DAOD 8006-0, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence


1. Introduction

Date of Issue: 2009-06-19

Date of Last Modification: 2019-02-13

Application: This DAOD is a directive that applies to employees of the Department of National Defence (DND employees) and an order that applies to officers and non-commissioned members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF members).

Supersession: NDHQ Policy Directive P6/93, CF Policy – Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) Defence

Approval Authorities:

  • Deputy Minister of National Defence
  • Chief of the Defence Staff

Enquiries: Director Joint Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence (D JCBRN D)

2. Definitions

chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence (défense chimique, biologique, radiologique et nucléaire)

Plans and activities intended to mitigate or neutralize adverse effects resulting from the use or threatened use of chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear weapons and devices, the emergence of secondary hazards arising from such use, or the release, or risk of release, of toxic industrial materials into the environment. (Defence Terminology Bank record number 35239)

chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear medical countermeasures (contre-mesures médicales chimiques, biologiques, radiologiques et nucléaires)

Medical interventions designed to diminish the susceptibility of personnel to the damaging and lethal effects of chemical, biological and radiological hazards, and to treat any injuries arising from exposure to such hazards. (Defence Terminology Bank record number 695065)

riot control agent (agent antiémeute)

A chemical not listed in a schedule of the Chemical Weapons Convention, that can rapidly produce in humans sensory irritation or disabling physical effects that disappear shortly after termination of exposure. (Defence Terminology Bank record number 5270)

3. Abbreviations

Abbreviation Complete Word or Phase
ACV arms control verification
ADM(Mat) Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel)
ADM(S&T) Assistant Deputy Minister (Science and Technology)
AOR area of responsibility
BCDRC Biological and Chemical Defence Review Committee
CANSOFCOM Canadian Special Operations Forces Command
CBRN chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear
CBRND chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence
CJOC Canadian Joint Operations Command
comd commander
D N Safe Director Nuclear Safety
FP force protection
L1 advisor level one advisor
med CM medical countermeasure
MND Minister of National Defence
NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization
OPCOM operational command
R&D research and development
RCA riot control agent
SJS Strategic Joint Staff

4. Policy Direction

Context

4.1 Canadian CBRND policies and procedures have been developed since 1945 in conjunction with:

  1. our allies, through standardization agreements with NATO;
  2. American, Australian, British and Canadian standardization programs; and
  3. co-operative development programs with the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

4.2 CBRND is a highly specialized enabling capability of FP that requires staff with a full understanding of all technical aspects of the deployment and subsequent employment of the CBRND capability in support of CAF operations. A force not enabled with a basic CBRN FP capability unnecessarily risks the possibility of significant casualties and mission failure. The publication A-FD-005-005/AF-003, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operating Concept, stresses that CBRND capability can be critical to the success of a CAF domestic or expeditionary operation when a CBRN threat exists. This publication provides:

  1. a framework to establish an effective CBRN FP capability with requisite capacity to achieve objectives outlined in the Canada First Defence Strategy; and
  2. the basis for the development of future CBRN capabilities and contingency plans.

4.3 The first line of defence against CBRN weapons lies in preventing the proliferation of such weapons. To prevent their proliferation, the DND and the CAF participate in and support verification activities under existing international arms control agreements as well as the development of future agreements and export control regimes. If the proliferation of a specific type of CBRN weapon occurs, the DND and CAF would work to reverse it through diplomatic means.

4.4 The policy of Canada with respect to CBRN weapons and CBRN agents takes into consideration the obligations of Canada under international law, including the following arms control agreements:

  1. the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, under which Canada agreed not to transfer or transfer control over, either directly or indirectly, or assist, any non-nuclear state to acquire nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, and not to receive the transfer of or manufacture, receive assistance in manufacturing or to otherwise acquire, nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices;
  2. the 1972 Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction, under which Canada agreed never to develop, produce, stockpile or otherwise acquire or retain biological agents or toxins for other than protective or peaceful purposes, or weapons, equipment or means of delivery to use such agents or toxins for hostile purposes or in armed conflict; and
  3. the 1993 Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, under which Canada undertook never to develop, produce, stockpile or otherwise acquire or retain, use or transfer, directly or indirectly, chemical weapons or engage in any military preparations to use such weapons. Those obligations were formally integrated into Canadian domestic law with the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act.

4.5 As CBRN weapons exist throughout the world and no verification regime can guarantee their absence, there is a continuing requirement to ensure the protection of the DND and the CAF against such weapons. To this end, small quantities of certain biological and chemical agents are held for defensive purposes under the provisions of treaties and conventions. These agents are never used in experiments on human subjects but may be used in:

  1. R&D facilities to test and develop CBRND capabilities; and
  2. training establishments to instil confidence in CAF members in their use of protective equipment and procedures.

4.6 Certification that R&D projects comply with this DAOD is reported annually in accordance with the provisions of ADM(Mat) Instruction 8/89, Approval and Certification of the Research and Development Chemical/Biological Defence Program.

4.7 Under the provisions of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, Canada has renounced the right to use RCAs as a method of warfare, but reserves the right to use RCAs for law enforcement, including domestic riot control. As such, training with and defensive use of certain RCAs may be authorized for designated DND employees and CAF members involved in domestic operations in support of Canadian law enforcement authorities or on international operations not involving the use of an RCA as a method of warfare against belligerents within an armed conflict.

4.8 The DND and the CAF are excluded from the application of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its regulations in respect to any military operation and military equipment, except in respect to any activity taking place at the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario. D N Safe is responsible, under DAOD 4002-0, Nuclear Technology Regulation and Control, and DAOD 4002-1, Nuclear and Ionizing Radiation Safety, for the regulatory oversight of all matters related to DND and CAF nuclear activities.

4.9 The BCDRC is a federally-mandated civilian committee that reports directly to the MND and confirms annually that biological and chemical agents are not being used to develop an offensive biological or chemical warfare capability.

4.10 The CAF maintains an immediate and effective response to the threatened use or use of CBRN agents by adversaries. DND employees may be involved in CAF operations when they are considered essential for such operations. Accordingly, both DND employees and CAF members involved in operations are required to be able to operate effectively in a CBRN environment.

Policy Statement

4.11 It is the policy of the DND and the CAF to:

  1. never develop, produce, stockpile or otherwise acquire or retain biological or chemical agents or toxins other than in quantities permitted under treaties or conventions to which Canada is a party and that are necessary for defensive research, training or other peaceful purposes;
  2. never receive the transfer of or control over, either directly or indirectly, manufacture, or receive assistance in manufacturing, or otherwise acquire, nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices;
  3. never use, or participate in planning to use, chemical, biological or toxin weapons;
  4. continue to maintain the obligations of Canada as a founding member of NATO with respect to nuclear consultation and planning;
  5. authorize the use by CAF members of RCA, under rules of engagement authorized by the CDS, in domestic operations in support of Canadian law enforcement authorities or international operations not involving the use of an RCA as a method of warfare against belligerents within an armed conflict;
  6. permit the use of an RCA by members of the military police under CAF Provost Marshal policies;
  7. ensure DND employees and CAF members involved in domestic or international operations carry out their functions in a CBRN environment with minimum disruption to the tempo of the operation and without significant casualties;
  8. not impose on DND employees or CAF members more risk than is necessary to achieve the aim of any operation, mission or task which may involve CBRN hazards; and
  9. take all reasonable measures to minimize the exposure of DND employees and CAF members to CBRN hazards as reasonably achievable, taking into consideration relevant operational, social and economic factors.

Requirements

4.12 To implement this policy, the DND and the CAF must:

  1. integrate CBRND fundamentals into the decision-making process for policy, capability development, program design, R&D, service delivery, and military doctrine and operations;
  2. articulate and communicate responsibilities for CBRND across all levels of the DND and the CAF to ensure the CBRND roles and responsibilities of all DND employees and CAF members are clearly defined and understood;
  3. provide DND employees involved in operations and CAF members with the doctrine, procedures, training and equipment to conduct and support operations and survive and function in a CBRN environment;
  4. ensure, if possible and practicable, that CBRND doctrine, procedures, plans, training and equipment are interoperable with the capabilities of Canadian civil authorities and allies;
  5. establish DND and CAF plans and procedures for the proactive management of issues and crises involving a CBRN weapon or CBRN agent in domestic or international operations, or a nuclear emergency under the Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan;
  6. integrate, to the maximum extent practicable, domestic CBRND with civil arrangements through protocols, memoranda of understanding and other arrangements with other federal and provincial government departments and civil authorities to assist with incidents involving a CBRN weapon, CBRN agent or nuclear emergency;
  7. consider integrating CBRN hardening criteria into operation-, mission- or task-essential equipment;
  8. incorporate CBRND into all applicable training – individual and collective training, basic and pre-operational deployment training, and DND management and CAF leadership training;
  9. establish requirements, procedures, standards of proficiency, evaluation criteria, training and education for CBRND in a manner that is cost effective and consistent with DND and CAF strategic direction and ratified NATO standards;
  10. co-operate in annual BCDRC reviews of DND and CAF CBRND activities;
  11. establish and maintain capabilities to manage initial reconnaissance, site survey, sampling, testing and analysis of potential environmental and industrial health hazards and CBRN environments to identify appropriate FP measures and areas requiring special precautions consistent with the analysis;
  12. establish and maintain military escort teams to support the SJS ACV missions; and
  13. ensure in respect of radiological and nuclear defence that CBRND programs are compliant with the international obligations and domestic laws of Canada, and the DAOD 4002 series.

5. Consequences

Consequences of Non-Compliance

5.1 Non-compliance with this DAOD may have consequences for both the DND and the CAF as institutions, and for DND employees and CAF members as individuals. Suspected non-compliance may be investigated. The nature and severity of the consequences resulting from actual non-compliance will be commensurate with the circumstances of the non-compliance.

5.2 Non-compliance with this DOAD may also constitute a breach of domestic and international legal obligations, which could result in DND management or CAF command responsibility, and personal liability.

Note – In respect of the compliance of DND employees, see the Treasury Board Framework for the Management of Compliance for additional information.

6. Authorities

Authority Table

6.1 DND managers and CAF comds at all levels must maintain a sufficient level of CBRND expertise to provide for an effective and safe CBRND program.

6.2 The following table identifies the authorities associated with this DAOD:

The ... has or have the authority to ...
MND
  • prescribe, under QR&O subparagraph 34.30(2)(d), the circumstances under which medical care may be extended to civilians, including the possible administration of CBRN pre-treatments and pre-exposure vaccinations, and individually-issued CBRN med CMs.
CDS
  • control all aspects of CBRND, including:
    – issuing orders regarding the use of CBRN pre-treatments and
    pre-exposure
    vaccinations, and individually-issued CBRN med CMs; and
    – delegating the authority to order the use of CBRN pre-treatments and
    individually-issued CBRN med CMs for CAF members to designated
    comds of operational commands.
Comd Canadian Army
  • oversee the development of CBRND policy and doctrine, working in collaboration with ADM(S&T);
  • oversee the development of radiological and nuclear safety policy and doctrine, working in consultation with D N Safe;
  • lead the enhancement of joint CBRND capabilities;
  • approve chemical agent training for DND employees and CAF members; anddecide project direction for joint CBRND capability acquisition.
Director of Staff, SJS
  • formulate procedures and approve DND employees and CAF members, for the escort of CBRN-related SJS ACV teams inspecting DND and CAF CBRN-related facilities in accordance with international agreements;
  • oversee CBRND issues with outside agencies;
  • oversee the management of the CDS Directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness, by SJS;
  • release necessary CBRN defence equipment (not including CBRN med CMs) from operational stocks, as deemed appropriate, at the request of an L1 advisor, the Comd CJOC or the Comd CANSOFCOM;
  • issue strategic direction on CBRND issues; and
  • advise the CDS relating to CBRND issues.
Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy)
  • advise on the impact of international arms control agreements on CBRND policy;
  • liaise with Global Affairs Canada on CBRND-related matters;
  • oversee DND and CAF policy on the prevention of the proliferation of CBRN weapons; and
  • lead the provision of DND and CAF input on NATO nuclear planning and policy issues.
ADM(Mat)
  • delegate the provision of management for:
    – CBRND equipment acquisition projects; and
    – in-service CBRND equipment.
Comd CJOC
  • liaise with outside agencies in regards to CBRND issues;
  • establish CBRND FP levels for CAF units within the CJOC AOR;
  • establish CBRND procedures for operations;
  • oversee the planning of CBRND support to operations;
  • direct the CBRND of allocated forces deployed within the CJOC AOR;
  • issue orders for the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs by CAF members under OPCOM or operational control;
  • oversee the preparedness and response by the DND and the CAF to a nuclear accident involving a visit of a nuclear powered vessel or nuclear capable vessel; and
  • oversee the response by the DND and the CAF as required under the Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan and other federal government CBRN response plans.
Chief of Military Personnel
  • establish officer and non-commissioned member general military qualifications for CBRND;
  • through the Canadian Defence Academy and Canadian Forces Support Training Group:
    – oversee the operation of a joint CBRND training establishment; and
    – oversee the provision of joint CBRND training during all individual training periods;
  • through the Surgeon General:
    – advise on the health effects of exposure to CBRN agents;
    – establish policy and procedures for CBRND medical decontamination, CBRN med CMs and medical screening and treatment of personnel exposed to CBRN agents; and
    – establish regulatory oversight of CBRN med CMs as required by Health Canada; and
  • oversee the provision of medical decontamination and health care for CAF members who are exposed to CBRN agents.
Comd CANSOFCOM
  • establish CBRND procedures for special operations, as applicable;
  • act to provide the CDS with high readiness CBRN forces capable of conducting special operations;
  • direct the CBRND of deployed special operations forces; and
  • issue orders for the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs by CANSOFCOM members.
Assistant Deputy Minister (Infrastructure and Environment)
  • establish requirements for, and oversee compliance with, the DND and the CAF nuclear safety program;
  • provide expert advice, guidance and scientific support on radiological and nuclear safety matters;
  • collaborate with the SJS, operational commands and other L1 advisors on nuclear and radiological readiness; and
  • authorize the use of radioactive sources for DND and CAF training.
ADM(S&T)
  • control CBRND R&D and other scientific support; and
  • authorize live agent training for all persons who are not DND employees or CAF members.
L1 advisors
  • establish and maintain the CBRND expertise, capability and readiness of operational forces as applicable; and
  • establish individual and collective operations evaluation criteria for CAF units.
Surgeon General
  • in consultation with the Comd CJOC or Comd CANSOFCOM, pre-position all CBRN med CMs.

Director General Science and Technology Centre Operations

and Director General Science and Technology Force Employment

  • certify that an R&D project relevant to biological and chemical defence is in compliance with the DAOD 8006 series.
D N Safe
  • authorize live agent training for DND employees and CAF members; and
  • authorize the use of ionizing radiation sources for training and exercises.
Royal Canadian Navy nuclear emergency comds
  • offer radioiodine uptake preventative med CMs.
senior CAF comds
  • in the case of an operational emergency, when a delay in seeking OPCOM authority to order the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs may result in an unacceptable risk to CAF members, order the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs.

7. References

Acts, Regulations, Central Agency Policies and Policy DAOD

 

Other References

  • DAOD 4002-0, Nuclear Technology Regulation and Control
  • DAOD 4002-1, Nuclear and Ionizing Radiation Safety
  • DAOD 8006-1, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operations
  • A-FD-005-005/AF-003, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operating Concept
  • B-GJ-005-104/FP-021, Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-020, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Tactics, Techniques and Procedures
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-021, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Tactics, Techniques and Procedures – Urban
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-040, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Equipment
  • B-GL-005-380/FP-001, CFJP 3-8, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence
  • B-GL-005-380/FP-101, CFJP 3-8.1, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operations
  • CDS Directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness (available in English only)
  • Nuclear Safety Orders and Directives
  • Canada First Defence Strategy
  • Force Capability Guidance (classified document)
  • ADM(Mat) Instruction 8/89, Approval and Certification of the Research and Development Chemical/Biological Defence Program
  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Resilience Action Plan for Canada, Public Safety Canada
  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Resilience Strategy for Canada, Public Safety Canada
  • Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan, Health Canada
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