2010 FDR - Appendix C: Learning, skills and employment

Appendix C
Federal disability spending for the 2009–2010 fiscal year: Learning, skills and employment
Program/
Initiative
Description Amount
($ Millions) 2009–2010
Direct spending Footnote 20   Footnote 21
Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities replaced the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities in August 2009. The grant is an up-front grant awarded to students with permanent disabilities who have demonstrated financial need. It is intended to assist in covering the costs of accommodation, tuition, books and other education-related expenses.

Note: Effective August 2009, the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities became the Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities. The purpose of and eligibility criteria for the grant remain the same, but the grant now provides $2,000 per loan year (August 1 to July 31) for eligible students with permanent disabilities who have at least a $1.00 of demonstrated financial need.

For more information on the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities, please visit:
www.servicecanada.gc.ca
/eng/goc/grant_disabilities.shtml

For more information on the Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities, please visit:
www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants/grants/disabilities.shtml
See footnote Footnote 22
Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities replaced the Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities in August 2009. This grant provides money to help students with permanent disabilities pay for exceptional education-related costs associated with their disabilities. These costs may include tutors, oral or sign interpreters, attendant care for studies, specialized transportation (to and from school only), note takers, readers and braillers.

Note: Effective August 2009, the Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities became the Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities. The grant’s purpose remains the same, and the grant provides a maximum of $8,000 per loan year.

For more information on the Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities, please visit:
www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants
/grants/disabilities.shtml

For more information on the Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities, please visit:
www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants
/grants/disabilities.shtml
See footnote Footnote 23
Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities (LMAPDs) are bilateral cost-shared agreements between the Government of Canada and each province based on the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities. The objectives of LMAPDs are to enhance the employability of people with disabilities, increase the number of employment opportunities available to them, and build on the existing knowledge base.

For more information, please visit:
www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability_issues/
labour_market_agreements/index.shtml
222.0
Opportunities Fund

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities assists people with disabilities in preparing for, obtaining and keeping employment or becoming self-employed, thereby increasing their economic participation and independence.

For more information, please visit:
www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/funding_programs/ofpd/index.shtml
26.8
Permanent Disability Benefit

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Permanent Disability Benefit helps people with permanent disabilities that are experiencing exceptional financial hardship repaying their Canada Student Loans (CSL) due to their permanent disabilities. Eligible borrowers may have their CSL loan obligations cancelled.

For more information, please visit:
www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/goc/permanent_disability_benefit.shtml

Note: Effective August 2009, the Permanent Disability Benefit regulations were amended. In order to qualify for the Permanent Disability Benefit, a borrower must have a severe permanent disability. Under this benefit, borrowers may be eligible to have their Canada Student Loans immediately cancelled.

The Canada Student Loans Program defines a severe permanent disability as preventing a person from working and from participating in post-secondary education.

Also, students with severe permanent disabilities who received loans between 1995 and 2000 are eligible for immediate loan cancellation regardless of when the severe permanent disability occurred, provided that they meet the eligibility criteria and their loan remains with the financial institution.

For more information on the current Permanent Disability Benefit, please visit:
www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants
/repayment/help/severe_disability.shtml

See footnote Footnote 24
Repayment Assistance Plan for Borrowers with a Permanent Disability (RAP-PD)

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
Under the Repayment Assistance Plan for Borrowers with a Permanent Disability (RAP-PD), student loan borrowers only pay back what they can reasonably afford, based on their family income, family size and any exceptional medical expenses related to their permanent disability. Affordable monthly payments are limited to less than 20% of a borrower’s family income, and in certain cases, borrowers may not have to make any student loan payments until their income increases. To ensure that their repayment period is not longer than 10 years, the Canada Student Loans Program covers any interest and principal not met by the monthly affordable payment of a borrower with permanent disabilities (even if that payment is $0).

For more information, please visit:
www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants
/repayment/help/repayment_assistance.shtml
See footnote Footnote 25
Special Education Program

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
The Special Education Program provides additional investments to schools who offer special education programs and learning services to First Nations students who live on reserves, are between ages 4 and 21, and have been identified as having moderate to profound learning disabilities.

The objective of the program is to support the special education needs of First Nations students so they may be able to achieve their fullest potential and be contributing members of society. It also aims to increase the number of high-cost special needs students acquiring a regular high school diploma.

For more information, please visit:
www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/edu/ep/sep-eng.asp
131.3
Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Program

Western Economic Diversification Canada
The program provides western Canadians with disabilities with easy access to business information, training and development, mentoring and one-on-one counselling services, and financing in their pursuit of self-employment and entrepreneurship.

For more information, please visit:
www.wd.gc.ca/eng/13643.asp
1.5
Indirect spending Footnote 26
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) is an initiative that helps all Aboriginal people, including those with disabilities, to upgrade their skills and find employment.

Note: ASETS is the successor program to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS), which expired in March 2010.

For more information, please visit:
www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/aboriginal/asets/index.shtml

To find out more about training under ASETS, individuals can contact their Aboriginal Agreement Holder by visiting:
www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs
/aboriginal/agreement_holders.shtml
335.5
Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP)

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program (ALLESP) is administered by the Office of Literacy and Essential Skills (OLES). It is delivered through grants and contributions which funds projects that build knowledge and expertise; develop, adapt and disseminate tools, supports and best practices; and sustain partnerships with partners (e.g. provinces and territories, employers, unions, and literacy organizations). ALLESP also provides core funding to 22 literacy and essential skills organizations across the country.

For more information, please visit:
1.5
The Legislated Employment Equity Program and Federal Contractors Program

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada
The Employment Equity Act requires employers in these two programs to assess whether people with disabilities are adequately represented on their staff. If gaps occur, the employers must implement equity plans to close these gaps.

For more information, please visit:
www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/labour/equality/index.shtml
See footnote Footnote 27
Vocational Services

Veterans Affairs Canada
The Vocational Services aim to help Canadian veterans who have recently been released from medical care and those with disabilities who need support to re-enter civilian life. Experts help them learn if skills and education from their military job can be transferred to a similar civilian job. Services include: vocational counselling and evaluation to help find a job, possible support for training, and other costs related to training such as child care.

For more information, please visit:
www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/transition/rehabilitation
6.0
Appendix C Text Description

The following programs and policies are considered “direct spending” related to learning, skills and employment.

The next six programs listed were funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, also called HRSDC, in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

Dollar amount for fiscal year 2009 to 2010 not known at time of publication. In fiscal year 2008 to 2009, HRSDC spent 30 million dollars on the Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities. The Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities replaced the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities in August 2009. The grant is an up front grant awarded to students with permanent disabilities who have demonstrated financial need. It is intended to assist in covering the costs of accommodation, tuition, books and other education related expenses. Note, Effective August 2009, the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities became the Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities. The purpose of and eligibility criteria for the grant remain the same, but the grant now provides 2,000 dollars per loan year, set as August 1 to July 31, for eligible students with permanent disabilities who have at least one dollar of demonstrated financial need. More information on the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities is available on the internet at www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants/grants/disabilities.shtml

More information on the Canada Student Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities is available on the internet at www.canlearn.ca/eng/postsec/money/grants/gpd.shtml

Dollar amount for fiscal year 2009 to 2010 not known at time of publication. In fiscal year 2008 to 2009, HRSDC spent 21.5 million dollars on the Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities. The Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities replaced the Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities in August 2010. This grant provides money to help students with permanent disabilities pay for exceptional education related costs associated with their disabilities. These costs may include tutors, oral or sign interpreters, attendant care for studies, specialized transportation, to and from school only, note takers, readers and braillers. Note, Effective August 2010, the Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities became the Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities. The grant’s purpose remains the same, and the grant provides a maximum of 8,000 dollars per loan year. More information on the former Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities is available on the internet at
www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants/grants/disabilities.shtml

More information on the former Canada Student Grant for Services and Equipment for Students with Permanent Disabilities is available on the internet at www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants/grants/disabilities.shtml

222 million dollars on the Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities, also called the LMAPDs. LMAPDs are bilateral cost shared agreements between the Government of Canada and each province based on the Multilateral Framework for Labour Market Agreements for Persons with Disabilities. The objectives of LMAPDs are to enhance the employability of people with disabilities, increase the number of employment opportunities available to them, and build on the existing knowledge base. More information on the former LMAPDs is available on the internet at www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/disability_issues/labour_market_agreements/index.shtml

26.8 million dollars on the Opportunities Fund. The Opportunities Fund for Persons with Disabilities assists people with disabilities in preparing for, obtaining and keeping employment or becoming self-employed, thereby increasing their economic participation and independence. More information on the Opportunities Fund is available on the internet at www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/funding_programs/ofpd/index.shtml

Dollar amount for fiscal year 2009 to 2010 not known at time of publication. In fiscal year 2008 to 2009, HRSDC spent 15.5 million dollars on the Permanent Disability Benefit. The Permanent Disability Benefit helps people with permanent disabilities that are experiencing exceptional financial hardship repaying their Canada Student Loans, also called CSL, due to their permanent disabilities. Eligible borrowers may have their CSL loan obligations cancelled. More information on the Permanent Disability Benefit is available on the internet at www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/goc/permanent_disability_benefit.shtml

Note, effective August 2009, the Permanent Disability Benefit regulations were amended. In order to qualify for the Permanent Disability Benefit, a borrower must have a severe permanent disability. Under this benefit, borrowers may be eligible to have their Canada Student Loans immediately cancelled. The Canada Student Loans Program defines a severe permanent disability as preventing a person from working and from participating in post-secondary education. Also, students with severe permanent disabilities who received loans between 1995 and 2000 are eligible for immediate loan cancellation regardless of when the severe permanent disability occurred, provided that they meet the eligibility criteria and their loan remains with the financial institution. More information on the current Permanent Disability Benefit is available on the internet at www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants/repayment/help/severe_disability.shtml

Dollar amount for fiscal year 2009 to 2010 not known at time of publication. HRSDC provides funding for the Repayment Assistance Plan for Borrowers with a Permanent Disability, also called the RAPPD. Under the RAPPD, student loan borrowers only pay back what they can reasonably afford, based on their family income, family size and any exceptional medical expenses related to their permanent disability. Affordable monthly payments are limited to less than 20 percent of a borrower’s family income, and in certain cases, borrowers may not have to make any student loan payments until their income increases. To ensure that their repayment period is not longer than 10 years, the Canada Student Loans Program covers any interest and principal not met by the monthly affordable payment of a borrower with permanent disabilities (even if that payment is 0 dollars). More information on the RAPPD is available on the internet at www.canlearn.ca/eng/loans_grants/repayment/help/repayment_assistance.shtml

This concludes learning, skills and employment related direct spending from HRSDC.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, also called INAC, spent 131.3 million dollars on the Special Education Program. The Special Education Program provides additional investments to schools who offer special education programs and learning services to First Nations students who live on reserves, are between ages 4 and 21, and have been identified as having moderate to profound learning disabilities. The objective of the program is to support the special education needs of First Nations students so they may be able to achieve their fullest potential and be contributing members of society. It also aims to increase the number of high-cost special needs students acquiring a regular high school diploma. More information on the Special Education Program is available on the internet at www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/edu/ep/sep-eng.asp

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010, Western Economic Diversification Canada spent 1.5 million dollars on the Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Program. The program provides western Canadians with disabilities with easy access to business information, training and development, mentoring and one on one counselling services, and financing in their pursuit of self employment and entrepreneurship. More information on the Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Program is available on the internet at www.wd.gc.ca/eng/13643.asp

This concludes direct spending under the theme of learning, skills and employment.

The following programs and policies are considered “indirect spending” related to learning, skills and employment.

The next three programs listed were funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, also called HRSDC, in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

335.5 million dollars on the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy , also called ASETS. ASETS is an initiative that helps all Aboriginal people, including those with disabilities, to upgrade their skills and find employment. Note, ASETS is the successor program to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy, which was also called AHRDS, and expired in March 2010. More information on ASETS is available on the internet at www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/aboriginal/asets/index.shtml

To find out more about training under ASETS, individuals can locate their Aboriginal Agreement Holder on the internet at www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/aboriginal/agreement_holders.shtml

1.5 million dollars on the Adult Learning, Literacy and Essential Skills Program, also called ALLESP. The ALLESP is administered by the Office of Literacy and Essential Skills. It is delivered through grants and contributions which funds projects that build knowledge and expertise; develop, adapt and disseminate tools, supports and best practices; and sustain partnerships with partners, for example, provinces and territories, employers, unions, and literacy organizations. ALLESP also provides core funding to 22 literacy and essential skills organizations across the country. More information on ALLESP is available on the internet at
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/LES/index.shtml and at
www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/hip/lld/olt/ADULTLLES/CFP-2006/Qs-As-CFP-2006.shtml

The exact dollar amount spent on people with disabilities in fiscal year 2009 to 2010 was not known at time of publication, but approximately 3.2 million dollars, largely salary dollars, was allocated to The Legislated Employment Equity Program and Federal Contractors Program in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. Approximately one fifth or 640,000 dollars could be attributed to people with disabilities. The Employment Equity Act requires employers in these two programs to assess whether people with disabilities are adequately represented on their staff. If gaps occur, the employers must implement equity plans to close these gaps. More information on the Legislated Employment Equity Program and Federal Contractors Program is available on the internet at www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/labour/equality/index.shtml

This concludes learning, skills and employment related indirect spending from HRSDC.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010, Veterans Affairs Canada or VAC spent 6 million dollars on Vocational Services. The Vocational Services aim to help Canadian veterans who have recently been released from medical care and those with disabilities who need support to re enter civilian life. Experts help them learn if skills and education from their military job can be transferred to a similar civilian job. Services include vocational counselling and evaluation to help find a job, possible support for training, and other costs related to training such as child care. More information on VAC vocational services is available on the internet at
www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/transition/rehabilitation

This concludes Appendix C on learning, skills and employment.

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