What it is like to work at Employment and Social Development Canada

Sarah Bonesteel - Policy Analyst

Skills and Employment Branch
Location: Gatineau, Quebec

What are your main job functions?

I support the development and implementation of Indigenous labour market programs through research, policy analysis and partnership work. For example, I help to link potential partners, including private sector companies and other government departments, with Indigenous organizations so they can create partnerships on skills training activities that will lead to jobs for Indigenous people.

How has ESDC or the Public Service supported your career development?

I’ve had opportunities to try out other jobs and formal training to build specific competencies. Over the past year, I’ve really enjoyed participating in a pilot group mentoring program focused on developing leadership abilities and strategic thinking.

What is your most memorable moment as an ESDC employee?

Collaborating with the organizations that deliver the labour market programs and hearing first-hand how access to skills development activities improved individuals’ employment opportunities and positively benefitted them, their families and their communities.

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

The programs that I work on promote skills development, and labour market participation and inclusiveness, which lead to improved quality of life for Canadians.

Jacob Travis - Policy Analyst

Skills and Employment Branch
Location: Gatineau, Quebec

Why did you choose a career at ESDC?

After spending a couple years in the academic world I decided to switch up my career path and move to the Government of Canada. I chose ESDC because I wanted policy analysis experience. The level of in-depth analysis that ESDC undertakes on a regular basis made it an easy decision. I am glad I made that choice!

What are your main job functions?

The core function of my job is to analyze data to assess the impacts of proposed Employment Insurance (EI) policy measures. More recently, my primary role was to provide quantitative analytical support for several of the 2016 Budget items that involved the EI program. In addition to our policy development work, my team is routinely called upon for input on complex issues. For example, when major layoffs occur within the Canadian economy, it is common for our team to provide quick diagnostics on the potential impact of these layoffs on local labour markets.

What makes you passionate about your work?

Being able to work on policy measures that have a direct impact on Canadians is such a rewarding experience. Understanding the issues that Canadians are facing and developing policy to best address those issues makes my work exciting, and something that I look forward to coming into work for.

What makes your job at ESDC enjoyable?

For me, it is the people I work with. In my current job I am surrounded by such a great team. The members of our directorate, from the top down, provide a working environment that is supportive, professional, and above all else, fun! We work hard, but we also make sure that when time allows for it we have fun with the people we work with.

Mina Riad - Business Analyst

Skills and Employment Branch
Location: Gatineau, Quebec

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

I am currently the acting manager for the team responsible for the Job Bank web site, the Government of Canada's leading source for jobs and labour market information. My team identifies and finds solutions to improve the web site. We regularly work on designing new tools and features for the Job Bank (for example, Job Match for Job Seekers, Job Alerts and the Career Tool), as well as analyzing and reporting on the data and user patterns collected through the website. This information helps us to fine tune the website and its tools in order to better meet the needs of employers and job-seekers.

Why did you choose a career at ESDC?

I started working at ESDC in 2009 as a student through the Federal Student Work Experience Program (FSWEP). The main reason I chose a career at ESDC is the variety and diversity of its programs, in addition to the important role it plays in the daily lives of Canadians.

What is the best part of your work?

The best part about my work is that we are delivering a service to Canadians looking for work and to which we receive constant and direct feedback. This allows our work to have quick and straight impact on the lives of Canadians.

What is the one thing you want prospective employees to take away?

ESDC is one of the best places to learn how new policies are created and to see how their implementation has a direct effect on the lives of Canadians.

Francesco Misuraca - Health and Safety Officer

Labour Program
Location: Toronto, Ontario

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

I help ensure that employers protect the health and safety of their employees and follow the Canada Labour Code, Part II. I also investigate serious workplace accidents and complaints from employees.

Why did you choose a career at ESDC?

Because, on a personal level, I know that every day I can directly impact someone in a positive way. And also because ESDC takes pride in being a respectful workplace and offers various opportunities for career advancement and diversification.

What is the best part of your work?

Visiting different workplaces all over Ontario, meeting new people and ensuring that employers fulfill their duty to protect Canadians from hazards in their workplace so they can return home safe and sound.

What is the one thing you want prospective employees to take away?

I think that ESDC is a great employer. There are fantastic opportunities for individuals to advance their career in a variety of work streams, from Human Resources Professionals, Customer Service, Regulators, Policy Analysts and many more.

Courtney Wolfe - Health and Safety Officer

Labour Program
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba

What are your main job functions?

As a Health and Safety Officer, I enforce the Canada Labour Code, Part II and the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations at worksites controlled by federally regulated employers. I conduct hazardous occurrence investigations into serious accidents and fatalities concerning federally regulated employees while at work and/or in the process of performing their job duties.

How has ESDC or the public service supported your career development?

When I joined ESDC’s Labour Program they welcomed me with open arms and provided a complete training program to facilitate my progression into becoming a fully trained officer within the Program. I am now on a temporary assignment at a higher level, working as a senior investigator within the Program, handling high-profile cases, mentoring new officers and participating at a national level with the other senior investigators of the Labour Program.

What is your most memorable moment as an ESDC employee?

When I was informed that I was selected for developmental activities as a result of an outstanding performance appraisal. A career path has been made available to me, should I wish to proceed, to work at a higher level on an interim basis, as a senior investigator, to enhance my career development.

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

By following the Labour Program’s own regulations and consistently acting in a manner that reflects well on the Program, I enhance workplace safety and assist employers in improving overall safety for their employees.

Pierre Nolet - Communications Advisor

Jobs and Training Communications Team
Public Affairs and Stakeholder Relations Branch
Location: Gatineau, Quebec

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

I work on the communications products and media responses relating to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. I really enjoy it because I get to work with experts from different parts of the organization, from policy makers and service delivery agents to web programmers, on a daily basis to find solutions to issues that truly matter to employers and employees. Every day brings new challenges.

What is the best part of your work?

My colleagues. There are so many issues that crop up in a day, some of them quite serious, like employer abuse of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. I feel that my work makes a difference. I’m part of the solution. I often surprise myself with the amount I can accomplish in one day, and I would not be able to get it all done without the resourceful and helpful people I get to work with every day.

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

My work in communications helps ensure that Canadians receive accurate information and are kept up-to-date on policy changes so they can make informed decisions.

What makes your job at ESDC enjoyable?

I really enjoy learning new skills. I have worked for ESDC for seven years, and during this time I have had the great experience to hold six different positions, from working in a writing unit, to being a media relations spokesperson, and now a communications advisor on a priority file—the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Working in these different roles has definitely helped me grow in my career.

Sara Assaad - Communications Advisor

Public Environment and Stakeholder Relations Team
Public Affairs and Stakeholder Relations Branch
Location: Gatineau, Quebec

What makes you passionate about working at ESDC?

I have always been passionate about helping people and making a real difference in my community, which is why I chose to work at ESDC. The programs and services we offer directly improve the lives of Canadians, especially under-represented groups like youth, seniors, people with disabilities, Indigenous people, women and newcomers. I even promote ESDC programs and services to my family and friends who may not know about our initiatives, and I show them how ESDC could help improve their quality of life.

What are your main job functions?

My team finds innovative ways to reach out to and hear directly from Canadians on important topics related to ESDC’s programs. It’s exciting and challenging to help plan, design and implement these outreach initiatives by making sure people have a voice in how we develop policies and programs, and bringing so many various groups together. It makes me feel that I have a hand in making a difference.

How has ESDC or the public service supported your career development?

Every year I am encouraged to attend training sessions to help broaden my knowledge or improve my skills. I work with excellent people, including my manager and director, who mentor me and help me to gain the experience required to grow professionally. I have the opportunity to work with a wide variety of communicators on a daily basis. This gives me the chance to learn a lot about the different areas of communications and to share ideas when collaborating on complex projects.

What is the one thing you want prospective employees to take away?

I want prospective employees to know that if they choose to work at ESDC, they will gain the right skills and experience required to become experts in the field of communications while working on files that make a real difference in their community.

Joshua Adams - Citizen Service Officer

Service Canada
Location: Edmonton, Alberta

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

As a Citizen Service Officer, I work at a Service Canada Office, answering questions from the public about government services or benefits they may be eligible for and then helping them apply for programs like Employment Insurance (EI), Old Age Security (OAS), the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and Social Insurance Numbers (SIN).

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

ESDC is all about providing quality service to Canadians. I work with the public on a daily basis, helping make sure people’s applications for EI, OAS & CPP are done correctly so they can start receiving financial assistance as quickly as possible, whether they’re applying online or using a paper application.

What makes you passionate about working at ESDC?

I’ve always wanted to help people and this work is making my passion come true. I love my job at ESDC because I think the programs I help deliver make a difference in someone’s life.

What makes your job at ESDC enjoyable?

I get a real sense of happiness and fulfilment from helping people. I would say that is the joy of working at ESDC—knowing that I’ve done something to help my clients.

Abone Awaleh - Citizen Service Officer

Service Canada
Location: Edmonton, Alberta

What are your main job functions?

As a Citizen Service Officer, I determine the needs of and respond to questions from clients on service offerings and other government services. I provide information, advice and guidance on Service Canada programs.

How has ESDC or the public service supported your career development?

ESDC is very supportive of growth, and it’s nice to see supervisors, managers and even directors interested in your growth within the public service. I have never experienced this kind of workplace before, and it’s the reason I am motivated to continue working for the public service. It’s truly a wonderful place to work and thrive.

What makes your job at ESDC enjoyable?

Working at Service Canada, ESDC’s program delivery arm, has made a huge impact in my life. It’s not just a job for me—it’s much more than that. I go to work every day with a smile, knowing that I am helping people for a living. ESDC is an environment that promotes growth and encourages you to reach your full potential. It’s been a great experience, and I can’t wait to see how far this journey takes me!

What is the one thing you want prospective employees to take away?

Don’t be afraid to go outside of your comfort zone and explore different career paths—this will help you find the right career for you.

Maya Jelali - Citizen Services Specialist

Service Canada
Location: Iqaluit, Nunavut

What are your main job functions?

I conduct community activities and attend community events to promote the Department's service offerings. That can be anything from delivering presentations to coordinating the delivery of service offerings. The goal is to establish and maintain good working relationships with local and regional clients, partners and stakeholders (Members of Parliament, community groups, unions, employers, etc.) to facilitate communication and education.

How has ESDC or the public service supported your career development?

I am very fortunate to have my director’s and manager’s support. They have always encouraged me to pursue any opportunities that will help me gain knowledge and experience. For example, I have had the opportunity to take interesting courses and obtain professional certificates, such as the Certified Service Professional issued by the Institute for Citizen-Centred Service. In addition, I have had the chance to acquire management and supervision skills.

Participating in different committees is also a great learning experience that has definitely been useful on a personal and professional level.

I have also used the Reimbursement of Tuition (ROT) program, which allows employees to acquire skills and knowledge through professional development. Becoming a higher performing organization helps us fulfill our mandate to serve Canadians.

What is your most memorable moment as an ESDC employee?

I have had many memorable moments as an ESDC employee. The most recent one was during my trip to Alberta to assist the Fort McMurray evacuees.

I was at the evacuation sites across Alberta and also got the chance to help out the mobile command centres (RVs) team to do outreach in northern Alberta. I was there for three weeks, and the whole team worked tirelessly to ensure clients were served promptly when they needed support the most. I was very proud to be part of ESDC’s support to the Fort McMurray evacuees.

People were very thankful and grateful for our presence in their communities, and it honestly meant a lot to me. This experience also allowed me to discover places in Alberta where I have never been and meet lots of great people who work for ESDC as well. Overall, I really enjoyed my experience and feel very lucky for being part of this!

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

My work contributes greatly to ESDC’s mandate and vision, part of which is to provide secure, knowledgeable, one-stop, personalized service to Canadians and improve access to the programs they need most.

By providing information and assistance, I get to know my community better, establish partnerships and serve people from diverse segments of society like Aboriginal people, youth, seniors, newcomers and persons with disabilities. Ultimately, it’s about helping the people where I live, and being a visible minority myself, it’s very important to me that all Canadians get the help and services they need and are treated fairly. Some clients may already be facing barriers in terms of access to government services. I want to make sure they can access ESDC’s programs and services easily.

Susan Matiko - Citizen Service Officer

Service Canada
Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

What is the best part of your work?

As a front-line employee, I get a tremendous amount of job satisfaction from my delivery of service to the public. Some citizens prefer to receive services in person and I enjoy that particular aspect of my job.

What are your main job functions?

I’m part of a team that offers information and assistance on various government programs available to Canadians. I am challenged daily by new questions from clients on some type of benefit or service available, and I like helping them find the answers they are looking for.

What is your most memorable moment as an ESDC employee?

I began working at ESDC in 1982 and have many wonderful memories. A specific example is from 1985, when I was working at the service counter and I provided a first-time Social Insurance Number to a young man from Vietnam. It’s now 2016 and I was assisting a client apply for his Old Age Security benefits, when he said to me, “I remember you. You gave me my Social Insurance Number.” Experiences like that are incredible and remind us that we make a difference.

What makes you passionate about working at ESDC?

Helping clients. It is my enthusiasm, my drive and my motivation. After 33 years of service at ESDC, I continue to put all of my skills and energy into my work, while enjoying a work-life balance. After being given the opportunity to try various positions within this organization, it is clear to me that this position suits my personality. For me, helping people is my passion. Call it what you want, but it’s my self-driven attitude about my job and my willingness to help clients that have helped me feel successful in my job. I want to be at my job every day. I love what I do.

Carrie McGinnis - Citizen Service Officer

Service Canada
Location: Williams Lake, British Columbia

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

I work in one of ESDC’s Service Canada centres, answering clients’ questions about our service offerings, providing advice on how to access government programs like the Canada Pension Plan, the Old Age Security pension and Social Insurance Numbers, and promoting the use of our electronic services.

What is the best part of your work?

The best part of my work at ESDC, absolutely, is the gratification of making a difference by having clients leave our Service Canada Centre fully satisfied with the service they received.

What is the one thing you want prospective employees to take away?

This role is so beneficial and provides you with so much job satisfaction. Particularly, the satisfaction of helping people, both the public and the people you work with on a daily basis. We really work hard together, as a team, to respond to the needs of our community.

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

As a Citizen Service Officer, I’m often the face of the Government of Canada that the public sees. It’s a big responsibility. By using all the tools and training ESDC makes available to me, I can confidently provide an efficient, consistent, friendly service experience to people.

Irena Sowinska - Citizen Service Officer

Service Canada
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia

Why did you choose a career at ESDC?

I enjoy interacting with people, and this job provides me with tremendous opportunities to do what I love. Being able to provide assistance to citizens when they need it the most gives me satisfaction and contributes to my personal growth, especially when clients leave my desk assured that they received the best service.

What is the best part of your work?

The best part of my work is the variety. There is never a dull moment in this job, as we see clients from all over the world and from all walks of life. I answer hundreds of questions every day, which forces me to constantly research and expand my knowledge. I can say that I learn something new every day.

I use my problem-solving skills when dealing with clients' issues. I’m really glad when clients receive what they need and are satisfied with the service.

I also value working relationships with my co-workers. We share information and resources, and we work together as a team to foster a supportive environment.

What are your main job functions?

I provide clients with information about the programs offered by the federal government. I assist with applications for Employment Insurance, the Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security, and I help clients get in touch with processing centres when an issue arises. We promote self-service and assist with access to navigation tools such as My Service Canada Account.

What is your most memorable moment as an ESDC employee?

It is difficult to think of just one most memorable moment. Almost every day brings something memorable since we are privileged to deliver programs and services that make positive changes in peoples' lives.

I remember serving a client who came for a new Social Insurance Number on the day she became a permanent resident. She was so happy that she was crying. On another occasion, I provided information about maternity and parental benefits to a young woman expecting her first baby. She was so excited and wanted to share her joy with me. Another time, a senior citizen came to report the death of her husband of 60 years, and she was totally devastated and lost. I guided her through the application process for survivor and death benefits and offered my sympathy.

Moments like these make my job meaningful and rewarding.

Sandra-Lee Stewart - Sandra-Lee Stewart

Citizen Service Officer
Service Canada
Location: Edmonton, Alberta

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

I get the pleasure of helping people of all ages determine which ESDC programs they need (Employment Insurance, Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security, etc.) and supporting them through the application process. I also get to conduct Claimant Information Sessions, which is exciting as I get to demonstrate our www.servicecanada.gc.ca and www.canada.ca websites and share Employment Insurance and Job Search techniques. Once a month I get to travel out of the city to provide Scheduled Outreach Services to a remote town. I love having the flexibility and mobility to provide our programs and services in the communities where clients live. Recently, I had the privilege of partnering with Rupertsland Institute, working outside the Edmonton Expo Fort McMurray Evacuation Centre in their RV, where I helped displaced Indigenous and other citizens apply for Employment Insurance, gave general information regarding government programs and services, and referred people to the appropriate services they needed. Being that I am of Métis heritage, I was honoured to serve Fort McMurray citizens by letting them know we as the federal government do care.

Why did you choose a career at ESDC?

I have worked several years in the human services field, and just before coming to Service Canada I had worked for nine years at Hope Mission serving the homeless population in Edmonton, Alberta. I came across the employment posting to become a Citizen Service Officer and knew it would be an excellent fit for me. It was rewarding and challenging learning all of the programs and services that ESDC offers. I chose to work for Service Canada because I wanted to be part of something inspiring that helps make a difference in people’s lives. I feel that the work we do at Service Canada is incredibly valuable.

What is the best part of your work?

The best part of my job is seeing a client leave our office happy with the service, information and treatment that we provided. There are no words to describe the satisfaction you get from making someone’s day a little easier because you helped them get what they needed in a timely manner. Our clients come from all walks of life, they’re just like you and me, and they want to be treated like they matter. I love working with a team where everyone has got the same goal to serve and provide service excellence.

What is the one thing you want prospective employees to take away?

To be a Citizen Service Officer, you must have a passion for working with people. It takes good communication and interpersonal skills, and you have to be willing to learn new things since we are always adapting to meet new needs. We need team players and co-workers who want to go the extra mile in their work and career with ESDC.

Nerissa Beeler - Service Delivery Manager

Service Canada
Location: Atlantic Region

What interesting projects/programs do you work on?

In April of this year, I started working with the Canada Pension Plan Disability Program. This new opportunity gives me a chance to manage a team of nurses who make decisions on whether clients will receive disability benefits under the Canada Pension Plan Disability Program. I am looking forward to meeting the challenge of the learning curve this year.

One of my favourite "projects" is working with the students we hire every year through the Federal Student Work Experience Program (FSWEP). I have been lucky to work with many different students over the past eight years. I enjoy watching them learn, not only about ESDC, but how to work with people in an office setting, how to contribute in meetings and how to plan for a busy week! It is amazing to grow with these students and listen as they provide insight we "old people" wouldn't even think of. They are engaged, fun, energetic, intelligent, enthusiastic and passionate, and I thoroughly enjoy listening to their ideas and watching them work. It is a very rewarding experience.

Why did you choose a career at ESDC?

One of the great things about being an employee within the federal government is the mobility factor. I worked in three other departments before I was given the opportunity to work with ESDC at the Service Canada Centre in Halifax. As someone who enjoys working with and assisting the public, I jumped at the chance to work there and have been with ESDC for the last 16 years (the majority of my 23 years of public service)!

What is the best part of your work?

As a Service Delivery Manager, I would say my favourite part of the job is working with my team. I like being able to help team members grow in their careers, providing advice on their files when they need it, and supporting them in managing a good work/life balance. I like the fact that my team can make a difference in the lives of Canadians and I am proud to be part of the ESDC family.

What is the one thing you want prospective middle managers to take away?

The rewards of the middle manager are all that you make of it, but what I would highlight about ESDC are the many opportunities for growth and career movement as well as the depth and breadth of networking, partnerships and leadership experiences.

If you are willing to take risks, have initiative, are passionate, are able to support both your team and your director and take every day's challenges in stride, then I would highly recommend taking on the challenge of the middle manager position here at ESDC.

Émilie Duguay - Manager

Processing and Payment Services Branch
Service Canada

What interesting projects and programs are you working on?

I am currently working on the recruitment campaign for call centres in the Atlantic Region. This gives me the opportunity to apply a number of skills I have acquired over the course of my career. I do everything in collaboration with my colleagues. We work on developing our inventory, we create tools for the selection process, we conduct the interviews and then, I can make the offers. Being able to offer jobs to candidates who have succeeded in the selection process is an extremely rewarding experience.

I am also responsible for hiring team leaders. This gives me the chance to evaluate and meet our future leaders. I love developing evaluation tools. Also, my evaluation team is located throughout the Atlantic provinces. It’s a significant challenge, which I love. We use the technology available to us—like videoconferencing and Lync—to communicate.

In addition to managing my team of 100 employees, I am also the manager of our worksite of 500 employees. This means that I am the manager who ensures that the various management functions associated with the site are completed properly, in collaboration with the other managers. We are currently preparing for

renovations to the building and this will require collaboration between employees and management.

I also love continuing training. I have just finished the Management Development Program. This four-stage program allowed me to meet and interact with dozens of managers from various departments throughout the country.

Why did you choose to work for ESDC?

The public service has always fascinated me. Being able to work close to home while having a job that allows me to make some of my dreams a reality was very attractive. The chance to make lateral moves within the organization also influenced my decision to leave the private sector for the public service

What is the best part of your job?

Definitely the best part of my job is knowing that my work makes a difference in the lives of Canadian citizens. My current work allows me to have a direct impact on the service provided to Canadians, nationwide.

What main thing would you advise potential acting managers to keep in mind?

Managers have a fairly fast-paced work life, and it can be easy to forget to take care of yourself. Don’t forget to take the time to slow down a bit and celebrate your successes. It’s these little personal achievements that will help keep you motivated in your work. The work is demanding, but also so rewarding!

Kelly Lingard - Service Manager

Service Canada
Location: Atlantic Region

What are your main job functions?

I lead a professional team of Payment Services Officers who are responsible for assessing and adjudicating Employment Insurance claims.

How does your work contribute to ESDC’s mandate and vision?

Our mandate is to build a stronger, more competitive Canada, to support Canadians in making choices that help them live productive and rewarding lives, and to improve Canadians' quality of life. Ensuring our clients have access to financial support during periods of unemployment is our priority and one we take very seriously.

How has ESDC or the public service supported your career development?

I started with ESDC as a Program Officer in 1997. I was given the opportunity to work in a number of positions that I really enjoyed, and now I work in my dream job as a Service Manager. I love this job, I love coming to work, I love the challenges, I love the adrenaline and I love the people I work with. I feel supported and respected as an employee. I feel very fortunate to be working with the public service in this role. I have had great mentors over the years, people who believed in me and supported my career development. I never forget the role these people played in my career path, and I try to do the same with my employees.

What makes you passionate about working at ESDC?

ESDC might be a large organization, but I feel like I am part of a family here. Working in various business areas throughout my almost 20 years, I have come to know a lot of great people—people who care about what they do, and of course who care about our clients. The work is challenging: We each do our piece and it has to run like a finely tuned machine. I have had the opportunity to grow professionally in this organization, and to watch others grow and develop in their careers, and that is very rewarding. Fundamentally, we get to help Canadians through their challenges and difficulties. It’s easy to be passionate when you are helping others. As the saying goes, we succeed best by helping others succeed.

Wassim Athimini – Data Science Officer
Transcript of video: 60 Seconds With Wassim Athimini

My name is Wassim. I'm a data scientist in the office of ESDC’s Chief Data Officer.

Our mandate is to help the entire department with its artificial intelligence or data modeling tasks.

We help make processes more efficient by using models for data, artificial intelligence and automated learning.

My colleagues are excellent.

Everyone is very open.

For example, if I'm wrestling with a tough problem, I know it's completely acceptable to ask one of them for help, and nobody thinks anything of it.

Everyone really supports each other.

What's also cool is that there are a lot of people here at ESDC, so if you ever want to find a team to play soccer outside, there are always people around.

I wouldn't really have thought about government, but what's cool here is that I found a team where I was really doing math and such.

At the same time, it's cool because I’m working on projects that are interesting

like, I'm not trying to optimize the number of clicks to get money

I’m working on real issues that affect the population.

I think the more we advance, the better we'll be able to deal with these social problems.

And I think that's something unique to ESDC.

Tarek Bouzidi - Benefits officer
Transcript of video: 60 Secondes Avec Tarek Bouzidi

My name is Natalia Little and I'm a policy analyst.

I work in the evaluation directorate.

So I provide support to evaluators, and evaluators provide oversight on how Government of Canada programs and services are performing.

So we have a lot of interesting data about so many different sub-sets of the Canadian population.

And by delving into this data we get a real sense of exactly the conditions that these different groups face.

I mean, when I worked in the private sector, the most important thing at the end of every day was how much profit you made, and the bottom line.

I always felt like I was missing something and I wanted to have some more meaning, so that's what I'm getting out of this job opportunity here at Employment and Social Development Canada.

The centre of my work is serving Canadians better and that brings a lot of meaning to my work.

My parents are immigrants to Canada; they emigrated from Poland.

And working for this type of department, that has, my parents have benefited from so many different programs from Employment and Social Development Canada and from social services that the Government of Canada has funded; it's my way of giving back.

Oh don't put me on the spot here, my mom is going to chirp me if I do it wrong...

[Polish] I'm giving back to the country that has given so much to my family.

I'm giving back to the country that has given so much to my family.

Jeannette Longchap - Citizen Service Officer
Transcript of video: 60 Seconds Jeannette Longchap

My name is Jeannette Longchap and I am a Citizen Service Officer.

I work at Service Canada.

As a Citizen Service officer, we welcome clients, we assist them with various applications for federal programs and services and we also help them obtain benefits that they could be entitled to.

I had the privilege of being part of an opening of Service Canada in Mistassini.

Mistassini Lake is my home community, that’s the place I grew up and I really felt like I contributed.

I am a member of the Indigenous Executive Committee (Indigenous Employee Circle Executive Committee).

I represent the Quebec Region and our mandate is to create indigenous awareness at ESDC and also to recruit potential indigenous employees at the federal government.

Having that committee helps us to have some kind of identity to who we are.

And today I still play an active role in helping, through the Indigenous Executive Committee (Indigenous Employee Circle Executive Committee), to encourage aboriginal people to apply at the federal government.

(In Cree) Hello my name’s Jeannette and I work at Service Canada.

Natalia Little
Transcript of video: 60 Seconds With Natalia Little

My name is Natalia Little and I'm a policy analyst.

I work in the evaluation directorate.

So I provide support to evaluators, and evaluators provide oversight on how Government of Canada programs and services are performing.

So we have a lot of interesting data about so many different sub-sets of the Canadian population.

And by delving into this data we get a real sense of exactly the conditions that these different groups face.

I mean, when I worked in the private sector, the most important thing at the end of every day was how much profit you made, and the bottom line.

I always felt like I was missing something and I wanted to have some more meaning, so that's what I'm getting out of this job opportunity here at Employment and Social Development Canada.

The centre of my work is serving Canadians better and that brings a lot of meaning to my work.

My parents are immigrants to Canada; they emigrated from Poland.

And working for this type of department, that has, my parents have benefited from so many different programs from Employment and Social Development Canada and from social services that the Government of Canada has funded; it's my way of giving back.

Oh don't put me on the spot here, my mom is going to chirp me if I do it wrong...

[Polish] I'm giving back to the country that has given so much to my family.

Sarina De Petrillo - Project coordinator
Transcript of video: 60 Sarina De Petrillo

Hi.

My name is Sarina De Petrillo and I work at Employment and Social Development Canada as a project coordinator.

In my job right now, there, we work on disability stats.

And for me that really runs home because my dad is on disability.

I know first-hand what happens to a family and what happens to a life when an event happens and it forces someone to be on disability.

I’d say that’s a part—a part of my job is knowing that somewhere out there, someone’s life is going to be easier because of what I’ve done.

Another part is just the people in general. Everybody’s so nice, everybody’s so welcoming and I feel . . .

I feel like there’s a place for me here.

Being here now and knowing that I’m in a place that can cultivate my growth as a professional and as human being—that makes me . . .

that makes me want to stay here.

OTo say it’s a great opportunity isn’t enough.

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