Quarterly financial report for the quarter ended December 31, 2017

From: Employment and Social Development Canada

Official title: Employment and Social Development Canada - Quarterly financial report (Statement outlining results, risks and significant changes in operations, personnel and programs) for the quarter ended December 31, 2017

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1. Introduction

This quarterly report has been prepared by management as required by section 65.1 of the Financial Administration Act and in the form and manner prescribed by the Treasury Board. This quarterly report should be read in conjunction with the Main Estimates for the current year.

1.1 Authority, mandate and programs

The mission of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), including the Labour Program and Service Canada, is to build a stronger and more inclusive Canada, to support Canadians in helping them live productive and rewarding lives and improving Canadians’ quality of life.

ESDC delivers a range of programs and services that affect Canadians throughout their lives. The Department provides seniors with basic income security, supports unemployed workers, helps students finance their post-secondary education and assists parents who are raising young children. The Labour Program contributes to social and economic well-being by fostering safe, healthy, fair and inclusive work environments and cooperative workplace relations in the federal jurisdiction. Service Canada helps citizens access ESDC's programs, as well as other Government of Canada programs and services.

The Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour and the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities are responsible for this organization.

To fulfill its mission, the Department is responsible for:

  • developing policies that ensure all can use their talents, skills and resources to participate in learning, work and their community
  • delivering programs that help Canadians move through life's transitions, from school to work, from one job to another, from unemployment to employment, from the workforce to retirement
  • providing income support to seniors, families with children and Employment Insurance beneficiaries
  • fostering inclusive growth by providing opportunity and assistance to Canadians with distinct needs, such as Indigenous people, people with disabilities, homeless people, and recent immigrants
  • overseeing labour relations, occupational health and safety, labour standards, employment equity and workers' compensation in the federal jurisdiction; and
  • delivering programs and services on behalf of other departments and agencies, such as passport services delivered on behalf of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and services to veterans delivered on behalf of Veterans Affairs Canada

Included in these core roles are responsibilities for the design and delivery of some of the Government of Canada's most well-known programs and services, including:

  • Old Age Security (OAS)
  • the Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
  • Employment Insurance (EI)
  • Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program
  • the Canada Education Savings Program (Canada Education Savings Grant and Canada Learning Bond)
  • the Wage Earner Protection Program; and
  • passport services

These direct benefits to Canadians are part of Canada's social safety net and represent 95 percent of the Department's expenditures.

Further details on ESDC's authority, mandate and programs may be found in Part II of the Main Estimates and in the Departmental Plan.

1.2 Basis of presentation

This quarterly report has been prepared by management using an expenditure basis of accounting. The accompanying Statement of Authorities (Table 1) includes ESDC’s spending authorities granted by Parliament, consistent with the Main Estimates and the budgetary authorities used by the Department for the 2017-18 fiscal year. This quarterly report has been prepared using a special-purpose financial reporting framework designed to meet financial information needs with respect to the use of spending authorities.

The authority of Parliament is required before moneys can be spent by the Government. Approvals are given in the form of annually approved limits through appropriation acts or through legislation in the form of statutory spending authorities for specific purposes.

As part of the departmental performance reporting process, ESDC prepares its annual departmental financial statements on a full accrual basis in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector. However, the spending authorities voted by Parliament remain on an expenditure basis.

The quarterly report has not been subject to an external audit or review.

1.3 ESDC’s financial structure

ESDC has a complex financial structure, with various funding mechanisms used to deliver its mandate. This includes budgetary authorities, comprised of voted and statutory authorities, as well as non-budgetary authorities. The voted budgetary authorities include Vote 1 (Operating Expenditures), vote-netted revenues, and Vote 5 (Grants and Contributions), while the statutory authorities are mainly comprised of the Old Age Security Program, the Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program, the Canada Education Savings Program, the Canada Disability Savings Program, the Wage Earner Protection Program, Federal Workers' Compensation and employee benefit plans (EBP). The non-budgetary authorities consist of loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act and the Apprentice Loans Act.

It should be noted that EI and CPP benefits and related administrative costs are administered through specified purpose accounts and not through appropriations from government. The EI Operating Account and the CPP are financed by employers and employees. Federal administrative costs incurred by departments in the delivery of programs related to EI and CPP are charged to the respective accounts and reported as revenues credited to the vote. The EI Operating Account and the CPP are excluded from ESDC's Main and Supplementary Estimates. However, they are presented in the Departmental Plan. Accordingly, these accounts are not reflected in the Quarterly Financial Report.

2. Highlights of fiscal quarter and fiscal year-to-date results

This section highlights the significant items that contributed to the net increase in resources available for the year and the net increase in actual expenditures for the quarter ending December 31, 2017.

ESDC’s total budgetary authority available in the third quarter ending December 31, 2017 was $58,240 million, which represents an overall increase of $1,974 million from the previous year. Much of this increase relates to an increase in statutory items. Statutory items are payments to be made under legislation previously approved by Parliament and are non-discretionary. Total Year-to-Date (YTD) budgetary authorities used as of the third quarter ending December 31, 2017 were $43,362 million. In comparison, total YTD budgetary authorities used as of the third quarter of the previous year were $42,777 million, representing a year-over-year increase of $585 million.

Figure 1: Quarter ended December 31, 2017 (in millions of dollars)
Figure 1: description follows
Text description of Figure 1
Details Total available % Total available YTD used % YTD used
Voted 3,214 6% 2,168 5%
Statutory 55,026 94% 41,194 95%
Total 58,240 100% 43,362 100%
Figure 2: Quarter ended December 31, 2016 (in millions of dollars)
Figure 2 : description follows
Text description of Figure 2
Details Total available % Total available YTD used % YTD used
Voted 2,667 5% 1,931 5%
Statutory 53,599 95% 40,846 95%
Total 56,266 100% 42,777 100%

2.1 Significant changes to authorities

ESDC’s budgetary authorities available for use increased by $1,974 million compared to the third quarter of 2016-17 (Tables 1 and 2).

This increase is primarily associated with statutory items. In particular, forecasted OAS pension and Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) payments represent an increase of $1,724 million and $1,044 million respectively owing to changes in average benefit payments and in the number of beneficiaries. This increase is mainly offset by a decrease of $1,901 million from the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), as planned spending was adjusted to include only retroactive payments pertaining to benefits paid prior to July 2016. The UCCB has been replaced by the Canada Child Benefit announced in Budget 2016, and administered by the Canada Revenue Agency as of July 2016. Other factors contributing to the increase include:

  • An increase of $472 million in Voted Grants and Contributions to fund government initiatives announced in Budget 2016, mainly to support early learning and child care
  • An increase of $461 million in Canada Student Loans and Grants for Students and Apprentices mostly explained by an increase to Canada Student Grants as a result of Budget 2016 measures to make post-secondary education more affordable for low- and middle-income families
  • An increase of $107 million to Registered Disability Savings Grants and Bonds which is due to a steady increase in total registered Canada Disability Savings Plans and participation in the program
  • An increase of $74 million to Vote 1 - Operating expenditures, is made up of different changes to funding and mainly involves new funds to address the Old Age Security workload, an increase in the carry-forward received in 2017-18 compared to the one received in 2016-17 and funding for collective bargaining agreements recently signed. Funds received for the Government Advertising Plan is also a contributing factor in the increase of Operating Expenditures for this quarter ending December 31st, 2017; and
  • a decrease of $7 million for other items
Significant changes to authorities at the end of the third quarter of 2017-18
Details Amount (in millions of dollars)
Total budgetary authorities available for use – 2016-17 56,266
Changes to authorities available for use Old Age Security payments 1,724
Guaranteed Income Supplement payments 1,044
Vote 5 - Grants and contributions 472
Canada Student Loans and Grants and
Canada Apprentice Loans Program
461
Canada Disability Savings Program 107
Vote 1 - Operating expenditures 74
Other (7)
Universal Child Care Benefit (1,901)
Sub-total - Changes to authorities available for use 1,974
Total budgetary authorities available for use – 2017-18 58,240

For non-budgetary loans, there is a net decrease in authorities of $621 million from 2016-17 mainly as a result of Budget 2016 measures which increased Canada Student Grants and reduced the disbursement of Canada Student Loans as more borrowers will have their financial needs met by the increase in grants.

As shown in Table 2, total authorities related to personnel expenditures have increased by $172 million mainly due to new funds to address the Old Age Security workload and additional funding received for the collective bargaining agreements recently signed.

The increase of $71 million in authorities recoverable from the Employment Insurance Operating Account and the increase of $ 47 million in authorities recoverable from the Canada Pension Plan are mostly attributable to new funding approved for the collective agreements recently signed.

As well, variances to other operating expenditures (standard objects 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07 and 09) are the result of adjustments made to authorities available for use to bring them more in line with actual historical spending trends.

2.2 Significant changes to expenditures

Overall, the proportion of ESDC’s total budgetary expenditures as of December 31, 2017 is comparable to the usual spending presented at the third quarter, with approximately 75% of the authorities available for use expensed.

Compared to the previous year, total budgetary expenditures as of the quarter ending December 31, 2017 have increased by $585 million (1.4%), from $42,777 million to 43,362 million (refer to Tables 1 and 2).

This 1.4% increase is primarily explained by the rise in statutory expenditures from $40,846 million for the third quarter in 2016-17 to $41,194 million for the same period in 2017-18, representing a $348 million increase as of the end of the third quarter. The main reason for this increase relates to OAS pension payments ($1,461 million) and to GIS payments ($606 million). The main factors explaining these increases are the aging population thus the greater number of seniors receiving OAS and GIS benefits in addition to higher average amounts paid to beneficiaries, mainly explained by an increase of the GIS top-up amount for single seniors in July 2016, and the indexation of benefits.

In addition, payments under the Canada Student Loans and Grants and Canada Apprentice Loans Program have increased by $212 million compared to the spending as at December 31, 2016, mostly due to implementation in 2017 of Budget 2016 measures that increased the number of low and middle-income students eligible for the Canada Student Grants.

An increase of $48 million in payments by third quarter of 2017-18 compared to the third quarter of 2016-17 for the Canada Education Savings Program can be mainly attributed to more Canadians opening Registered Education Savings Plans and requesting the education savings incentives for their children.

These statutory increases are partly offset by a decrease of $1,945 million in relation with the Universal Child Care Benefit, which was replaced by the new Canada Child Benefit introduced in Budget 2016 and administered by the Canada Revenue Agency effective July 1, 2016.

Other smaller decreases partly offset the increase in statutory spending. Injury compensation benefits related to the Government Employees Compensation Act (GECA) have decreased by $16 million mainly due to higher recoveries from Crown corporations in this third quarter compared to the same period last year.

The Canada Disability Savings Program (CDSP) also shows an overall decrease of $12 million. CDSP experienced a higher than expected take-up in 2016-17 resulting from a very successful mail-out campaign, as a result, grant and bond payments raised above normal as of December 31st, 2016.   Over the 2017-18 fiscal year, grant and bond payments returned to normal levels, which is why we there is an overall decrease of $12M in bond and grant payments from December 31st 2016 to December 31st 2017.

Other changes to statutory expenditures, equating $5 million, also contribute to the variance.

The total variance of $585 million also includes an increase of $79 million to Vote 1 – Operating Expenditures and an increase of $157 million in Vote 5 — Grants and Contributions. The increase in operating expenditures, as compared to the same period last year, is mainly attributable to retroactive payments for earnings to employees in relation with collective agreements recently signed. For voted grants and contributions, the increase of $157 million is mostly attributable to the new transfer agreements with provinces and territories to support Early learning and Child care (ELCC). These new transfers are responsible for an increase of $162 million between the two years.

Significant changes to expenditures at the end of the third quarter of 2017-18
Details Amount (in millions of dollars)
Total budgetary authorities used as of December 31, 2016 42,777
Changes in authorities used Old Age Security payments 1,461
Guaranteed Income Supplement payments 606
Canada Student Loans and Grants and
Canada Apprentice Loans Program
212
Vote 5 - Grants and contributions 157
Vote 1 - Operating expenditures 79
Canada Education Savings Program 48
Other (5)
Canada Disability Savings Grants and Bond (12)
Payments of compensation respecting government employees and merchant seamen (16)
Universal Child Care Benefit (1,945)
Sub-total - Changes in authorities used 585
Total budgetary authorities used as of December 31, 2017 43,362

In Table 1, the net amount of non-budgetary loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act has increased by $208 million at the end of the third quarter, primarily due to an increase in loans being issued.

In Table 2, the expenditure decreases in transportation and communication and in professional services (standard object 02 and 04) are mostly attributable to the timing of payments rather than changes in spending patterns.

3. Risks and uncertainties

The delivery of our programs and services is impacted by factors such as economic fluctuations, demographic shifts, technological developments and government priorities, to which the Department must respond accordingly. The Department has identified corporate‑level risk and mitigation strategies for 2017-18 in the Key Risks section of the Departmental Plan. The following report identifies risks which have a potential financial impact and provides a brief overview of progress to date to reduce them.

3.1 Human resource management

There is a risk that the Department will not be able to sustain a sufficient workforce or attract skilled employees with the appropriate competencies to meet current and future organizational needs.

Risk response strategies:

  • A 2017-18 Workforce Action Plan has been developed
  • Significant progress has been made in the implementation of the 2017-18 Workforce Action Plan with particular emphasis on increasing senior leadership capacity and innovative hiring approaches

3.2 Investment planning and project management

There is a risk that major projects may be over budget, face substantial delays and/or not be completed within scope.

Risk response strategy

  • An Investment Advisory Group was formalized to provide investment recommendations to senior management through the use of a new investment prioritization methodology

3.3 Policy on results

There is a risk that ESDC may not adequately meet the objectives or expected results of Treasury Board Secretariat's Policy on Results thereby limiting its ability to effectively achieve and communicate results to Canadians.

Risk response strategy:

  • The 2018-19 Departmental Results Framework has been developed and approved by the Minister

4. Significant changes in operations, personnel and programs

Budget 2016 introduced the new Canada Child Benefit, one simple, tax-free, and more generous benefit targeted to families who need it most. The new, income-tested Canada Child Benefit came into effect and replaced the UCCB on July 1, 2016. The UCCB payments were made to eligible recipients only for the months of April, May, and June 2016. ESDC is still disbursing payments for retroactive claims, and other adjustments, and this responsibility has not been transferred to any another department.

5. Approval by senior officials

Approved in Gatineau, Canada, by:

  • Mark Perlman, Chief Financial Officer, on February 15, 2018
  • Leslie MacLean, Senior Associate Deputy Minister of ESD and Chief Operating Officer for Service Canada, on February 16, 2018

Table 1: Statement of authorities (unaudited)

Table 1a: Statement of authorities (unaudited) - Fiscal year 2017-18
Vote (in thousands of dollars) Total available for use for the year ending March 31, 2018Footnote 1 Used during the quarter ended December 31, 2017 Year to date used at quarter-end
Budgetary 1 - Operating expenditures 728,484 94,426 576,107
5 - Grants and contributions 2,484,935 653,467 1,591,176
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 256,365 57,854 173,563
(S) Minister of Families, Children and Social Development—Salary and motor car allowance 84 21 63
(S) Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour—Salary and motor car allowance 84 21 63
(S) Old Age Security Pension Payments (Old Age Security Act) 38,810,000 10,129,871 29,954,945
(S) Guaranteed Income Supplement Payments (Old Age Security Act) 11,848,000 2,962,407 8,635,393
(S) Canada Student Grants to qualifying full and part-time students pursuant to the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 1,135,016 124,751 718,818
(S) Canada Education Savings grant payments to Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) trustees on behalf of RESP beneficiaries to encourage Canadians to save for post-secondary education for their children 843,000 192,825 578,523
(S) Payments related to the direct financing arrangement under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 795,376 107,511 262,017
(S) Allowance Payments (Old Age Security Act) 497,000 137,154 399,944
(S) Canada Disability Savings Grant payments to Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) issuers on behalf of RDSP beneficiaries to encourage long-term financial security of eligible individuals with disabilities 371,500 66,592 219,426
(S) Canada Disability Savings Bond payments to Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) issuers on behalf of RDSP beneficiaries to encourage long-term financial security of eligible individuals with disabilities 200,600 24,807 56,237
(S) Canada Learning Bond payments to Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) trustees on behalf of RESP beneficiaries to support access to post-secondary education for children from low-income families 143,000 30,232 135,966
(S) Wage Earner Protection Program payments to eligible applicants owed wages and vacation pay, severance pay and termination pay from employers who are either bankrupt or in receivership as well as payments to trustees and receivers who will provide the necessary information to determine eligibility 49,250 3,305 11,424
(S) Payments of compensation respecting government employees (Government Employees Compensation Act) and merchant seamen (Merchant Seamen Compensation Act) 44,000  (1,016) 34,761
(S) Universal Child Care Benefit (Universal Child Care Benefit Act) 24,000 4,774 8,299
(S) The provision of funds for interest and other payments to lending institutions and liabilities under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 7,359 928 3,733
(S) Payment related to direct financing arrangement under the Apprentice Loans Act 3,219 219 2,011
(S) Civil Service Insurance actuarial liability adjustments 145 0 0
(S) Supplementary Retirement Benefits—Annuities agents' pensions 35 0 0
(S) The provision of funds for interest payments to lending institutions under the Canada Student Loans Act 0 0 0
(S) The provision of funds for liabilities including liabilities in the form of guaranteed loans under the Canada Student Loans Act (3,572) (1,139) (2,596)
(S) Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 234 0 1
(S) Refunds of amounts credited to revenues in previous years 91 78 91
(S) Spending pursuant to section 12(4) of the Canada Education Savings Act 1,652 0 1,651
(S) Energy Cost Benefit 0 0 0
Sub-total - Statutory items 55,026,438 13,841,195 41,194,333
Total budgetary 58,239,857 14,589,088 43,361,616
Non-budgetary (S) Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 280,883  (111,563) 945,393
(S) Loans disbursed under the Apprentice Loans Act 77,880 11,146 27,881
Total non-budgetary 358,763  (100,417) 973,274
Table 1b: Statement of authorities (unaudited) - Fiscal year 2016-17
Vote (in thousands of dollars) Total available for use for the year ending March 31, 2017Footnote 1 Used during the quarter ended December 31, 2016 Year to date used at quarter-end
Budgetary 1 - Operating expenditures 654,620 201,180 496,786
5 - Grants and contributions 2,012,883 618,146 1,433,770
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 271,500 60,427 181,281
(S) Minister of Families, Children and Social Development—Salary and motor car allowance 84 21 56
(S) Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour—Salary and motor car allowance 84 21 56
(S) Old Age Security Pension Payments (Old Age Security Act) 37,086,490 9,665,486 28,493,730
(S) Guaranteed Income Supplement Payments (Old Age Security Act) 10,804,379 2,811,803 8,029,700
(S) Canada Student Grants to qualifying full and part-time students pursuant to the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 763,845 103,541 534,037
(S) Canada Education Savings grant payments to Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) trustees on behalf of RESP beneficiaries to encourage Canadians to save for post-secondary education for their children 824,000 187,785 552,828
(S) Payments related to the direct financing arrangement under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 705,088 101,436 234,086
(S) Allowance Payments (Old Age Security Act) 515,878 136,978 394,086
(S) Canada Disability Savings Grant payments to Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) issuers on behalf of RDSP beneficiaries to encourage long-term financial security of eligible individuals with disabilities 322,900 64,922 203,026
(S) Canada Disability Savings Bond payments to Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) issuers on behalf of RDSP beneficiaries to encourage long-term financial security of eligible individuals with disabilities 142,200 35,233 84,723
(S) Canada Learning Bond payments to Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) trustees on behalf of RESP beneficiaries to support access to post-secondary education for children from low-income families 133,000 24,840 113,423
(S) Wage Earner Protection Program payments to eligible applicants owed wages and vacation pay, severance pay and termination pay from employers who are either bankrupt or in receivership as well as payments to trustees and receivers who will provide the necessary information to determine eligibility 49,250 4,910 16,400
(S) Payments of compensation respecting government employees (Government Employees Compensation Act) and merchant seamen (Merchant Seamen Compensation Act) 44,000 28,946 50,784
(S) Universal Child Care Benefit (Universal Child Care Benefit Act) 1,924,955 10,735 1,953,304
(S) The provision of funds for interest and other payments to lending institutions and liabilities under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 6,892 2,574 3,874
(S) Payment related to direct financing arrangement under the Apprentice Loans Act 4,273 1,321 2,605
(S) Civil Service Insurance actuarial liability adjustments 145 0 0
(S) Supplementary Retirement Benefits—Annuities agents' pensions 35 0 0
(S) The provision of funds for interest payments to lending institutions under the Canada Student Loans Act 1 0 0
(S) The provision of funds for liabilities including liabilities in the form of guaranteed loans under the Canada Student Loans Act (4,080) (583) (2,691)
(S) Spending of proceeds from the disposal of surplus Crown assets 298 7 45
(S) Refunds of amounts credited to revenues in previous years 155 110 155
(S) Spending pursuant to section 12(4) of the Canada Education Savings Act 2,803 468 751
(S) Energy Cost Benefit 0 0 0
Sub-total - Statutory items 53,598,175 13,240,981 40,846,259
Total budgetary 56,265,678 14,060,307 42,776,815
Non-budgetary (S) Loans disbursed under the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act 861,806 (121,741) 737,029
(S) Loans disbursed under the Apprentice Loans Act 118,164 15,105 38,889
Total non-budgetary 979,970 (106,636) 775,918

Table 2: Departmental budgetary expenditures by standard object (unaudited)

Table 2a: Departmental budgetary expenditures by standard object (unaudited) - Fiscal year 2017-18
Details (in thousands of dollars) Planned expenditures for the year ending
March 31, 2018Footnote 1
Expended during the quarter ended December 31, 2017 Year to date used at quarter-end
Expenditures (01) Personnel 2,126,761 513,148 1,584,965
(02) Transportation and communications 60,404 14,728 37,197
(03) Information 72,207 24,022 36,342
(04) Professional and special services 687,685 153,700 430,814
(05) Rentals 273,448 49,151 161,873
(06) Repair and maintenance 5,464 883 1,606
(07) Utilities, materials and supplies 9,818 1,470 3,868
(09) Acquisition of machinery and equipment 38,878 8,082 15,400
(10) Transfer payments 57,091,149 14,416,973 42,528,908
(12)  Other subsidies and payments 7,500 4,419 7,767
Total gross budgetary expenditures 60,373,314 15,186,576 44,808,740
Less: Revenues netted against expenditures Recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Employment Insurance Operating Account (1,447,723) (430,713) (1,045,179)
Recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan (347,374) (87,010) (238,675)
Amounts recoverable from Crown agencies and other government departments regarding payments of injury compensation benefits (124,671) (40,589) (76,635)
Other amounts recoverable from provincial and territorial governments, other departments or other programs within a department (213,689) (39,176) (86,635)
Total revenues netted against expenditures (2,133,457) (597,488) (1,447,124)
Total net budgetary expenditures 58,239,857 14,589,088 43,361,616
Table 2b: Departmental budgetary expenditures by standard object (unaudited) - Fiscal year 2016-17
Details (in thousands of dollars) Planned expenditures for the year ending
March 31, 2017Footnote 1
Expended during the quarter ended December 31, 2016 Year to date used at quarter-end
Expenditures (01) Personnel 1,954,836 471,507 1,385,905
(02) Transportation and communications 60,251 42,078 65,942
(03) Information 60,873 14,054 31,939
(04) Professional and special services 668,305 200,291 453,661
(05) Rentals 276,031 53,528 155,797
(06) Repair and maintenance 11,488 753 2,182
(07) Utilities, materials and supplies 9,999 1,571 4,178
(09) Acquisition of machinery and equipment 33,020 1,511 6,138
(10) Transfer payments 55,173,341 13,744,263 41,996,815
(12) Other subsidies and payments 4,683 4,408 4,723
Total gross budgetary expenditures 58,252,827 14,533,964 44,107,280
Less: Revenues netted against expenditures Recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Employment Insurance Operating Account (1,376,941) (348,837) (980,439)
Recoverable expenditures on behalf of the Canada Pension Plan (300,076) (77,197) (213,263)
Amounts recoverable from Crown agencies and other government departments regarding payments of injury compensation benefits (114,566) (12,885) (60,817)
Other amounts recoverable from provincial and territorial governments, other departments or other programs within a department (195,566) (34,738) (75,946)
Total revenues netted against expenditures (1,987,149) (473,657) (1,330,465)
Total net budgetary expenditures 56,265,678 14,060,307 42,776,815
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