to Canada's social and economic interests while protecting the health and safety of Canadians.

The Department provides policy advice on appropriate measures to conserve Canada's international image as one of the few countries in the world with an open immigration policy, while preventing potential threats to the security and peace of the country.

The ADM, Operations, provides corporate leadership for the implementation of citizenship and immigration legislation and regulations.

The ADM is responsible for developing and implementing operational policies, strategies, plans, guidelines, standards, processes and procedures for the delivery of the Department's citizenship, settlement, selection, integration, enforcement and refugee programs. The incumbent ensures cost-effective delivery of the Department's programs and services through domestic regional offices and through Canada's missions abroad with a view to enhancing the efficient, consistent and transparent delivery of the Department's operations and exercise of decision-making authorities. Programs and services are delivered through five domestic regional offices, 150 Canada Immigration Centres and through 70 international points of service abroad. Centralized program delivery is managed from the National Capital Region (NCR), which includes the management of three centralized processing centres located outside the NCR.

The ADM is responsible for ensuring that the operational policy framework and national performance standards are consistent with the Department's strategic policy objectives. This responsibility requires the incumbent to ensure that operational groups have input into the development of strategic directions and policy and that appropriate functional direction is incorporated into the Sector's work processes.

The ADM develops and implements strategies and mechanisms that facilitate the admission of legitimate students and temporary workers, among other people, while preventing entry of inadmissible persons, in accordance with immigration legislation. The incumbent ensures that non-immigrants meet all requirements for obtaining visas and that the required fees are collected. He or she directs reporting and liaison on comparative immigration and refugee policies and programs of foreign countries; and on specific events related to international migration, such as hostilities and natural disasters. In consultation with stakeholders in the Department and other federal government departments, he or she also develops operational strategies for dealing with those events. The ADM ensures that the immigration levels set by Cabinet are met. This requires the incumbent to direct assessments of the capacity of the network of posts abroad, and to develop and implement resourcing strategies to manage the intended level.

The ADM is called upon to provide authoritative advice and recommendations to the Minister, the Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister and the Executive Committee, based on a sound assessment of the domestic and international environment, the anticipation of emerging issues and the provision of timely advice and leadership. The incumbent is also responsible for ensuring, directing and leading substantive dialogue, consultations and negotiations with provinces, territories, non-governmental organizations, stakeholders and other government departments, including central agencies and international organizations. He or she presents the views and policy positions of the Minister and the Deputy Minister at conferences, negotiations, and consultations with other levels of government, organizations, institutions, clients, stakeholders and interested parties.

A major challenge for the ADM is to lead the development and implementation of operational procedures and processes which contribute to protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians; which educate potential new Canadians about the rights, value and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship; and which protect refugees and persons in need of humanitarian assistance. In meeting this challenge, the ADM is required to direct the development and implementation of strategies and initiatives that respond to national and international pressures on Canada, to report on international relations and issues and to ensure that a responsive operational delivery system is in place.

The ADM ensures that appropriate control measures are in place, that alleged abuses of the immigration system are identified and investigated, that the measures for removal and deportation are executed in accordance with the letter and spirit of the Immigration Act and regulations and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and that suitable support and operational mechanisms are in place for the integration and settlement of immigrants and refugees. The incumbent must ensure that the capacity for operational response to changing national and international situations is enhanced through the use of information management and technology systems and renewed business processes.

As a member of the Departmental Executive Committee, the incumbent participates in identifying departmental priorities and in designing and developing the overarching strategic direction.

The ADM is in frequent contact with senior officials of the Privy Council Office, the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), Foreign Affairs Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, the Solicitor General and the Department of Justice, as well as with foreign ambassadors, to represent the interests and concerns related to his or her departmental responsibilities. The incumbent is in regular contact with lawyers, consultants and non-governmental organizations involved in immigration and refugee matters to present the Department's views on operations and particular cases and to receive the views of those groups on behalf of the Department with respect to initiatives or cases under consideration by the Minister.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
  Sector Department
FTEs: 2,930 4,442
Operating budget: $33 million $59 million
Grants and contributions: $58 million $64 million
Capital:   $1.7 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Ensures the cost-effective development and implementation of operational policies, priorities, and plans for all aspects of Canada's immigrant, refugee, non-immigrant and citizenship programs.
  2. Directs the development and application of national and international performance standards and monitoring mechanisms for legislative, regulatory, policy and program delivery activities under the Citizenship and Immigration Acts.
  3. Ensures that Canada's immigration legislation, regulations, policies and programs are delivered effectively abroad to achieve established immigration levels.
  4. Directs activities that monitor the operational and policy environment abroad to identify, analyse and report on policies and initiatives of foreign governments related to immigration and refugee matters.
  5. Directs the development of outreach strategies and initiatives, ensuring that strategic linkages are maintained with other government departments and stakeholders outside of government, in order to advance the interests of the Department with respect to the delivery of all programs and services abroad.
  6. Provides advice to the Minister and the Deputy Minister on all aspects of the responsibilities falling within his or her mandate and, as a member of the Executive Committee, participates in the major strategic decision-making processes related to the goals, strategies and operations of all departmental programs.
  7. Provides leadership in detecting and preventing irregular migrant movements through liaison with the CRA, CSIS, RCMP, transportation companies, national and international agencies and organizations, and foreign governments.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations

Know-How

G
Mastery of government policies and priorities related to social, economic and foreign policy and of the policy and program strategies, priorities and operations of the Department and associated agencies; expert knowledge of changing domestic and international geopolitical circumstances affecting international migrations and their integration into a new cultural environment; and expert professional knowledge of the priorities and policies of other federal departments, provincial, municipal and foreign governments and national and international associations and organizations associated with citizenship, immigration and refugee matters.
IV
Manages, initiates, promotes, and coordinates the formulation and implementation of operational policies, procedures and processes to deliver Canadian citizenship and immigration programs abroad and in Canada.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to provide direction to a large decentralized staff and to manage relationships with a number of stakeholders across and outside the country.
920
Mid-range number reflects the expertise required to provide corporate leadership for the delivery of complex programs abroad and in Canada.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking within the context of governmental and departmental socio-economic priorities regarding immigrants and refugees, as well as citizens and landed immigrants.
4
Evaluative and constructive thinking is required to formulate and implement operational policies and procedures to achieve the Department's strategic and operational goals in Canada and abroad in the rapidly evolving international geopolitical context.
(66) 608
Higher percentage reflects the requirement of the position to deliver the Department's programs domestically and abroad.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Deputy Minister, the position ensures that the Department develops cost-effective, operationally sound strategies and initiatives to deliver immigration and citizenship programs abroad and in Canada.
4P
The position has a primary impact on all activities undertaken by the Department to deliver its programs domestically and abroad. The proxy used to represent these activities is the Sector operating budget of $33 million (constant).
800
Mid-range number reflects budgetary magnitude and the autonomy of the position in managing the delivery of the Department's programs and services domestically and abroad.

Summary

GIV3 920
G4(66) 608
G4P 800
Total = 2328 A2
Assistant Deputy Minister Operations Number: 9 - B - 1
Org Chart of the ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER OPERATIONS
Figure: 9 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 9 – B – 1

Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 8 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations are 5 Regional Directors General, 1 Director General and 1 Director.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Human Resources
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy and Program Development
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Directions and Communications
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Centralized Service Delivery and Corporate Services
  • Assistant Deputy Attorney-General
  • Ombudsman
  • Global Case Management System Business Executive Director
  • Director, Client Service Project
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
    • 5 Regional Directors General for :
      • Atlantic
      • Quebec
      • Ontario
      • Prairies and Northern Territories
      • British Columbia and Yukon
    • Director General, International Region
    • Director, Strategic Operations

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 9-B-2

Position Title: Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing service-wide leadership in the development and implementation of strategies and initiatives for the continuum of activities to actively encourage and assist offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 15 positions at the first managerial level reporting to the Commissioner. The others are Senior Deputy Commissioner; Regional Deputy Commissioners (5) (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies and Pacific); Deputy Commissioner, Women; Assistant Commissioner, Performance Assurance; Assistant Commissioner, Communications; Executive Director, Corporate Secretariat; Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services; Assistant Commissioner, Human Resources; Assistant Commissioner, Policy, Planning and Coordination; and Senior General Counsel.

Specific functions of the senior positions reporting to the Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs, are as follows:

Director General, Programs, (staff of 27) is responsible for developing, implementing and monitoring the effectiveness of correctional programs in key program areas such as sex offenders, long-term and short-term offenders; and for developing and monitoring the implementation of strategies, policies, standards and best practices to enhance the Department's capacity in the areas of unit management, occupational development, employment, education, personal development, diversity and multiculturalism.

Director General, Offender Reintegration, (staff of 22) is responsible for developing and monitoring the implementation of risk-assessment tools and sentence-management standards, processes and procedures; for providing leadership in the implementation of corrections strategies; and for developing and maintaining effective liaison with the National Parole Board and the National Joint Committees.

Chief Executive Officer, CORCAN, (staff of 350) is responsible for directing the CORCAN Management Team and for managing all delegated authorities granted to CORCAN. CORCAN is a special operating agency mandated to employ offenders while they are incarcerated, and to aid in their rehabilitation by teaching them new work skills and attitudes. In addition, CORCAN markets the goods and services produced by offenders to the public sector.

Director General, Operational Support, (staff of 14) is responsible for developing and implementing frameworks, policies, approaches and initiatives for the integration of all institutional and community strategies and plans to support safe release; and for providing advice on major corrections-management issues affecting the mandate of the Department.

Director General, Security, (staff of 17) is responsible for designing, developing and implementing policies, standards and operating procedures to ensure the safety of personnel and offenders in institutions; for developing and promulgating preventive security standards, procedures and practices; for developing and promulgating emergency response team standards and practices; and for managing the operations crisis centre.

Director General, Health Care, (staff of 13) is responsible for developing and implementing strategies, approaches and initiatives to establish and maintain departmental health programs; for developing and implementing strategies and approaches to integrate psychology into programming and intervention initiatives and risk analysis; and for tracking and improving physical and mental health approaches, processes and practices.

Director General, Chaplaincy, (staff of 5) is responsible for developing and implementing strategies, standards, approaches, processes and procedures to enhance the development and delivery of spiritual counselling and services; and for providing leadership in the development and maintenance of volunteer networks.

Director General, Aboriginal Issues, (staff of 8) is responsible for providing analyses and advice on a wide range of corrections management issues related to the cultural and personal characteristics and aspirations of the Aboriginal offender population.

Nature And Scope

The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to the protection of society by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

The CSC operates under three levels of management: national, regional and institutional / district parole office. The national headquarters in Ottawa performs overall planning and policy development, while each of the five regional offices implements departmental activities in facilities in its respective region.

It is in this context that the Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs, is responsible for providing corporate leadership in developing comprehensive, integrated approaches to the management of offenders from the time of sentencing through to release into the community. As the CSC's second-ranking officer, the incumbent provides the Commissioner with critical management support in integrating the various elements of the CSC's activities within a comprehensive management framework. The incumbent is responsible for an extremely diverse scope of activities, ranging from the development and promulgation of operational polices and standards to the day-to-day management of major correctional issues.

The Assistant Commissioner provides corporate leadership in the effective management of offenders in institutions and in the community after release on parole. In fulfilling this responsibility, the incumbent provides corporate direction for establishing performance standards, monitoring their implementation at the institutional level and identifying approaches and initiatives for systemic changes. The incumbent is called upon to develop and implement approaches and methodologies for identifying and addressing deficiencies in the federal correctional system, as well as in the management of offenders released into the community.

The Assistant Commissioner provides corporate leadership in identifying priorities, approaches and initiatives for change. The incumbent leads the CSC's business process modernization initiatives and provides direction and support for the formulation, development and implementation of all corporate initiatives in all federal correctional institutions. The incumbent directs the development and implementation of strategies and initiatives to ensure the integration of the Offender Management System within the operational context of the consistent and integrated delivery of the CSC's custodial responsibilities and programs across the Department. The incumbent is responsible for ensuring the development and application of strategies and approaches to integrating the lessons learned from program measurement and research findings into an integrated operational framework for offender custody and rehabilitation both in institutions and in the community.

The Assistant Commissioner draws on the body of expertise available throughout the Department to develop, assess and apply a wide range of operational alternatives to a variety of issues ranging from the spiritual, physical and mental well-being of offenders to their release into society. The incumbent must ensure that the appropriate standards, approaches and tools for dealing with all aspects of the offender population are developed and implemented. This responsibility involves the incumbent in developing and applying a wide range of tracking and monitoring mechanisms related to the assessment and management of offenders under the CSC's responsibility and of their potential risk to themselves, the offender population, and eventually, the population as a whole. The challenge for the incumbent is to ensure that the standards, operational policies, procedures and practices are mutually supportive and are designed to deal with the offender in a holistic manner.

A major challenge for the Assistant Commissioner is to ensure that policies, standards, operations and practices comply with the rule of law. The incumbent ensures that the Department has the capacity to treat offenders within the established legislative, policy and operational frameworks. This responsibility requires the incumbent to be in continual contact with the heads of all federal correctional institutions, as well as with the Commissioner and with senior officials of the National Parole Board and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. In addition, the incumbent is called upon to establish and maintain productive working relationships with a variety of non-governmental groups interested in the management of offenders in federal institutions.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 460
Operating budget: $2.4 million
CORCAN national budget: $10.8 million
Departmental budget: $241.5 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides leadership in the integrated management of all custodial and program activities in federal correctional institutions across Canada, ensuring that the management regime is consistent with the legislated mandate and with the corporate strategic vision and mission.
  2. Provides leadership in the management of changes required in the correctional system to ensure that the rule of law is followed in every federal institution across Canada and that the physical, spiritual and mental well-being of offenders is attended to in an appropriate manner.
  3. Directs the planning and implementation of a review of the business processes and systems and the identification, development and implementation of opportunities to enhance the systemic capacity of the Department to manage its activities effectively and efficiently.
  4. Directs the identification of priority items within the corporate agenda and the development of strategies and approaches to address them, ensuring that program measurement and research findings are incorporated into operating standards and practices.
  5. Ensures the development of standards, approaches, practices and procedures to protect the safety and security of personnel and offenders in federal institutions and that of the general population in relation to the managed release of offenders.
  6. Ensures the development of standards, approaches practices and procedures to support the equitable treatment of minority groups in the offender population.
  7. Provides leadership in the management of relations with the National Parole Board and with non-governmental groups interested in offenders' issues.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs

Know-How

G
Mastery of the legislative framework and government policies and priorities related to incarceration and rehabilitation, criminal justice and criminal cultural diversity in order to design, develop, adapt and lead the delivery of correctional programs and services by the Department. In-depth knowledge of the legislative framework and mandate of multiple partners in the criminal justice system in order to manage interrelationships and support the government's objectives in relation to the safety and security of Canadians while respecting the rights and entitlement of offenders.
IV
Corporate leadership in developing the Department's correctional agenda and in integrating multiple programs to meet the diverse needs of the offender population. Functional direction to a national network of federal correctional institutions and parole districts.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to work effectively with criminal justice partners and stakeholders in order to identify and resolve safety and security issues, and with CSC staff in order to direct the delivery of national correctional services.
920
Mid-range number reflects the solid knowledge and skills required to develop and manage the delivery of diverse programs and services in a large, geographically dispersed organization.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking within the federal legislative framework and the corporate objectives of the Department to develop approaches and programs to meet evolving offender needs. National and inter-regional issues are addressed within the diverse offender cultural and social constraints while recognizing the inherent hostility of offenders toward staff.
4
Significant analytical, interpretative, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to develop correctional programs and services to address the diverse social, cultural, medical and security needs of offenders, considering a broad criminal cultural diversity, individual rights and entitlement, public safety and security, and legislative and legal requirements.
(66) 608
This higher percentage reflects the challenges associated with developing multi-year program and service priorities while considering the diversity of federal offenders and their associated needs; public and departmental staff safety and security concerns; the operational requirements of a large, decentralized organization; and the unique correctional environment.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Commissioner, the incumbent receives general guidance on policy and program responsibilities and provides operational and program leadership to the Executive Committee.
5C
The position has a contributory impact on the Department's ability to deliver its programs and services. The proxy selected to represent this impact is the departmental budget of $241.5 million (constant).
608
The mid-range number reflects the significant degree of decision-making authority and the contribution that the position makes to achieving the Department's objectives.

Summary

GIV3 920
G4(66) 608
G5C 608
Total = 2136 0
Assistant Commissioner Operations And Programs Number: 9 - B - 2
Org Chart of the ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OPERATIONS AND PROGRAMS
Figure: 9 – B – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 9 – B – 2

Assistant Commissioner, Operations And Programs

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 14 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs are 7 Directors General and 1 Chief Executive Officer.

Linear organisation chart:

Commissioner (Departmental deputy head)

  • Senior Deputy Commissioner
  • 5 Regional Deputy Commissioners
    • Atlantic
    • Quebec
    • Ontario
    • Prairies
    • Pacific
  • Deputy Commissioner, Women
  • Assistant Commissioner, Performance Assurance
  • Assistant Commissioner, Communications
  • Executive Director, Corporate Secretariat
  • Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services
  • Assistant Commissioner, Human Resources
  • Assistant Commissioner, Policy, Planning and Coordination
  • Senior General Counsel
  • Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs
    • 7 Directors General for :
      • Programs
      • Offender Reintegration
      • Operational Support
      • Security
      • Health Care
      • Chaplaincy
      • Aboriginal Issues
    • Chief Executive Officer, CORCAN

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 8-B-1

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister, Oceans

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing corporate leadership in designing, developing and coordinating the implementation of strategic policy and planning frameworks, approaches, programs and initiatives to support and advance the Minister's government-wide legislated responsibilities with respect to the management of Canada's marine and freshwater environments.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 20 senior executive positions at the first level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The others are the Assistant Deputy Minister, Marine Services / Commissioner of the Coast Guard; Assistant Deputy Minister, Science; Assistant Deputy Minister, Fisheries Management; Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy; Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services; Director General, Communications; Regional Directors General (6); Special Advisors to the Deputy Minister (2); General Counsel; Director General, Review; Executive Director; Fisheries Resource Conservation Council; Visiting Fellow to the Canada School of the Public Service; and Senior Advisor, Early Conflict Resolution.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Oceans, are as follows:

Director General, Oceans, (staff of 31) is responsible for developing, designing and implementing national policies, plans and programs related to the management of coastal and oceanic resources consistent with the Oceans Act.

Director General, Habitat Management and Environmental Sciences, (staff of 45) is responsible for providing leadership in developing, designing and coordinating the implementation of national habitat protection.

Director, Program Planning and Coordination, (staff of 10) is responsible for directing the development and monitoring the implementation of national operational policies, strategies, plans and initiatives to support and advance the cost-effective management of the Oceans Program; and for providing leadership in supporting changes to the business culture of the sector.

Nature And Scope

The Department develops and delivers policies and programs in support of Canada's economic, ecological and scientific interests in oceans and inland waters. The Department is responsible for developing and delivering operational programs and policies, standards, directives and cost-recovery services related to the legislated mandate of the Coast Guard, and for managing major scientific and technical activities related to renewable fisheries resources, and aquatic and oceans research and management programs of national and international consequence. Federal jurisdiction in oceans matters covers a wide variety of areas, such as international obligations and commitments, defence, sovereignty, national law enforcement, off-shore exploration, environmental protection, the conservation of migratory birds and recreational, Aboriginal and commercial fisheries resources.

The Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) has a national leadership role in developing an integrated oceans strategy and protecting fisheries habitats. This involves providing functional direction to regional organizations established to deliver the Habitat Management Program and Oceans Management Program.

The ADM exercises a national leadership role in developing an integrated oceans strategy and in protecting fisheries habitats. This responsibility requires the incumbent to provide a national focal point for all departmental initiatives related to the development of a comprehensive policy on the federal government's responsibilities for oceans management. The incumbent also directs and coordinates the Department's activities with respect to developing and implementing policies and initiatives for understanding, conserving and protecting aquatic habitats, including cost-effective management of the Department's responsibilities for environmental assessments and reviews. The challenge for the incumbent is to develop and coordinate the implementation of an environmental impact assessment process-reflecting recent court decisions to accommodate the thrust of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and to meet government priorities for the environment and its development as a means of economic prosperity. The incumbent ensures that functional direction is provided to regional organizations that deliver the Habitat Management Program and the Oceans Management Program.

The ADM provides leadership for the development and promulgation of a comprehensive ocean management policy, which is shared among 23 federal departments and agencies. The ADM leads the development and implementation of the government's Oceans Management Strategy for Canada with a view to harmonizing competing federal interests in the management of Canadian oceanic resources. In meeting this challenge, the incumbent is called upon to lead the development and implementation of a comprehensive framework to guide all federal initiatives related to the development, implementation and monitoring of the Department's mandate for managing oceans resources, as well as the broader responsibility for federal collaboration, coordination and cooperation called for under the Oceans Act. The incumbent must ensure that the Department has the capacity to harmonize the competing interests and concerns of a myriad of stakeholders, including provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal communities, commercial and sport fishers and environmental groups, into a comprehensive national approach to managing ocean resources.

The ADM is responsible for developing and implementing operational program strategies and initiatives to support the government's overall approaches to enhancing the quality of the environment, protecting the resource so that it can maintain itself and balancing the economic exploitation of the resource within its regenerative capacity. The incumbent is called upon to ensure that those operational policies and programs are consistent with the government's overarching environmental, social and economic goals.

The ADM directs the development of environmental operational policies and programs that support the development of a cohesive management regime based on a comprehensive ecological approach to conserving and protecting the aquatic environment and the ecosystems and resources they contain. The challenge for the incumbent is to ensure the most appropriate means of addressing the scientific, social and economic issues that affect those parts of the environment on which fish depend directly or indirectly in order to carry out their life processes.

The ADM plays a leadership role in reorienting the Department's habitat protection and environmental assessment activities as a proponent, initiator, regulator and adviser. The challenge for the incumbent is to gain acceptance and support for the Department's ocean environment and habitat programs throughout the Department and client groups and from stakeholders.

The ADM plays a leadership role in articulating, negotiating and advancing the Department's position on managing oceans activity internationally to position Canada as a world leader in oceans and resource management. The challenge for the incumbent is to develop and advance strategies and initiatives that extend domestic objectives into international fora.

As the Department's senior spokesperson for policy and program matters related to the oceans and habitat, the ADM is in frequent contact with senior representatives of other federal departments and agencies to represent the Department's interests and concerns with respect to cooperative initiatives, national science policy, university support, economic development and multiple uses of the resource. The incumbent is also in frequent contact with representatives of foreign governments to discuss research collaboration, treaties or agreements, and with senior officials and elected representatives of provincial and territorial governments to discuss oceans and habitat management agreements and economic development initiatives.

The ADM is a member of the Departmental Executive Committee, which sets the Department's strategic direction, and of the Departmental Management Committee, which reviews and adjusts program operations. The incumbent contributes to the formulation of departmental policies, priorities and practices.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
  Line Functional
FTEs: 95 560
Operating budget: $1.70 million $10.3 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides federal government leadership in developing and promoting a comprehensive oceans management policy. Leads the development and implementation of the government's Oceans Management Strategy for Canada to harmonize competing federal interests in the management of Canadian oceanic resources.
  2. Provides departmental leadership and expertise on the federal government's responsibilities for oceans management; provides advice to the Minister, Deputy Minister and senior departmental managers; and ensures the development of cohesive departmental plans, strategies and initiatives related to national and regional habitat management and environmental science programs.
  3. Manages the development, coordination and implementation of policies, plans and programs related to the management of coastal and oceanic resources and national habitat protection, with the goal of facilitating the sustained economic use of both renewable and non-renewable resources in a safe, environmentally sound manner.
  4. Develops and implements strategies and initiatives that stimulate and encourage the development of oceans by creating and maintaining partnerships with the public and private sectors to ensure the development of cost-sharing arrangements and the transfer of technology.
  5. As senior spokesperson for policy and program matters, leads Canadian delegations to national and international events on managing oceans activities internationally, promotes the sustainable development of the world's ocean resources and advances Canada's position as a world leader in oceans and resource management.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister, Oceans

Know-How

G
Mastery of government legislation, vision, mandate, programs and policies related to managing Canada's oceans, including the government's agenda with respect to the management of oceanic and freshwater habitats; mastery of legislation, policies, practices, processes and procedures regarding environmental impact assessments; extensive knowledge of principles, approaches and practices related to policy and program development and management; and in-depth knowledge of the interrelationships between federal and provincial resource management programs affecting oceanic and freshwater habitats.
III
Manages and coordinates the formulation of long-term strategic plans and policies required to provide government-wide leadership in the management of national oceanic resources.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to develop effective working relationships, provide leadership on a national basis for a government-wide function and motivate professional staff.
800
Top number reflects the expertise required to achieve the results of broad, complex ocean-based policies and programs on a national scale.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Top Thinking within the general framework of the government's Natural Resources Management Program, in accordance with recognized environmental principles, to develop national oceans management policies, strategies and plans.
4
Identifying, planning and rationalizing oceans management across the federal government requires a high degree of constructive thinking.
(57) 460
Solid percentage reflects the requirement of the position to identify, recommend and support new directions for the government's management of the oceans and associated habitats.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Deputy Minister, the position ensures that the federal government has a coherent policy direction and program structure to manage oceanic resources and manages the Department's environmental impact assessment activities.
3P
The position has a primary impact on Branch activities. The proxy used is the branch budget of $1.70 million (constant).
608
Mid-range number reflects the strong influence that the position has on the direction taken by the federal government in managing the oceans, and the significant contribution the position makes to the achievement of the Department's strategic objectives and operational goals.

Summary

GIII3 800
G4(57) 460
G3P 608
Total = 1868 A2
Assistant Deputy Minister Oceans Number: 8 - B - 1
Org Chart of the ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER OCEANS
Figure: 8 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 8 – B – 1

Assistant Deputy Minister, Oceans

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 19 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Oceans are 2 Directors General and 1 Director.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Marine Services/Commissioner of the Coast Guard
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Science
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Fisheries Management
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Communications
  • 6 Regional Directors General
  • 2 Special Advisors to the Deputy Minister
  • General Counsel
  • Director General, Review
  • Executive Director, Fisheries Resource Conservation Council
  • Visiting Fellow to The Canada School of Public Service
  • Senior Advisor, Early Conflict Resolution
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Oceans
    • 2 Directors General for :
      • Oceans
      • Habitat Management and Environmental Sciences
    • Director, Program Planning and Coordination

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 7-B-1

Position Title: Director General, Primary Health Care and Public Health

General Accountability

Is accountable for managing the development and implementation of integrated policy, program, model, accountability and other frameworks and systems for the provision of primary health care and public health services to assist registered First Nations and Inuit individuals to attain a level of health and of access to health services comparable to that of other Canadians living in similar locations.

Organization Structure

The Director General is 1 of 19 positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch. The others are Director General, Non-Insured Health Benefits; Director General, Community Programs; Executive Director, Office of Nursing Services; Executive Director, Office of Community Medicine; Director General, Strategic Policy, Planning and Analysis; Director General, Business Planning and Management; Director, Research Coordination and Special Projects; Senior Advisor, Issues Management; eight Regional Directors; Special Advisor, Risk Management; and Chief Executive Advisor, First Nations and Inuit Relations.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director General, Primary Health Care and Public Health, are as follows:

Director, Primary Health Care, (staff of 51) is responsible for consulting, analysis, planning, development and agreement on policies, models, accountability frameworks, capacities and other requirements for integrated, accessible and quality delivery of primary health care and public health services and systems and programs (primary care services; home and community care; health information infrastructure; First Nations health system reforms and alternative models; e-Health Solutions; best practices and alternatives in Canada and internationally; and the health of human resources, including bursary and scholarship programs) to First Nations and Inuit populations.

Director, Communicable Disease Control, (staff of 15) is responsible for directing and managing medical and health surveillance, as well as risk assessment of infectious diseases, with particular focus on tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C, to help First Nations and Inuit communities and populations address health inequalities and disease threats.

Director, Environmental Health, (staff of 20) is responsible for planning and developing strategies, initiatives and programs, in partnership with First Nations and Inuit communities, to promote and sustain healthy environments. Programs range from the Mould and Housing Program and the Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Program to training, advice and support to the regions in the management and delivery of various programs, including the Transport of Dangerous Goods, sewage and waste disposal, food inspection, pest control and Indoor Air Quality.

Director, Environmental Research, (staff of 21) is responsible for conducting, coordinating and funding laboratory and biostatistical services and scientific research into environmental health and contaminants issues that have an impact on First Nations and Inuit communities, as well as for promoting sustainable development involving fuel storage tank operations, air, water, soil, and country food.

Dental Unit (staff of 5) and Pharmacy Unit (staff of 3), in which each professional area is responsible for program and policy development in its area of expertise; for providing professional advice and specific evaluation of client services; and for providing advice to national associations, regulatory bodies and other areas within the Department on First Nations and Inuit dental and pharmacology needs.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mission is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Its mandate, underpinned by a solid information and knowledge base, covers three broad areas: national health policy and systems, including health care; health promotion and protection, including disease, illness and injury prevention; and First Nations and Inuit health.

The First Nations and Inuit Branch ensures the availability of or access to health services for First Nations and Inuit communities; helps First Nations and Inuit communities address health barriers and disease threats and attain health levels comparable to those of other Canadians living in similar locations; and builds strong partnerships with First Nations and Inuit populations to improve the health system.

The Director General oversees the development and implementation of a national integrated policy framework for the provision of primary health care and public health services to First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals. First Nations and Inuit access to provincial health services, and the delivery of those services by the Branch regions to isolated or other communities where provincial services are not available is provided by primary health care and public health. That access includes hospitals, health facilities, nursing stations and emergency and community medicine. It also involves home and community care for a unique clientele with special needs, whose relationship with all levels of government continues to evolve in a complex and politically sensitive environment, and whose health care and public health services are complicated by a myriad of factors, including small isolated communities, diverse and unique cultures, high disease trends (both chronic and communicable) and environmental challenges (contaminants, water, housing).

The Director General provides federal leadership in negotiating agreements and partnerships to shift the focus of primary health care and public health programs and services to a delivery approach based on active, joint participation with First Nations and Inuit partners to meet the specific needs of their populations and communities. A major challenge for the incumbent is to lead the creation of national accountability and collaboration frameworks for the delivery of integrated and continuous primary health care and public health services, including the development of strong partnerships with other federal departments, provinces, health professionals and their organizations, and the many levels of First Nations and Inuit representation and organization.

The Director General oversees the development and improvement of specific programs and policies for the prevention, control and management of communicable diseases and diseases linked to environmental factors. The incumbent manages medical and health surveillance, as well as risk assessment; directs scientific research into communicable disease prevention and management in indigenous or isolated populations; and develops national programs and policies for immunization, communicable disease prevention and management, and health promotion and protection, spanning treatment protocols and guidelines; rehabilitation and support; health information and surveillance; initial trends in population health and risk assessment; health promotion; health protection; and disease prevention.

Another challenge facing the Director General is the continuous development and delivery of innovative health information systems that enhance health surveillance and services. The incumbent provides authoritative advice on proposed investments in new technologies for hospitals, health facilities and equipment, and health information systems.

The Director General ensures the provision of specialist expertise and authoritative advice on pharmacy and dental issues, and the championing of new policy, program and resource requirements to enhance quality programs and service delivery to First Nations and Inuit populations.

The Director General provides advice to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Regional Directors and other departmental managers on primary health care, public health, and communicable disease and environmental health issues relating to First Nations and Inuit communities, and ensures that programs, policies and frameworks related to primary health care and public health address regional, First Nations and Inuit sensitivities, needs and issues. The incumbent consults extensively to ensure that national policies, programs and frameworks are aligned with overall national priorities, including those specific to Aboriginal concerns (such as the Gathering Strength initiative) or health concerns (such as the Wellness Agency, Health System Renewal), as well as other federal or departmental initiatives.

The Director General establishes and supports national multi-jurisdictional committees for the collaborative development and management of primary health care and public health. The incumbent is involved in federal interdepartmental committees and advocates new policies and programs to improve health for First Nations and Inuit clients. The incumbent also participates in major conferences, committees and meetings with other multi-jurisdictional and international organizations involved with the health of Aboriginal peoples.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 121
Operating budget: $4.6 million
Branch assets and investments: $83.8 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Oversees the national development, implementation and improvement of programs and policies for the prevention, control and management of infection and environmental diseases to help First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals address health issues and disease threats.
  2. Leads the creation of national accountability and collaboration frameworks for the delivery of integrated and continuous systems for primary health care and public health services to improve or sustain health of First Nations and Inuit populations throughout Canada.
  3. Represents the Department as the primary federal representative in matters of primary health care and occasionally of public health services in negotiations for binding agreements, collaborations and partnerships with First Nations and Inuit organizations and with other levels of government in Canada to develop a delivery approach based on active, joint participation.
  4. Leads the development and delivery of innovative health information systems and other technology-enabling capabilities to continuously enhance health surveillance, systems and services.
  5. Sets priorities and oversees laboratory operations, initial surveillance of the health of First Nations and Inuit populations, and contaminant and other research to develop evidence for improvement of national programs.
  6. Ensures that Directorate strategies, policy and program leadership, operations and other activities address regional, First Nations and Inuit sensitivities, needs and issues and are also aligned with relevant overall national priorities, including those specific to Aboriginal concerns, health concerns or federal or departmental initiatives.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Primary Health Care and Public Health

Know-How

G
Mastery of legislation, policy and programs related to primary health care and public health services; in-depth professional knowledge of First Nations and Inuit culture, traditions, practices, philosophy and organizations involved in primary health care; and in-depth professional knowledge of mandates, programs, services, objectives and priorities of provincial and territorial health services, and the interrelationships between multiple levels of government and community partners in order to develop integrated policies, frameworks and systems to meet First Nations and Inuit health needs.
III
Operational and conceptual management of national accountability and collaboration frameworks for the delivery of an integrated and geographically consistent standard of health care services through joint participation with First Nations and Inuit partners, provincial health service providers or Branch regions in isolated or other communities where provincial services are not available.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to develop cooperative and trusting relationships with multiple stakeholders and partners to support collaborative development, management and delivery of primary health care and public health services to First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals.
700
Mid-range number reflects the depth of specialized knowledge and the solid managerial skill needed to provide federal leadership in reaching agreements and forming partnerships across multiple jurisdictions in order to ensure that the broad range of health needs of First Nations and Inuit communities are addressed.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within broadly defined policies and objectives in situations where First Nations and Inuit relationships with government are evolving.
4
Analytical, interpretative, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to lead the creation of national accountability and collaboration frameworks and to develop and improve specific national programs and policies. Programs and policies complement and support the Department's mandate and the government's health priorities, as well as other federal or departmental initiatives.
(57) 400
Solid percentage reflects the challenges associated with developing support, across all levels of government and the many levels of First Nations and Inuit representation and organization, to refocus programs and services on a delivery approach based on active, joint participation with First Nations and Inuit partners.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, the incumbent receives general direction in the development of policies and frameworks.
3P
Primary impact on the activities of the Directorate. The proxy selected to represent these activities is the Directorate budget of $4.6 million (constant).
460
High number reflects the latitude of the position in developing agreements and partnerships with multiple jurisdictions that advance the Department's mandate to ensure that health services are available and accessible to First Nations and Inuit populations.

Summary

GIII3 700
F4(57) 400
F3P 460
Total = 1560 A1
Director General Primary Health Care And Public Health Number: 7 - B - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR GENERAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH
Figure: 7 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 7 – B – 1

Director General, Primary Health Care And Public Health

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, and there are 18 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Primary Health Care and Public Health are 4 Directors, 1

Dental Unit and 1 Pharmacy Unit

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch

  • Director General, Non-Insured Health Benefits
  • Director General, General Community Programs
  • Executive Director Office of Nursing Services
  • Executive Director, Office of Community Medicine
  • Director General, Strategic Policy, Planning and Analysis
  • Director General, Business Planning and Management
  • Director, Research Coordination and Special Projects
  • Senior Advisor, Issues Management
  • 8 Regional Directors
  • Special Advisor, Risk Management
  • Chief Executive Advisor, First Nations and Inuit Relations
  • Director General, Primary Health Care and Public Health
    • 4 Directors for :
      • Primary Health Care
      • Communicable Disease Control
      • Environmental Health
      • Environmental Research
    • Dental Unit
    • Pharmacy Unit

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 6-B-1

Position Title: Director General, Interregional Interventions and Partnerships

General Accountability

Is accountable for operationalizing corporate priorities, directing horizontality- and consensus-building functions, and establishing interregional partnerships. Provides leadership and direction with respect to the orientation and consistency of the Agency's operational content and the management of interregional partnerships and projects that respond to clients' needs and Department and government issues. Is also accountable for managing Info-entrepreneurs and points of service, including the Quebec Aboriginal Business Service Centre; for maintaining operational relations with the Industry portfolio, federal networks and federal departments; and for managing memoranda of understanding with financial institutions.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 18 positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations. The other positions are Director General, Regional Operations; Director, Infrastructure Program; Regional Directors (14); and the staff in the Assistant Deputy Minister's Office.

Seven positions report to the Director General: Director, Operationalization of Corporate Priorities; Director, Partnerships and Consultations; Managers, Programs (4); Manager, Results Measurement and Progress Reporting.

Nature And Scope

The Agency's mandate is to promote the economic development of the regions of Quebec and to foster job creation by emphasizing long-term economic development and the creation of sustainable employment and income, in accordance with the objectives of the Industry portfolio, while focussing its efforts on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and on the enhancement of entrepreneurship. The operations are decentralized, with a head office in Montreal and 14 other points of service spread across the regions of Quebec.

The Agency, together with other federal agencies and sector stakeholders, defines federal guidelines for economic development. It promotes sustainable long-term economic development while focussing its efforts on SMEs and on the enhancement of entrepreneurship. It fosters improvements related to innovation, productivity, and the development of industrial and technological sectors and service industries by prioritizing, for example, the aeronautical, biotechnology and information technology industries, and the bio-food sector, as well as professional services, tourism and design, market development and marketing initiatives.

The Interregional Interventions and Partnerships Branch is part of Operations. It ensures the proactive management of issues by performing functions related to the direction and consistency of programs and the management of interregional partnerships and projects. The Branch plays a decisive role in the consistent operationalization of government priorities through several corporate initiatives, in particular, productivity initiatives and test and experimentation initiatives. It leads the management of consensus-building mechanisms in innovation, market development and sustainable development, as well as in the numerous responsibilities inherent in the operational delivery of government priorities through consensus-building mechanisms.

In this context, the Director General has a triple mandate: to operationalize national and Agency priorities; to manage the service centres for Quebec businesses, such as Info-entrepreneurs, its points of service and the Quebec Aboriginal Business Service Centre; and to manage operational relations with the Industry portfolio (Aboriginal people, the Industrial Research Assistance Program, the Canada Business Service Centres), federal networks (the Canadian Technology Network and Team Canada) and federal departments.

The Director General's operationalization mandate involves management of strategic interregional projects and coordination of the business offices responsible for that function, as well as the establishment of strategic interregional partnerships. This last responsibility involves overseeing, on a sectoral basis, the identification of private partners who have business relations with SMEs and who could assist in resolving interregional problems as awareness agents or as suppliers of skills or support to SMEs; establishing business relationships and partnerships to enable the federal government to provide the full range of services that the sectors need in order to develop; determining financial contributions to partners and sitting as an observer on the boards of partner organizations; following up on the results of and returns on federal investments; and overseeing the implementation of any corrective measures required.

To fulfill the mandate to the manage Info-entrepreneurs, its points of service and the Quebec Aboriginal Business Service Centre, the incumbent establishes the partnership protocols; sits on the Joint Management Committee with the Quebec office; plans allocations for Info-entrepreneurs and the operations of the Quebec Aboriginal Business Service Centre and points of service; sits on the committee of directors general of agencies that manage the Canadian initiative; conducts an operational follow-up and assesses results; and ensures ongoing liaison with the Departmental Management Committee.

Finally, within the framework of the responsibility for managing operational relations with the Industry portfolio, federal networks, federal departments and financial institutions, the Director General is a member of the national management and coordination committees on operational initiatives and of Team Canada's Executive Committee; and is an executive member of the Canada-Quebec Team, the Canadian Technology Network and the Commission on Strategic Directions for Technological SMEs. To fulfill this mandate, the incumbent is responsible for managing memoranda of understanding with federal departments (the Natural Research Council, Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, Natural Resources (in particular, the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology), and Agriculture Canada. The incumbent manages memoranda of understanding with banks for the financing of new-economy projects. To do so, the incumbent establishes a management committee, manages the reserves for losses, and manages relations between business offices and banks.

The Director General must identify the numerous realities and problems emerging from the regions and ensure that Agency interventions complement the interventions of the Quebec government, other federal stakeholders and private organizations. In this regard, the Director General establishes and manages a consensus-building process with other federal stakeholders and chairs and manages mirror committees and various working groups. The Director General provides strategic guidance and advice on the operation of Agency interventions.

The Director General must have an in-depth understanding of operations, design, economic and development services, business assistance programs, and the issues and priorities of the Agency and the federal government. This knowledge is essential for directing the programming operations framework, operationalizing corporate priorities and directing horizontality- and consensus-building functions within the Agency. The Director General is also required to identify the Agency's role; take on and operationalize intervention problems; synthesize and present operational problems; explore solutions and measures to be taken; determine the costs of projects and partnerships; and establish communication plans.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)

FTEs - Branch:

27.5

FTEs - Info-entrepreneurs:

21 - results accountability and co-management with partner

Branch and Info-entrepreneurs operating budgets:

$500,000

Contributions budget:

$10 million

Programs and initiatives:

$45 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides leadership and direction with respect to the direction and consistency of Agency programming content and the management of interregional partnerships and projects, and operationalizes corporate issues.
  2. Identifies the numerous realities and problems emerging from the regions in the operationalization of priorities, and establishes the operational objectives of the Operations Sector.
  3. Establishes and manages a consensus-building process with other federal stakeholders; determines the nature of interventions; implements the required programming; and manages memoranda of understanding with financial institutions, other organizations and federal departments in order to establish follow-up and results-measurement mechanisms and report them to senior management.
  4. Establishes, with the regional offices, the parameters for intervention, directs the provision of training for the business offices' advisors, and provides guidance on the settlement of eligibility issues.
  5. Chairs and manages mirror committees on priority areas (innovation, market development, entrepreneurship, tourism, sustainable development, e-business) and various working groups (Aboriginal people, productivity, tests and experimentation); establishes strategic interregional partnerships, identifying private partners who have business relations with SMEs; establishes business relationships and partnership so that the federal government can provide a full range of services; determines financial contributions to partners; follows up on the results of and returns on federal investments; and oversees the implementation of any corrective measures required.
  6. Manages and plans the operations of Info-entrepreneurs, its points of service and those of the Quebec Aboriginal Business Service Centre; sits on the committee of directors general of agencies that manage the Canadian initiative; conducts an operational follow-up; and assesses results.
  7. Sits on the national management and coordination committees on operational initiatives and Team Canada's Executive Committee, and serves on the executive of the Canada-Quebec Team, the Canadian Technology Network and the Commission on Strategic Directions for Technological SMEs.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Interregional Interventions and Partnerships

Know-How

F
The position requires in-depth knowledge of the policies, principles and practices governing the development and delivery of business assistance services and programs; federal government priorities for economic development and related issues; and the policies, principles and processes relating to corporate priorities and the management of horizontality- and consensus-building functions.
III
Implementing national and Agency priorities; managing the service centres for Quebec businesses; managing operational relations with the Industry portfolio, federal networks and federal departments; establishing and incorporating follow-up and results-measurement mechanisms, determining financial contributions to partners; following up on the results of and returns on federal investments; and overseeing the implementation of any corrective measures required.
3
Successful achievement of the objectives requires that the incumbent establish and manage a consensus-building process with the other federal stakeholders, chair and manage mirror committees and various working groups, and provide strategic advice and guidance on the operationalization of Agency interventions.
608
High number reflects the expertise required to analyse the aspects of operationalizing interventions, strategic interregional projects, the coordination needs of business offices, and the development of strategic interregional partners; and the mastery required of the issues, trends and economic development in the Agency's intervention sectors.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
In the context of the Agency's strategic guidelines, the incumbent directs the Sector and ensures the consistency of intervention programming.
4
The position requires creative initiative to identify the numerous realities and problems emerging from the regions in relation to the operationalization of priorities, and to determine priority needs and the nature of interventions.
(57) 350
High percentage reflects the level of leadership needed when developing the innovative approaches required to create and deliver initiatives and programs that meet economic development needs in the regions.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Position reports to the ADM, Operations, who gives the incumbent general guidance. The incumbent contributes significantly to the strategic management of the key sectors of Agency operations, including the operationalization of interventions and the coordination of regional activities.
2P
Direct impact on Branch activities, as represented by an operating budget of $500,000 (constant dollars), and a strong impact on the contribution budget.
350
High number reflects the position's direct scope and its degree of influence on the management of contribution funding, and its degree of influence within the organization and within the network of partners and stakeholders.

Summary

FIII3 608
F4(57) 350
F2P 350
Total = 1308 0
Director General, Interregional Interventions and Partnerships - Number: 6 - B - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR GENERAL INTERREGIONAL INTERVENTIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS
Figure: 6 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 6 – B – 1

Director General, Interregional Interventions and Partnerships

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations, and there are 16 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Interregional Interventions and Partnerships are 2 Directors and 5 Managers.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations

  • Director General, Regional Operations
  • Director, Infrastructure Programs
  • 14 Regional Directors
  • Director General, Interregional Interventions and Partnerships
    • 2 Directors for :
      • Operationalization of Corporate Priorities
      • Partnerships and Consultations
    • 5 Managers for :
      • Programs (4)
      • Results Measurement and Progress Reporting

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 5-B-1

Position Title: Director, Trade Integration

General Accountability

Is accountable for developing the Canadian International Business Strategy (CIBS) in collaboration with Foreign Affairs Canada (FAC), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), other government departments (OGDs), other levels of government and the private sector in order to enhance the capacity of Canadian enterprises to compete successfully in international markets.

Organization Structure

This is one of four positions reporting at the third level to the Director General, Trade and Operations Branch. The other three positions are Director, Regional Coordination and Special Projects; Managing Partner, Management Consulting Centre; and Manager, Administration, Finance and Management Services.

Reporting directly to the Director, Trade Integration Directorate (TID), are the five following positions:

Manager, International Business Development (IBD), Strategic Planning, (staff of 4) is responsible for planning and managing the IBD and Team Canada Inc. (TCI) committee structure (14 different committees) and related activities, as well as liaising with FAC, AAFC and other partners to develop and implement IBD policy directions.

Manager, TCI Export Information Products and Marketing, (staff of 4) is responsible for analysing, planning and developing leading-edge single-window access through the Canada Business Service Centres' export information line for business clients and through ExportSource information products and services and TCI for partners across Canada and abroad; promoting strategic trade partnerships and service delivery frameworks and mechanisms among OGDs, provincial governments and non-governmental organizations; and developing and implementing an internal and external communication and marketing strategy.

Manager, IBD, Operations, (staff of 2) is responsible for analysing and developing recommendations for regional trade programs; liaising with regional offices, the provinces and industry associations; providing advice on issues related to the development and implementation of trade services and communications strategies; and for TCI service delivery initiatives in the regions through liaison with International Trade Centres (ITCs) and key partners.

Manager, IBD, Design, (staff of 2) is responsible for analysing, designing, developing and implementing the planning and evaluation mechanisms to be used throughout the Regional Trade Networks; consolidating and analysing results; and developing TCI interdepartmental initiatives, including the design of an Interdepartmental IBD plan and a departmental Trade Achievement Framework.

Nature And Scope

The mission of the Department is to position Canada as a world business leader by advancing its international trade and economic interests abroad, helping large and small Canadian companies expand and succeed internationally and maintain market access for their goods and services, promoting Canada as a dynamic place to do business, attracting foreign investment, and negotiating and administering trade agreements.

Within this context, the Director, TID, provides leadership and advice in the development, promotion and strategic management of government IBD strategies, priorities and action plans. The incumbent supports the development of strong partnerships and strengthens Canada's trading position to increase awareness of global market opportunities and prepare Canadian firms to export and diversify their presence in international markets. Meeting this challenge requires the incumbent to apply a comprehensive knowledge of law, industry and economy, and trade development, investment and marketing opportunities in coordinating and promoting trade opportunities.

The Director establishes and maintains a strong regional trade network among key federal departments and agencies and with provincial and private sector partners. The incumbent is called upon to implement a trade promotion strategy for all industries in all parts of the country through an active collaboration with Regional Executive Directors (REXDs) and Senior Trade Commissioners (STCs). The incumbent is responsible for developing and implementing strategies, approaches and initiatives to extend the regional trade networks to provincial and private sector partners, NGOs and academic institutions to enhance the capacity of the Department in designing, developing and delivering export development programs.

The Director provides strategic, value-added advice and recommendations to senior management on IBD opportunities and issues. The incumbent designs and advises on the formulation of innovative, integrated departmental IBD policy positions and strategies consistent with government objectives to encourage potential exporters to participate in international trade and investment opportunities, and to assist businesses in diversifying markets and exporting sectors.

The Director manages the development and implementation of corporate strategies to ensure effective delivery of regional trade and investment programs and services that support a competitive Canadian knowledge-based economy. The challenge is to recognize and adapt to regional differences and the requirements of particular industry sectors. In meeting this challenge, the incumbent provides functional direction, coordination and internal integration for government IBD priorities and initiatives in horizontal and regional operations in the Department. The incumbent ensures the corporate-level two-way exchanges of information and intelligence on export issues and initiatives between Industry Canada, FAC, provincial governments, the ITCs, the private sector and academic institutions. The incumbent is responsible for monitoring the performance of ITCs within the framework of departmental objectives and priorities, the CIBS and Regional Trade Plans to identify and recommend opportunities for change and improvement.

The Director leads the development and implementation of innovative mechanisms to diversify and expand Canada's trade by helping existing exporters and encouraging more Canadian firms to get involved in exporting. The incumbent is responsible for developing, producing and implementing information products, including ExportSource, to provide business users with a TCI international trade toolkit that contains information on a range of services offered. The incumbent consults and collaborates with public and private sector partners and stakeholders to drive the development of a comprehensive suite of information products to complement and enhance the existing information network. The Director must ensure that the system provides seamless delivery of trade information and support through single-window access to all federal and provincial trade development information and activities that are primarily provided by the ExportSource and Strategis platforms as well as the 1-888-exporters information line.

The Director is responsible for ensuring the optimal internal integration of efforts in the development of new regional trade initiatives and developing a cohesive departmental approach to ODGs. To that end, the incumbent develops a regional trade planning framework and, with FAC, leads the development of regional trade plans. The incumbent provides advice and assistance to REXDs and STCs on the formulation and delivery of their export development programs, including the development of client tracking systems, performance measures and strategies for targeting clients, and is the focal point in the provision of support to the regional offices on trade issues that require inter-regional consultation.

A major challenge for the Director is to work within an environment with many competing interests. Problems must be resolved by exercising astute judgment to find solutions that interpret the intent of policy and operational guidelines as well as management priorities. The incumbent must have a strong understanding of trade, economic development departments, key trade development instruments, FAC priorities and programs, and government policies and strategies regarding the delivery of trade programs and services.

The Director has extensive contacts with senior management at headquarters and in the regions on all issues bearing on the operation of the ITCs and the trade priorities of the Department. These contacts are used to identify key issues and to develop a clear expression of regional interests and concerns. There is also regular contact and negotiation with officials in ODGs and central agencies regarding trade program and service delivery issues of concern to regional offices. Consultation with provincial governments and with the business, academic and professional sectors is also undertaken as part of any study or review of trade programs and services.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 13
Operating budget: $278,000
Federal government international business development budget: $59.3 million
Regional operations: $11.4 million
Regional trade offices: $1.2 million
Team Canada Inc.: $259,000

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides corporate advice and direction on the development, promotion and strategic management of IBD priorities and initiatives to enhance the capacity of the Canadian business community to maintain a competitive position in existing export markets and to expand to new ones.
  2. Establishes and nurtures effective working relationships with ODGs, provincial and territorial governments, private sector and academic institutions to maximize the effectiveness of IBD initiatives and to enhance service delivery to a large array of firms.
  3. Develops, delivers and markets strategic information services, products and the information line to facilitate access to the private sector for IBD information.
  4. 4. Develops, recommends and provides functional direction with respect to strategies, programs and services to be delivered by ITCs located in regional offices in order to promote and advance TCI strategies and initiatives.
  5. Develops a business planning framework to set goals, objectives and standards, including performance criteria, to ensure the effective administration of regional trade programs and services and to secure regional input to policy, sector and operational priorities.
  6. Provides functional direction for the horizontal implementation of innovative and integrated departmental IBD policy, positions and strategies.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Trade Integration

Know-How

F
Professional knowledge of federal, provincial and territorial legislation, policies, programs, priorities for economic growth, trade, foreign investment, connectedness and investment in a knowledge-based economy; professional knowledge of the priorities and practices of a multi-faceted IBD community; in-depth knowledge of Canada's general foreign policy position with respect to countries targeted for international business promotion activities; and solid knowledge of the concepts and practices for strategic policy analysis and development as used in the federal government, including the TCI committee structure and related activities.
III
Conceptual and operational integration of priorities and programs for a broad spectrum of partners and stakeholders into a consolidated government international business strategy, priorities and plans.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to influence and convince senior officials of ways and means to promote and advance IBD activities within a comprehensive strategic management planning framework.
528
Mid-range number reflects a solid knowledge of departmental and OGD policies and objectives; policy development concepts, techniques and theories; and client relationships in a complex subject matter, requiring collaboration with other federal and provincial organizations to achieve objectives.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
The position works within departmental and TCI strategic frameworks and operational goals for the development, implementation and delivery of a government-wide, multi-faceted and comprehensive international business promotion program.
4
Evaluative and constructive thinking required to identify and develop innovative strategies for developing and promoting a comprehensive approach to planning and implementing pan-governmental initiatives for promoting and facilitating IBD in Canada.
(50) 264
Percentage is representative of the challenge inherent in developing strategies to integrate and harmonize program activities among a variety of organizations that include ODGs, other levels of government and the private sector.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Director General, Trade and Operations, the position is accountable for creating and facilitating the delivery of the government-wide international business strategy and approaches.
4I
Perceptible impact on the government IBD program through the development of the CIBS. Proxy selected is the federal government's IBD budget of $59.3 million (constant).
230
Mid-range number reflects a solid degree of freedom to act in negotiating multi-jurisdictional partnerships and the general guidance the position receives in policy and development activities, and is consistent with the size of the federal government's IBD budget and the contribution that the position makes to the achievement of departmental and government objectives related to IBD.

Summary

FIII3 528
F4(50) 264
F4I 230
Total = 1022 P1
Director, Trade Integration - Number: 5 - B - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR TRADE INTEGRATION
Figure: 5 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 5 – B – 1

Director, Trade Integration

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Trade and Operations Branch, and there are 3 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Trade Integration are 4 Managers.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, Trade and Operations Branch

  • Director, Regional Coordination and Special Projects
  • Managing Partner, Management Consulting Centre
  • Manager, Administration, Finance and Management Services
  • Director, Trade Integration
    • 4 Managers for :
      • International Business Development, Strategic Planning
      • International Business Development, Operations
      • International Business Development, Design
      • Team Canada Inc. Export Information Products and Marketing

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 4-B-1

Position Title: Director, Operations and Regional Coordination

General Accountability

Is accountable for developing, negotiating, and managing federal-provincial/territorial agreements to ensure the effective delivery of official languages support programs nationally, the provision of support to minority and majority community organizations, and national and inter-regional promotional programs and initiatives to advance the government's agenda for the enhancement of official languages in Canada.

Organization Structure

This is one of six positions at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Official Languages. The others are Director, Policy Analysis and Promotion; Director, Interdepartmental Coordination; Manager, Planning and Resource Management; and Management Advisor.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director, Operations and Regional Coordination, are as follows:

Three (3) Chiefs, Operations, (total staff of 15) Each is responsible for managing the negotiation and administration of federal-provincial/territorial agreements related to official languages in education and bilateral agreements related to the promotion and support of official languages in the delivery of services such as social, legal and health services in the assigned geographic region; managing the negotiation and administration of Canada-community agreements, in collaboration with assigned regional offices; and managing community support, including community development funding.

One (1) Chief, National Programs and Organizations, (staff of 12) is responsible for the development, negotiation and management of grants and contributions to national organizations and to minority and majority official-languages groups; the negotiation and administration of multilateral agreements; the provision of support in the negotiation of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC), Protocol Agreement; and the provision of strategic planning input.

One (1) Manager, Operational Practices Unit, is responsible for ensuring that grants and contributions recommendation files comply with the requirements of due diligence and results-based management; spearheading the development of relevant management guidelines, service standards, practices and operational tools; developing, maintaining and ensuring the ongoing evaluation of a training program and related material; advising the Operational Practices Committee on training and on the work procedures and tools required to ensure due diligence.

Nature And Scope

The Department works with Canadians to strengthen their shared sense of identity while respecting their diversity. It seeks to eliminate barriers and encourage the participation of all citizens, individually and collectively, in the social, political and cultural life of the country. It pursues initiatives that balance individual and collective rights and responsibilities in a way that promotes community self-reliance and individual fulfilment. It fosters a coordinated approach among federal institutions to enhance the vitality of official language minority communities.

The Department also works with other federal departments and agencies to ensure that the government carries out its activities in a manner that is sensitive and responsive to Canada's diversity.

The Official Languages Branch is the focal point in the Department and in the federal government for the pursuit and realization of the government's commitments and objectives to ensure Canadian linguistic duality and bilingualism, as defined in the Official Languages Act.

It is in this context that the Director, Operations and Regional Coordination, is responsible for planning, developing and delivering a wide variety of national official languages discretionary and contribution programs covering three major areas: federal-provincial/territorial agreements related to official languages in education, as well as bilateral agreements with the provinces and territories, to provide official languages services in other major areas of provincial jurisdiction such as justice, health and social services; Canada-community agreements and other funding initiatives to support the development of official language minority community organizations; and support for national programs and activities to promote and enhance understanding and appreciation of Canada's linguistic duality.

The Director plans, develops, negotiates and manages funding agreements with each province and territory to ensure equal access by all Canadians to minority and second-language education and to shape the education environment in the provinces and territories to promote excellence in official language education programs. The Director also manages the development, negotiation and implementation of annual financial agreements with the CMEC to support official languages in education initiatives.

The Director is responsible for establishing the program criteria and the framework for the development and negotiation of multi-year, Canada-community agreements in each province and territory to support official language minority communities. While these agreements are subsequently negotiated and administered by the regional offices, the Director is responsible for overseeing and evaluating the overall effectiveness of the program and for ensuring national consistency, coherence and integration.

The Director is called upon to develop and oversee the implementation of an administrative framework for the management of official languages support programs, which involves a multitude of formal legal agreements, partnership and administrative arrangements. These arrangements cover many categories of financial assistance and support to a diverse range of programs. While the financial management system offers a great deal of flexibility, allowing for the continuous movement of funds among programs, the incumbent must ensure the integrity of the financial management system as a whole. An immediate challenge facing the incumbent is to simplify this administrative framework.

The Director is charged with providing leadership and direction in the development of comprehensive bilateral agreements covering all areas of endeavour under provincial/territorial jurisdiction. The challenge lies in leading this change while simultaneously maintaining the integrity of ongoing program delivery. A major challenge for the incumbent is to maintain a judicious balance between support to majority and minority linguistic groups in all official languages program operations throughout Canada in order to meet the expectations and needs of all Canadians.

In overseeing the provision of support to the CMEC, the Director is in frequent contact with the Director General, Assistant Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers and the Minister to address issues and make decisions related to advancing the government's agenda to promote and advance official languages support for partners and stakeholders.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 30
Operating budget: $376,900

Grants and contributions:

$42.7 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides national leadership in planning, developing, negotiating and managing federal-provincial/territorial agreements related to official languages in education, as well as bilateral agreements with the provinces and territories, to provide official languages services in other major areas of provincial jurisdiction such as justice, health and social services.
  2. Directs the development of the program framework and oversees the national negotiation and management of multi-year Canada-community agreements and other funding initiatives to support official language minority communities.
  3. Directs the management of national programs to promote increased understanding and acceptance of Canada's linguistic duality and bilingualism with the Canadian voluntary and private sectors.
  4. Directs the provision of advisory and secretariat services to the CMEC in the negotiation of the Protocol Agreement.
  5. Provides advice and recommendations, through the Director General, to the Assistant Deputy Minister, the Deputy Minister and the Minister on all issues and decisions relating to official languages support program operations and regional coordination.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Operations and Regional Coordination

Know-How

F
Extensive knowledge of the Department's mission, legislation, policies and programs related to government cultural programs and initiatives, particularly those dealing with the official languages communities and their community-based organizations and institutions; in-depth knowledge of minority and second-language education research, curriculum development and promotion; and sound knowledge of the policies, principles and practices in developing and implementing strategic plans and policies.
II
Conceptual and operational management of national official-languages-related programs of which the results tend to be homogeneous.
3
Critical to work collaboratively with subordinates, colleagues and superiors to ensure that program activities serve national, federal, departmental and stakeholder interests and objectives.
460
High number reflects the degree of specialized knowledge required to develop and manage the delivery of national programs that support the government's agenda for the enhancement of official languages in Canada.

Problem Solving / Thinking

E
Thinking is done within the Department's strategic objectives as they relate to Canadian linguistic duality and bilingualism.
4
Analytical, evaluative and interpretive thinking required to develop and implement strategies in order to improve and deliver official languages support programs nationally, ensuring national consistency, coherence and integration; and to identify and address issues so as to reconcile the interests and concerns of multiple and varied partners and stakeholders with divergent interests and priorities.
(50) 230
Higher percentage is consistent with the development of strategies, policies and programs in a variety of official languages areas, including research, program development, operations and physical facilities throughout Canada, to develop and coordinate the implementation of strategies, policies and programs concerning the Department's role and position vis-à-vis all aspects of minority and second official-language education.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Director General, Official Languages, the Director is accountable for program development and implementation. The Director manages a significant grants and contributions program in accordance with central agency and departmental financial practices.
2P
Primary impact on programs to ensure the effective delivery of official languages support programs nationally. The proxy selected to represent these activities is the combined salary and operating budgets of $376,900 (constant).
230
The high number reflects the strong role the position plays in the planning, negotiating, management and accountability of federal financial support to provinces and territories related to official languages in education and in other major areas.

Summary

FII3 460
E4(50) 230
E2P 230
Total = 920 0
Director, Operations and Regional Coordination - Number: 4 - B - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR OPERATIONS AND REGIONAL COORDINATION
Figure: 4 – B – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – B – 1

Director, Operations and Regional Coordination

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Official Languages, and there are 4 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Operations and Regional Coordination are 4 Chiefs and 1 Manager.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, Official Languages

  • Director, Policy Analysis and Promotion
  • Director, Interdepartmental Coordination
  • Manager, Planning and Resource Management
  • Management Advisor
  • Director, Operations and Regional Coordination
    • 4 Chiefs for :
      • Operations (3)
      • National Programs and Organizations
    • Manager, Operational Practices Unit

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