2018-2019 Annual Report to Parliament — Administration of the Privacy Act - DND

1. Introduction

The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces are pleased to present to Parliament their annual report on the administration of the Privacy Act. Section 72 of the Act requires the head of every federal government institution to submit an annual report to Parliament on its administration each financial year. This report describes National Defence activities that support compliance with the Privacy Act for the fiscal year (FY) commencing 1 April 2018 and ending 31 March 2019.

1.1. Purpose of the Privacy Act

The purpose of the Privacy Act is to extend the present laws of Canada that protect the privacy of individuals with respect to personal information about themselves held by a government institution and that provide individuals with a right of access to that information.

These rights of protection and access are in accordance with the principles that individuals should have a right to know why their information is collected by the government, how it will be used, how long it will be kept and who will have access to it.

2. Access to Information and Privacy at National Defense

2.1. Mandate of National Defence

Who we are

The Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) make up the largest federal government department. Under Canada’s defence policy, the Defence Team will grow to over 125,000 personnel, including 71,500 Regular Force members, 30,000 Reserve Force members and 25,000 civilian employees.

What we do

DND and the CAF have complementary roles to play in providing advice and support to the Minister of National Defence, and implementing Government decisions regarding the defence of Canadian interests at home and abroad.

At any given time, the Government of Canada can call upon the CAF to undertake missions for the protection of Canada and Canadians and to maintain international peace and stability.

Canada’s defence policy presents a new strategic vision for defence: Strong, Secure, Engaged. This is a vision in which Canada is:

Strong at home, with a military ready and able to defend its sovereignty, and to assist in times of natural disaster, support search and rescue, or respond to other emergencies.

Secure in North America, active in a renewed defence partnership in the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and with the United States to monitor and defend continental airspace and ocean areas.

Engaged in the world, with the Canadian Armed Forces doing its part in Canada’s contributions to a more stable, peaceful world, including through peace support operations and peacekeeping.

 

The National Defence Act (NDA) establishes DND and the CAF as separate entities, operating within an integrated National Defence Headquarters as they pursue their primary responsibility of providing defence for Canada and Canadians.

2.1. National Defence organization

Senior leadership

The Governor General of Canada is the Commander-in-Chief of Canada. DND is headed by the Minister of National Defence. The Associate Minister of National Defence supports the Minister of National Defence. The Deputy Minister of National Defence is the Department’s senior civil servant. The CAF are headed by the Chief of the Defence Staff, Canada’s senior serving officer. These senior leaders each have different responsibilities:

Defence organization

The National Defence organizational structure is represented in the diagram below. Additional information about the National Defence organization is available online.

Organization chart
Figure 1: National Defence organizational chart

2.3. The Directorate of Access to Information and Privacy

Delegation of authority

In accordance with section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, a delegation of authority, signed by the Minister, designates the Deputy Minister, Corporate Secretary, Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Director, and ATIP Deputy Directors to exercise all powers and functions of the Minister, as the head of institution, under both Acts. It also designates other specific powers and functions to employees within the Directorate Access to Information and Privacy (DAIP).

Under the authority of the Corporate Secretary, the ATIP Director administers and coordinates both the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, and acts as the departmental ATIP Coordinator. In the administration of the Acts, DAIP seeks advice on legal, public affairs, policy, and operational security matters from other organizations and specialists as required.

A copy of the Access to Information Act and Privacy Act Designation Order is provided at Annex A.

DAIP organization

DAIP is responsible for matters regarding access to information and privacy protection within the National Defence portfolio, except in the case of the following organizations: the Communication Security Establishment, the Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner, the Military Police Complaints Commission, the Military Grievances External Review Committee, the Office of the National Defence and Canadian Forces Ombudsman, and Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services.

DAIP implemented organizational changes in 2018-2019 with the aim to integrate and streamline key intake processes. General operations support activities and access to information tasking functions were consolidated into a single Intake Team, and a Chief of Staff was established to manage this unit in addition to the existing Systems Liaison Team and Business Management Office.

DAIP’s ATIP program management workforce is divided functionally into four main areas, and supported by Defence organization liaison officers, as illustrated in the diagram at FIGURE 2. The number of employees indicated are number of full time equivalents staffed at the end of the reporting period.

Long description follows
Figure 2: National Defence ATIP operational workforce
Figure 2: Long description

National Defence ATIP operational workforce

ATIP Intake receive requests from outside of the Department, send tasking notices to request records from National Defence organizations and prepare records for review.

ATI Operations process access to information requests, conduct line-by-line review of records, consult other parties for disclosure recommendations and apply Access to Information Act provisions.

The ATI Liaison Officers is a role performed within each of the organizations identified in the National Defence organization chart.  This role supports the ATIP program by coordinating the ATI activities for their respective groups.

Privacy Operations process personal information requests, conduct line-by-line review of records, apply Privacy Act provisions, process requests for disclosures in the public interest and retain records of disclosures to investigative bodies.

Policy and Governance provides strategic advice and issues management support, develop policy instruments, deliver training and awareness program, perform data analysis and report on program performance, manage privacy incident response process, and conduct privacy risk assessments.

The Privacy Liaison Officers is a role performed within each of the organizations identified in the National Defence organization chart.  This role supports the ATIP program by coordinating the privacy incident response activities for their respective groups.

 

DAIP is also supported by a Systems Liaison Team that maintain the ATIP application system and database, and a Business Management Office that is responsible for business planning, budgeting, human resources, physical security, and other administrative duties.

Additionally, in response to a key priority for National Defence, DAIP established a new Litigation Support Team. Stood up in the fall of 2018, this unit performs an ATIP-like review of records in support of class action settlements such as the LBGT Purge Class Action.

3. Highlights of the Satistical report

The statistical report at Annex B consists of data submitted by National Defence as part of Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) annual collection of ATIP-related statistics. The following sections contain highlights, trends and an analysis of notable statistical data from a departmental perspective.

3.1. Requests received

During the reporting period, National Defence received 6,637 requests for personal information under the Privacy Act versus 7,393 in FY 2017-2018, representing a 10 percent decrease. Despite a second year of decreasing requests received, the large number of files carried over into the reporting period (4,183 requests) continued the trend of an increasing overall workload. This combined workload of 10,820 requests is the highest National Defence has experienced in over ten years.

Long description follows
Figure 3: Privacy request workload (last five years)
Figure 3: Long description

Privacy Request workload

In 2014-2015, 7000 requests were received, 1366 requests were carried over from the previous reporting year.  A combined workload of 8366 requests.

In 2015-2016, 6978 requests were received, 2156 requests were carried over from the previous reporting period. A combined workload of 9134 requests.

In 2016-2017, 8244 requests were received, 1465 requests were carried over from the previous reporting period. A combined workload of 9709 requests.

In 2017-2018, 7393 requests were received, 2659 requests were carried over from the previous reporting period. A combined workload of 10,052 requests.

In 2018-2019, 6637 requests were received, 4183 requests were carried over from the previous reporting year.  A combined workload of 10,820 requests.

Additionally, for the past ten years, National Defence has ranked in the top five federal institutions for highest volume of personal information requests received according to annual statistics compiled by TBS.

A large portion of Privacy Act requests received by National Defence are applications from CAF members for their health and personnel records upon releasing from the Forces. Canada’s Defence Policy has directed improvements to the transition experience for CAF members to better prepare them for the shift to civilian life. As part of this new approach, relevant medical and dental records are provided to members as part of the release process to allow for a positive transition from the military health system to a civilian physician.

The reduction in number of requests received is likely due in large part to this proactive disclosure of health records to the releasing CAF member.

3.2. Requests completed

National Defence closed a total of 9,006 privacy requests during the reporting period, over 3,000 more requests over FY 2017-2018, representing a 53 percent increase in productivity.

Long description follows
Figure 4: Disposition of requests completed and total requests closed (last five years)
Figure 4: Long description

Disposition of Request Completed and Total Requests Closed

In 2014-2015, 1447 were all disclosed, 3277 were disclosed in part, 40 where nothing was disclosed, 1055 where no records exist, and 391 were abandoned.  A total of 6210 requests were closed.

In 2015-2016, 1792 were all disclosed, 4472 were disclosed in part, 37 where nothing was disclosed, 979 where no records exist, and 389 were abandoned.  A total of 7669 requests were closed.

In 2016-2017, 1727 were all disclosed, 3649 were disclosed in part, 56 where nothing was disclosed, 1257 where no records exist, and 365 were abandoned.  A total of 7054 requests were closed.

In 2017-2018, 1722 were all disclosed, 2525 were disclosed in part, 38 where nothing was disclosed, 1223 where no records exist, and 362 were abandoned.  A total of 5871 requests were closed.

In 2018-2019, 2492 requests were all disclosed, 4685 requests were disclosed in part, 35 requests where nothing was disclosed, 1301 requests where no records exist, and 493 requests were abandoned.  A total of 9006 requests were closed.

Pages reviewed

The volume of pages reviewed in FY 2018-2019 more than doubled from the previous reporting period with over 3.0 million pages processed. This volume represents a 129 percent increase over the 1.3 million pages processed in FY 2017-2018.

Long description follows
Figure 5: Number of pages reviewed for requests closed, where records existed (last three years)
Figure 5: Long description

Number of Pages Reviewed for Requests Closed, where Records Existed

In 2016-2017, 2,111,559 pages reviewed for 5797 requests closed

In 2017-2018, 1,323,272 pages reviewed for 4648 requests closed

In 2018-2019, 3,034,777 pages reviewed for 7705 requests closed 

The number of pages reviewed represents the total processed pages for closed requests and does not include the number of pages processed for requests that were carried over into the next reporting period.

National Defence consistently processes the highest volume of pages in response to personal information requests when compared to other federal government institutions.

Exemptions and exclusions

Consistent with previous reporting periods, section 26 of the Privacy Act was the most frequently invoked exemption and was applied in 3,653 requests. This section of the Act protects personal information of individuals other than the requester.

No information was excluded under the Privacy Act for requests completed in FY 2018-2019.

Completion time

Figure 6 illustrates completion time for privacy requests. Despite the increase in total workload, Defence closed 4,134 requests within 30 days. This represents 46 percent of the total volume of requests closed and a 60 percent increase of files closed within 30 days compared to the last reporting period.

There was also a 75 percent increase in the number of requests closed that took 121 days or more to complete; however, this was a result of focused efforts to successfully reduce the number of backlogged files.

Long description follows
Figure 6: Time to complete requests (the last five years)
Figure 6: Long description

Time to Complete Requests

In 2014-2015, 2944 requests were closed in 30 days or less, 383 requests were closed between 31-60 days, 408 requests were closed between 61-120 days and, 2475 requests were closed in 121 days or more

In 2015-2016, 3574 requests were closed in 30 days or less, 369 requests were closed between 31-60 days, 367 requests were closed between 61-120 days and, 3359 requests were closed in 121 days or more

In 2016-2017, 4020 requests were closed in 30 days or less, 642 requests were closed between 31-60 days, 619 requests were closed between 61-120 days and, 1773 requests were closed in 121 days or more

In 2017-2018, 2576 requests were closed in 30 days or less, 546 requests were closed between 31-60 days, 667 requests were closed between 61-120 days and, 2052 requests were closed in 121 days or more

In 2018-2019, 4134 requests were closed in 30 days or less, 717 requests were closed between 31-60 days, 518 requests were closed between 61-120 days and, 3637 requests were closed in 121 days or more

Files closed beyond 30 days were not necessarily late as legal extensions may have been applied.

On-time compliance

A total of 4,567 requests were closed past the statutory deadline in FY 2018-2019. This represents a 49 percent increase from the previous year, due in large part to focused efforts during the reporting period to clear out backlogged files.

National Defence responded to 49 percent of requests within legislated timelines.

Workload continued to be the most common reason for deemed refusal, cited for over 75 percent of requests closed late during the reporting period. Some factors affecting performance and deemed refusal rates include:

3.3. Consultations received and completed

During the reporting period, Defence received nine requests for consultation, all from other Government of Canada institutions. No consultations were received from other organizations in FY 2018-2019.

All nine consultations received were closed during the reporting period.

Back to top

4. Privacy protection and personal information management

4.1. Public interest disclosures

Paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act permits the disclosure of personal information, without the consent of the individual to whom it relates, where the public interest in disclosure clearly outweighs any invasion of privacy that could result, or where the disclosure would clearly benefit the individual to whom the information relates.

During the reporting period, 48 disclosures of personal information were made in accordance with paragraph 8(2)(m). These public interest disclosures included information regarding Boards of Inquiry or Summary Investigations into the death or serious injury of a CAF member; others related to disclosures providing information in CAF medical records, personnel records or military police reports. In all cases, the information was disclosed to the CAF member’s family or representative.

For the 48 disclosures made in the public interest during FY 2018-2019, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) was notified in advance of each release.

4.2. Privacy breaches

Privacy rights are a matter of ongoing public concern. In respect of sections 4 to 8 of the Privacy Act, which govern personal information management, DAIP received 104 complaints regarding contravention of one or more of these provisions, a 20 percent increase from the previous reporting period.

DAIP’s privacy incident response team worked to resolve 84 complaints alleging a breach of privacy, 33 of which were deemed to be well-founded.

Material privacy breaches

TBS defines a material privacy breach as one that involves sensitive personal information and could reasonably be expected to cause injury or harm to the individual, and/or involves a large number of affected individuals.

National Defence did not report any material privacy breaches this reporting period.

4.3. Privacy impact assessments

National Defence collects, uses and discloses personal information in the delivery of mandated programs and services. In accordance with TB policy, the DND and the CAF undertake privacy impact assessments (PIA) to evaluate privacy impacts in the administration of these activities. A PIA provides a framework to identify the extent to which proposals comply with the Privacy Act and applicable privacy policies, assist program officials in avoiding or mitigating privacy risks, and promote informed program and system design choices.

National Defence completedFootnote 1  one PIA during FY 2018-2019 in support of the program described below. The Department is preparing to post the summary on its website.

In addition, DAIP continues to provide ongoing advice and support to National Defence organizations in the development of PIAs.

Sexual Assault Review Program

In support of Operation HONOUR, which aims to eliminate sexual misconduct in the CAF, National Defence launched the Sexual Assault Review Program (SARP) to review unfounded sexual assault files investigated by the Military Police. An External Review Team (ERT), comprised of stakeholders and representatives from both the civilian and CAF communities, is responsible for conducting an annual review of unfounded investigations from the previous year. The ERT reports their findings to the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal and makes recommendations as to the conduct of the investigations, identifying policy, training or best practice proposals for consideration.

Back to top

5. Complaints, Audits and Reviews

5.1. Complaints from the Office of the Privacy Commissioner

In FY 2018-19, National Defence received a total of 77 complaints from the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC), less than one percent of all requests closed during the reporting period.

Further to Part 8 of the Statistical Report, which notes complaints received and closed:

The 61 well-founded determinations represent 66 percent of all findings issued in FY 2018-2019. The majority of these complaints – 56 – were administrative in nature (about delays and time extensions) and five were refusal complaints (regarding application of exemptions or possible missing records). Figure 7 illustrates the reasons for complaints that had findings issued during the reporting period.

Long description follows
Figure 7: Reasons for complaints (FY 2018-2019)
Figure 7: Long description

Reasons for Complaint

15 complaints were discontinued, settled, or resolved

61 complaints were well founded, 56 of which were administrative in nature (delays and time extensions), and 5 of which were refusal complaints (application of exemptions or possible missing records)

17 complaints were not well founded

There were no significant investigations to note regarding the processing of Privacy Act requests during the reporting period.

5.2. Court decisions

In FY 2018-19, there were no court proceedings actioned in respect of requests processed by National Defence.

5.3. ATIP program review

Further to the ATIP program review initiated in the fall 2017, National Defence continues to implement recommendations to improve the design, operational effectiveness and efficiency of key ATIP processes within the Department. Progress updates were provided to the Defence Audit Committee throughout the reporting period. Notable achievements have been made in the areas of Training and Awareness, and ATIP Governance and are outlined in the sections below.

Efforts and improvements will continue into the next reporting period. Additional information about the Assessment of the Access to Information and Privacy Program is available on the National Defence website.

Back to top

6. Policies and procedures

6.1. Departmental policies

DND/CAF corporate administrative direction is set out in the comprehensive collection of Defence Administrative Orders and Directives (DAOD) that are issued under the authority of the Deputy Minister and the Chief of the Defence Staff.

During the reporting period, DND/CAF drafted and revised several DAODs that describe authorities, responsibilities, and requirements in respect of appropriate personal information management within the institution. These DAODs are scheduled for publishing early next fiscal year.

6.2. Internal procedures

DAIP continues to review and update procedures for processing personal information requests and managing privacy incidents, to document process improvements, and to ensure alignment with TB policies and directives.

Litigation holds and preservation orders

In addition to ongoing improvements to ATIP-specific procedures, DAIP developed internal instructions to assist information management activities for requests that are subject to preservation orders.

Litigation holds, or preservation orders, are issued by departmental legal services to Defence organizations when litigation involving National Defence information is imminent or ongoing. These orders detail the legal obligations to preserve relevant records for possible disclosure as may be required for the litigation action.

DAIP procedures in respect of litigation holds ensures that steps are taken to prevent otherwise routine disposition of records when the normal retention periods have ended.

Back to top

7. Training and awarness

7.1. ATIP training program

Departmental ATIP training increased during this reporting period and included the creation of a dedicated ATIP training and awareness team. A three-pronged approach was implemented, where Directorate training resources supported the development and delivery of:

Introductory level courses continued to be offered along with various newly-developed advanced courses. Regional training at Canadian Forces Base Kingston was also delivered during this reporting period.

7.2. Training and awareness activities

A total of 90 face-to-face training sessions were delivered to approximately 1,500 Defence employees and CAF members on the administration of both the ATI Act and Privacy Act, as well as on appropriate management of personal information under the control of the institution. These training sessions were provided through participation in ATIP 101 (introductory) sessions, ATIP 201 (advanced) sessions, GCDOCS privacy-focused training, and targeted training sessions for specific Defence organizations. Most training sessions were delivered by ATIP Directorate staff in person, however some organizations conducted their own courses and one-on-one sessions. Defence employees and CAF members were also encouraged to take the Access to Information and Privacy Fundamentals course offered through the Canada School of Public Service.

In keeping with promoting awareness, ATIP Directorate employees also provided guidance to third parties and requesters on the requirements of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, TB policies and directives, and associated institutional procedures as required.

Liaison officer engagement

Two ATIP Town Halls were conducted in FY 2018-2019, which brought ATIP Directorate staff, organizational ATIP Liaison Officers and other departmental officials together to provide awareness, recognize achievements, and discuss experiences and solutions on various issues. As a result of positive feedback, the ATIP Town Hall will continue on an annual basis.

Integrated privacy training

DAIP continued to collaborate on program-specific training offered by other Defence organizations to integrate supporting content on privacy protection concepts and personal information management practices. During FY 2018-2019, DAIP participated in the following courses:

Canadian Forces Health Services training

The Canadian Forces Health Services (CFHS) operates a privacy office that is responsible for providing advice and support to the CFHS Group on policies and activities that involve personal health information. In accordance with their mandate, the CHFS privacy office maintains training modules to educate staff on the principles of “Privacy, Confidentiality and Security” to support appropriate use of the Canadian Forces Health Information System.

During this reporting period, members of CFHS Group completed these modules and over 200 of their staff attended training offered specifically to the CFHS organization.

Back to top

8. Initiatives and projects

8.1. DAIP engagement with Defence organizations

An initiative to engage with Defence organizations to enhance performance and strengthen relationships with partners in DND was implemented during the reporting period. Current structures, staffing, processes and systems in support of ATIP activities were reviewed and discussed, in addition to opportunities for DAIP to assist through job aids, research, training or other forms of support. Reports for each organization were prepared following each assessment, which provided DAIP with a framework of details to identify efficiencies and areas of support that will inform planning for next fiscal year.

Back to top

9. Monitoring compliance

The ATIP Directorate regularly monitors and reports on a number of ATIP metrics.  In FY 2018-2019, a new Performance Dashboard was developed to provide general awareness to Defence leadership on ATIP performance and metrics. In addition, the Department receives on-demand statistical reports. Performance is also compared to previous fiscal years to identify trends. This monitoring allows the ATIP Operations teams to manage workload and to determine where process improvement may be required. ATIP statistics are also provided to the Corporate Secretary upon request and are often accompanied by other key elements such as human resources data.

Currently, the time to process requests for correction of personal information is not formally monitored as this number is regularly very low. In FY 2018-2019, DAIP received only two requests for correction.

Back to top

10. Privacy operating costs

The annual cost to administer the National Defence privacy program increased by 27 percent to approximately $3.27 million in FY 2018-2019.

The cost of operations includes salaries, overtime, goods and services, contracts and all other expenses specific to the access to information and privacy office. Costs associated with time spent by program areas searching for and reviewing records are not included here.

The overall increase in operating costs is due in large part to growth in spending for operational personnel in FY 2018-2019:

Additional resourcing in both these areas enabled National Defence to close over 3,000 more requests in FY 2018-2019 despite a largest total request workload experience in at least a decade.

Back to top

Annex A: Designation Order

National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces

Access to Information Act and Privacy Act Designation Order

  1. Pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act, the Minister of National Defence, as the head of a government institution under these Acts, hereby designates the persons holding the following positions, or the persons occupying those positions on an acting basis, to exercise or perform all of the powers, duties and functions of the head of a government institution under these Acts:
    1. the Deputy Minister;
    2. the Corporate Secretary;
    3. the Director Access to Information and Privacy; and
    4. Deputy Directors Access to Information and Privacy.
  2. Pursuant to section 73 of the above-mentioned Acts, the Minister also designates the following:
    1. those persons holding the position of Access Team Leader, or the persons occupying this position on an acting basis, to exercise or perform the powers, duties and functions in respect of:
      • The application of the following provisions under the Access to Information Act: section 9; subsection 11(2), 11(3), 11(4), 11(5), 11(6); sections 19, 20, 23 and 24; subsections 27(1) and 27(4); paragraph 28 (1)(b), subsections 28(2) and 28(4); and
      • The response to requests made under the Access to Information Act if no records exist.
    2. those persons holding the position of Privacy Team Leader, or the persons occupying this position on an acting basis, to exercise or perform any of the powers, duties and functions of the head of an institution under the Privacy Act, other than under sub-paragraphs 8(2)(j) and 8(2)(m); and
    3. those persons holding the position of Privacy Senior Analyst, or the persons occupying this position on an acting basis, to exercise or perform the powers and duties in respect of the application of section 26 of the Privacy Act.

 

Original signed by

The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, PC, OMM, MSM, CD, MP
Minister of National Defence
Date: 2016-01-12

Back to top

Annex B: Statistical Report on the Privacy Act for 2018-2019

Government of Canada

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: National Defence

Reporting period: 2018-04-01 to 2019-03-31

Part 1: Request Under the Privacy Act

1.1 Requests under the Privacy Act

  Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 6,637
Outstanding from previous reporting period 4,183
Total 10,820
Closed during reporting period 9,006
Carried over to next reporting period 1,814

Part 2: Requests Closed During the Reporting Period


2.1 Disposition and Completion time

Disposition of Requests Completion Time
1 to 15
Days
16 to 30
Days
31 to 60
Days
61 to 120
Days
121 to 180
Days
181 to 365
Days
More Than 365
Days
Total
All disclosed 351 768 288 220 52 141 672 2,492
Disclosed in part 60 1,333 336 257 108 316 2,275 4,685
All exempted 17 12 2 0 1 1 0 35
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 984 219 60 14 8 10 6 1,301
Request abandoned 331 59 31 27 6 7 32 493
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1,743 2,391 717 518 175 475 2,987 9,006

2.2 Exemptions

Section Number of Requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 4
19(1)(b)
0
19(1)(c)
28
19(1)(d)
14
19(1)(e)
0
19(1)(f)
0
20 0
21 29
22(1)(a)(i) 120
22(1)(a)(ii)
2
22(1)(a)(iii)
0
22(1)(b)
15
22(1)(c)
0
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 4
23(a) 2
23(b)
0
24(a)
0
24(b)
0
25 0
26 4,679
27 65
28 0

2.3 Exclusions

Section Number of Requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b)
0
69.1 0
70(1) 0
70(1)(a)
0
70(1)(b)
0
70(1)(c)
0
70(1)(d)
0
70(1)(e)
0
70(1)(f)
0
70.1
0

2.4 Format of information released

Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 708 1,784 0
Disclosed in part 302 4,383 0
Total 1,010 6,167 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of Requests Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Disclosed Number of Requests
All disclosed 754,985 721,800 2,492
Disclosed in part 2,277,773 2,240,770 4,685
All exempted 627 0 35
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 1,392 0 493
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
Total 3,034,777 2,962,570 7,705

2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1,000 Pages Processed 1,001-5,000 Pages Processed More Than 5,000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 1,281 27,643 611 157,283 392 264,699 208 272,175 0 0
Disclosed in part 1,053 46,452 2,030 585,850 966 696,748 635 905,727 1 5,993
All exempted 34 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 486 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2,854 74,095 2,649 743,133 1,358 961,447 843 1,177,902 1 5,993

2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation Required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 1 1 0 3 5
Disclosed in part 3 7 0 2 12
All exempted 0 3 0 0 3
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 1 0 0 1
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 4 12 0 5 21

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of Requests Closed Past the Statutory Deadline Prinicipal Reason
Workload External Consultation Internal Consultation Other
4,567 3,475 1 0 1,091

2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of Days Past Deadline Number of Requests Past Deadline
Where No Extentions Was Taken
Number of Requests Past Deadline
Where An Extentions Was Taken
Total
1 to 15 days 224 0 224
16 to 30 days 204 0 204
31 to 60 days 380 0 380 
61 to 120 days 225 0 225
121 to 180 days 142 0 142
181 to 365 days 584 0 584
More than 365 days 2,808 0 2,808
Total 4,567 0 4,567

2.7 Requests for translation

Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3: Disclosures under Subsections 8(2) and 8(5)


Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Subsection 8(5) Total
108 48 48 204

Part 4: Requests for Correction of Personal Information and Notations


Paragraph 8(2)(e) Disposition for Correction Requests Received
Notations attached 0
Requests for correction accepted 2
Total 2

Part 5: Extensions


5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Disposition of Requests Where
an Extension Was Taken
15(a)(i)
Interference With Operations
15(a)(ii)
Interference With Operations
15(b)
Translation or Conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 3 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 9 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No record exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 1 0 0 0
Total 13 0 0 0

5.2 Length of extensions

Length of Extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference With Operations
15(a)(ii)
Interference With Operations
15(b)
Translation or Conversion
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 13 0 0 23
Total 13 0 0 0

Part 6: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations


6.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and other organizations

Consultations Other Government of Canada Institutions Number of Pages to Review Other Organizations Number of Pages to Review
Received during reporting period 9 225 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 9 225 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 9 225 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0

6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Recommendations Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed
8 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
Disclosed in part 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
All exempted
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendations Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
All disclosed
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 7: Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences


7.1 Requests with Legal Services

Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1,000 Pages Processed 1,001-5,000 Pages Processed More Than 5,000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1,000 Pages Processed 1,001-5,000 Pages Processed More Than 5,000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 8: Complaints and Investigations Notices Received


Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
77 0 61 0 138

Part 9: Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs)

Number of PIA(s) completed: 1


Part 10: Resources Related to the Privacy Act


10.1 Costs

Expenditures Amount
Salaries $2,622,604
Overtime $38,308
Good and Services $604,503
  • Professional services contracts
$459,468
  • Other
$145,035
Total $3,265,415

10.2 Human Resources

Resources Person Years Dedicated to Access to Information Activities
Full-time employees 35.50
Part-time and casual employees 0.88
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 2.25
Students 1.88
Total 40.50

New Exemptions Table: Privacy Act

Section Number of requests
22.4 National Security and Intelligence Committee
0
27.1 Patent or Trademark privilege
0

Back to top

Back to top

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: