Main Estimates – Grants and Contributions

Contribution: NATO Security Investment Program

  • The National Security Investment Program helps fund the capital costs associated with NATO's communications and information systems, installations and facilities.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $26.5 million to contribute to this program. 
  • These funds will go towards various installations at NATO facilities like radars, airfields, fuel pipelines, and storage units.
  • These funds will also be used to support navigational aids and automated information systems, which assist NATO's activities and deployed operations.
  • Canada will continue working closely with NATO Allies to enhance our collective security and promote peace and stability around the world.  

Key Facts

  • Canada's contribution to NATO Security Investment Program over the years has been:
    • $26.5M 2020-21 (Main Estimates)
    • $36.5M 2019-20 (Main Estimates)
    • $32.6M 2018-19 (Main Estimates)
  • From Main Estimates 2019-20 to 2020-21, there is a decrease of $10M.  This is the result of an internal reallocation to the NATO Military Budget.

Details

  • The North Atlantic Treaty Organization Contribution Program is comprised of two NATO budgets and one NATO program: NATO Military Budget, NATO Security Investment Program and NATO Other Activities Budget.
  • The NATO Security Investment Program (NSIP) covers major construction and command and control system investments of the Alliance.
  • NSIP is not a NATO budget per se but rather a ceiling against which host nations (owners of NSIP projects) may call upon common funds for NATO Security Investments. Once the ceiling has been reached, investments will be delayed to subsequent years, or allies will agree to increase the ceiling.
  • It supports the roles of the NATO Strategic Commands by providing critical installations and facilities, such as:
    • Airfield, fuel systems and harbor facilities
    • Air command and control systems
    • Automated information systems
    • Intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities
  • NSIP spending in recent years have been consistently exceeding planned capital spending. This will likely continue over the next years. The anticipated increase in NSIP spending is the result of:
    • Implementation of several large capabilities approved in 2018 and 2019 has started. Notably, five significant air-related capabilities, totalling approximately €1.9B over 15 years, will have a significant impact on upcoming spending levels.
    • Capital costs associated with the NATO Command Structure, communications and information system (CIS) costs for replacing obsolete systems, and the need to maintain and augment CIS capability in a rapidly changing world continue.
    • Reduced decision points and streamlined program management approach fostered by the new common funded capability delivery governance model. The full impact of the new governance model is expected to be more significant later in the planning period.

Back to top

Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) Program

  • The Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security program – or IDEaS – supports Canadian innovators in developing defence and security solutions for National Defence.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $21 million for the program, of which $18 million will go towards contributions, and $3 million will go towards grants.
  • The $18 million in contribution money will fund research in areas like emerging and advanced protective materials and autonomous systems for defence and security.
  • It will also address challenges related to COVID-19 by helping to develop personal protective equipment, sanitization, disease-tracking technology, and diagnostics and testing.
  • The $3 million in grant money will be used to provide awards as part of the program's ongoing contest entitled "Pop-up City."
  • This contest invited innovators to propose and develop testable prototypes for energy, water, and waste management systems for the military's Relocatable Temporary Camps.
  • This ongoing work conducted through the IDEaS program will ensure that the Canadian Armed Forces continues to benefit from the latest cutting-edge research.

Key Facts

  • In response to the pandemic, IDEaS issued four COVID-related challenges to Canadian innovators in areas such as:
    • personal protective equipment;
    • sanitization;
    • moral injury; and
    • disease-tracking technology.
  • IDEaS is also supporting two projects, valued at $1M each, and identified via the National Research Council's Pandemic Response challenge to develop innovative COVID-19 rapid testing for Canadians.

Details

  • The Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) program was announced in June 2017 with the release of Canada's defence policy Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE).
  • Through IDEaS innovative thinkers are providing the Department of National Defence, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and Canada's safety and security communities with unique solutions to today's toughest defence and security challenges.
  • IDEaS has three main objectives:
    • Catalyzing innovation clusters by promoting and supporting science and technology (S&T) networks of academics, industry, other government departments, as well as other external partners that conduct research and development;
    • Holding competitions for ideas that invite innovators to present viable solutions to specific defence and security S&T challenges; and,
    • Providing innovators with opportunities to assess their innovations in a test environment and receive feedback from DND/CAF subject-matter experts (Sandbox program element). This iterative process will also allow National Defence to procure small volumes of innovations for assessment in operational environments (Test Drive program element).

COVID-19

  • Due to the ongoing and evolving COVID-19 outbreak, the IDEaS program has scaled back its outputs to adapt to the reduced capacity issues facing a lot of Canadian workplaces, and provide innovators with more flexibility and time to deliver ongoing projects.
  • The current phase of the Pop-Up City contest will be delayed by approximately 10 weeks, and subsequent milestones will also shift. This shift does not pose a risk to the milestones that will take place in the 2021-22 fiscal year. 
  • The IDEaS program pivoted some of its capacity and existing tools to reach out to the innovation sector to develop novel solutions or refine existing technologies that could help respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • This includes addressing challenges in areas such as personal protective equipment, sanitization, diagnostics and testing, moral injury, and disease-tracking technology.
  • Two specific projects being funded as a result of IDEaS' participation in the National Research Council's Pandemic Response challenge, valued at approximately $1M each are:
    • Diagnostics Biochem: Their planned anti-SARS-CoV-2 serological tests are intended to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 in human blood. They have developed four tests, each of which provides information that helps physicians, epidemiologists, and other specialists to evaluate the nature of the infection, including the timing between the infection and the blood test. Their test will differentiate between people that have been infected by the virus from individuals that never were infected, whether they have been symptomatic or not.
    • Custom Biologics is targeting point-of-care solutions that will bring rapid testing directly to the community. Test kits are being developed that are more stable for shipping and storage and will not require trained personnel for handling. Saliva based tests are designed to detect SARS- CoV-2 instead of a nose swab, a much simpler and more agreeable procedure. Finally, they are developing point-of-care readers. Testing is currently done on laboratory-based equipment. Custom Biologics is exploring a variety of point-of-care devices that can be deployed in diverse community- based settings such as long-term care facilities, mobile clinics, airports, and sea going vessels.

Back to top

Grant for Compensation for Employers of Reservists

  • Canada appreciates the flexibility and support that employers provide to Reservists.
  • That is why National Defence offers the Compensation of Employers of Reservists Program, which helps employers offset the costs incurred when part-time Reservists deploy on full-time operational duty.
  • In these estimates, National Defence is requesting $2.45 million to continue delivering this vital programming.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted just how important our women and men in uniform are at home, where thousands of Reservists answered the call to support Canadians.
  • National Defence is proud to continue support our Reservists and the Canadians who employ them.

Key Facts

  • The program was approved in 2014 and funding is requested annually through the Main Estimates.
  • In 2020, this program will pay eligible employers and self-employed reservists approximately $452 per week when a reservist deploys.
  • Number of active Primary Reservists in the Canadian Armed Forces as of 30 September 2020:
    • 30,872 Total Strength
    • 24,352 Average Paid Strength
  • The Compensation for Employers of Reservists Program is delivered by National Defence, with support from Employment and Social Development Canada on a cost-recovery basis.

Details

  • The role of reservists in international operations has increased significantly since the early 1990s. For example, 15% of each rotation to Afghanistan was made up of reservists (i.e. 400-600 per rotation).
  • The Compensation for Employers of Reservists Program (CERP) came into effect on September 25, 2014. It is implemented and delivered by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) on a cost-recovery basis.
  • In addition to compensating employers and increasing reservists' availability for operational duty, CERP is also seen as an awareness-building tool that can improve people's understanding of reservists' value and purpose.
  • CERP will provide financial support to civilian employees, and self-employed reservists, to help offset operational costs their businesses may incur when a reservist employee is deployed away from work on a Chief of the Defence Staff-named - international or domestic - operation. Eligible applicants will receive a lump sum payment, in the form of a grant, following the deployment period of the reservist employee.
  • Operating costs for employers may include:
    • Training or hiring replacement workers;
    • Increasing overtime hours for existing employees;
    • Business realignment to mitigate staff reduction; and,
    • Reduced revenue.

Back to top

Grants and Contributions for Mobilizing Insights in Defence and Security (MINDS)

  • The Mobilizing Insights in Defence and Security program – or MINDS – delivers on SSE's commitment to strengthen the foundation of evidence-based defence policy-making.
  • MINDS delivers a program that:
    • responds to the need for relevant and timely advice from defence and security experts;
    • fosters the next generation of experts and scholars; and,
    • contributes to Canadians' understanding of defence and security issues.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting a total of $3.4 million for the MINDS program, including:
    • $1.9 million in grant funding to enable innovative research and activities in support of Defence Team priorities; and
    • $1.5 million in contribution funding to support ongoing collaboration with multi-disciplinary networks of experts in addressing the key policy issues of the day.
  • As the pace of change in the global security environment continues to accelerate, this investment is more important than ever to ensure the Defence Team is equipped to anticipate and adapt to changes in the world in which we operate.

Key Facts

  • Since its launch in spring 2019, MINDS has supported the Defence Team by:
    • Engaging top-tier Canadian and international experts to support the Defence Team in thinking through the key issues of the day;
    • Establishing three-year, mutually supportive relationships with six multidisciplinary networks of experts on issues ranging from North American security and defence to hateful conduct and right-wing extremism in the Canadian Armed Forces. 
    • Helping bright young minds from across Canada pursue their studies in the field of defence and security through the awarding of scholarships, including for Indigenous students; and
    • Supporting the advancement of thinking on issues ranging from the impact of COVID on global power structures to how to address the issue of sexual misconduct in the Canadian Armed Forces.
    • Delivering the first NATO Defense College Fellowship, as part of Canada's ongoing support to the Alliance.

Details

  • MINDS is an innovative program which provides access to evidence-based research and collaboration between the Defence Team and the defence and security expert community.
  • The program assists DND/CAF in responding to key defence and security policy challenges in areas such as: national resilience, continental defence and NORAD modernization; great power competition; understanding emerging domains and technology; addressing hateful conduct; and, eliminating sexual misconduct. 
  • MINDS also provides the flexibility to adjust to a changing security environment, such as the changes arising from COVID-19, ensuring the Defence Team has the knowledge and support it needs to meet these challenges.
  • The program ensures Gender Based Analysis (GBA+) is incorporated in all MINDS activities and supports Indigenous reconciliation and youth engagement.

Key Achievements

  • From the start of FY 2019-20 to date, MINDS has continued to deliver a high quality program, with many notable achievements. For example:
    • MINDS' first Collaborative Networks continued to grow and three new networks were added, each with a unique and relevant focus: addressing hateful conduct and right wing extremism; military design and innovation; and, strategic analysis related to great power competition, capacity building and defence relationships.
    • The program granted an increasing number of scholarships at the Master's, Doctoral and Post-Doctoral level, including to Indigenous Masters students, with topics ranging from the Arctic to cyberspace.
    • MINDS quickly adapted to the needs of the department for information on crown prerogative and defence intelligence. Connecting one of the country's preeminent constitutional scholars with the Defence Team.
    • Through its grants, MINDS helped fund a number of thought-provoking events including a well-attended and well-received event on modernizing North American Defence – a DND/CAF priority from SSE.
    • MINDS launched a special grant competition in response to COVID-19, soliciting input from experts on how COVID-19 is changing the global security environment, identifying lessons learned and best practices, and determining short- and long-term implications for DND/CAF. 

Back to top

Grant for the National Offices of the Cadet Leagues of Canada

  • Through the Cadet Program, young Canadians experience positive development opportunities and help strengthen communities across Canada.
  • The National Offices of the Cadet Leagues of Canada provides support for the Cadet Program, as currently requested by the Canadian Armed Forces.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $1.5 million to help the National Offices coordinate their support to the Cadet Program.
  • The funding will be used for the Cadet Leagues' administrative expenses, including accommodation and transportation services as well as paying salaries, rent and purchasing supplies.
  • It will also be used to provide insurance coverage for cadets and conduct security screenings for volunteers.
  • We are proud to support the Cadet Program, which provides valuable developmental opportunities and is an important source of youth engagement from coast to coast to coast.

Key Facts

  • Main Estimates funding is broken down as follows:
    • Navy Cadet League: $0.5M
    • Army Cadet League: $0.5M
    • Air Cadet League: $0.5M

Details

  • The Navy League of Canada, the Army Cadet League of Canada and the Air Cadet League of Canada (collectively referred to as the "Cadet Leagues") are national federally incorporated not-for-profit organizations.
  • These organizations support Cadets and Cadet Corps and Squadrons in specific key areas, as requested by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF).
  • They serve as the points of contact for their provincial counterparts, the sponsoring bodies of the local cadet corps and squadrons and liaison between these entities and the CAF organizations under the command and control of the VCDS and Command Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers (CJCR).
  • Through its ongoing and planned activities, the Cadet Leagues of Canada aim to:
    • Improve League management and support through developing volunteer management, corporate governance, and standardize policies and procedures;
    • Increase communication  through the national information centre and active recruitment to increase volunteer and cadet membership; and
    • Promote liaison with the Government of Canada (at the national and international levels) through attendance and participation in national forums like the National Cadet Council.

Back to top

Statutory Grant & Contribution

  • National Defence makes benefits payments, in the form of grants and contributions, to a number of individuals with links to the Canadian Armed Forces.
  • The contribution of $1.7 million ensures that military members receive the compensation they deserve.
  • These funds include:
    • $1.4 million from the Supplementary Retirement Benefits Act for individuals receiving pensions from the Consolidated Revenue Fund; and
    •  $300,000 from the Defence Services Pension Continuation Act to pay pensions to individuals enrolled as Regular Force members before 1 April 1946.
  • The grant of $23,000 will be used to compensate dependants of Air Force members who were killed while serving as instructors under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.  

Back to top

Contribution to NATO Military Budget

  • In Strong, Secure, Engaged, Canada articulated its unwavering support to multilateralism and reaffirmed NATO as a cornerstone of Canada's defence and security policy. 
  • To support these efforts, Canada contributes annual funds to the NATO Military Budget.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $130.7 million to support operating and maintenance costs for Allied military activities.
  • These funds will be used to support the International Military Staff, NATO's Command Structure, as well as NATO operations and missions.
  • They will also be used to support the NATO Airborne Warning and Control System as well as Allied Ground Surveillance.
  • Canada will keep working closely with NATO Allies to enhance our collective security and promote peace and stability around the world.   

Key Facts

  • Canada contributes to NATO's annual Military Budget:
    • $130.7M 2020-21 (Main Estimates)
    • $100.7M 2019-20  (Main Estimates)
    • $104.9M 2018-19 (Main Estimates)
  • Canada's share of NATO's commonly funded budgets is 6.4%.
  • Canada actively contributes to several NATO missions including commanding the NATO battlegroup in Latvia and contributing to the NATO training mission in Iraq;
  • Due to decreased GDP forecasts and the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada is now forecasted to spend 1.57% of its GDP on defence by 2024/25.
  • It is also anticipated that Canada will spend approximately 32% of its defence expenditures on major equipment in 2024, far exceeding the 20% NATO guideline.

Details

  • The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Contribution Program is comprised of two NATO budgets and one program: the NATO Military Budget, the NATO Security Investment Program, and the NATO Other Activities Budget.
  • The NATO Military Budget funds the operating and maintenance costs of the NATO military structure and activities, including deployed operations.
  • From Main Estimates 2019-20 to 2020-21, there has been an increase of $30 million in Canada's contributions to the NATO Military Budget. This increase is mainly the result of prior years' decisions, including:
    • Rejoining the Airborne Warning Control System (AWACS) program;
    • Committing to the NATO Command Structure Adaptation; and,
    • Commanding NATO Mission in Iraq.
  • The current planning figures see a renewed emphasis on deterrence and collective defence, with a move toward enhanced readiness and responsiveness to global crises.
  • To determine the percentage of what each nation will contribute, NATO considers Allies' Gross National Income (GNI), current exchange rates and purchasing power parity. Consequently, Canada's cost share fluctuates with its economic performance.
  • Exceptionally in 2020-2021, two other factors will influence the cost shares:
    • Accession of North Macedonia effective April 1, 2020.
    • November 2019 Council approved changes to the common funding budget shares effective 2021 to 2024.

Back to top

Military Training and Cooperation Program

  • The Military Training and Cooperation Program plays an important role in building partner capacity and advancing defence diplomacy with countries of strategic interest to Canada.
  • In these Estimates, National Defence is requesting $11.4 million to provide cooperative training to partner countries, such as Ukraine, Vietnam, Mexico, and Tunisia.
  • These funds will be used to provide training in key areas, including enhanced understanding of civil-military relations and improved English and French communication skills.
  • This Program is designed to meet Canada's foreign and defence policy objectives, including enhanced bilateral and multilateral interoperability among Canada's partners.
  • It also contributes to international peace and security by promoting the rule of law, democratic principles, and the protection of human rights.

Key Facts

  • The Military Training and Cooperation Program trains approximately 1700 member personnel from 68 countries annually.
  • As part of this program, Canada provides non-lethal military training, including:
    • Language training
    • Peace Support Operations training
    • Military professional development
    • Delegation & expert team visits
  • The Directorate of Military Training and Cooperation is working with partner countries to develop distance learning training due to COVID-19.  

Details

  • The following activities are key priorities for the Military Training and Cooperation Program (MTCP) in 2020-21:
    • Identifying opportunities to establish and maintain bilateral relations through cooperative training and professional development projects;
    • Seeking opportunities to partner with regionally significant countries to deliver activities in various locations around the world;
    • Using non-lethal military training assistance to enhance Canadian influence with countries of strategic interest;
    • Promoting democratic principles, the rule of law, international stability, and the protection of human rights;
    • Building the capacity of MTCP members to contribute trained and effective personnel to multi-lateral operations, such as peace support operations;
    • Continuing to demonstrate cost-effectiveness and innovation by enhancing bilateral and multi-lateral interoperability among Canada's partners to lessen the operational burden on Canada;
    • Improving partner understanding of Canadian values, civil-military relations, and democratic control over the armed forces, and enhance their staff officer and professional skills and qualifications; and,
    • Continuing to partner with the Defence Team's teaching and learning establishments to increase the ability of member country personnel to communicate in English and French.

Back to top

Capital Assistance Program

  • Through the Capital Assistance Program, National Defence provides funding to local governments and agencies to upgrade and expand defence infrastructure.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $5.5 million to fund 17 projects across the country.
  • For example, we are providing funding to the Government of Nunavut to update the road from Arctic Bay to the Nanasivik port, which will facilitate access to the Nanisivik Naval Facility.
  • We are also providing funding to the City of Winnipeg to construct new access points to the City's Airport, which will establish a new security perimeter at the Base's Main entrance.
  • These infrastructure improvements will enhance the quality of life of military personnel and their families and ensure our Armed Forces can train and operate successfully.
  • They will also benefit the economies of the individual municipalities where the work is being done, by providing local jobs and supporting local industry.

Key Facts

  • 17 active projects for 2020-21.
  • 3 projects completed in 2019-20:
    • NDHQ Carling South Entrance;
    • Halifax - Multi-use Trail; and,
    • Ste-Hyacinthe Monument.

Details

  • Projects funded under the Capital Assistance Program (CAP) meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Collaboration with local authorities to upgrade, expand, construct, own and operate public infrastructure and services required by National Defence;
    • Reduce departmental non-core infrastructure and prioritize cost-effective development and maintenance of infrastructure; and,
    • Optimize departmental infrastructure to support the evolving force structure and enhanced quality of life in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF).
  • Most CAP projects are multi-year projects with staggered project phasing required to accommodate multiple cash flows within current budget allocations.
  • COVID-19 has had minimal effect on the long term scheduling of CAP projects. Although some initial Milestone delays were realized at the onset of COVID-19, these delays have been mitigated through reworking of the multi-year schedules so the target completion date remains the same.

Completed and Current Projects

Project Funding / Timeline Description
Halifax – Multi-use Trail Completed Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Provided contribution funding to the Halifax Regional District to upgrade Barrington Street adjacent to CFB Halifax to create a safe, all-traffic corridor as part of the HRM Active Transportation Greenway system.
Ste-Hyacinthe Monument Completed Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Provided contribution funding to City of Ste-Hyancinthe to build a memorial next to Laframboise Street Armory to commemorate 100th anniversary of the Royal 22nd Regiment.
NDHQ Carling South Entrance Completed Fiscal Year 2019-2020 Provided contribution funding to the City of Ottawa to upgrade the south entrance to NDHQ Carling, including a new traffic light.
Nanisivik Road Upgrade $4.7 million over 2015-2021 Providing contribution funding to Government of Nunavut to upgrade Nanisivik road in order to support access to the Nanisivik Naval Facility.
Valcartier Route 369 re-alignment $4.98 million over 2019-2021 Providing contribution funding to Province of Quebec to construct turning lane to Garrison and upgrade pedestrian tunnel under the highway.
Vernon Storm Water Drainage $2.9 million over 2019-2021 Transferring storm water infrastructure and outfall to neighbouring municipality and providing contribution funding to recapitalize storm water infrastructure.
Edmonton – Water Connection $1.9 million over 2019-2021 Providing contribution funding to Sturgeon County to extend their water infrastructure to enable transfer of water service from National Defence to the County and create a redundant water supply to National Defence.
Inuvik Runway Extension $150 million over 2019 – 2025. Providing contribution funding to the Government of the Northwest Territories to extend the existing runway at the Forward Operating Location Inuvik, co-located on the GNWT owned Inuvik (Mike Zubko) NT Airport (CYEV) for shared public / DND use, and in support of Air Sovereignty Alert Operations, Canadian Sovereignty Operations, and Defence of the North, as mandated under the NORAD Treaty
Winnipeg – Air Force Way $2 million over 2020-2021 Transferring land and providing contribution funding to the City of Winnipeg to design / construct new access to the Winnipeg Airport that does not go through National Defence property, thereby establishing a security perimeter at the Base's main entrance.
Valcartier Water Distribution $12.6 million over 2021-2023 Providing safe drinking water to Valcartier Garrison via a connection to the neighbouring municipality water distribution network.
Nanisivik Road Maintenance $17 million over   25 years, 2021-2046 Providing contribution funding to the Government of Nunavut for maintenance and ongoing repair work to Nanisivik Road.
St. Jean Pumping Station $0.5 million over    2 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer the on-base wastewater pumping station to the municipality and provide contribution funding to repair and upgrade the pump.
Gander Water Connection $100,000 over      1 year. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer water supply service to neighbouring municipality and provide contribution funding to install new meter and connection.
Petawawa Road Work $5 million over      4 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to provide contribution funding to municipality to widen Petawawa Blvd, bridge and round-a-bout at base entrance. Joint project with Province, County and Town.
Esquimalt – Mary Hill Road $1 million over      2 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer access road to neighbouring municipality and provide contribution funding to widen and upgrade the road to municipal standards.
Amherst Armoury Shared funding,   $4 million over       3 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer and provide contribution funding to Town of Amherst to repair and upgrade the heritage property for shared public / National Defence use.
Rocky Point – Potable Water Supply $6.5 million over          3 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer infrastructure and provide contribution funding to install new service connections to National Defence facilities.
Gagetown – Water Treatment Plant & Wastewater Treatment Plant Dedicated funding, $74.5 million over 5 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer Base water and wastewater treatment plants to Town of Oromocto, requiring dedicated funding to proceed to design and Implementation.
Wainright – Water Treatment Plant Dedicated funding, $50 million over     4 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer Base water treatment plant to Town of Wainright, requiring dedicated funding to proceed to design and implementation.
Goose Bay – Water Treatment Plant Dedicated funding, $50 million over    4 years. Project currently in development. Proposed project to transfer Base water treatment plant to Town of Goose Bay, requiring dedicated funding to proceed to design and implementation.

Back to top

Contribution for Civil Air Search and Rescue Association

  • The Civil Air Search and Rescue Association Program – or CASARA – trains volunteers to support Search and Rescue activities coordinated by the Canadian Armed Forces.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $3.1 million to support the Search and Rescue training events and initiatives, including in remote locations.
  • The funds will also help cover the program's operating costs, such as insurance, national and regional office administration, IT equipment and support.
  • Through these activities, CASARA continues to effectively augment the Canadian Armed Forces' capacity to provide life-saving assistance to those who are in distress.

Key Facts

  • Membership: 1,767 volunteers nationwide
  • Volunteers include pilots, navigators, spotters, search coordinators, electronic search specialists, radio operators and administrative support staff.
  • Total CASARA taskings in 2019-20: 164
    • 102 aircraft taskings;
    • 62 ground vehicle taskings;
    • 2 cases where aircraft or people were missing/in distress; and,
    • 10 lives saved.
  • At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, CASARA stopped all training activities. Virtual training was conducted from April to June.
  • Live training exercises resumed as of June 2020. CASARA has been able to conduct 355 SAR training exercises since April 2020 and continues to respond to active SAR cases.

Details

  • CASARA was established in 1986.
  • The CASARA program trains volunteers and enables them to support activities related to aeronautical search and rescue operations coordinated by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF).
  • The program helps maintain an effective and affordable Search and Rescue (SAR) system that considers the value of other resources in addition to the CAF.
  • CASARA contributes to the development and maintenance of a well-informed aviation community appreciating the complexity of SAR response.

Funding

  • National Defence has a Contribution Agreement in place with CASARA which is renewed every five years.
  • The current agreement stands from April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2025 for $3.1 million per year. An inflationary increase is currently being sought for future years.
  • Under the program's Terms and Conditions, eligible initiatives and expenditures must relate to:
    • Training CASARA volunteers in the fundamental techniques required to assist in SAR activities; and,
    • Maintaining CASARA (i.e. insurance and administration costs).

COVID-19

  • To date, CASARA is facing minor impacts on its operational readiness in Northern Canada due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It still has 97 private aircraft and many more ground teams ready for tasking, as required.
  • Further, there have been some issues regarding travel limitations for members conducting intra-provincial/territorial exercises based on provincial/territorial bubbles and updates on COVID-19 hotspots.
  • CASARA is currently working to be declared an essential service to resolve this issue. CASARA is close to being recognized in Quebec as an Essential Service, and in other provinces, CASARA is working with Health Ministers to be recognized as an Essential Service.

Back to top

Contribution for Sexual Assault Centres in Canada Program

  • The Sexual Assault Centres in Canada Program provides funding for sexual assault centres within close proximity of Canadian Armed Forces' bases.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $500,000 to support ten sexual assault centres identified as having the highest need.
  • Funds will allow the centres to launch new initiatives and expand existing services, such as peer support groups and confidential spaces off base.
  • Throughout the pandemic, these centres have developed safe solutions to continue supporting members of the Canadian Armed Forces community affected by sexual misconduct.
  • For some centres, this has meant providing support services remotely – either online or over the phone – and developing outreach and prevention campaigns online. 
  • By providing support for survivors from the DND/CAF community across Canada, this Program is an integral part of National Defence's approach and response to sexual misconduct.

Key Facts

  • Total funding for the Program is $2M over four years, with the program expected to end in fiscal year 2022-23.
  • In 2020, funding agreements have been signed with the following 6 sexual assault centres
    • Barrie, ON – CFB Borden;
    • Kingston, ON – CFB Kingston;
    • Petawawa, ON – CFB Petawawa;
    • Ottawa, ON – CFSU Ottawa;
    • Fredericton, NB – CFB Gagetown; and
    • Victoria, BC – CFB Esquimalt.

Details

  • The Sexual Misconduct Response Centre (SMRC) is outside the military chain of command and provides support to CAF members affected by sexual misconduct, through the provision of information, advice, and accompaniment.
  • The Sexual Assault Centre Contribution Program is one component of broader efforts to address the need to support those affected by sexual misconduct, especially for groups falling outside the Operation HONOUR and SMRC mandates, such as National Defence civilian employees and CAF family members.
  • The centres will ensure programming responds to diverse population needs (including LGBTQ persons, Indigenous people, visible minorities, persons with disabilities, and both men and women), based on a GBA+ analysis during program development. 

COVID-19

  • The six projects with signed agreements were initially impeded in their ability to launch, hire staff, and start delivering services, as most closed their face-to-face support services.
  • Some projects have since restructured face-to-face individual and group counselling as well as outreach efforts planned as project activities. Project partners have adapted to virtual services, with additional, limited in-person options for those who don't have a safe space to attend virtual sessions.
  • Signature of the four remaining projects are delayed due to the uncertainty about when service provision and outreach efforts can resume. These locations are:
  • Edmonton, AB – CFB Edmonton (proposal being revised);
  • Montréal, QC – Saint-Jean Garrison (no proposal was received);
  • Québec City – CFB Valcartier (to be signed soon);
  • Halifax, NS – CFB Halifax (to be signed soon)
  • All projects rely on the availability of their CAF counterparts on the local bases, which is also affected by the CAF’s changed posture and operational tempo during this pandemic.
  • This will have a significant impact on the ability of the program to fully expend the allocated $2 million, as there are limits on in-year funding to each recipient ($60,000) and the Terms and Conditions expire on March 31, 2024, which leave little flexibility for re-profiling and extending projects. 

Back to top

Vancouver Principles

  • The Vancouver Principles on Peacekeeping and the Prevention of the Recruitment and Use of Child Soldiers are a set of political commitments launched by Canada in 2017.
  • To implement and operationalize these Principles, Canada works closely with academia and NGOs through the Vancouver Principles Contribution Program.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $225,000 to provide funding to this Contribution Program.
  • These funds will be used by the Dallaire Institute for Children, Peace and Security to conduct research and identify lessons learned on preventing the recruitment and use of child soldiers.
  • This research will help to enhance education and training on child soldiers for the Canadian Armed Forces.
  • It will also help ensure that military members have the preparation they need to respond effectively when encountering child soldiers in UN peacekeeping operations.

If pressed on the 2019 GAC briefing note to the Defence Committee with inaccurate information on Canada's peacekeeping pledges:

  • Unfortunately, this note contained an error regarding Canada's commitment to deploy a Quick Reaction Force in support of UN peacekeeping.
  • The Quick Reaction Force has never been entered in the UN capability registry, as opportunities for a Canadian contribution have yet to be determined.
  • Since July 2019, information shared publicly has consistently indicated that a Quick Reaction Force has not been entered into the UN registry.
  • Global Affairs Canada has apologized to the Standing

Key Facts

  • In total, National Defence will provide the Vancouver Principles Contribution Program $1.125M from Fiscal Year 2019-24.
  • To date, 97 countries have endorsed the Vancouver Principles.

Details

Vancouver Principles

  • The Vancouver Principles were launched during the United Nations (UN) Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial, hosted by Canada in Vancouver in November 2017.
  • The Vancouver Principles were conceived by the Government of Canada, in partnership with the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative (RDCSI), and developed in consultation with:
    • The UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations;
    • The UN Children's Fund;
    • The Special Representative to the Secretary General for Children and Armed Conflict;
    • Child protection actors and civil society partners; and
    • UN Member States.

Back to top

Contribution for Biological and Chemical Defence Review Committee

  • The Biological and Chemical Defence Review Committee is an independent group of non-governmental biological and chemical defence experts.
  • Each year, the Committee inspects a number of National Defence facilities and issues an independent, publicly accessible report with its findings.
  • In these Estimates, National Defence is requesting $137,700 to continue the important work of the Committee.
  • These funds will be used to conduct reviews of seven National Defence facilities in 2020-2021.
  • This work provides independent expert review of Canadian biological and chemical defence activities to help improve program safety.
  • It also fosters public and international confidence that Canadian biological and chemical defence activities are for defensive purposes only, and are in line with our international obligations.

Key Facts

  • Facilities to be reviewed in 2020-21 include:
    • Defence Research and Development Canada Research Centre Suffield;
    • Canadian Joint Incident Response Unit – Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear Capability Trenton; and,
    • 1 Canadian Air Division Headquarters Winnipeg.
  • Due to COVID-19, alternate plans – including virtual visits –were made for visits and reviews, which took place in October 2020.
  • Facilities reviewed in 2019-20 include:
    • Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield;
    • Canadian Forces Base Wainwright; and
    • Canadian Forces Fire and Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Academy Borden.

Details

  • In May 1990, the Minister of National Defence directed the establishment of the Biological and Chemical Defence Review Committee (BCDRC). The BCDRC now operates at arm's length to Government.
  • The BCDRC builds public and international confidence that the biological and chemical research, development and training activities of National Defence are strictly defensive in nature, comply with Canada's international treaty obligations, and are conducted in a professional manner with minimal risk to the public or the environment.
  • Reviews conducted in 2020-21
    • Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield;
    • Canadian Joint Incident Response Unit / Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear Capability Trenton;
    • Director Joint Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence;
    • Canadian Forces Health Services Headquarters; and
    • Defence Research and Development Canada Corporate Office.
  • As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic physical visits were cancelled. Documentary evidence was gathered from some organizations and virtual visits were conducted in October upon which observations, conclusions and recommendations will be made in the annual report.
  • Reviews conducted in 2019-20
    • Observed Exercise FIRE DRAKE at Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield
    • Canadian Forces Base Wainwright
    • Canadian Forces Fire/and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Academy Borden
    • 1st Canadian Field Hospitality and Canadian Medical Equipment Depot at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa
    • Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters
    • National Defence Headquarters
    • Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Defence (CBRN) Advisor Course and CBRN Defence Workshop

Back to top

Contribution: NATO Other Activities

  • NATO's Other Activities Budget is separate from NATO's Military Budget and its Security Investment Program.
  • This Budget contributes to NATO's Centres of Excellence, including the Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence.
  • In these Main Estimates, National Defence is requesting $3.1 million to contribute to NATO's Other Activities.
  • These funds will also be used to support NATO's Naval Forces Sensor and Weapons Accuracy Check Sites, as well as NATO's Rapidly Deployable Corps Headquarters.
  • Canada will continue working closely with NATO Allies to enhance our collective security and promote peace and stability around the world.  

Key Facts

  • Canada's contribution NATO Other Activities has been stable over recent years:
    • $3.1M 2020-21 (Main Estimates)
    • $3.1M 2019-20 (Main Estimates)
    • $2.8M 2018-19 (Main Estimates)
  • Canada's contributions to these NATO Other Activities are voluntary.

Details

  • The North Atlantic Treaty Organization Contribution Program is comprised of two NATO budgets and one NATO program: NATO Military Budget, NATO Security Investment Program and NATO Other Activities Budget.
  • Funding going toward NATO Other Activities helps pay for projects that do not fall under the NATO military budget or NATO Security Investment Program (NSIP).  They relate to projects with fewer participating member nations.
  • The participating countries identify the requirements, the priorities and the funding arrangements, and NATO provides political and financial oversight.
  • The share that participating nations will pay is determined at the beginning of the activity and is agreed to by Canada and other participating nations in a Memorandum of Understanding.
  • Canada's contribution to NATO Other Activities varies, based on activities it is participating in and funding arrangements established.
  • The funding forecasts are subject to change due to the following:
    • Currency fluctuations;
    • Cost share calculation; and
    • Funding pressure.

Back to top

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: