Departmental Evaluation Plan 2019 to 2020 to 2023 to 2024

On this page

Alternate formats

List of acronyms

CPP:
Canada Pension Plan
EI:
Employment Insurance
ESDC:
Employment and Social Development Canada
OAS:
Old Age Security
PMEC:
Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee
TBS:
Treasury Board Secretariat

Deputy head Departmental Evaluation Plan confirmation note

I approve the Departmental Evaluation Plan of Employment and Social Development Canada for the fiscal years 2019 to 2020 to 2023 to 2024, which I submit to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat as required by the Policy on Results.

I confirm that this five-year rolling Departmental Evaluation Plan:

  • Plans for evaluation of all ongoing programs of grants and contributions with five-year average actual expenditures of $5 million or greater per year at least once every five years, in fulfillment of the requirements of subsection 42.1 of the Financial Administration Act
  • Meets the requirements of the Mandatory Procedures for Evaluation
  • Supports the requirements of the expenditure management system including, as applicable, Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submissions, and resource alignment reviews

I will ensure that this plan is updated annually, and I will provide information about its implementation to the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, as required.

Graham Flack
Deputy Minister of Employment and Social Development

Executive summary

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) supports Canadians through the delivery of over $125 billion in Government programs and services,Footnote 1 which helps Canadians over the course of their lives. The Evaluation Directorate at ESDC establishes priorities for the upcoming five-year fiscal period through annual consultations with program officials and Central Agencies. This ensures the timely provision of evaluation information to management and program officials, supporting policy and program decision-making. Consultations conducted in Fall 2018 underscored the strategic importance of collaboration between the Evaluation Directorate and program officials. They also helped identify opportunities for innovative ways to measure results and to leverage thematic and horizontal evaluations. This document outlines ESDC's evaluation planning up until 2024, and reports on the Evaluation Directorate's major accomplishments in fiscal year 2018 to 2019.Footnote 2

Key achievements

In fiscal year 2018 to 2019, as a key element of ESDC's program innovation landscape, the Directorate continued to develop innovative approaches and methodologies in designing and carrying out its evaluations. The Directorate also helped inform decision making, shared knowledge with program officials and increased its role as a trusted advisor. Key achievements realized through the year included:

  1. Supporting evidence-based decision making
  • Providing reliable, cost-effective and timely evidence for program officials through the completion of 17 evaluation reports and 44 technical studies, as well as policy and program design decisions.
  • Incorporating evaluation evidence into decision-making documents, including 51 Treasury Board Submissions and 15 Memoranda to Cabinet.
  • Advising program officials on Performance Information Profiles for programs across the Department, and for all new programs at the design and implementation stages.
  1. Sharing knowledge through dissemination and engagement
  • Disseminating evidence through more than 10 presentations at domestic and international conferences.
  • Adopting new innovative report formats to help audiences better understand and visualize the results of evaluations, and extending the retention of evaluation reports online to 10 years.
  • Harnessing social media platforms to improve dissemination of evaluation reports and conference presentations made by evaluators.
  1. Broadening the trusted advisor role
  • Contributing to the Government of Canada's Horizontal Skills Review with the provision of information and analysis of departmental labour market training programs.
  • Supporting the Head of Performance Measurement who leads the review of the Performance Information Profiles,Footnote 3 by advising program officials on performance measurement, covering 14 major ESDC programs.
  • Contracting a third party to conduct an independent neutral assessment, which highlighted the value Evaluation provides the Department, and its compliance with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat policies and professional standards.

Over the next 5 years, Evaluation will continue building on its established role as a trusted advisor to program officials, while fulfilling its obligations under the Financial Administration Act and the Policy on Results. In 2019 to 2020, 13 evaluations are currently planned for completion. Evaluation will focus on: the impacts of labour market programs for youth, Indigenous Peoples and persons with disabilities; outcomes of apprenticeship grants and loans; and providing services to Canadians through multiple channels. Looking forward, evaluations will focus on the effectiveness of electronic service delivery for the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) and Old Age Security (OAS), examining the ease of access and meeting client needs as well as the efficiency of Canada Student Loans and education savings progress.

To further integrate innovative practices into its methods, Evaluation will examine and pilot various approaches, including the leveraging of machine learning to better estimate the impact of our programs and the use of rapid impact assessments. The Directorate will also explore the feasibility of undertaking more strategic, thematic, and horizontal (including the Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy and the Evaluation of Passport Program Delivery) evaluations. Through continued engagement with the academic community, Evaluation will ensure that its high quality evaluation work is current with evolving best practices and standards.

Evaluation faces 2 ongoing challenges related to human resources and data, particularly data associated with performance measurement. The Directorate continues with efforts to meet capacity requirements by recruiting highly qualified employees, developing skills and competencies, and acknowledging employees' contributions. These emerging capacity requirements are reflected in the plan for financial resourcing in the next fiscal year. Investments in our workforce and capacity will enable Evaluation to meet additional demands anticipated as a result of new programs, previous commitments made at the Department's Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee (PMEC), increased demand for Evaluation's expertise and the adoption of innovative tools and methodologies.

Evaluation also helps team members with professional development and accreditation that ensures they are able to meet future challenges and opportunities through transparent human resource planning.

To mitigate the risks associated with the availability and quality of data and performance measurement information, the Directorate will continue to support efforts of the Chief Data Officer and the Head of Performance Measurement by advising program officials and leveraging its Labour Market Data Platform to support the evaluation of youth and Indigenous labour market programming.

The Directorate increasingly publishes different types of evaluationsFootnote 4; looks for and pilots innovative approaches, and works to effectively communicate results to improve the services it provides to the Department and other stakeholders. By aligning the Directorate with the Government of Canada's Beyond2020 vision, Evaluation is ensuring an agile, inclusive and equipped workforce that continues to meet the challenges of the future.

Infographic 1
Chart of Infographic 1: Key Achievements of the Evaluation Directorate in 2018 to 2019 Infographic: description follows
Text description of Infographic 1

Supported Evidence-based Decision Making

  • Completed 17 evaluation reports and 44 technical studies to support program officials.
  • Advised on 51 Treasury Board Submissions and 15 Memoranda to Cabinet.
  • Launched the Labour Market Program Data Platform to enable net impact analysis for evaluations using administrative data.

Shared Knowledge through Dissemination and Engagement

  • Disseminated evidence and innovations through more than 10 presentations at domestic and international conferences.
  • Increased the mobile discoverability of evaluation reports and extended their online retention to 10 years.
  • Harnessed social media platforms to improve the impact of evaluation reports among the public.

Broadened the Trusted Advisor Role

  • Advised program officials on 14 Performance Information Profiles, and conducted preliminary reviews of 6 new programs.
  • Contributed to Federal Horizontal Skills Review through analysis of labour market training programs.
  • Supported the EI Commissioner of Employers' and Workers' Forums through evaluation findings and supplemental studies.

93% of surveyed respondents indicated that evaluators were professional at all times.

85% of surveyed ESDC programs indicated that the program benefitted from the Directorate's evaluations.

"Evidence indicates that the evaluation function is adding important value to ESDC."

- Neutral Assessment of ESDC's Evaluation Function, 2018-19

Introduction

Purpose of the report

As per the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) Policy on Results, each department must develop and publish an annual five-year, departmental evaluation plan. The main purpose of this plan is to assist the Deputy Head in ensuring that factual, neutral, and timely information on the department’s programs is available to support evidence-based decision making, and inform Canadians on results.

Increased flexibilities provided under the Policy have underscored the necessity for sound planning. The timing of evaluations is determined in consultation with program officials and Central Agencies on the basis of need, risk, and priorities. The Plan also serves to ensure transparency in the decision making process for the evaluation function, highlighting priorities and coverage decisions.

Departmental context

Employment and Social Development Canada's mandate is to build a stronger and more competitive Canada, to support Canadians in helping them live productive and rewarding lives and to improve Canadians' quality of life. The Department delivers a range of programs and services that affect Canadians throughout their lives.

The Department's portfolio includes Employment and Social Development, the Labour Program, and Service Canada.

  • Employment and Social Development delivers a range of programs and services that assist Canadians throughout their lives, providing seniors with basic income security, supporting unemployed workers, helping students finance their post-secondary education and assisting parents who are raising young children.
  • The Labour Program fosters safe, healthy, fair and inclusive work environments and cooperative workplace relations in the federal jurisdiction.
  • Service Canada serves as a single point of access for some of the Government's largest and most well known programs and services, such as Employment Insurance (EI), OAS, CPP, the Social Insurance Number, and Passports.

The Department spends over $125 billion annually on programs and services, with approximately 94% of this amount directly benefiting Canadians through statutory transfer payment programs, including EI; CPP, and OAS. In addition, the Department administers employment benefits and support measures, which includes transfers totalling $2.2 billion annually to provinces and territories.Footnote 5

There is a large scale of interactions between the Department and Canadians across the country. The Department's services are delivered through online service channels, over the telephone, and through a regional network of over 590 in-person sites.Footnote 6

Operating in this context, Evaluation supports the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to examine the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of departmental programs and services to inform Canadians and support decision making.

Departmental programs touch the lives of Canadians across the country, and must be designed to ensure that these programs and services meet the diverse needs of all Canadians. By incorporating a Gender-Based Analysis Plus framework to policy, program, and evaluation design, the Department works to ensure that all populations have equitable access to programs and services.

Mandate

Evaluation collaborates and shares knowledge with program officials across the Department to support evidence-based decision-making. Evaluation ensures program officials and senior management are involved in strategic decisions and are able to provide input into the evaluation process through an inclusive approach to governance (Annex 1). This approach helps provide relevant information to program officials in a timely fashion, ensuring Evaluation continues to be a trusted advisor in the Department.

Evaluation's involvement with program officials occurs at all stages of the program and policy life cycle. At the initial stage, evaluations are able to inform the design and development of new programs and policies. During implementation, evaluations can provide recommendations, supported by available data and information that guide adjustments and program renewal. As a program or policy matures or winds down, evaluations are able to derive lessons learned and inform the development of future programs or policies.

Evaluation occasionally advises program officials in developing responses to the recommendations found in final reports, and in developing action plans for recommendations noted during evaluations. Monitoring progress on these action plans allows Evaluation to ensure a system of continuous improvement is realized throughout the evaluation cycle.

Accomplishments in 2018 to 2019

In 2018 to 2019, the Directorate delivered evaluations and advice that focused on key knowledge gaps and the relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of programs, while making concrete recommendations for program improvement.

Supporting evidence-based decision making

Evaluation influenced and supported sound decision making at ESDC by:

  • completing 17 evaluation reports and 44 technical studies to support program officials, and the EI Monitoring and Assessment Report
  • advising on 51 Treasury Board Submissions and 15 Memoranda to Cabinet to inform policies and programs
  • leveraging administrative data through a Labour Market Data Platform to measure impacts and report on the effectiveness of Employment Benefits and Support Measures over the medium term. The analysis provided reliable, cost-effective, and timely evidence that contributed to the design and delivery of labour market programs
  • generating technical studies that informed the current Working While on Claim provisions of the EI Program in 2018
  • demonstrating the potential long-term effectiveness of programs focusing on early interventions to support educational attainment though the Evaluation of Pathways to Education
  • developing preliminary findings to support departmental decisions on labour market programming geared towards improving employment and educational outcomes among youth, particularly as related to the Youth Employment Strategy

After evaluations are approved by the Deputy Minister, the Evaluation Directorate asks program officials to complete a post-evaluation questionnaire. This survey enables the program to reflect on the entire process of the evaluation and provide insight into their experiences. Of the post-evaluation questionnaire respondents, 83% reported that the recommendations made by the Evaluation Directorate were realistic, actionable, and should result in significant improvements for the program.

In 2018 to 2019, external consultants conducted a Neutral Assessment of ESDC's Evaluation function to determine how it conforms to TBS's expectations. The independent assessment performed by Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton, under the supervision of Internal Audit Services, found that the Department's evaluation function complies with all TBS requirements found in the Policy and the Directive on Results. The assessment found that the Department conforms to professional practice expectations at both the functional and project level. Further, after reviewing the evidence base provided and engaging in discussions with senior management, the assessors concluded that the evaluation function is adding important value to the Department and that results from evaluations are used by the Department's executives in program decision making.

In terms of areas for improvement, the Neutral Assessment found that evaluation reports "would prove more useful and complete if they indicated to the reader the limitations of the methodologies and the resulting impacts on interpreting the findings and conclusions." To address this recommendation, Evaluation has started to more clearly address methodological and practical limitations in measuring program or policy attribution and contribution in final reports. For further information and detailed findings, visit the Neutral Assessment Final Report.

Disseminating and engaging

In addition to evaluation reports, Evaluation Directorate generates a number of other products such as technical reports, one-page summaries, lessons learned synthesis, conference presentations, and supplemental studies. In the spirit of Open Government, Evaluation is significantly improving awareness of Directorate products and expanding our audience using traditional and innovative channels of dissemination.

Infographic 2
Infographic 2: Publishing and Participation Infographic: description follows
Text description of Infographic 2
  • Published reference articles and presentation
  • Presented evaluation research relating to the Working While on Claim Pilot Projects and the Connecting Canadians with Available Jobs Initiative
  • Presented seminars on the Directorate's Labour Market Program Data Platform to multiple for a, including the Congrès annuel de la Société Canadienne de science économique, and the International Conference on Big Data Analysis and Data Mining in Rome, Italy

Social Media Engagement

  • Leveraged multiple social media platforms to share the results of over 20 evaluations

Increased Accessibility

  • Secured ten year, online retention period for evaluation reports
  • Made Evaluations website more user-friendly
  • Advanced Federal Evaluation Function
  • Led collective staff processes with other departments
  • Contributed to federal professional development plans
  • Exchanged best practices in seminars and conferences

Supported Policy Analysis

Shared technical studies and evaluation with policy developers in relation to:

  • Labour Market Development Agreements
  • Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
  • Sectoral Initiatives Program
  • Federal Workers' Compensation Service Phase I

Evaluation has also identified various opportunities to engage with stakeholders in the coming year, which include: participating on a panel at the Annual Conference of the Canadian Economic Association, presenting at the Canadian Evaluation Society and will participate in the annual American Evaluation Society. ESDC is improving the availability of administrative data for economic research and evaluation purposes.

The trusted advisor role

Evaluation continues to build on its role as a trusted advisor to program officials and senior management. In 2018 to 2019, the Evaluation Directorate completed the following:

  • mapped results for more than 30 programs to support the TBS' Horizontal Skills Review. Evaluation provided the review with a robust analysis of departmental labour market training programs
  • prepared 4 supplemental studies to improve and expand the evidence available to Canadians in the annual EI Monitoring and Assessment Report prepared by the Department on behalf of the Canada EI Commission
  • continued involvement in the Forum of Labour Market Ministers' Performance Measurement Working Group and provided advice regarding performance measurement strategy and data sharing between the federal, provincial and territorial governments in support of evaluation activities
  • supported the Head of Performance Measurement, who leads the ongoing review of the Performance Information Profiles,Footnote 7 by advising program officials on the performance measurement of 14 major ESDC programs

In addition to conducting the evaluations listed in coverage tables (Table 1 and Annex 2), Evaluation actively contributes evidence in support of the EI Monitoring and Assessment Report. The EI program is evaluated more frequently than others due to the program's scale and the unique objectives of each Employment Benefit and Support Measure. Evaluation co-develops and advances the analytical agenda for members of the Monitoring Report Advisory Committee, which includes the Canada EI Commissioners for Employers and for Workers.

In November 2018, the Head of Evaluation presented evaluation results at the EI Commissioner of Employers' Forum and at the EI Commissioner of Workers' Forum.

Innovative approaches

As a central component of ESDC's program innovation landscape, Evaluation employs tools and methods to develop an evidence base for policy and program development. During 2018 to 2019, the Directorate pursued a multitude of innovative practices to better estimate the impact of programs, disseminate results to inform decisions, and experiment with new approaches to yield rapid results. These included the following:

  • supporting net impact analysis of training programs through the use of the Labour Market Program Data Platform, which uses advanced statistical techniques to estimate program impacts related to earnings, employment status, and independence from government assistance
  • employing machine-learning approaches (in other words data-driven predictive techniques) to better estimate the net impact of the different labour market programs and to better understand what works for whom
  • developing Gender Based Analysis Plus analytical capacity to properly assess clients' needs and expectations and understand barriers to access and delivery
  • publishing reports (for example, the Evaluation of the Federal Labour Standards Program) in a user-friendly slidedoc format,Footnote 8 providing readers with more concise and visual information. Slidedocs also reference other publications or technical studies, thus providing readers the depth of analysis found in traditional evaluation reports
  • increasing the use of visualization techniques and infographics to more effectively convey messages to audiences in a more accessible format
  • hosting a methodology workshop on the approach to assess the effectiveness of labour market programs and services. The workshop included discussions on: the measurement of medium-term outcomes; incremental impacts of participation; a cost-benefit analysis; and the heterogeneity of treatment effect
  • developing capacity to conduct Rapid Impact Assessments. This line of evidence assesses qualitative impacts using scenario-based counterfactuals to estimate the impact of alternate program interventions. Working closely with the ESDC Innovation Lab to engage stakeholders, a Rapid Impact Assessment is being piloted with the New Horizons for Seniors Program, as a potential line of evidence

Results

On March 19, 2019, the Government of Canada released Investing in the Middle Class: Budget 2019, outlining changes and additions to the Department's programs, which included investment in skills of Canadians, including youth, and a secure retirement for seniors. Evaluations completed in the 2018 to 2019 fiscal year informed program officials and policy makers by providing concrete evidence on seniors and youth programming. For example, the Evaluation of the Old Age Security Program showed that an increased work earnings exemption on benefits for low-income seniors increased employment rates and earnings for those who worked. Previous evaluation results on the Youth Employment Strategy and preliminary analysis in the upcoming evaluation helped inform a re-assessment and renewed approach to the programs under a modernized Youth Employment Strategy.

Through 17 evaluations completed in 2018 to 2019, Evaluation provided results across all departmental core responsibilities. A brief sample of results extracted from these evaluations include:

Supporting persons with disabilities achieve employment

Through the evaluation of the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities program, which assists persons with disabilities achieve employment, the Directorate found that participation enhanced clients' attachment to the labour market.Footnote 9 The percentage of participants who were employed, self-employed, or returned to school within one year of their last program intervention increased from 42% in 2012 to 2013, to 55% in 2016 to 2017. Gaps were identified in the area of performance measurement, in particular regarding the progress made through employer awareness activities and the impact program interventions have on participants' skills, employability and medium to long-term outcomes on the labour market.

Helping at-risk youth complete schooling

The Directorate's Evaluation of the Pathways to Education program demonstrated the value of early interventions with at-risk youth. The programming positively affected high school graduation rates, enrollment to post-secondary education and educational attainment. As well, the long-term net benefits include greater lifetime earnings for individuals and the program "breaks even" after 22.5 years from a government perspective and after 20.8 years from a total social net benefit perspective.Footnote 10 Challenges reaching underrepresented youth beyond larger urban areas or in rural, remote and Indigenous communities were acknowledged by the Department.

Giving parents with critically ill children more time on leave

Evaluation Directorate evaluated the Parents of Critically Ill Children benefit, recently replaced by the new Family Caregiving Benefit for Children. This benefit provides financial assistance to caregivers providing care or support to a critically ill or injured child. The evaluation found that this benefit increased the amount of time parents could go on leave from work to provide caregiving to their child, and that this program had a positive impact on parents dealing with difficult situations. In the early years of implementation, the benefit's uptake was initially below an anticipated 6,000 applications per year due to low levels of awareness and difficulties with submitting and/or processing appropriate medical certificates. As such, one recommendation was put forward to increase the level of awareness and a second recommendation focused on ways to better process claims and at the same time, to allow for greater self-service functionality for applicants.Footnote 11

Improving union-employer relationships

An evaluation of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service program found that between 2013 to 2014 and 2016 to 2017, the dispute prevention services component of the program contributed to improving communication between parties. As a result, these activities improved union-employer relationships and facilitated the negotiations of collective agreements in Canada.Footnote 12

Informing seniors of available income supports

Changes in take-up of the Guaranteed Income Supplement were evaluated in 2019, with an emphasis on better understanding those who were eligible for the Supplement but did not receive it, and on barriers faced by vulnerable groups of seniors. Evaluation findings indicate that care should be taken to assess the needs of younger seniors who may have less knowledge of income supports.Footnote 13 In addition, seniors with relatively higher income levels may not be aware of their possible eligibility for a smaller amount of the Supplement. Although take-up rates for vulnerable groups, including Indigenous Peoples, immigrants, and those who live in rural areas tend to differ little from the general population of eligible seniors, barriers still exist for immigrants and those who live in rural areas. These barriers include language and difficulty understanding the application process.

Evaluation coverage

When determining the timing and order of future evaluations, the Directorate uses a risk-based approach that prioritizes mandatory evaluations, as well as those that are most likely to inform major policy and program decisions.

In 2018 to 2019, the Evaluation Directorate completed all evaluations that were mandatory under the Financial Administration Act and the Policy on Results. With respect to non-mandatory evaluations, budgetary constraints required the Directorate to exercise the flexibility granted to it through the Policy on Results to adjust its evaluation schedule in a limited number of cases. This included reducing the scope of some evaluations (for example the Evaluation of the Canada Service Corps) and delaying other evaluations (for example, the Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-Up Initiative Evaluation Phase II).

In total, the Directorate completed and received Deputy Minister approval for 16 evaluation reports in 2018 to 2019, and an additional report was subsequently approved in April 2019.

Five evaluations originally scheduled for 2018 to 2019 have been carried over to the next fiscal year due to resource and capacity constraints, and they will meet requirements under the Financial Administration Act and Policy on Results.

In addition to undertaking evaluations planned at the outset of each new fiscal year, the Directorate also strives to maintain a degree of flexibility to pursue additional evaluations should opportunities emerge or circumstances change during the year. In 2018 to 2019, Evaluation completed 4 unplanned evaluations in support of departmental priorities, including the Evaluation of the Bilateral and Regional Labour Affairs program, the Evaluation of Multilateral Labour Affairs, the Evaluation of the Guaranteed Income Supplement (Phase 1) and the Evaluation of the Social Development Partnerships Program.

Table 1: Status of evaluations planned for approval in 2018 to 2019.
Evaluation report StatusFootnote 14
Evaluation of the Sectoral Initiatives Program Completed: April 2018
Evaluation of the Bilateral and Regional Labour Affairs Program Completed: April 2018
Evaluation of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy Completed: April 2018
Evaluation of Multilateral Labour Affairs Completed: April 2018
Evaluation of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (Phase I) Completed: May 2018
Evaluation of the Working While on Claim Pilot Projects Completed: July 2018
Evaluation of Federal Workers Compensation Service (Phase I) Completed: July 2018
Evaluation of Connecting Canadians with Available Jobs Initiatives Completed: August 2018
Evaluation of Canada Disability Savings Program (Phase II) Completed: December 2018
Employment Equity Program Completed: December 2018
Evaluation of the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities Program, Phase I Completed: December 2018
Evaluation of the Pathways to Education Program Completed: February 2019  
Evaluation of the Occupational Health and Safety Program Completed: February 2019
Evaluation of the Labour Standards Program Completed: February 2019
Guaranteed Income Supplement, Phase I Completed: March 2019
Social Development Partnerships Program Completed: March 2019
Evaluation of the EI Benefit for Parents of Critically Ill Children Completed: April 2019
Evaluation of Passport Program DeliveryFootnote 15 Carried Over: September 2019
Evaluation of the Apprenticeship Grants Program Carried Over: June 2019
Evaluation of the EI Sickness Benefits Program Carried Over: September 2019
Evaluation of the Old Age Security Program, Phase II Carried Over: September 2019
Evaluation of the Job Bank Program Carried Over: March 2020

In meeting its obligations under the Policy on Results, all of the Department's evaluation reports were transmitted to TBS and released to the public in a timely manner, thus meeting standards.

In the coming year, the Directorate plans to complete 13 evaluations in total, 8 of which are ongoing and previously scheduled, and 5 that are being carried over from 2018 to 2019. Working with program officials, Evaluation will also ensure that 6 new departmental programs continue to receive proper consideration at the design stage to identify Performance Information Profile indicators.

For 2020 to 2021, Evaluation is currently planning to complete 11 evaluations. These will include evaluations related to: EI Parental and Maternity Benefits; the New Horizons for Seniors Program; the Student Work-Integrated Learning Program; and the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. While additional evaluations may be identified in the coming year, constraints will necessitate capacity management, prioritization, and the adoption of innovative approaches during the next 2 years to meet demands.

Increased flexibility

Under the Policy on Results, ongoing grants and contributions programs that have a five-year average actual expenditure of less than $5 million per year are not subject to the Financial Administration Act requirement for a review of the relevance and effectiveness of the program. While this exemption is applicable to 2 programs (in other words the Sustainable Development Goals Funding Program, and Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime), evaluations of the Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime was approved for strategic policy reasons in 2017 to 2018.

Consultations

In carrying out evaluation planning, the Evaluation Directorate engaged in extensive strategic discussions with corporate, program, and policy officials to ensure that the full range of evidence and operational needs were considered.

Between October and December 2018, the Directorate held consultations with program officials, which strengthened the collaborative environment of the Department, and highlighted the value programs place on evidence-based decision-making. The Directorate worked with program officials to define needs, timing requirements, and the focus of evaluations.

The evaluation planning process also included consultations with TBS, during which advice from Central Agencies was provided on priorities and needs related to the evaluation function. Consultations held in January 2019 identified the need to incorporate evaluation evidence into decision-making documents, including Treasury Board Submissions and Memoranda to Cabinet. This evidence can be a combination of research, technical studies, or evaluation results to inform the development or review of programs.

Reflecting the desire for stronger evidence-based decision-making, program officials continue to improve the quality of the Performance Information Profiles with advice from Evaluation. As well, the Evaluation Directorate continues to work with departmental researchers to coordinate activities and identify opportunities. Finally, Evaluation will continue to develop means through which early knowledge from ongoing evaluations can inform and be integrated into program and policy decision-making, providing input to Treasury Board Submissions and Memoranda to Cabinet.

Risk assessment

When planning discretionary evaluations, Evaluation weighs departmental and program level risks. Integrating risk analysis into the planning exercise helps to ensure that evaluations provide value-added benefit to the Department. The risk assessment exercise examines program-level characteristics that contribute to the overall risk of a program, departmental risks identified in the Corporate Risk Profile, and risks specific to the Evaluation Directorate. By incorporating a multi-level approach to the determination of risk, Evaluation ensures that perspectives of major stakeholders, as well as risks internal to the organization are considered.

Program characteristics act as a proxy for risk exposure during the evaluation planning exercise. Characteristics considered in early stages of evaluation planning include:

  • size of the population affected or targeted by the program
  • program materiality (for example value)
  • program complexity
  • time elapsed since the previous evaluation
  • magnitude of change to the program since the previous evaluation; and
  • knowledge gaps with respect to the program

Risks specific to individual evaluations are further considered in Evaluability AssessmentsFootnote 16 to ensure that risks are identified prior to the commencement of an evaluation. Evaluability assessments consider limited risks, such as those associated with program oversight, availability of data, and the application of earlier evaluation findings.

Key corporate risks for the department are also examined and considered when planning discretionary evaluations, and includes a review of the risk-based corporate audit plan. In carrying out this work, the Directorate makes sure to align the audit and evaluation schedules to reduce duplication or undue burden for programs. Collaboration ensures an overall assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of a department's control processes are examined (through appropriate audit coverage), and that relevance and cost-effectiveness of a department's overall activities are also assessed (through appropriate evaluation coverage).

Challenges and opportunities

The evaluation function continues to face 2 key challenges: analytical capacity to meet the workload requirements; and the availability and quality of data and performance measurement information.

Infographic 3
Infographic 3: Challenges and Opportunities Infographic: description follows
Text description of Infographic 3
  1. Human Resource Capacity

The Directorate is responding by:

  • Leading efforts to improve promotional material and recruitment for the evaluation function;
  • Using flexible staffing options (e.g. students, casuals, consultants);
  • Maintaining an annual Strategic Human Resource Plan;
  • Supporting professional development of staff;
  • Engaging with staff to support a positive and healthy workplace.
  1. Quality of Data and Performance Measure to Support Evaluations

The Directorate is responding by:

  • Advising responsible program officials and the Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee on Performance Information Profiles and quality of indicators;
  • * Conducting Evaluability Assessments to support performance measurement;
  • Launching the Labour market data platform to improve data, analysis, and performance measures for relating programs

83% of Evaluation Directorate employees get a sense of satisfaction from their work.*

82% of Evaluation Directorate employees feel they receive meaningful recognition for work well done.*

* Public Service Employee Survey, 2018

Human resource capacity

The nature of the work undertaken in the Evaluation Directorate requires the continuous recruitment, development and retention of highly skilled employees. It requires specialized skills to analyze, synthesize and communicate complex lines of quantitative and qualitative evidence in order to provide the quality advice that the Department relies on to effectively build policy and programs to best serve Canadians.

A number of actions address these requirements. Evaluation is leading efforts to improve promotional material and recruitment for the evaluation function. The Directorate supports collective staffing processes across government to ensure there is a continuous intake of new candidates with the right skills through a streamlined hiring process. Evaluation led a collective, external recruitment of evaluators on behalf of the Government of Canada, which identified approximately 40 candidates. In addition, the Evaluation Directorate is supporting the establishment of the Emerging Evaluators Network, an informal group of evaluators from across government that meet to discuss issues of importance to the evaluation community.

To ensure that capacity demands are met in the short term, the Directorate uses flexible staffing tools, including hiring students, casual employees and consultants. As an additional response to capacity concerns, a number of retired public servants were hired on a temporary basis. Evaluation maintains an annual Strategic Human Resource Plan to ensure transparency in its staffing actions and as a means of succession planning. The Strategic Human Resources Plan empowers employees by providing them with the knowledge they require to help them take charge of their professional career. In order to provide employees with an opportunity to participate in and influence the environment in which they work, Evaluation established a working group to contribute to the update of the Plan. The Directorate's commitment to using these tools as a means of providing a transparent and inclusive work environment was recognized in 2018, with the receipt of a Deputy Minister's award of excellence in leadership and people management.

While the Public Service Employee Survey found 80%Footnote 17 of Evaluation employees think they get the training they need, Evaluation is implementing additional talent management programs, including:

  • continuing to use Performance Agreements, Learning Plans and Talent Management Plans to support staff development
  • ensuring that team members understand the competencies required for their current job and those they may aspire to; and
  • implementing strategies to improve second language skills to support bilingual capacity and succession of experienced staff

To further promote the professional development of employees, Evaluation supports employees' accreditation in the Canadian Evaluation Society. Currently, the Directorate has supported accreditation for 9 employees. Evaluation further assists in employees' professional development by holding regular internal training sessions. Training ensures that team members are ready and equipped to meet the challenges of an evolving profession and workforce.

While 83% of employees indicated that they get a sense of satisfaction from their work, and 82% of employees feel that they receive meaningful recognition for work well done, the Public Service Employee Survey noted that capacity and compensation issues were key sources of stress. In addition to leveraging flexibilities provided by the Policy on Results to address these concerns, Evaluation will continue to focus on developing a healthy workplace for its team members by providing training, support and avenues for open dialogue.

In 2018, management engaged with staff to strengthen and improve the workplace by:

  • continuing to celebrate and recognize achievements
  • managing and prioritizing workflows
  • encouraging staff to expand skills by presenting their work to internal and external stakeholders
  • bringing observers to senior officials' meetings
  • ensuring analysts are present when their files are discussed

Further recognizing the strength and contributions of staff, Evaluation has fully embraced the "Take Me With You" campaign, which encourages evaluators to attend meetings with senior management. Observers, including junior evaluators, attend PMEC, and participate in evaluation management committee meetings, and other management meetings held throughout the year.

The actions and initiatives of management help contribute to a safe and healthy workplace. Evaluation fully supports workplace mental health and contributed significantly to develop the mental health framework for the department. This work has been identified as an interdepartmental best practice, and other countries such as the United Kingdom have consulted Evaluation on this work. A continued focus on the mental health of employees is central to not only encouraging open discussion about issues that affect the team on a daily basis, but also ensuring that management is aware of emerging issues and is able to support employees in an effective manner.

Data and performance measurement

Evaluations undertaken by the Directorate are highly dependent on the availability of quality data. Performance measurement information that program officials use to make decisions is also used by evaluators to determine relevance and value for money. This information is sometimes used to summarize and assess the way a program is being implemented. It is important that the evidence-base that performance data provides is accurate, timely and measures the right elements of programs. Barriers in accessing, and/or the lack of data can jeopardize Evaluation's ability to deliver high quality and timely evaluations and result in inadequate support for policy and program development.

In support of the Department's performance measurement regime, and consistent with the Policy on Results, Evaluation advises PMEC and responsible program officials on the availability, quality, validity, and reliability of indicators in the Departmental Results Framework, and in each program Performance Information Profile. The Directorate also assesses indicators for their ability to support evaluations in the context of Evaluability Assessments, and provides support to the Head of Performance Measurement through various channels, including involvement in the Director General Performance Measurement Committee. Program officials across the Department develop, update and implement Performance Information Profiles for all existing and new programs in the Department's program inventory.

The Chief Results and Delivery Officer is the key contact for the Results and Delivery Unit of the Privy Council Office, and identifies top departmental priorities in support of the results agenda. This role acts as the primary change agent for the Department and ensures that a delivery plan, measurement strategy and reporting structures are in place to support the delivery of these priorities. The Head of Performance Measurement supports the Chief Results and Delivery Officer by supporting performance measurement and reporting by establishing, implementing and maintaining the Departmental Results Framework and overseeing Performance Information Profiles. The Chief Results and Delivery Officer is also supported by the Director General, Strategic Horizontal Policy, with an emphasis on measuring and reporting on government activities and their impact on Canadians. This Director General leads on elements of horizontal priorities for the government and the tracking of mandate letter commitments, including their progress, challenges and barriers to completion. The key responsibilities of the Head of Evaluation are to assess departmental evaluation needs; to undertake departmental evaluation planning, directing and reporting; to support the use of performance information; and to advise the Deputy Head on evaluation findings and issues. ESDC's Chief Data Officer leads the implementation of the Department's enterprise Data Strategy, including the development of data foundations, such as data governance and stewardship. These foundations are essential to ensuring that data users have the knowledge and support needed to identify, locate, and fully leverage data in their daily work, and in developing indicators to support performance measurement, including reports of the Chief Results and Delivery Officer. All of these positions are located in the Strategic and Service Policy Branch of ESDC.

During 2018 to 2019, some of the Evaluability Assessments presented to PMEC indicated insufficient performance measurement information and indicators to support evaluation questions, desired lines of evidence, or the measurement of program outcomes. This, in turn, necessitates investments in data, surveys and interviews. Several evaluations with rich administrative data enable robust attribution of program impacts. Evaluation is working with partners to support the continued development of data and maturity of the performance measurement regime. Most evaluations have provided evidence of a contribution of program activities to outcomes. This is an improvement from the past when many ESDC evaluations were limited to documenting inputs and some outputs.

Evaluation has significantly improved data and analysis for labour market programs, enabling the attribution of outcomes to program activities. The Labor Market Program Data Platform supported more than 17 evaluation studies related to the Labour Market Development Agreements. These studies addressed program and policy questions important to ESDC and the provinces and territories who are responsible for delivering these interventions under the Agreements. The Data Platform is generating increased demand to access the rich administrative data to support program and policy analysis, accompanied by demand for technical knowledge transfer from program officials. In 2019 to 2020, Evaluation will continue to leverage the Data Platform, expanding net incremental analysis to youth and Indigenous labour market programming.

As the Department's use of data and performance measures to inform decision-making continues to expand, Evaluation will support program officials with sound advice on the use of available data and performance measures to improve Performance Information Profiles and support evaluations.

Resource allocation

Several factors affect Evaluation's budget year-to-year; some reduce the need for funding, while others increase resource needs. Resourcing requirements for the 2019 to 2020 fiscal year have increased as a result of new demands, including those from program officials for evidence to support the Department's results agenda, the introduction of new departmental programs which will be reflected in future plans, and PMEC decisions on the scope and depth of evaluations. To ensure program officials continue to benefit from timely evaluations, the plan prioritizes requirements under the Financial Administration Act and the Policy on Results, and commitments made by PMEC.

Over the medium-term, human and financial resource pressures are expected from increasing demands for: thematic and horizontal evaluations; experimentation and development of innovative methodologies and tools to better measure the impacts of programs; and, collaboration with programs to improve the quality of performance measurement across the Department. Evaluation streamlined and reduced capacity requirements for privacy approvals and is employing the slidedocs format for reporting efficiency and will continue to meet medium-term pressures through additional enhancements in human resource management.

To optimize capacity over the last 5 years, Evaluation has reshaped the composition of its workforce. An increased complement of junior staff replaced vacated senior positions, providing additional capacity and new skill sets to meet expanding priorities. The shift towards more junior positions is enabling the completion of work previously undertaken by external consultants and leverages emerging skills. While this shift has contributed to optimizing human resources, the results agenda's focus on outcomes measurement requires Evaluation to compensate for administrative data gaps through external contracts, including surveys, thereby increasing the need for operations and maintenance funding. In addition, 5 evaluations carried over into 2019 to 2020 due to capacity constraints experienced in the previous year, contributed to an increase in operations and maintenance spending from $0.8M in 2018 to 2019 to $1.79M in 2019 to 2020. Through the course of fiscal year 2019 to 2020, adjustments may be made to activities, potentially carrying forward some activities to the following year and Plan.

The Evaluation Directorate now has 66 full time equivalent employees. While Evaluation forecasted increases in spending are largely dependent on the number of full time equivalents within the Directorate, required operations and maintenance expenses contribute to the anticipated increase in expenditures in the 2019 to 2020 fiscal year, as demonstrated in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Summary of evaluation spending and number of full time equivalents
Actual spending 2012 to 2013 2013 to 2014 2014 to 2015 2015 to 2016 2016 to 2017 2017 to 2018 2018 to 2019
Salaries $5.17M $4.72M $5.51M $5.23M $4.58M $5.32M $5.13M
O & M $2.87M $2.55M $2.01M $1.02M $998,975 $1.13M $0.91M
Total $8.04M $7.27M $7.52M $6.25M $5.57M $6.44M $6.04M
FTEs 61 56 62 57 52 65 58
Forecast 2019 to 2020*
Salaries $5.72M
O & M $1.8M
Total $7.52M
FTEs 66
  • * Budget for 2019 to 2020 is still to be confirmed.
  • Notes: Actual salary spending includes all employees except students. Forecast spending includes further human resources staffing actions planned for 2019 to 2020. Operations and Maintenance expenses includes students, training, travel, printing, utilities, material and supplies, special services, construction/acquisition, machinery and equipment, other business services and tenant services.

Going forward

In the coming years, priority evaluations will assess labour market, learning and income security programs. The incremental impacts of participation in labour market programs and the attribution of these programs will be evaluated using net impact analysis and machine learning techniques.

Evaluation reports on the Canada Student Loans Program, Canada Education Savings Program and Canada Learning Bond will examine the programs’ effect on savings and access to education, including the extent to which different segments of the population benefit.

Income security programs including Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan will be examined through reports aimed at assessing various aspects of program efficiency, efficacy and relevance. Separate evaluations of the service aspects of these income security programs will assess their service improvement strategies. Service delivery evaluations will focus on contributions to program delivery outcomes, such as ease-of-access, meeting clients’ service needs and expectations, and helping to ensure eligible seniors receive payments.

The Directorate will build on its foundations to strengthen the evaluation function at ESDC by investing in innovation and learning, and effectively sharing and disseminating evaluation findings. Evaluation will continue to incorporate innovative methods and approaches into its operations and the services it provides the Department and other stakeholders. Going forward, consideration will be given to the use of additional horizontal or thematic evaluations, allowing for an investigation of themes common to multiple programs or priorities, or linked to client groups that the Department serves.

The Directorate will continue to engage experts in the academic community on optimal approaches to conducting evaluations. This will ensure that best practices are continually adopted across the evaluation function and lessons learned from other jurisdictions, departments and disciplines are leveraged to achieve results for Canadians. Engagement with researchers will also increase the use of data assets to provide insights into departmental programs that may contribute to greater social and economic outcomes for Canada. Furthermore, Evaluation will continue to engage with federal counterparts to ensure the ongoing strengthening of the evaluation function across government.

The Evaluation Directorate plays a key role in supporting informed decision-making, providing trusted advice to officials on program effectiveness, as well as adopting innovative approaches to better measure the impacts of our programs. As indicated in the 2018 Neutral Assessment of the Evaluation Function, the Directorate’s work in these areas is valuable in supporting the mission of ESDC and reporting on results. The Evaluation Directorate will continue to build on the priorities established in this plan, to deliver on results for Canadians.

The coverage table resulting from the development of this plan is provided in the attached annex (Annex 2 – Planned Annual Coverage Table). Evaluations are organized under their respective Core Responsibility and Program, as outlined in the Departmental Results Framework. The table demonstrates that in addition to completing discretionary evaluations deemed as priorities, the Directorate will meet all coverage requirements mandated by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the Policy on Results, and the Financial Administration Act.

Annex 1 – evaluation governance

Infographic 4: Annex A – Evaluation Governance Infographic
Infographic 4: Annex A – Evaluation Governance Infographic: description follows
Text description of Infographic 4

Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee

Composed of stakeholders from senior ranks of ESDC, including the Head of Evaluation

  • Approves the Departmental Evaluation Plan.
  • Reviews evaluation reports, including management responses
  • Approves Evaluability Assessments.
  • Discusses follow-up on action plans.

Evaluation Advisory Committee

Compose of Stakeholders from across ESDC, TBS, Program Sector and Finance Canada (Director General level and below)

  • Identifies options for evaluation scope.
  • Discusses preliminary findings.
  • Provides input for final report.

Evaluation Working Group

Composed of Stakeholders from across ESDC (Director level and below)

  • Focuses on technical aspects.
  • Performs data collection and analysis.
  • Provides input for preliminary report.

Annex 2

Planned annual coverage table
Program Last evaluation Evaluations planned in the next 5 years Fiscal year of approval 2019 to 20 Program spending covered by the planned evaluation 2019 to 20  Total program spending 2019 to 20 Total gross program spending Evaluation Rationale Rationale for not evaluating Program or spending
Core Responsibility 1: Social Development
Reaching Home Evaluation of the Homelessness Partnering Strategy 2018 Reaching Home Evaluation 2022 to 2023 202,936,157 202,936,157 202,936,157 FAA requirement N/A
Social Development Partnerships Program Evaluation of the Social Development Partnerships Program 2019 Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP) - Summative Evaluation 2021 to 2022 43,145,840 43,145,840 43,145,840 FAA requirement N/A
Social Development Partnerships Program N/A Community Inclusion Initiative Assessment 2019 to 2020 See above, as this is part of the Social Development Partnerships Program See above, as this is part of the Social Development Partnerships Program See above, as this is part of the Social Development Partnerships Program Departmental Priority N/A
New Horizons for Seniors Program Evaluation of the New Horizons for Seniors Program 2015 New Horizons for Seniors Program – Evaluation 2020 2020 to 2021 48,711,072 48,711,072 48,711,072 FAA requirement N/A
Enabling Accessibility Fund Evaluation of the Enabling Accessibility Fund 2017 Enabling Accessibility Fund 2022 Evaluation 2022 to 2023 22,529,297 22,529,297 22,529,297 FAA requirement N/A
Early Learning and Childcare N/A Early Learning and Childcare 2022 to 2023 410,217,249 410,217,249 410,217,249 Departmental Priority N/A
Indigenous Early learning and Childcare Transformation Initiative N/A Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care 2021 to 2022 4,391,703 4,391,703 4,391,703 FAA requirement N/A
Canadian Benefit for Parents of Young Victims of Crime Evaluation of the Federal Income Support for Parents of Murdered or Missing Children Grant 2017 N/A N/A 11,253,229 11,253,229 11,253,229 N/A Does not meet FAA requirement threshold.
Accessible Canada Initiative N/A Accessible Canada Initiative 2022 to 2023 8,963,468 8,963,468 8,963,468 FAA requirement N/A
Sustainable Development Goals Funding Program N/A N/A N/A 7,287,688 7,287,688 7,287,688 N/A Does not meet FAA requirement threshold.
Core Responsibility 2: Pensions and Benefits
Old Age Security Evaluation of the Old Age Security Program: Phase 1 2018 Old Age Security (OAS) Phase 2 2019 to 2020 56,376,557,685 56,376,557,685 56,376,557,685 Departmental Priority N/A
Old Age Security N/A OAS/GIS Service Improvement – Evaluation 2021 to 2022 See above, as this is part of the Old Age Security Program See above, as this is part of the Old Age Security Program See above, as this is part of the Old Age Security Program Commitment in TB Sub 2021-22 N/A
Old Age Security N/A Guaranteed Income Supplement Take-up Evaluation Phase II 2019 to 2020 See above, as this is part of the Old Age Security Program See above, as this is part of the Old Age Security Program See above, as this is part of the Old Age Security Program Departmental Priority N/A
Canada Disability Savings Program Evaluation of Canada Disability Savings Program (Phase II) 2018 Canada Disability Savings Program 2023 to 2024 770,371,387 770,371,387 770,371,387 Departmental Priority N/A
Canada Pension Plan Canada Pension Plan Disability - Summative Evaluation 2011 Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits Summative Evaluation 2020 to 2021 22,382,544 22,382,544 49,928,482,017 Departmental Priority N/A
Canada Pension Plan N/A Canada Pension Plan - Service Improvement 2021 to 2022 See above, as this is part of the Canada Pension Plan Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Pension Plan Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Pension Plan Program Commitment in TB Sub 2021-22 N/A
Core Responsibility 3: Learning, Skills Development and Employment
Employment Insurance Benefit for Parents of Critically Ill Children - Evaluation (April 2019) EI Fishing Benefit 2022 to 2023 68,986,604 68,986,604 19,019,125,931 N/A N/A
Employment Insurance N/A EI Sickness Benefits - Evaluation 2019 to 2020 See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program Departmental Priority N/A
Employment Insurance N/A EI Parental and Maternity Benefits: Phase 1 2021 to 2022 See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program N/A N/A
Employment Insurance N/A EI Benefits and Post-Claim Outcomes – Evaluation 2020 to 2021 See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program Departmental Priority N/A
Employment Insurance N/A Targeted Extended EI Regular Benefits 2024 to 2025 See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program Commitment in TB Sub 2023 to 2024 N/A
Employment Insurance N/A EI Caregiver Benefits 2023 to 2024 See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program See above, as this is part of the EI Program N/A N/A
Labour Market Development Agreements Second Cycle of Labour Market Development Agreements 2018 Third Cycle for the Horizontal Evaluation of the Labour Market Development Agreements 2022 to 2023 476,043 476,043 2,441,024,660 Required by legislation other than the FAA N/A
    Horizontal Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) of Labour Market Programs 2020 to 2021 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Workforce Development Agreements N/A Workforce Development Agreements 2021 to 2022 874,812,343 874,812,343 874,812,343 Required by legislation other than the FAA N/A
Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities Evaluation of the Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities – Phase 1, 2018 Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities (OFPD) Phase 2 - Summative Evaluation 2019 to 2020 43,194,640 43,194,640 43,194,640 FAA requirement N/A
Job Bank Job Bank - Evaluation 2011 Job Bank - Evaluation 2019 to 2020 5,985,067 5,985,067 28,164,481 Commitment in TB Sub 2019 to 2020 N/A
Youth Employment Strategy Summative Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy 2015 Youth Employment Strategy (YES) - Summative Evaluation 2019 to 2020 516,130,849 516,130,849 516,130,849 FAA requirement N/A
Youth Employment Strategy N/A Horizontal Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) of Labour Market Programs 2020 to 2021 N/A N/A N/A Departmental Priority N/A
Skills and Partnership Fund Evaluation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy and the Skills and Partnership Fund 2015 Aboriginal Labour Market Programming – Evaluation 2019 to 2020 57,200,611 57,200,611 57,200,611 FAA requirement N/A
Literacy and Essential Skills Evaluation of Literacy and Essential Skills 2017 Workplace Literacy and Essential Skills 2022 to 2023 22,055,650 22,055,650 27,473,324 FAA requirement N/A
Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program Evaluation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy and the Skills and Partnership Fund 2015 Aboriginal Labour Market Programming – Evaluation 2019 to 2020 320,863,783 320,863,783 446,634,781 FAA requirement N/A
Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Program N/A Horizontal Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) of Labour Market Programs 2020 to 2021 N/A N/A N/A Departmental Priority N/A
Student Work-Integrated Learning Program N/A Student Work-Integrated Learning Program 2020 to 2021 3,585,516 3,585,516 3,585,516 FAA requirement N/A
Union Training and Innovation N/A Union Training and Innovation 2021 to 2022 28,016,331 28,016,331 28,016,331 FAA requirement N/A
Sectoral Initiatives Program Evaluation of the Sectoral Initiatives Program 2018 Sectoral Initiatives Program 2023 to 2024 7,091,918 7,091,918 29,423,300 FAA requirement N/A
Temporary Foreign Worker Program Evaluation of the Labour Market Opinion Streams of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program 2013 Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) 2020 to 2021 49,506,403 49,506,403 49,506,403 Commitment in TB Sub 2020-21 N/A
Foreign Credential Recognition Program Evaluation of the Foreign Credential Recognition Program and the Interprovincial Labour Mobility Initiative 2015 Foreign Credential Recognition Program (2019) - Summative Evaluation 2020 to 2021 26,658,477 26,658,477 26,658,477 FAA requirement N/A
Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC) 2017 Enabling Fund for Official Language Minority Communities 2022 2021 to 2022 15,732,186 15,732,186 15,932,186 FAA requirement N/A
Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program Canada Apprentice Loan - Phase 1 Canada Apprentice Loan – Phase 2 2019 to 2020 2,415,173,295 2,415,173,295 2,415,173,295 Commitment in TB Sub 2019 to 2020 N/A
Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program N/A Pathways to Education Canada - Evaluation 2023 to 2024 9,500,000 9,500,000 9,500,000 FAA requirement N/A
Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program N/A Canada Student Loans Program, Phase 1 2020 to 2021 See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program Departmental Priority N/A
Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program N/A Canada Student Loans Program - Phase 2 2022 to 2023 See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program Departmental Priority N/A
Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program N/A Skills Boost Initiatives of the Canada Student Loans Program 2024 to 2025 See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program See above, as this is part of the Canada Student Loans Program Departmental Priority N/A
Canada Education Savings Program Summative Evaluation of Canada Education Savings Program 2015 Canada Education Savings Program - Evaluation 2020 to 2021 1,147,833,445 1,147,833,445 1,147,833,445 Departmental Priority N/A
Apprenticeship Grants Apprenticeship Grants and Red Seal Phase 1 - Summative Evaluation 2014. Evaluation of the Apprenticeship Grants Program 2019 2019 to 2020 119,055,639 119,055,639 119,055,639 FAA requirement N/A
Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship (Red Seal Program) Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship (Red Seal Program) 2014 N/A N/A N/A 1,145,015 12,490,826 N/A Funded with EI Part II funds converted to O&M. No associated evaluation requirement
Canada Service Corps N/A Canada Service Corps 2021 to 2022 31,920,397 31,920,397 31,920,397 Commitment in TB Sub 2021-22 N/A
Trades Exploration and Experience Program N/A Trades Exploration and Experience Program 2022 to 2023 9,859,138 9,859,138 9,859,138 FAA requirement N/A
Future Skills Program N/A Future Skills Program 2019 to 2020 49,468,174 49,468,174 49,468,174 FAA requirement N/A
Core Responsibility 4: Working Conditions and Workplace Relations
Labour Relations Evaluation of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (Phase I) 2018 Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS) Phase II 2020 to 2021 16,439,048 16,439,048 16,439,048 Required by legislation other than the FAA N/A
Federal Workers’ Compensation Federal Workers’ Compensation Service (FWCS) Phase I - 2018 Federal Workers’ Compensation Service - Evaluation 2022 to 2023 48,935,256 48,935,256 174,835,256 Required by legislation other than the FAA N/A
Occupational Health and Safety Evaluation of Occupational Health and Safety, 2019 Evaluation of Occupational Health and Safety, 2024 2023 to 2024 29,326,409 29,326,409 29,326,409 FAA requirement N/A
Workplace Equity Employment Equity Program Evaluation - 2018 Employment Equity Program Evaluation - 2024 2023 to 2024 3,717,981 3,717,981 3,717,981 FAA requirement N/A
Labour Standards Evaluation of the Federal Labour Standards Program 2019 Evaluation of Labour Standards Program 2024 2023 to 2024 17,374,804 17,374,804 17,374,804 Departmental Priority N/A
Wage Earner Protection Program Summative Evaluation of the Wage Earner Protection Program 2014 Wage Earner Protection Program (WEPP) - Evaluation 2021 to 2022 51,330,885 51,330,885 51,330,885 Departmental Priority N/A
International Labour Affairs Evaluation of Bilateral and Regional Labour Affairs 2018 and Evaluation of Multilateral Labour Affairs 2018 International Labour Affairs 2022 to 2023 5,884,986 5,884,986 5,884,986 FAA requirement N/A
Core Responsibility 5: Information Delivery and Services for Other Departments
Government of Canada Telephone General Enquiries Services N/A Providing Services and Information to Canadians 2019 to 2020 15,190,435 15,190,435 15,190,435 Departmental Priority N/A
Government of Canada Internet Presence N/A Providing Services and Information to Canadians 2019 to 2020 10,990,236 10,990,236 10,990,236 Departmental Priority N/A
In-Person Points of Service N/A Providing Services and Information to Canadians 2019 to 2020 25,536,387 25,536,387 25,536,387 Departmental Priority N/A
Passport Evaluation of Passport Receiving Agent Service Offering 2014 Evaluation of the Passport Program 2019 to 2020 147,200,582 147,200,582 147,200,582 Departmental Priority N/A
Other Government Department Programs Evaluation of the VAC-Service Canada Partnership, 2014-15 Service Delivery for Other Government Department Programs 2026 to 2027 26,156,466 26,156,466 26,156,466 N/A  N/A
Internal Services N/A N/A N/A N/A 285,502,626 841,778,820 N/A No applicable government programs.
Other Costs N/A N/A N/A N/A   1,690,372,657 N/A No applicable government programs.
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: