2010 FDR - Appendix A: Inclusion and supports

Appendix A
Federal disability spending for the 2009–2010 fiscal year: Inclusion and supports
Program/
Initiative
Description Amount
($ Millions) 2009–2010
Direct spending Footnote 1
Athlete Assistance Program for athletes with disabilities

Canadian Heritage
Sport Canada’s Athlete Assistance Program provides funding to support individual Canadian athletes with disabilities identified as performing at or having the greatest potential to achieve a top‑16 result at the Paralympic Games or World Championships.

For more information, please visit:
canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414514343755/1414514385181
3.95
Canadian Deaf Sports Association

Canadian Heritage
Canadian Deaf Sports Association is a multi-sport service organization providing programs to athletes who are deaf.

For more information, please visit:
www.assc-cdsa.com
0.3
Canadian Paralympic Committee

Canadian Heritage
The Canadian Paralympic Committee is a multi-sport service organization providing programs to athletes with disabilities.

For more information, please visit:
www.paralympic.ca
1.1
Excellence

Canadian Heritage
Excellence funds are allocated by Own the Podium to develop Canadian sports in order to achieve sustainable podium performances at Olympic and Paralympic Games.

For more information, please visit:
www.ownthepodium2010.com
7.2
Federal-provincial/ territorial projects related to sports programs for people with disabilities

Canadian Heritage
Federal-Provincial/Territorial (F-P/T) bilateral agreements are a means of advancing the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy. The opportunity for such bilateral agreements was approved by Federal-Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation when they endorsed the Federal-Provincial/Territorial Priorities for Collaborative Action 2002–2005, revised for the 2007–2012 period, as a collective action plan, complementary to those of the F-P/T governments and of the sport community.

The Government of Canada has signed generic bilateral agreements with all provincial and territorial governments and is contributing up to $4.4 million per year to support these agreements. Provincial/territorial governments are required to match the federal contribution, thereby leveraging the investment by the Government of Canada.

The objective of the agreements is to enhance the sport participation of children and youth and under-represented groups including: Aboriginal people, people with disabilities, visible minorities, youth at risk, and women and girls.

For more information, please visit:
canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414151906468/1414151995275#a2
0.5 Footnote 2
Funding for national sport organizations’ Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) Model for sports programs for athletes with disabilities

Canadian Heritage
All Sport Funding and Accountability Framework eligible sports that have a paralympic component receive specific funds to either develop a separate long-term athlete development (LTAD) model for that sport or integrate the athletes with disabilities (AWAD) specific components and information into their able-bodied model.

For more information, please visit:
www.canadiansportforlife.ca
See footnote Footnote 3
Hosting program funding (major international games for people with disabilities, international single-sport events)

Canadian Heritage
Hosting program funding is provided for major international games for people with disabilities hosted in Canada.

Hosting program funding for international single-sport events is financial support provided to National Sport Organizations who are hosting international single-sport events for athletes with disabilities in Canada. These events promote sport awareness for people with disabilities in Canada, encourage local participation for athletes with disabilities, and increase the number of competitive opportunities for high-performance athletes with disabilities.

For more information, please visit:
canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414504474134/1414504789478
0.3
Special Olympics sports funding

Canadian Heritage
Special Olympics Canada is a multi-sport service organization providing programs to athletes with intellectual disabilities.

For more information, please visit:
www.specialolympics.ca
1.5
Sports participation funding – disability component, base funding for national sport organizations’ sports programs for athletes with disabilities

Canadian Heritage
This total includes core funding for national sport organizations’ disability sports programs and sport participation projects for people with disabilities. It includes funding to National Sport Organizations to develop sports programs for athletes with disabilities.

For more information, please visit:
canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414151906468/1414151995275#a2
4.1 Footnote 4
Canadian Institutes of Health Research funding related to disability

Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) funds health research related to disabilities through its open grants program and through strategic initiatives targeted to disability research. In 2009–2010, CIHR expenditures for grants and awards funded under CIHR strategic initiatives targeted towards disability researchamounted to approximately $10.8 million.

For more information, please visit:
www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/193.html
10.8 Footnote 5
Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program for Persons with Disabilities (RRAP-D)

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) offers financial assistance to allow homeowners and landlords to pay for modifications to make their property more accessible to people with disabilities. These modifications are intended to eliminate physical barriers imminent safety risks and improve the ability to meet the demands of daily living within the home.

Modifications must be related to housing and reasonably related to the occupant’s disability. Examples of eligible modifications are ramps, handrails, chair lifts, bath lifts, height adjustments to countertops and cues for doorbells / fire alarms.

For more information, please visit:
www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/ab/hoprfias/hoprfias_011.cfm
13.7 Footnote 6
Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program, Secondary/Garden Suite

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) offers financial assistance for the creation of a Secondary or Garden Suite for a low-income senior or adult with disabilities, making it possible for them to live independently in their community, close to family and friends.

For more information, please visit:
www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/acho/acho_013.cfm
1.4 Footnote 7
Home Adaptations for Seniors’ Independence program (HASI)

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
The Home Adaptations for Seniors’ Independence (HASI) program offers financial assistance to homeowners and landlords for minor home adaptations that will help low-income seniors to perform daily activities in their homes independently and safely. Examples of eligible adaptations are handrails in hallways, easy-to-reach work and storage areas in the kitchen, lever handles on doors, and grab bars in the bathroom.

For more information, please visit:
www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/afhoce/afhoce/vi/vi_075.cfm
4.7 Footnote 8
Housing for Persons with Disabilities

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Canada's Economic Action Plan is providing $75 million over two years (2009–2010 and 2010–2011) to build new rental housing for people with disabilities. To ensure a quick start to construction, funding is being delivered through existing arrangements with provinces and territories. Through the amended agreements, provinces and territories cost-share federal funding on a 50-50 basis and are responsible for program design and delivery. Program details are available through the appropriate provincial or territorial government or housing agency.

For more information, please visit the provincial or territorial websites listed at:
www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/acho/
25.0 Footnote 9
Ensure that our national transportation system is accessible, particularly to people with disabilities

Canadian Transportation Agency
The Canadian Transportation Agency helps to protect the interests of users, service providers and others affected by the federal transportation system through access to a specialized dispute resolution system of formal and informal processes and economic regulation of air, rail and marine transportation. It resolves disputes between travellers and transportation providers over undue obstacles to the mobility of people with disabilities within the federally regulated transportation system. It also develops regulations, codes of practice, standards, and educational and outreach programs to ensure that undue obstacles to the mobility of people with disabilities are removed from the federal transportation system.

For more information, please visit:
www.otc-cta.gc.ca
2.3
Voting Services for Persons with Special Needs

Elections Canada
Elections Canada offers information, education and accessibility services to people with special needs, seniors, and those with limited reading and writing skills to facilitate the voting process. In 2009–2010, in preparation for the next electoral event, Elections Canada produced a series of sign language video clips and accessibility tools, such as Voting Templates for Visually Impaired Electors, for a total cost of $210,420. Other services for voters include Special Ballot services, information in multiple formats, interpreter services on request, and more.

For more information, please visit:
www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section
=vot&dir=spe&document=index&lang=e
 
0.2
Enabling Accessibility Fund

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The objective of the Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) is to support community-based projects across Canada that improve accessibility, remove barriers and enable Canadians with disabilities to participate in and contribute to their communities.

For more information, please visit:
www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability_
issues/eaf/cfp/index.shtml
13.2
Multiple Formats

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Service Canada
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) and Service Canada provide the public with multiple formats of publications, forms or letters upon request. The term “multiple formats” refers to any non-traditional publishing format such as audio cassette, Braille, computer diskette and CD, described video, large print, multimedia, and on-screen text.

Service Canada publications can be ordered in multiple formats by calling 1 800 O‑Canada.

HRSDC’s Publications Catalogue offers the possibility of ordering publications in multiple formats at www12.hrsdc.gc.ca.
0.5
Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP-D) grants and contributions

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Disability component of the Social Development Partnerships Program (SDPP-D) provides $11 million per year in grants and contributions to not-for-profit social organizations to help improve life outcomes for people with disabilities by enabling them to participate fully in the community.

SDPP-D consists of three types of funding:

  • Grants: Grants in the amount of $5 million are provided to 18 national disability organizations to assist in building their capacity, to increase their effectiveness and/or to encourage their viability as partners in furthering the disability agenda at the national level.
  • Community Inclusion Initiative: This initiative is designed to promote the social and economic participation and full citizenship of Canadians with intellectual disabilities. Contribution funding in the amount of $3 million is provided to provincial Associations for Community Living and People First of Canada.
  • Project funding: Contribution funding supports activities that respond to the evolving needs of people with disabilities by improving services, promoting accessibility and increasing awareness about disabilities and the barriers facing people with disabilities. SDPP-D project funding promotes innovation, networks for collaboration, program and services enhancements, and dissemination of best practices that support the full participation of people with disabilities.
For more information, please visit:
www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/disability
/social_development/index.shtml
11.0
Assisted Living Program

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
The Assisted Living Program of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada provides funding to support First Nations people ordinarily resident on-reserve who have functional limitations due to age, health problems or disability in maintaining their independence, to maximize their level of functioning and to live in conditions of health and safety.

The Assisted Living Program has four components:

  • in-home care, which provides homemaker and non-medical support services;
  • adult foster care, which provides supervision and care in a family setting; and
  • institutional care, which provides services in residential care for individuals requiring only limited supervision and assistance with daily living activities for short periods of time each day, and extended care for individuals requiring some personal care on a 24-hour basis, under medical and nursing supervision (but does not cover costs for medical services).
  • Disabilities Initiative – provides funding for projects to improve the coordination and accessibility of existing disability programs and services on reserves, which can include advocacy, public awareness or regional workshops.
For more information, please visit:
www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/hb/sp/alp-eng.asp
92.1
Justice Canada programs,
disability component

Justice Canada
The Department of Justice is dedicated to developing and maintaining a fair and accessible Canadian justice system and has a number of programs that help to test various approaches to improving Canada’s justice system and to contribute to policy development that supports an accessible, equitable and efficient justice system for Canadians. In 2009–2010, through the Justice Partnership and Innovation Program (JPIP), Victims Fund, and the Youth Justice Fund, the Department supported projects aimed at building knowledge, awareness and an informed dialogue among justice stakeholders and the public with respect to Canadians with disabilities. Specific initiatives included the Reach Canada: Equality in Practice – Sharing the Knowledge project, the Human Rights and Persons with Intellectual Disabilities 2010 Conference, the Communication Access to the Justice System for Victims Who Have Complex Communication Disabilities project, and the Understanding Youth with FASD and Making Accommodations project.

For more information, please visit:
www.justice.gc.ca/eng/fund-fina/index.html
0.2
Indirect spending Footnote 10
Sport Canada expenditures on Official Languages

Canadian Heritage
Through its programs, Sport Canada allocated additional funding to sports organizations to help them meet official languages requirements. Funding for these targeted official languages initiatives included funds for translation, interpretation and linguistic training.

For more information, please visit:
www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1266413216352
1.1
Canadian International Development Agency programs,
disability component

Canadian International Development Agency
This total spending includes programs that were tagged with the Disabled Issues policy marker. These programs also include other policy markers and are meant only to be illustrative of the types of projects that address disabilities issues at the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). 66.1 Footnote 11   Footnote 12
Shelter Enhancement Program (SEP)

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) offers financial assistance to assist in the repair, rehabilitation and improvement of existing shelters for women and their children, youth and men who are victims of family violence, and to assist in the acquisition or construction of new shelters and second-stage housing.

Eligible repairs are those required to help preserve the quality of existing shelters and second-stage housing by bringing the structure and systems up to a minimum standard of health and safety (including heating, structural, electrical, plumbing and fire safety). Repairs and improvements can also be made to provide safe play areas for children, provide appropriate levels of security for occupants, and increase accessibility for people with disabilities.

For more information, please visit:
www.cmhc.ca/en/ab/hoprfias/hoprfias_006.cfm
10.9 Footnote 13
New Horizons for Seniors Program

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The New Horizons for Seniors Program helps to ensure that seniors can benefit from, and contribute to, the quality of life in their communities through active living and participation in social activities.

Through grants and contributions, the Program funds projects that help improve the quality of life for seniors and their communities—from enabling seniors to share their knowledge, wisdom and experiences with others, to improving facilities for seniors' programs and activities, to raising awareness of elder abuse. The Program is comprised of three funding components: Community Participation and Leadership; Capital Assistance; and Elder Abuse Awareness.

For more information, please visit: www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/community_
partnerships/seniors/index.shtml
1.6
Appendix A Text Description

The following programs and policies are considered “direct spending” related to inclusion and supports.

The first nine programs listed were funded by Canadian Heritage in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

3.95 million dollars to the Athlete Assistance Program. Sport Canada’s Athlete Assistance Program provides funding to support individual Canadian athletes with disabilities identified as performing at or having the greatest potential to achieve a top 16 result at the Paralympic Games or World Championships. More information on the Athlete Assistance Program is available on the internet at canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414514343755/1414514385181

0.3 million dollars to the Canadian Deaf Sports Association. The Canadian Deaf Sports Association is a multi-sport service organization providing programs to athletes who are deaf. More information on the Canadian Deaf Sports Association is available on the internet at www.assc-cdsa.com

1.1 million dollars to the Canadian Paralympic Committee. The Canadian Paralympic Committee is a multi-sport service organization providing programs to athletes with disabilities. More information on the Canadian Paralympic Committee is available on the internet at www.paralympic.ca

7.2 million dollars to the Excellence initiative. Excellence funds are allocated by Own the Podium to develop Canadian sports in order to achieve sustainable podium performances at Olympic and Paralympic Games. More information on the Excellence initiative is available on the internet at www.ownthepodium2010.com

0.5 million dollars on federal, provincial and territorial projects related to sports programs for people. Federal, provincial and territorial bilateral agreements are a means of advancing the goals of the Canadian Sport Policy. The opportunity for such bilateral agreements was approved by Federal, Provincial, and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation when they endorsed the Federal, Provincial, Territorial Priorities for Collaborative Action 2002 to 2005, revised for the 2007 to 2012 period, as a collective action plan, complementary to those of the FPT governments and of the sport community. The Government of Canada has signed generic bilateral agreements with all provincial and territorial governments and is contributing up to 4.4 million dollars per year to support these agreements. Provincial and Territorial governments are required to match the federal contribution, thereby leveraging the investment by the Government of Canada. The objective of the agreements is to enhance the sport participation of children and youth and under represented groups including: Aboriginal people, people with disabilities, visible minorities, youth at risk, and women and girls. More information on this initiative is available on the internet at canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414151906468/1414151995275#a2

Dollar amount for fiscal year 2009 to 2010 not known at time of publication. 0.65 million dollars over multiple years for the development of the national sport organizations’ Long-Term Athlete Development Model for sports programs for athletes with disabilities. The Long-Term Athlete Development Model is also called LTAD for short. All Sport Funding and Accountability Framework eligible sports that have a paralympic component receive specific funds to either develop a separate LTAD model for that sport or integrate the athletes with disabilities specific components and information into their able-bodied model. More information on the LTAD is available on the internet at www.canadiansportforlife.ca

0.3 million dollars in hosting program funding. Hosting program funding is provided for major international games for people with disabilities hosted in Canada. Hosting program funding for international single-sport events is financial support provided to National Sport Organizations who are hosting international single-sport events for athletes with disabilities in Canada. These events promote sport awareness for people with disabilities in Canada, encourage local participation for athletes with disabilities, and increase the number of competitive opportunities for high-performance athletes with disabilities. More information on hosting program funding is available on the internet at canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414504474134/1414504789478

1.5 million dollars in Special Olympics sports funding. Special Olympics Canada is a multi-sport service organization providing programs to athletes with intellectual disabilities. More information on Special Olympics is available on the internet at www.specialolympics.ca

4.1 million dollars in sports participation funding, disability component. This total includes core funding for national sport organizations’ disability sports programs and sport participation projects for people with disabilities. It includes funding to National Sport Organizations to develop sports programs for athletes with disabilities. More information on this initiative is available on the internet at canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1414151906468/1414151995275#a2

This concludes inclusion and supports related direct spending from Canadian Heritage.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Canadian Institutes of Health Research, also called CIHR, spent approximately 10.8 million dollars on strategic research initiatives targeted toward disability research. CIHR funds health research related to disabilities through its open grants program and through strategic initiatives targeted to disability research. More information on CIHR funding is available on the internet at www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/193.html

The next four programs listed were funded by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, also called CMHC, in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

13.7 million dollars on the Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program for Persons with Disabilities, also called the RRAPD. CMHC offers financial assistance to allow homeowners and landlords to pay for modifications to make their property more accessible to people with disabilities. These modifications are intended to eliminate physical barriers imminent safety risks and improve the ability to meet the demands of daily living within the home. Modifications must be related to housing and reasonably related to the occupant’s disability. Examples of eligible modifications are ramps, handrails, chair lifts, bath lifts, height adjustments to countertops and cues for doorbells and or fire alarms. More information on the RRAPD is available on the internet at www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/ab/hoprfias/hoprfias_011.cfm

1.4 million dollars on the Residential Rehabilitation Assistance Program, Secondary or Garden Suite. CMHC offers financial assistance for the creation of a Secondary or Garden Suite for a low income senior or adult with disabilities, making it possible for them to live independently in their community, close to family and friends. More information the RRAP Secondary or Garden Suite funding is available on the internet at www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/acho/acho_013.cfm

4.7 million dollars on the Home Adaptations for Seniors’ Independence program, also called HASI. The HASI program offers financial assistance to homeowners and landlords for minor home adaptations that will help low-income seniors to perform daily activities in their homes independently and safely. Examples of eligible adaptations are handrails in hallways, easy to reach work and storage areas in the kitchen, lever handles on doors, and grab bars in the bathroom. More information on the HASI program is available on the internet at www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/afhoce/afhoce/vi/vi_075.cfm

25 million dollars on Housing for Persons with Disabilities. Canada's Economic Action Plan is providing $75 million over two years (2009 to 2010 and 2010 to 2011) to build new rental housing for people with disabilities. To ensure a quick start to construction, funding is being delivered through existing arrangements with provinces and territories. Through the amended agreements, provinces and territories cost-share federal funding on a 50 50 basis and are responsible for program design and delivery. Program details are available through the appropriate provincial or territorial government or housing agency. More information on this initiative can be found on the provincial or territorial websites listed on the internet at www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/acho/

This concludes inclusion and supports related direct spending from CMHC.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 the Canadian Transportation Agency spent 2.3 million dollars on efforts to ensure that our national transportation system is accessible, particularly to people with disabilities. The Canadian Transportation Agency helps to protect the interests of users, service providers and others affected by the federal transportation system through access to a specialized dispute resolution system of formal and informal processes and economic regulation of air, rail and marine transportation. It resolves disputes between travellers and transportation providers over undue obstacles to the mobility of people with disabilities within the federally regulated transportation system. It also develops regulations, codes of practice, standards, and educational and outreach programs to ensure that undue obstacles to the mobility of people with disabilities are removed from the federal transportation system. More information on this initiative is available on the internet at www.otc-cta.gc.ca

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Elections Canada spent 0.2 million dollars on Voting Services for Persons with Special Needs. Elections Canada offers information, education and accessibility services to people with special needs, seniors, and those with limited reading and writing skills to facilitate the voting process. In 2009 to 2010, in preparation for the next electoral event, Elections Canada produced a series of sign language video clips and accessibility tools, such as Voting Templates for Visually Impaired Electors, for a total cost of 210,420 dollars. Other services for voters include Special Ballot services, information in multiple formats, interpreter services on request, and more. More information on this initiative is available on the internet at http://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&dir=spe&document=index&lang=e

The next four programs listed were funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, also called HRSDC, in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

13.2 million dollars on the Enabling Accessibility Fund, also called EAF. The objective of the EAF is to support community based projects across Canada that improve accessibility, remove barriers and enable Canadians with disabilities to participate in and contribute to their communities. More information on the EAF is available on the internet at www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability_issues/eaf/cfp/index.shtml

0.5 million dollars on Multiple Formats. HRSDC,/ and Service Canada provide the public with multiple formats of publications, forms or letters upon request. The term “multiple formats” refers to any non-traditional publishing format such as audio cassette, Braille, computer diskette and CD, described video, large print, multimedia, and on-screen text. Service Canada publications can be ordered in multiple formats by calling 1 800 O Canada. HRSDC’s Publications Catalogue also offers the possibility of ordering publications in multiple formats on the internet at www12.hrsdc.gc.ca.

11 million dollars on the Social Development Partnerships Program grants and contributions. The Disability component of the Social Development Partnerships Program, also called SDPPD, provides 11 million dollars per year in grants and contributions to not for profit social organizations to help improve life outcomes for people with disabilities by enabling them to participate fully in the community. SDPPD consists of three types of funding. The first type is Grants. Grants in the amount of 5 million dollars are provided to 18 national disability organizations to assist in building their capacity, to increase their effectiveness and or to encourage their viability as partners in furthering the disability agenda at the national level. The second type of funding is for the Community Inclusion Initiative. This initiative is designed to promote the social and economic participation and full citizenship of Canadians with intellectual disabilities. Contribution funding in the amount of 3 million dollars is provided to provincial Associations for Community Living and People First of Canada. The third type of funding is project funding. Contribution funding supports activities that respond to the evolving needs of people with disabilities by improving services, promoting accessibility and increasing awareness about disabilities and the barriers facing people with disabilities. SDPPD project funding promotes innovation, networks for collaboration, program and services enhancements, and dissemination of best practices that support the full participation of people with disabilities. More information on the SDPPD is available on the internet at www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/disability
/social_development/index.shtml

This concludes inclusion and supports related direct spending from HRSDC.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, also called INAC, spent 92.1 million dollars on their Assisted Living Program. The Assisted Living Program of INAC provides funding to support First Nations people ordinarily resident on reserve who have functional limitations due to age, health problems or disability in maintaining their independence, to maximize their level of functioning and to live in conditions of health and safety. The Assisted Living Program has four components. The first component is in home care, which provides homemaker and non medical support services. The second component is adult foster care, which provides supervision and care in a family setting. The third component is institutional care, which provides services in residential care for individuals requiring only limited supervision and assistance with daily living activities for short periods of time each day, and extended care for individuals requiring some personal care on a 24 hour basis, under medical and nursing supervision, but does not cover costs for medical services. The fourth component is INAC’s Disabilities Initiative, which provides funding for projects to improve the coordination and accessibility of existing disability programs and services on reserves. This can include advocacy, public awareness or regional workshops. More information on the Assisted Living Program is available on the internet at www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/hb/sp/alp-eng.asp

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 the Department of Justice spent 0.2 million dollars on Justice Canada programs with a disability component. The Department of Justice is dedicated to developing and maintaining a fair and accessible Canadian justice system and has a number of programs that help to test various approaches to improving Canada’s justice system and to contribute to policy development that supports an accessible, equitable and efficient justice system for Canadians. In 2009 to 2010, through the Justice Partnership and Innovation Program, also called JPIP, the Victims Fund, and the Youth Justice Fund, the Department supported projects aimed at building knowledge, awareness and an informed dialogue among justice stakeholders and the public with respect to Canadians with disabilities. Specific initiatives included the Reach Canada: Equality in Practice, Sharing the Knowledge project, the Human Rights and Persons with Intellectual Disabilities 2010 Conference, the Communication Access to the Justice System for Victims Who Have Complex Communication Disabilities project, and the Understanding Youth with FASD and Making Accommodations project. More information on these initiatives is available on the internet at www.justice.gc.ca/eng/fund-fina/index.html 

This concludes direct spending under the theme of inclusion and supports.

The following programs and policies are considered “indirect spending” related to inclusion and supports.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Canadian Heritage spent 1.1 million dollars on Sport Canada expenditures on Official Languages. Through its programs, Sport Canada allocated additional funding to sports organizations to help them meet official languages requirements. Funding for these targeted official languages initiatives included funds for translation, interpretation and linguistic training. More information on this initiative is available on the internet at www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1266413216352

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Canadian International Development Agency, also called CIDA, spent 66.1 million dollars on many programs including programs that had a disability component. This total spending includes programs that were tagged with the Disabled Issues policy marker. These programs also include other policy markers and are meant only to be illustrative of the types of projects that address disabilities issues at CIDA.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 CMHC spent 10.9 million dollars on the Shelter Enhancement Program, also called SEP. CMHC offers financial assistance to assist in the repair, rehabilitation and improvement of existing shelters for women and their children, youth and men who are victims of family violence, and to assist in the acquisition or construction of new shelters and second-stage housing. Eligible repairs are those required to help preserve the quality of existing shelters and second-stage housing by bringing the structure and systems up to a minimum standard of health and safety, including heating, structural, electrical, plumbing and fire safety. Repairs and improvements can also be made to provide safe play areas for children, provide appropriate levels of security for occupants, and increase accessibility for people with disabilities. More information on the SEP is available on the internet at www.cmhc.ca/en/ab/hoprfias/hoprfias_006.cfm.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 HRSDC spent 1.6 million dollars on the New Horizons for Seniors Program. The New Horizons for Seniors Program helps to ensure that seniors can benefit from, and contribute to, the quality of life in their communities through active living and participation in social activities. Through grants and contributions, the Program funds projects that help improve the quality of life for seniors and their communities, from enabling seniors to share their knowledge, wisdom and experiences with others, to improving facilities for seniors' programs and activities, to raising awareness of elder abuse. The Program is comprised of three funding components: Community Participation and Leadership; Capital Assistance; and Elder Abuse Awareness. More information on the New Horizons for Seniors program is available on the internet at www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/community_partnerships/seniors/index.shtml

This concludes Appendix A on inclusion and supports.

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