DAOD 8006-1, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operations, Training and Capability Development and Sustainment


1. Introduction

Date of Issue: 2009-06-19

Date of Last Modification: 2019-02-13

Application: This DAOD is a directive that applies to employees of the Department of National Defence (DND employees) and an order that applies to officers and non-commissioned members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF members).

Supersession:

  • DAOD 8006-2, Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Defence Training
  • DAOD 8006-3, Chemical Biological and Nuclear Defence Capability Development and Sustainment
  • Confidential 041, NBC Medical Countermeasures (Med CM) for CF Operations (classified document)

Approval Authority:

  • Deputy Minister of National Defence
  • Chief of the Defence Staff

Enquiries: Director Joint Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence (D JCBRN D)

2. Definitions

chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence (défense chimique, biologique, radiologique et nucléaire)

Plans and activities intended to mitigate or neutralize adverse effects resulting from the use or threatened use of chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear weapons and devices, the emergence of secondary hazards arising from such use, or the release, or risk of release, of toxic industrial materials into the environment. (Defence Terminology Bank record number 35239)

chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear medical countermeasures (contre-mesures médicales chimiques, biologiques, radiologiques et nucléaires)

Medical interventions designed to diminish the susceptibility of personnel to the damaging and lethal effects of chemical, biological and radiological hazards and to treat any injuries arising from exposure to such hazards. (DefenceTerminology Bank record number 695065)

riot control agent (agent antiémeute)

A chemical not listed in a schedule of the Chemical Weapons Convention, that can rapidly produce in humans sensory irritation or disabling physical effects that disappear shortly after termination of exposure. (Defence Terminology Bank record number 5270)

toxic industrial material (matière industrielle toxique)

A toxic, biological or radioactive substance intended for industrial, commercial, medical, military or domestic purposes.
Note – Toxic industrial material includes toxic industrial chemical, toxic industrial biological and toxic industrial radiological products. (Defence Terminology Bank record number 35241)

3. Abbreviations

Abbreviation

Complete Word or Phrase

ABCA Program

American, British, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Armies’ Program

ADM(Mat)

Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel)

ADM(S&T)

Assistant Deputy Minister (Science and Technology)

AEP

Allied Engineering Publication

AUSCANNZUKUS

Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom and United States of America

CA

Canadian Army

CANSOFCOM

Canadian Special Operations Forces Command

CARC

chemical agent resistant coating

CBR MOU

Memorandum of Understanding among the Department of Defence of Australia, the Department of National Defence of Canada, the Secretary of State for Defence of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Secretary of Defense on behalf of the Department of Defense of the United States of America Concerning the Research, Development and Acquisition of Chemical, Biological and Radiological Defense Materiel

CBRN

chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear

CBRND

chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence

CBRN Med WG

Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Medical Working Group

CDI

Chief of Defence Intelligence

CDIO

CJOC Directives for International Operations (formerly CEFCOM Directives for International Operations)

CEO

chief executive officer

CFB

Canadian Forces Base

CFD

Chief of Force Development

CFFCA

Canadian Forces Fire and CBRN Academy

CF H Svcs Gp

Canadian Forces Health Services Group

CFSTG

Canadian Forces Support Training Group

CJIRU-CBRN

Canadian Joint Incident Response Unit – Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear

CJOC

Canadian Joint Operations Command

CO

commanding officer

Comd

commander

CS

close support

CS gas

O-chlorobenzylmalononitrile gas (also known as “CS” or “tear gas”)

DCB

Defence Capability Board

DGCSI

Director General Capability and Structure Integration

DGLEPM

Director General Land Equipment Program Management

DG Pol Plan

Director General Policy Planning

DGSTFE

Director General Science and Technology Force Employment

D N Safe

Director Nuclear Safety

DOS

Director of Staff

DRDC

Defence Research and Development Canada

DSTFESDS

Director Science and Technology Force Employment and Strategic Decision Support

ECS

environmental chief of staff

EMP

electromagnetic pulse

FCG

Force Capability Guidance

FP

force protection

FSE

The Future Security Environment 2013-2040

GAC

Global Affairs Canada

GC

Government of Canada

GS

general support

HQ

headquarters

IS

integral support

ITF

international task force

JCBRND-CDG

Joint Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Capability Development Group

LCMM

life cycle materiel manager

med CM

medical countermeasure

MES

military employment structure

NATO

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NDHQ

National Defence Headquarters

NDR

National Dose Registry

NSODs

Nuclear Safety Orders and Directives

PM

project manager

POC

point of contact

RCA

riot control agent

RCAF

Royal Canadian Air Force

RCN

Royal Canadian Navy

R&D

research and development

SAP

Special Access Programme

SG restricted product

Surgeon General restricted product

SJS

Strategic Joint Staff

SLA

service level agreement

SOF

special operations forces

SPI

standard personal issue

STANAG

NATO Standardization Agreement

S&T

science and technology

Surg Gen

Surgeon General

TEP

Training and Exercise Panel

WG

working group

4. Operations

General

4.1 CBRND is divided into the following five doctrinal enabling components as set out in B-GL-005-380/FP-101, CFJP 3-8.1, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operations:

  1. detection, identification and monitoring;
  2. information management;
  3. physical protection;
  4. hazard management; and
  5. med CMs and support.

4.2 CBRND staffs must form part of the operations staff of all HQ, formations, units and other elements.

CBRND Support to Operations

4.3 The comds of operational commands, i.e. Comd CJOC and Comd CANSOFCOM, must ensure operational plans include CBRND support to operations and must advise senior management and government officials on CBRND matters.

4.4 CBRND support consists of IS, CS and GS.

CBRND IS

4.5 CBRND IS resources are limited in scope. Unit COs and officers commanding sub-units must ensure they have sufficient CBRND IS resources to survive and maintain operational tempo while awaiting CBRND CS or GS resources. The commitment of CBRND IS resources is planned and executed at the lowest possible tactical level. CBRND IS consists of functions that enable a unit or sub-unit to:

  1. survive in a CBRN environment; and
  2. maintain its operational tempo.

CBRND CS

4.6 CBRND CS consists of functions that enable a formation or unit to maintain or restore operational tempo within a short period of time, but which are beyond the CBRND IS capability of a unit. The commitment of CBRN CS resources is normally planned and executed at the tactical level.

CBRND GS

4.7 CBRND GS consists of functions beyond CBRND CS or CBRND IS capabilities. CBRND GS is carried out by specialist CBRND elements. The commitment of CBRND GS resources is planned at the operational level but executed at the tactical level.

Intelligence

4.8 The CDI conducts intelligence assessments of CBRN threats involving:

  1. chemical, biological and radiological agents;
  2. toxic industrial materials; and
  3. terrorism.

CBRND Operations

4.9 The CBRND doctrine for the CAF reflects the international strategic situation and the wide variety of roles and tasks that the CAF may encounter in an operational environment. The documentation of CBRND doctrine has been organized in the following publications:

  1. A-FD-005-005/AF-003, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operating Concept;
  2. B-GJ-005-311/FP-020, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Tactics,Techniques and Procedures, outlines the operational procedures necessary to operate CBRND equipment for the effective conduct of all CBRND operations of the CAF;
  3. B-GJ-005-311/FP-021, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Tactics, Techniques and Procedures – Urban, sets out tactics and operational procedures required to conduct CBRND operations in urban areas;
  4. B-GJ-005-311/FP-030, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Aide-Mémoire, provides a summary of CBRND doctrine and procedures;
  5. B-GJ-005-311/FP-040, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Equipment, details the operating instructions, safety considerations and capabilities and limitations of CBRND equipment in service in the CAF;
  6. B-GL-005-380/FP-001, CFJP 3-8, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence, introduces the chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defence doctrine at the strategic and operational levels and details the organization for CBRND in the CAF, based on the current threat environment and approved joint doctrine; and
  7. B-GL-005-380/FP-101, is a supporting publication to B-GL-005-380/FP-001. This publication guides CBRND staff in advising comds on the production of CBRND plans and the conduct of CBRND operations, and is the principal reference for training, standardization and evaluation in CBRND.

Domestic Operations

4.10 Domestic operations are conducted in accordance with B-GJ-005-302/FP-001, CFJP 3-2, Domestic Operations and CJOC Standing Operation Order for Domestic Operations (SOODO).

International Operations

4.11 International operations are conducted in accordance with the CDIO.

Evaluation

4.12 In general, CBRND readiness must be evaluated by the DOS SJS to ensure that units are adequately prepared to operate in a CBRN environment. Both the proficiency of forces to operate in a CBRN environment and the capability of CBRND must be evaluated as set out below.

Proficiency

4.13 The proficiency of forces to conduct operations in a CBRN environment must be evaluated on a regular basis to ensure forces are prepared, thus minimizing refresher training required prior to operations. The standards and evaluation criteria are provided in Chapter 9 of B-GL-005-380/FP-101.

Capability

4.14 The primary capability manager for CBRND in the CAF is D JCBRN D. The CBRND capability development program is explained in detail in section 7. CBRND capability, including policy, doctrine, plans, procedures, training and equipment, must be evaluated by the D JCBRN D during the planning and conduct of operations and training to ensure that it:

  1. provides the necessary ability for forces to conduct operations in a CBRN environment with little or no effect on their operational tempo; and
  2. is compliant with all international obligations and domestic laws of Canada, and DND and CAF policies and instructions.

Controlled Material and Equipment – CBRND Equipment

4.15 CBRN defence equipment requirements vary from one operation to another, requiring scales of issue to be tailored. For each operation, the CJOC develops scales of issue. CANSOFCOM maintains its own capability to develop scales of issue for SOF. The DOS SJS, in consultation with D JCBRN D and in response to the operational commands, affects the release of the necessary CBRN defence equipment from operational stocks.

CBRN Med CMs

4.16 Each SPI is operation-specific. The most commonly recommended SPI consists of three HI-6/atropine auto-injectors, one diazepam auto-injector, two Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion pouches, as well as a seven-day supply of pyridostigmine bromide or a supply of antibiotics, for each CAF member. CBRN medical treatment kits are issued to medical elements based on the CBRN threat. These contain a variety of drugs for administration only by qualified medical personnel. The CBRN med CMs reserve stocks are specified for each operation in the tasking order. Specific instructions regarding CBRN med CMs for CAF operations is provided in section 5.

Ionizing Radiation Exposure

4.17 Exposures to ionizing radiation, both external (radiation source outside the body) and internal (radiation source within the body), account for the dose incurred by an individual. Ionizing radiation exposure in all operations is managed to the lowest levels reasonably achievable, taking into consideration social, economic and military operational factors, along with the exposure limits and requirements set out in the NSODs. Any ionizing radiation doses received during operations that are above background levels are considered “occupational doses” and must be reported to the NDR. Authorization requirements for increases in the levels of exposure to ionizing radiation are also set out in NSODs. The advice of the D N Safe should be sought when setting an upper dose limit and when contemplating increasing that limit.

Interoperability – Standardization

4.18 The CAF is required to be capable of operating with allied forces in a CBRN environment, as well as with other GC departments and agencies. CBRND interoperability is achieved by:

  1. active participation in inter-departmental and international forums;
  2. protocols, memoranda of understanding and other arrangements;
  3. the development, ratification and implementation of standardized policies, doctrine, procedures and protocols;
  4. participation in national and international training and exercises; and
  5. operation of the CBR MOU (see paragraphs 7.17 and 7.18 for more details).

NATO JCBRND-CDG

4.19 The mission of the NATO JCBRND-CDG is to provide NATO with the CBRND operational and technical standards necessary to mitigate the adverse impacts of an intentional or inadvertent CBRN release on NATO forces. The D JCBRN D leads the Canadian delegation to JCBRND-CDG meetings, acts as the Canadian POC for issues arising from the JCBRND-CDG meetings and represents Canada in subordinate panels of the JCBRND-CDG as required. Other DND and CAF organizations, such as ADM(S&T), represent Canada in subordinate panels of the JCBRND-CDG as appropriate.

NATO CBRN Med WG

4.20 The NATO CBRN Med WG is an organization subordinate to the NATO Committee of the Chiefs of Military Medical Services, also known as the “CoMedS”. This WG prepares doctrine and procedures for defence against radiation (ionizing and non-ionizing), biological, chemical and laser directed energy weapons, or CBRN or laser hazards that result directly or indirectly from military operations. The Surg Gen appoints an officer to represent Canada at NATO CBRN Med WG meetings, who then acts as the Canadian POC for issues arising from the NATO CBRN Med WG.

AUSCANNZUKUS CBRND Interoperability

4.21 CBRND interoperability of AUSCANNZUKUS forces is achieved through the implementation of AUSCANNZUKUS naval standardization agreements, ABCA Program standards, and Air and Space Interoperability Council air standards. When two or more of the CAF environments adopt doctrine, equipment, tactics, techniques or procedures developed under these programs, it should be incorporated into CAF joint doctrine. Another key interoperability mechanism is the CBR MOU which concerns the research, development and acquisition of CBRN materiel.

5. Medical Countermeasures for CAF Operations

Purpose

5.1 The purpose of this section is to identify the requirements related to the distribution, storage, use and disposal of CBRN med CMs. The instructions in this section apply to all CAF operations (domestic and expeditionary), as well as any pre-deployment training and preparations, and DND support to CAF operations.

Mandatory CBRN Med CMs

5.2 Mandatory CBRN med CMs must be identified in each tasking order on an operation-specific basis. The pre-positioning of CBRN med CMs is an FP requirement. However, CBRN med CMS are distributed and used only when ordered. For the purposes of this paragraph, “use” is self-administration, buddy-administration or administration by a healthcare professional.

Authority to Order the Use of CBRN Pre-Treatments and Pre-Exposure Vaccinations, and Individually-Issued CBRN Med CMs

5.3 Under DAOD 8006-0, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence, only the CDS has the authority to order the use of CBRN pre-treatments and pre-exposure vaccinations, and individually-issued CBRN med CMs (with the exception of radioiodine uptake preventative med CMs (see paragraph 5.5)). The CDS has delegated the authority to order the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs to comds of operational commands (see the Authority Table in DAOD 8006-0). Authority to order the use of mandatory CBRN pre-exposure vaccinations is not delegated. An order to use CBRN med CMs constitutes the authority to distribute and issue CBRN med CMs.

Use of CBRN Pre-Treatments and Pre-Exposure Vaccinations, and Individually-Issued CBRN Med CMs

5.4 The use of CBRN pre-treatments and pre-exposure vaccinations, and individually-issued CBRN med CMs, may be requested by the senior CAF comd, regional joint task force comd or task force comd through the comd of the responsible operational command. Under DAOD 8006-0, in case of an operational emergency, when a delay in seeking operational command authority to order the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs may result in unacceptable risk to CAF members, the senior CAF comd is authorized to order the use of CBRN pre-treatments or individually-issued CBRN med CMs. The senior CAF comd must notify the comd of the respective operational command of the action taken as soon as practicable.

Radioiodine Uptake Preventative Med CMs

5.5 Radioiodine uptake preventative med CMs may be offered, but not ordered. Under DAOD 8006-0, the authority to offer radioiodine uptake preventative med CMs is delegated to the respective RCN nuclear emergency comds (i.e. base comds of CFB Halifax and CFB Esquimalt, and CO Canadian Forces Maritime Experimental and Test Ranges).

Pre-Positioning of CBRN Med CMs

5.6 In consultation with the Comd CJOC or Comd CANSOFCOM, the Surg Gen is authorized under DAOD 8006-0 to pre- position (for individuals or groups, in accordance with operational requirements) all CBRN med CMs within and outside of CF H Svcs Gp control. Comds of operational commands may determine in-theatre locations of pre-positioned stocks. However, storage conditions and medical oversight must meet requirements of both the manufacturer of the CBRN med CMs in question and as set out in CF H Svcs Gp Instruction 4200-01, Accounting, Reporting and Handling Requirements for Surgeon General Restricted Products.

Licensed and Unlicensed CBRN Med CMs

5.7 CBRN med CMs include both licensed and unlicensed medical products under the Food and Drugs Act and its regulations. Many CBRN med CMs require an additional level of control and are therefore designated as “SG restricted products”. The use of these medical products, including unlicensed medical products, has been deemed essential for FP. As a result, Health Canada has granted the CAF access to these unlicensed medical products on the condition of strict compliance with the terms and conditions of the SAP. The accounting, reporting and handling of SG restricted products must be in compliance with CF H Svcs Gp Instruction 4200-01, which is based on the regulations pertaining to the SAP in the Food and Drug Regulations. The requirements of CF H Svcs Gp Instruction 4200-01 are applicable in all cases when there are plans for the use of SG restricted products or when they are issued or used. These requirements include:

  1. control by a CF H Svcs Gp pharmacist (military or civilian), who is responsible for all aspects of CBRN med CMs handling;
  2. control by the physician at units without a pharmacist;
  3. control by the CO at units without a pharmacist or physician;
  4. the application of narcotic accounting procedures to SG restricted products, including maintaining a detailed register of all receipts, issues, use, loss, wastage, destruction and any adverse events; and
  5. the submission of reports in accordance with paragraphs 43, 44, 45, 47, 49, 51, 52, 53 and 54, and subparagraph 48b of CF H Svcs Gp Instruction 4200-01.

Briefing and Training

5.8 When CBRN med CMs are either pre-positioned at a unit whose members are to be deployed, used by CAF members prior to deployment or carried by CAF members being deployed into an area of operation, the parent unit CO and the senior physician at that unit, base or wing are responsible to ensure, in accordance with CF H Svcs Gp Instruction 4200-01, that:

  1. the CAF members are trained in the use of applicable individually-issued CBRN med CMs, including immediate action drills; and
  2. for CBRN pre-treatments and pre-exposure vaccinations, and individually-issued CBRN med CMs (except radioiodine uptake preventative med CMs), the appropriate briefing is delivered to and acknowledgement forms are signed by all CAF members either prior to their deployment or, in the case of designated units, as part of their unit training.

Deployment and Redeployment

5.9 During a deployment, the in-theatre CO and supporting physician are responsible for monitoring CAF members and reporting all adverse events relating to CBRN med CMs. When the CAF members have been redeployed back to their parent unit, the parent unit CO and the senior physician at that unit, base or wing must ensure that the CAF members are monitored and all adverse events relating to CBRN med CMs are reported.

5.10 Vaccine doses are administered either during the pre-deployment or the deployment phase of an operation according to the approved schedule. No further doses are administered after redeployment outside the threat area, without the approval of the Director Health Services Operations as based on the assessed medical requirement.

5.11 CAF members are required to comply with allied forces CBRN med CM directives only if these have been reviewed and approved by the CAF Surg Gen or a physician designated by the Surg Gen. When practicable, vaccinations are administered by the CF H Svcs Gp before the CAF members join the allied force.

5.12 Allied personnel may not accompany CAF units or elements on operations unless their parent force certifies its acceptance of CAF CBRN med CM directives.

5.13 Requirements for the provision of CBRN med CMs for military visitors to CAF operations are addressed on a case-by-case basis.

5.14 CBRN med CMs are intended for CAF members only. The circumstances under which CBRN med CMs can be provided to civilians, including DND employees and civilian visitors to CAF operations, must be prescribed by the Minister of National Defence (see paragraph 6.2 in DAOD 80096-0).

6.Training

General

6.1 The response of personnel exposed to CBRN agents should be automatic. Accordingly:

  1. applicable DND employees and all CAF members must be trained in basic CBRND survival skills; and
  2. all comds and COs must:
    i. understand the implications of conducting operations in a CBRN environment;
    ii. ensure their personnel are trained in basic CBRND survival skills; andiii. be trained themselves to
    plan and conduct CBRND operations.

6.2 The training requirements in paragraphs 6.3 to 6.18 are in addition to the general requirements in paragraph 6.1.

Individual Training

6.3 The comds of the RCN, CA and RCAF must ensure that appropriate CBRND training is provided for CAF members in their commands and that such training is conducted in accordance with DAOD 5031-2, Individual Training and Education Strategic Framework.

Collective Training

6.4 A CO must include CBRND in collective training at the unit level to ensure that all elements of the unit can work together effectively in a CBRN environment.

6.5 A formation comd must include CBRND in collective training at the formation level to ensure all units and other elements of the formation can work together effectively in a CBRN environment.

Contract Personnel

6.6 A CO must ensure that appropriate CBRND training is provided to contract personnel as specified in their contract.

Live Chemical Agent Training

6.7 CAF members who act as CBRND specialists should be confident that military operations can be conducted safely in a CBRN-contaminated environment. To ensure this confidence, live chemical agent training should be conducted in a realistic but controlled environment. Realism will enhance the opportunities for CAF members to ensure the accuracy and effectiveness of their equipment, and the reliability of CBRND techniques, as well as validate their competence.

6.8 Live chemical agent training in Canada is only conducted at the DRDC Suffield Counter Terrorism and Technology Centre, which has the unique expertise and facilities required for such training.

6.9 Live chemical agent training is authorized for the following groups in the following order of priority:

  1. the CJIRU-CBRN;
  2. CBRND GS units, including decontamination units;
  3. the Advanced CBRN Defence Officer Course;
  4. the Land Force Technical Staff Program;
  5. CAF fleet schools, unit CBRND officers and unit CBRND instructors;
  6. the DRDC Suffield Decontamination Team;
  7. designated units, sub-units and detachments as necessary in preparation for operations;
  8. allied forces; and
  9. civilian first-responders.

6.10 Requests for DND employees and CAF members, other than those referred to in paragraph 6.9, to participate in live chemical agent training, including as observers, must be forwarded to D CBRN D for Comd CA approval.

6.11 The CEO DRDC Suffield may contract with organizations outside of the DND and the CAF to conduct live chemical agent training without CFD approval, but this must not interfere with scheduled DND and CAF training. Any live chemical agent training contract must only be undertaken in accordance with international treaty obligations, and domestic statutory and regulatory requirements.

Use of Ionizing Radiation Sources in Radiological and Nuclear Defence Training

6.12 In order to provide realism in radiological and nuclear defence training, unsealed and sealed ionizing radioactive sources are used.

6.13 The primary goal of radiological and nuclear defence training using unsealed or sealed ionizing radiation sources is to provide basic instruction on the detection, proper handling and mitigation of radioactive material. Other goals include providing experience in the use of detection and sampling equipment, learning to apply radiation protection principles and learning how to work safely in contaminated environments. In addition to standard radiation safety training, special attention is paid to contamination control and the detection of radioisotopes. This type of practical radiation exercise gives participants the opportunity to put theory into practice.

6.14 D N Safe authorization is required under the NSODs to conduct radiological or nuclear defence training. Early collaboration with D N Safe staff is essential for timely approval of radiological or nuclear defence training requests. D N Safe collaboration on radiological or nuclear-related training standards is also required.

RCA Use in Training

6.15 To afford realism, CS gas is authorized for use in training. No other RCA is authorized for use in training. Procedures and limitations on the use of CS gas are set out in B-GJ-005-311/FP-020.

6.16 Training with CS gas is designed to teach DND employees and CAF members how to react correctly to a chemical warfare attack and use individual and collective protective equipment properly. CS gas can cause intense irritation and, although normally non-lethal, can result in significant short-term or long-term illness and, in extreme cases, death. Accordingly, only those personnel who have been properly briefed on the risks and fully trained on chemical defence measures and how to use chemical defence equipment may be subjected to training with CS gas.

6.17 CS gas and all other RCAs must not be used to conduct “rites of passage” or other similar activities. Any unauthorized activity with CS gas or any other RCA is prohibited and may:

  1. constitute a criminal offence; and
  2. result in administrative or disciplinary action, or both.

6.18 It is prohibited for any DND employee or CAF member to use an RCA as a weapon in an armed conflict.

Training Standards and Validation

6.19 D JCBRN D, in cooperation with MES authorities as set out in DAOD 5070-0, Military Employment Structure, must develop joint CBRND training standards based on ratified NATO proficiency standards, and general and occupation specialty qualifications. CBRND proficiency standards are set out in B-GL-005-380/FP-101.

6.20 For CBRND procedures for specialized CBRND units, the D JCBRN D is responsible for assisting in the development of unique operational standards on which training is based.

6.21 For CBRND procedures unique to each environment, the D JCBRN D may assist in developing unique operational standards on which training is based.

Monitoring CBRND Individual Training

6.22 The D JCBRN D and a representative of the Comd CFSTG act as the co-chairs of the CBRN Defence Training Steering Committee. The Committee is constituted of representatives from the environmental and joint staffs, and occupation managing authorities. The Committee meets when jointly agreed by the co-chairs to review CBRND training issues.

NATO CBRND TEP Participation

6.23 The NATO CBRND TEP of the JCBRND-CDG develops NATO CBRND training procedures in accordance with STANAGs. The D JCBRN D leads the Canadian delegation to CBRND TEP meetings and acts as the Canadian POC for issues arising from CBRND TEP meetings. Subject to NATO attendee limitations, representatives of the ECSs, the Comd CF H Svcs Gp and the CO CFFCA may attend CBRND TEP meetings as members of the Canadian delegation.

7. Capability Development and Sustainment

General

7.1 The delivery of CBRND capability is based on:

  1. the five doctrinal enabling components referred to in paragraph 4.1;
  2. R&D, when new capability is to be developed;
  3. life cycle support of equipment, supplies and services;
  4. concepts, doctrine and tactics, techniques and procedures documents;
  5. formal training through the CFFCA and regular unit training;
  6. FSE;
  7. capability-based planning;
  8. the FCG;
  9. the Canada First Defence Strategy;
  10. information technology and support infrastructure; and
  11. personnel.

Identifying Operational Capability Requirements and Deficiencies

7.2 The primary capability developer and manager for CBRND in the CAF is the D JCBRN D. It is essential that CBRND capabilities meet operational requirements based on capability development requirements determined initially by the D JCBRN D working with the personnel of the SJS, CJOC and CANSOFCOM, and then developed in detail in consultation with the ECSs. The DOS SJS must ensure the D JCBRN D is kept informed of operational CBRN issues and incidents to ensure the required CBRND capabilities are identified. Operational comds and ECSs must understand existing CBRND capabilities and report deficiencies though the chain of command to the DOS SJS. The D JCBRN D must be informed of all readiness reports, technical failure reports and unsatisfactory condition reports that identify CBRND deficiencies.

Capability Development Process

7.3 The Comd CA is responsible for CAF joint CBRND capabilities. As such, CFD is the sponsor for all joint CBRND projects and is represented by a project leader (sponsor), normally a director general from the Comd CA staff, and a project director from D JCBRN D staff. The ADM(Mat) provides the project management function and has responsibility for the acquisition, distribution and support of CBRND equipment. Three directorates within DGLEPM support CBRND material acquisition and sustainment activities: Director Combat Support Equipment Management, Director Soldier Systems Program Management and Director Land Command Systems Program Management. The staffs of these directorates also respond to the D JCBRN D capability manager for sustainment of in-service equipment. The Comd CA monitors project implementation activities to ensure that deliverables comply with the statement of operational requirements. To help achieve this Comd CA has developed and issued a functional directive entitled Chief of Army Staff Functional Directive for Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Sensor Integration Standards. DGLEPM is the project leader for implementation and is responsible, through normal reporting channels, to the Deputy Minister and to the CFD for all aspects of project implementation. The project leader for implementation chairs the Senior Review Board.

7.4 Joint, special operations and ECS planning staffs must identify potential future requirements for CBRND in strategic planning guidance.

7.5 CBRN med CMs are the responsibility of the Surg Gen who, in cooperation with the D JCBRN D, coordinates CBRN med CM requirements in the development of CBRND capability.

Role of DGCSI

7.6 The role of the DGCSI is both to provide strategic decision support and to act as a challenge function with respect to capability and force structure requirements. This means that the DGCSI analyzes files, project documentation, strategic initiatives, and new capabilities and force structures being proposed or delivered, to ensure that they are aligned with strategic need and direction as articulated by the DND and the CAF. The D JCBRN D contributes to the DGCSI process in regards to all aspects of CBRND, predominantly in cooperation with its following two directorates:

  1. the Director Capability Integration, who is responsible for:
    i. providing capability requirements analysis using the tools and results of capability-based
    planning;
    ii. leading the maintenance of FSE document, the development of the force development scenarios,
    the production of the Capability-Based Planning Report and the promulgation of the FCG; and
    iii. providing capability requirement tailored analysis on projects and initiatives to the CFD and the
    Vice Chief of the Defence Staff ensuring that analyses are aligned with strategic need and
    directions when submitted to the DCB and program management boards; and
  2. the Director Structure Integration, who is responsible for:
    i. conducting the force structure requirements analysis for projects, programs and other major
    initiatives within the CAF, in collaboration with force development partners and informed by the
    FCG;
    ii. providing advice regarding proposed structural changes;
    iii. employing comprehensive decision support risk analysis modeling to ensure a balanced,
    responsible approach to proposed structural changes; and
    iv. undertaking major studies and reviews, assisting in implementation planning and providing
    recommendations to senior leadership based on strategic guidance, executive level direction and
    GC initiatives including the Multi-Year Establishment Plan.

Service Level Agreements

7.7 The implementation of CBRND concepts, doctrine and individual and collective specialist training is achieved through SLAs between the D JCBRN D and the designated MES authorities assigned under DAOD 5070-0. SLAs:

  1. outline roles, responsibilities and procedures for a training support strategy for the fielding of capabilities by the CBRND capability development program throughout the life cycles of the equipment fielded;
  2. define the working relationship between the MES authorities for CBRND specialty implementation, the D JCBRN D and the strategic level agency responsible for coordinating the CBRND capabilities; and
  3. identify the D JCBRN D as the primary POC and coordinating office concerning CBRND job performance requirements and CBRND-related strategic level guidance.

R&D Program Overview

7.8 DRDC undertakes R&D in support of the CBRND capability development program. The program consists of short-term and long-term activities relating to technologies and defence applications relevant to optimizing human performance in a CBRN environment. To optimize the use of DRDC resources, the R&D goals are achieved by various means. The research may be conducted:

  1. internally by defence scientists;
  2. externally by experts in the private sector and academia under contract; and
  3. collaboratively with national partners and international allies, to leverage expertise and resources.

S&T Program Formulation

7.9 The R&D effort and the scientific support related to CBRND are managed by the CEO DRDC and are quantified in the CBRND S&T programs and projects within the force employment portfolio. The programs and projects are developed as set out in the following table:

Stage Who does it? Action
1 DGSTFE Prepares, in collaboration with clients and in response to client requirements, the definitions of program outcomes and project outcomes as end results to be achieved. The descriptions of the outcomes are written at relatively high levels to accommodate the wide spectrum of CBRND research conducted to satisfy client requirements.
2 DSTFESDS and staff officers Prepares, in consultation with the clients, the definitions of the programs outlining the work required to achieve the program outcomes.
3 DSTFESDS and staff officers Prepares, in consultation with the clients, the definitions of the projects in line with the contents of the programs. The project definitions outline in finer details the research to be done, the S&T deliverables meeting the client S&T requirements and the delivery plan. The project definitions also include estimates of personnel and funding required to conduct the research.
4 DRDC chief scientists Vets, as the program formulation evaluation team, the program and the project definition documents for S&T integrity and quality of delivery plan, and makes recommendations to the ADM(S&T).
5 ADM(S&T) Solicits feedback from the clients for S&T relevance on the research described in the aforementioned program and project definition documents, and seeks client approvals of the programs and projects.
6 ADM(S&T) Presents the CBRND programs to the DCB for approvals, after which the CBRND programs become official and research activities are commenced.

International R&D

7.10 The D JCBRN D assists in defining requirements for CAF participation in international R&D relating to CBRND.

R&D Certification of Compliance

7.11 Under NDHQ Instruction ADM(Mat) 8/89, Approval and Certification of the Research and Development Chemical/Biological Defence Program, only delegated authorities in DRDC may certify that an R&D project relevant to biological and chemical defence is in compliance with DAOD 8006-0 and this DAOD. Under DAOD 8006-0, the delegated authorities for the certification of compliance are the DGSTFE and the Director General Science and Technology Centre Operations.

7.12 The following statement must be used for certifications referred to in paragraph 7.11:

“It is certified that the projects in the [fiscal year] R&D Program related to biological and chemical defence are in compliance with DAOD 8006-0, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence and DAOD 8006-1, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operations, Training and Capability Development and Sustainment.”

NATO North Atlantic Council 225, JCBRND-CDG Interoperability

7.13 Interoperability with NATO forces is achieved through the implementation of STANAGs and the promulgation of allied publications. The NATO North Atlantic Council 225, JCBRND-CDG, develops CBRND-related STANAGs dealing with:

  1. operational and technical doctrine;
  2. equipment and material testing protocols; and
  3. equipment and materiel specifications.

Responsibilities of the JCBRND-CDG

7.14 The D JCBRN D is responsible for acting as the head of the Canadian delegation to the JCBRND-CDG meetings and, as the Canadian POC, for addressing issues arising from such meetings. The D JCBRN D is responsible for participating in the JCBRND-CDG panels while the CEO DRDC is responsible for coordinating or providing scientific expertise representation as required. The subject matter of the different JCBRND-CDG panels is organized as follows:

  1. detection, identification and monitoring;
  2. doctrine and terminology;
  3. information management;
  4. hazard management;
  5. physical protection; and
  6. training and exercises.

Responsibilities of Other NATO Project Groups and WGs

7.15 The D JCBRN D is responsible for coordinating the assignment of appropriate Canadian representation for other NATO project groups and WGs related to CBRND.

Interoperability of Coalition Forces Under the ABCA Program

7.16 The mission of the ABCA Program in respect of CBRND is to optimize the interoperability of ABCA Program armies in order to deliver success on coalition operations.

Responsibilities in Respect of the CBR MOU

7.17 For the purposes of the CBR MOU, the D JCBRN D is responsible for:

  1. providing the requirements officer;
  2. coordinating the assignment of appropriate military representation on ITFs, WGs and for WG sub-activities, including task forces, tasked groups or scoping studies that may be established; and
  3. supporting the three WGs (Assess, Inform and Protect) and the Medical Countermeasures Consortium by the provision of CAF advice.

7.18 The CEO DRDC is responsible for providing the program officers required under the terms of the CBR MOU and coordinating the assignment of appropriate scientific representation on the ITFs, WGs and for WG sub-activities, including task forces, tasked groups or scoping studies.

Responsibilities in Respect of Counter-Terrorism R&D

7.19 For the purposes of the Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Defense of the United States of America and the Department of National Defence Canada for Research and Development to Combat Terrorism:

  1. the D JCBRN D is responsible for providing DND and CAF assistance and advice; and
  2. the CEO DRDC is responsible for providing scientific assistance and advice.

Equipment Hardening for CBRN Attack

7.20 Canada has adopted numerous STANAGs relating to the design and capabilities of CBRND systems that commit the CAF to adopt the NATO-approved acceptance criteria, design guidelines, test procedures and analytical procedures for designing military equipment. Details are outlined in a series of AEPs (see section 10, Other References). These STANAGs are followed during the design, testing and acceptance of military equipment.

Equipment Design and Hardening

7.21 When designing CAF equipment, PMs must ensure providing equipment with the capability to withstand the effects of a CBRN attack and allowing for ease of equipment decontamination. PMs must further ensure, when designing platforms and equipment that, if they are contaminated, the platforms and equipment can be operated by crews dressed in full individual protective equipment, with only the minimum surface to be decontaminated (typically operational-level decontamination) in order to continue the mission. All new and refurbished mission-essential land, sea and air platforms and equipment which are at risk of becoming affected during a CBRN incident must also be considered by PMs for hardening in order to enhance their survivability.

CARC System Application

7.22 When paint would normally be applied, a CARC system meeting STANAG 4360, Specification for Paint Systems, Resistant to Chemical Agents and Decontaminants, for the Protection of Land Military Equipment (classified document), must be considered as the finish on all vehicles (including vehicle interiors), weapon systems, ships, aircraft maintenance support equipment and other major components procured for military operations. These coatings should be applied to all equipment intended for deployed operations when refinishing is required. Chemical agent resistance is not required of any temporary, removable coating (e.g. powder paints) applied over a CARC if the removable coating can be easily removed without damaging the underlying CARC. An ADM(Mat) Paint LCMM can identify other suitable coatings or surface treatments having high chemical agent resistance if it is determined that the CARC system selected for the main equipment interferes with the:

  1. operation of equipment accessories being coated (e.g. communications antennas or radomes);
  2. radar or infrared signatures of aircraft; or
  3. requirement to protect a substrate (e.g. aluminum or composites) from degeneration.

Waivers of CBRN Hardening Policy

7.23 A request to waive any requirements of the CBRN hardening policy must be submitted by the PM to the Comd CA for approval.

Life Cycle Materiel Management – Introducing Capabilities

7.24 Under the provisions of the Defence Planning and Management Framework, the D JCBRN D directs joint CBRND projects and introduces capabilities through the capital program of the Defence Services Programme using its major capital equipment and minor project mechanisms. The DGLEPM provides project management support to these projects. Any CBRND equipment procured outside the scope of the D JCBRN D and ADM(Mat) program is not supported as Common Equipment National Procurement, and may cause some confusion for DND and CAF CBRND equipment holders. While it is recognized that each of the commands may have unique requirements, the D JCBRN D must be consulted concerning CBRND equipment procured outside of the terms of the CAF joint CBRND program.

Joint Requirements Synergies

7.25 When an agreement refers to radiological or nuclear standards or requirements, D N Safe collaboration is required. As per NSODs, measurement of doses and exposure to ionizing radiation is only conducted with equipment approved for use by D N Safe. Accordingly, D N Safe must be consulted before any such equipment is procured.

Sustainability and Maintainability Problems

7.26 Sustainability and maintainability problems with in-service capabilities identified by ADM(Mat) LCMMs are communicated, along with modifications that are required or have been implemented, to the D JCBRN D who is responsible to ensure that any resulting amendments to doctrine, procedures and training are promulgated throughout the CAF.

Joint CBRND Equipment

7.27 ADM(Mat) LCMMs must report the status of operational and logistic stocks of joint CBRND equipment to the D JCBRN D.

Removing Obsolete or Non-Supportable Capabilities

7.28 Any ADM(Mat) LCMM who identifies obsolete CBRND equipment, or sustainability or maintainability problems with in-service capabilities, must inform the D JCBRN D of such equipment or problems. The D JCBRN D, in cooperation with the applicable ECS, is responsible for overseeing the removal of obsolete or non-supportable capabilities.

8. Consequences

Consequences of Non-Compliance

8.1 Non-compliance with this DAOD may have consequences for both the DND and the CAF as institutions, and for DND employees and CAF members as individuals. Suspected non-compliance may be investigated.

8.2 CBRND is planned, executed and managed under the domestic and international legal obligations of Canada. Accordingly, non-compliance with this DAOD may also constitute a breach of domestic and international legal obligations, which could result in DND management or CAF command responsibility, and personal liability.

Note – In respect of the compliance of DND employees, see the Treasury Board Framework for the Management of Compliance for additional information.

9. Responsibilities

Operations Responsibility Table

9.1 The following table identifies responsibilities associated with this DAOD regarding operations:

The ... is or are responsible for ...
DOS SJS
  • producing CDS initiating directives on operations to include CBRND issues;
  • releasing, in consultation with the D JCBRN D, necessary CBRND equipment (not including CBRN med CMs) from operational stocks; and
  • establishing, in consultation with force employers and the D N Safe, requirements for dosimetry in operations (based on risk assessment).
Comd RCN, Comd CA and Comd RCAF
  • establishing CBRND procedures for maritime, land and air force operations, as applicable;
  • maintaining, through training and the achievement of CBRND qualifications, the CBRND readiness of their forces;
  • evaluating the CBRND capability of their forces;
  • organizing tasks for specific CBRND missions;
  • providing qualified CBRND staff at the command, formation and unit levels;
  • providing CBRND-proficient maritime, land and air forces, as applicable, to support CAF operations; and
  • supporting and developing interoperability through participation in international WGs.
Comd CJOC
  • maintaining, through training and the achievement of CBRND qualifications, the CBRND readiness of CJOC forces;
  • developing scales of issue to support operations;
  • ordering the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CRBN med CMs by CJOC members; and
  • ensuring that qualified CBRND officers are integrated into CJOC organizations and are considered for involvement in operational planning and assessments.
CDI
  • providing CBRN threat assessments to the staffs of the SJS, CJOC, CANSOFCOM and
    D JCBRN D.
Comd CANSOFCOM
  • establishing CBRND procedures for special operations, as applicable;
  • maintaining the CBRND readiness of CANSOFCOM forces;
  • evaluating the CBRND capability of CANSOFCOM forces;
  • providing qualified CBRND officers for CANSOFCOM organizations;
  • ordering the use of CBRN pre-treatments and individually-issued CBRN med CMs by CANSOFCOM members;
  • providing the CDS and operational comds with high readiness CBRN forces capable of conducting special operations; and
  • providing CBRND-proficient joint forces, as applicable, to support operations.
ADM(S&T)
  • providing a facility within Canada (currently DRDC Suffield) where live chemical agent training is conducted;
  • supporting and developing interoperability through participation in international technical and scientific WGs, including provision of program officers for the groups created under the terms of the CBR MOU; and
  • providing scientific CBRND expertise.
Judge Advocate General
  • providing legal advice at all levels of command on the negotiation, interpretation, implementation and enforcement of Canadian legal obligations in the conduct of CBRND activities.
Surg Gen
  • providing advice on medical support to operations in a CBRN environment, and assisting operational comds and staff with planning medical support to CBRND operations;
  • establishing and maintaining policy and procedures for CBRND medical decontamination, CBRN med CMs, and medical screening and treatment of personnel exposed to CBRN agents;
  • providing regulatory oversight of CBRN med CMs as required by Health Canada;
  • pre-positioning, in consultation with the Comd CJOC and Comd CANSOFCOM, for individuals or groups in accordance with operational requirements, all CBRN med CMs in and outside of CF H Svcs Gp control;
  • providing briefings on CBRN med CMs;
  • providing medical decontamination and treatment elements to support CAF operations;
  • supporting and developing interoperability through participation in international WGs; and
  • establishing and maintaining CBRN med CM policy and procedures.
DG Pol Plan
  • providing DND input on NATO nuclear planning and policy issues in collaboration with D N Safe.
Director Arms Control Verification
  • administering arms control verification;
  • planning, coordinating and executing arms control verifications, confidence and security building measures, and other counter-proliferation and regional security operations; and
  • supporting GAC in receiving arms control verification teams in Canada to inspect DND chemical, biological or radiological facilities, such as the Canadian National Single Small Scale Facility located at DRDC Suffield.
D JCBRN D
  • providing CBRND specialist advice and information, and providing strategic and operational support, to all levels of command;
  • establishing and maintaining CBRND policy and doctrine for domestic and international operations;
  • developing joint CBRND capabilities to enable CAF members to survive and operate effectively in a CBRN environment; and
  • establishing and managing the CBRND capability development program.
D N Safe
  • providing expert advice and scientific support on radiological and nuclear safety matters;
  • ensuring that a radiological exposure to a DND employee or CAF member that constitutes an occupational exposure is reported to the NDR;
  • ensuring that the dose from radiation exposure is assessed if personnel are exposed to a significant amount of radiation without wearing a dosimeter and, in the case of overexposure, an estimation of the dose received is performed;
  • establishing and maintaining DND and CAF dose control levels; and
  • coordinating, on behalf of DND and the CAF, the provision of dosimetry services.
formation comds and unit COs
  • requesting and issuing radiation dosimeters for operations, if required;
  • maintaining radiation dosimetry records for operations and informing deployed personnel of the doses that they have received;
  • maintaining the CBRND readiness of forces under their command; and
  • evaluating the CBRND capacity of their formations or units.

Training Responsibility Table

9.2 The following table identifies responsibilities associated with this DAOD regarding CBRND training:

The ... is or are responsible for …
Comd RCN, Comd CA and Comd RCAF
  • directing the CBRND training for missions at the individual, unit and formation levels.
Comd CJOC
  • identifying the CBRND training requirements at CS and GS levels.
Comd CANSOFCOM
  • establishing CBRND proficiency standards and specialty qualifications for SOF; and
  • planning and conducting advanced individual and collective CBRND training for CJIRU-CBRN.
ADM(S&T)
  • providing live chemical and biological agent and radiation training through DRDC Suffield; and
  • providing advanced radiation training for the CJIRU-CBRN through DRDC Ottawa.
Surg Gen
  • providing advice on individual and collective CBRND training regarding the use of CBRN med CMs; and
  • providing CBRND training to CF H Svcs Gp personnel for medical support to operations.
D JCBRN D
  • establishing CBRND proficiency standards and specialty qualifications;
  • providing advice to all levels of command on:
  • CBRND training;
  • new CBRND capabilities being introduced into the DND and the CAF; and
  • capability-based planning in regards to CBRND;
  • acting as the co-chair with a representative of the Comd CFSTG on the CBRN Defence Training Steering Committee; and
  • acting as the requirements officer for all CAF individual CBRND training.
D N Safe
  • providing advanced radiation training for the CJIRU-CBRN;
  • approving training standards involving ionizing radiation; and
  • providing advice on radiological and nuclear protection aspects of CBRND training.
Comd CFSTG
  • conducting joint individual speciality CBRND and radiation safety training;
  • providing guidance to establish individual proficiency and training standards for joint CBRND; and
  • appointing a representative to act as the co-chairperson with D JCBRN D on the CBRN Defence Training Steering Committee.

Capability Development and Sustainment Responsibility Table

9.3 The following table identifies responsibilities associated with this DAOD regarding capability development and sustainment:

The ... is or are responsible for ...
level one advisors
  • identifying unique CBRND requirements within their organizations, including the acquisition of appropriate equipment and provision of training to overcome any deficiency.
ECSs
  • identifying CBRND operational requirements for domestic and expeditionary operations;
  • identifying force capabilities that need to be produced to support domestic and expeditionary CBRND operational requirements; and
  • providing environmental input to joint capability development projects.
Comd CJOC
  • identifying force capabilities that need to be produced to support domestic and expeditionary CBRND operational requirements.
Comd CANSOFCOM
  • identifying CBRND operational requirements for the operations of SOF; and
  • identifying force capabilities that need to be produced to support CBRND operational requirements for SOF.
ADM(S&T)
  • providing medical and non-medical R&D, testing and evaluation, and S&T advice and support, relating to CBRND.
Surg Gen
  • acquiring appropriate capabilities to address deficiencies in CBRN med CMs and overall medical support to CBRN operations;
  • coordinating CBRN med CMs requirements in cooperation with D JCBRN D; and
  • providing Canadian representation at the CBRN Med WG and the Biomedical Panel, with the goal of enhancing interoperability with NATO forces through the implementation of STANAGs and the promulgation of CBRND medical allied publications.
DGLEPM
  • providing project management for CBRND equipment acquisition, including Initial Cadre Training (train the trainer) implementation; and
  • providing life cycle management for CBRND equipment.
DG Pol Plan
  • liaising with GAC on CBRND capability-related matters.
D JCBRN D
  • sponsoring joint CBRND capital acquisition projects and miscellaneous requirements projects;
  • coordinating the funding of joint CBRND capital acquisition projects and of minor requirements;
  • reviewing SLAs;
  • identifying capability deficiencies and seeking methods to mitigate the deficiencies;
  • establishing and maintaining the joint CBRND capability development program long range plan;
  • identifying joint CBRND requirements and providing recommendations for joint CBRND capability acquisition;
  • acquiring appropriate CBRND capabilities to address deficiencies;
  • providing the requirement officer required under the terms of the CBR MOU;
  • appointing project directors and requirements officers for joint CBRND capital acquisition projects and miscellaneous requirements projects;
  • defining and ensuring requirements for capability interoperability are met;
  • representing the DND and the CAF in national and international CBRND forums; and
  • performing CBRND standardization functions under multinational and NATO arrangements and agreements.
D N Safe
  • approving standards and requirements for agreements involving radiological or nuclear protection issues;
  • providing scientific radiological expertise to support radiological and nuclear capability development and sustainment;
  • approving radiological and nuclear protection equipment before use; and
  • issuing NSODs-required authorization for the acquisition of an item containing an ionizing radiation source or a related service.

10. References

Acts, Regulations, Central Agency Policies and Policy DAOD

Other References

  • DAOD 2008-0, Public Affairs Policy
  • DAOD 2008-3, Issue and Crisis Management
  • DAOD 4002-0, Nuclear Technology Regulation and Control
  • DAOD 4002-1, Nuclear and Ionizing Radiation Safety
  • DAOD 4003-0, Environmental Protection and Stewardship
  • DAOD 5031-2, Individual Training and Education Strategic Framework
  • DAOD 5070-0, Military Employment Structure
  • DAOD 7014-0, Memoranda of Understanding
  • A-FD-005-005/AF-003, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operating Concept
  • B-GJ-005-104/FP-021, Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels
  • B-GJ-005-302/FP-001, CFJP 3-2, Domestic Operations
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-020, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Tactics, Techniques and Procedures
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-021, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Tactics, Techniques and Procedures – Urban
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-030, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Aide-Mémoire
  • B-GJ-005-311/FP-040, Canadian Forces Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Equipment
  • B-GL-005-380/FP-001, CFJP 3-8, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence
  • B-GL-005-380/FP-101, CFJP 3-8.1, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Operations
  • Canada First Defence Strategy
  • Chief of Army Staff Functional Directive for Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear (CRBN) Sensor Integration Standards (available in paper copy only)
  • Capability-Based Planning Report (classified document)(available in English only)
  • CDIO
  • Defence Planning and Management Framework
  • Defence Services Programme
  • Force Capability Guidance (classified document)
  • Multi-Year Establishment Plan (available in paper copy only)
  • Nuclear Safety Orders and Directives
  • Nuclear Vessel Visit Safety Program Manual
  • Standing Operation Order for Domestic Operations (SOODO)
  • The Future Security Environment 2013-2040
  • NDHQ Instruction ADM(Mat) 8/89Approval and Certification of the Research and Development Chemical/Biological Defence Program
  • CF H Svcs Gp Instruction 4200-01, Accounting, Reporting and Handling Requirements for Surgeon General Restricted Products
  • National Dose Registry Web site, Health Canada
  • Special Access Programme Web site, Health Canada
  • STANAG 4360, Specification for Paint Systems, Resistant to Chemical Agents and Decontaminants, for the Protection of Land Military Equipment (classified document)
  • Allied Administrative Publication – 06, NATO Glossary of Terms and Definitions (English and French) (available in paper copy only)
  • AEP – 04, Nuclear Survivability Criteria for Armed Forces Material and Installations (classified document)
  • AEP – 07, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Contamination Survivability Factors in the Design, Testing and Acceptance of Military Equipment (available in English paper copy only)
  • AEP – 09, NATO Manual of Simulators of Nuclear Weapons Effects – Introduction and Effects (Vols.1-5) (classified document)
  • AEP – 14, Guidelines to Improve Nuclear Radiation Protection of Military Vehicles (available in English paper copy only)
  • AEP – 18, EMP Test Methods and Procedures (available in English paper copy only)
  • AEP – 19, Nuclear Protection Design Considerations for Mobile Shelters (classified document) (available in English only)
  • AEP – 20, EMP Design and Test Guidelines for Systems in Mobile Shelters (available in English paper copy only)
  • AEP – 21, NATO Recommended Calibration/Procedures for EMP Measurements (available in English paper copy only)
  • AEP – 22, A Guide to Transient Radiation Effects on Electronics at the Tactical Level (Land Forces) (classified document)
  • AEP – 25, Nuclear Blast and Thermal Test Methods and Procedures (available in English paper copy only)
  • AEP – 38, Operational Requirements, Technical Specifications and Evaluation Criteria for CBRN Protective Clothing (classified document) (available in English only)
  • AEP – 45, Warning and Reporting and Hazard Prediction of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Incidents (Reference Manual) (available in English paper copy only)
  • American, British, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand Armies’ Program Web site
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