2010 FDR - Appendix D: Health and well-being

Appendix D
Federal disability spending for the 2009–2010 fiscal year: Health and well-being
Program/
Initiative
Description Amount
($ Millions) 2009–2010
Direct spending Footnote 28
Veterans Independence Program

Veterans Affairs Canada
The Veterans Independence Program helps clients remain healthy and independent in their homes and communities. Services include home care (i.e. grounds maintenance, housekeeping, personal care) and health support services. This program is available to people who have needs related to the condition for which they receive a Veterans Affairs Canada disability pension or award and to wartime veterans or overseas civilians who qualify due to low income.

For more information, please visit:
www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/health/veterans-independence-program
338.0
Indirect spending Footnote 29
Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative

Health Canada
The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative (ADI) aims to reduce type II diabetes in First Nations and Inuit communities by supporting health promotion and disease prevention activities and services delivered by trained community diabetes workers and health service providers. More than 600 First Nations and Inuit communities have access to diabetes prevention and health promotion activities delivered by trained community health service providers and community diabetes workers. The ADI benefits communities by increasing awareness and knowledge of risk factors, providing access to diabetes prevention activities, and promoting access to screening and case management services.

For more information, please visit:
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/diseases-maladies/diabete/index-eng.php#a7
49.1
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Program: First Nations and Inuit Component

Health Canada
The Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Program aims to reduce the number of babies born with FASD and to improve outcomes for those affected. First Nation and Inuit communities are supported to develop culturally appropriate and evidence-based prevention and early intervention programs through:
  • Mentoring projects developed using an evidence-based in-home visitation model in which the mentor helps a woman to identify her strengths and challenges and then links her to appropriate services and supports that can help to reduce her risk of having a baby affected by FASD; and
  • Community Coordinator positions that increase families’ access to multi-disciplinary diagnostic teams and other services and support that incorporate a wide variety of expertise, including doctors, social workers, psychologists, elders and educators.
For more information, please visit:
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/famil/preg-gros/intro-eng.php
13.8
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program

Health Canada
The First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program provides basic home and community care services to eligible First Nations and Inuit communities. The program provides assessment and case management services, nursing, personal care supports, and respite to caregivers.

For more information, please visit:
hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/services/home-domicile/index-eng.php
108.0
National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program and the National Youth Solvent Abuse Program

Health Canada
The main objectives of the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP) are to prevent and treat the high levels of alcohol and drug abuse in First Nations and Inuit communities. NNADAP supports an infrastructure managed and delivered by First Nations and Inuit communities south of the 60th parallel. This infrastructure includes a national network of treatment programs which provide culturally appropriate in-/out-patient non-medical treatment services. NNADAP also provides over 500 community-based drug and alcohol prevention programs employing over 700 addictions staff in First Nations and Inuit communities.

For more information, please visit:
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/substan/ads/nnadap-pnlaada-eng.php

The National Youth Solvent Abuse Program (NYSAP) is a community-based prevention, intervention, after-care and in-patient treatment program that targets First Nations and Inuit youth who are addicted to, or at risk of, inhaling solvents. Run through a network of Youth Solvent Addictions Centres, the NYSAP provides culturally appropriate in-patient and out-patient treatment services to First Nations and Inuit youth.

For more information, please visit:
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/substan/ads/nysap-pnlasj-eng.php
75.0
Non-Insured Health Benefits

Health Canada
The Non-Insured Health Benefits program provides eligible First Nations and Inuit people, including those with disabilities, with a limited range of medically necessary health-related goods and services not provided through private insurance plans, provincial/territorial health or social programs, or other publicly funded programs. The preliminary expenditures figure for 2009–2010 is $989.1 million (excluding H1N1 costs).

For more information, please visit:
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/nihb-ssna/index-eng.php
989.1 Footnote 30
Canadian Diabetes Strategy

Public Health Agency of Canada 
The Canadian Diabetes Strategy (CDS) is a national partnership that includes the provinces and territories, many national health organizations and interest groups, and Aboriginal communities across the country. The purpose of the CDS is to articulate and establish effective diabetes prevention and control strategies for Canada.

For more information, please visit:
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/diabetes-diabete/strategy_funding-strategie_finance-eng.php
9.9
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Initiative

Public Health Agency of Canada
The Pan-Canadian Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Initiative is a collaborative effort designed to ensure that everyone committed to action on fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is working towards common goals. The Pan-Canadian FASD Initiative has evolved from the original expansion of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program to enhance fetal alcohol syndrome / fetal alcohol effects (FAS/FAE) activities.

For more information, please visit:
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/prog-ini/fasd-etcaf/index-eng.php
2.3
Healthy Living Fund

Public Health Agency of Canada
The Healthy Living Fund (HLF) is a program that makes strategic investments to address the conditions that lead to unhealthy eating, physical inactivity and unhealthy weights. Projects supported through the fund will aim to reduce health disparities by focusing on vulnerable populations and related settings for action.

In 2009–2010, the HLF provided funding to the Active Living Alliance for Canadians with a Disability for their project "Physical Activity and Healthy Eating: A Project for Children and Youth." This project aims to improve the overall health of young Canadians with disabilities by increasing active living and healthy eating through promotion and inclusion education. The Alliance provides nationally coordinated leadership, support, encouragement, promotion and information that facilitate healthy, active living opportunities for Canadians of all abilities across all settings and environments.

The HLF also provided funding to Independent Living Canada for their project "Food For Thought: A Pan-Canadian Initiative Addressing the Healthy Eating Goals of Persons with Disabilities." This project explores how food can be used as a vehicle to connect people, encourage physical activity and healthy eating, and reduce isolation. Independent Living Canada is a national non-profit association of Independent Living Centres run by and for people with disabilities who promote the Independent Living Philosophy.

For more information, please visit the following three sites:
0.15











0.15
Treatment Benefits Program

Veterans Affairs Canada
The Treatment Benefits Program ensures that eligible veterans are provided with reasonable and timely treatment benefits that Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) considers to be an appropriate response to their health needs. Many of these benefits are available through “Programs of Choice,” where individuals with specific health needs can obtain benefits from the health professional or provider of their choice. Veterans with a disability pension are the primary clients of the Treatment Benefits Program. Other clients must first access provincial health care programs.

For more information, please visit:
www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/health/treatment-benefits
279.0
Appendix D Text Description

The following program or policy is considered “direct spending” related to health and well being.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Veterans Affairs Canada or VAC spent 338 million dollars on the Veterans Independence Program. The Veterans Independence Program helps clients remain healthy and independent in their homes and communities. Services include home care, in other words, grounds maintenance, housekeeping and personal care, and health support services. This program is available to people who have needs related to the condition for which they receive a Veterans Affairs Canada disability pension or award and to wartime veterans or overseas civilians who qualify due to low income. More information on the Veterans Independence Program is available on the internet at
www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/health/veterans-independence-program

This concludes health and well being related direct spending.

The following programs and policies are considered “indirect spending” related to health and well being.

The next five programs listed were funded by Health Canada in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

49.1 million dollars on the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative, also called ADI. The ADI aims to reduce type two diabetes in First Nations and Inuit communities by supporting health promotion and disease prevention activities and services delivered by trained community diabetes workers and health service providers. More than 600 First Nations and Inuit communities have access to diabetes prevention and health promotion activities delivered by trained community health service providers and community diabetes workers. The ADI benefits communities by increasing awareness and knowledge of risk factors, providing access to diabetes prevention activities, and promoting access to screening and case management services. More information on the ADI is available on the internet at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/diseases-maladies/diabete/index-eng.php#a7

13.8 million dollars on the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Program, First Nations and Inuit Component. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is also called FASDM. The FASD Program aims to reduce the number of babies born with FASD and to improve outcomes for those affected. First Nation and Inuit communities are supported to develop culturally appropriate and evidence-based prevention and early intervention programs through: Mentoring projects developed using an evidence based in home visitation model in which the mentor helps a woman to identify her strengths and challenges and then links her to appropriate services and supports that can help to reduce her risk of having a baby affected by FASD; and Community Coordinator positions that increase families’ access to multi disciplinary diagnostic teams and other services and support that incorporate a wide variety of expertise, including doctors, social workers, psychologists, elders and educators. More information on the FASD Program is available on the internet at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/famil/preg-gros/intro-eng.php

108 million dollars on the First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program. The First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program provides basic home and community care services to eligible First Nations and Inuit communities. The program provides assessment and case management services, nursing, personal care supports, and respite to caregivers. More information on the First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program is available on the internet at hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/services/home-domicile/index-eng.php

75 million dollars on the National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program and the National Youth Solvent Abuse Program, also called NNADAP and NYSAP. The main objectives of the NNADAP are to prevent and treat the high levels of alcohol and drug abuse in First Nations and Inuit communities. NNADAP supports an infrastructure managed and delivered by First Nations and Inuit communities south of the sixtieth parallel. This infrastructure includes a national network of treatment programs which provide culturally appropriate in or out patient non medical treatment services. NNADAP also provides over 500 community based drug and alcohol prevention programs employing over 700 addictions staff in First Nations and Inuit communities. More information on the NNADAP is available on the internet at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/substan/ads/nnadap-pnlaada-eng.php

The National Youth Solvent Abuse Program, also called NYSAP, is a community based prevention, intervention, after care and in patient treatment program that targets First Nations and Inuit youth who are addicted to, or at risk of, inhaling solvents. Run through a network of Youth Solvent Addictions Centres, the NYSAP provides culturally appropriate in patient and out patient treatment services to First Nations and Inuit youth. More information on the NYSAP is available on the internet at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/substan/ads/nysap-pnlasj-eng.php

989.1 million dollars on Non-Insured Health Benefits. The Non-Insured Health Benefits program provides eligible First Nations and Inuit people, including those with disabilities, with a limited range of medically necessary health-related goods and services not provided through private insurance plans, provincial/territorial health or social programs, or other publicly funded programs. The preliminary expenditures figure for 2009 to 2010 is $989.1 million, excluding H1N1 costs. More information on the Non-Insured Health Benefits program for eligible First Nations and Inuit people is available on the internet at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/nihb-ssna/index-eng.php

This concludes health and well being related indirect spending from Health Canada.

The next three programs listed were funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada, also called PHAC, in fiscal year 2009 to 2010. The descriptions begin with the amount spent.

9.9 million dollars on the Canadian Diabetes Strategy, also called CDS. The CDS is a national partnership that includes the provinces and territories, many national health organizations and interest groups, and Aboriginal communities across the country. The purpose of the CDS is to articulate and establish effective diabetes prevention and control strategies for Canada. More information on the CDS is available on the internet at www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/cd-mc/diabetes-diabete/strategy_funding-strategie_finance-eng.php

2.3 million dollars on the Pan Canadian FASD Initiative. The Pan Canadian FASD Initiative is a collaborative effort designed to ensure that everyone committed to action on FASD is working towards common goals. The Pan Canadian FASD Initiative has evolved from the original expansion of the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program to enhance fetal alcohol syndrome and or fetal alcohol effects, also known as FAS and FAE, activities. More information on the Pan Canadian FASD Initiative is available on the internet at www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/dca-dea/prog-ini/fasd-etcaf/index-eng.php

0.15 million dollars on the Healthy Living Fund, also called HLF. The HLF is a program that makes strategic investments to address the conditions that lead to unhealthy eating, physical inactivity and unhealthy weights. Projects supported through the fund will aim to reduce health disparities by focusing on vulnerable populations and related settings for action. In 2009 to 2010, the HLF provided funding to the Active Living Alliance for Canadians with a Disability for their project "Physical Activity and Healthy Eating, A Project for Children and Youth." This project aims to improve the overall health of young Canadians with disabilities by increasing active living and healthy eating through promotion and inclusion education. The Alliance provides nationally coordinated leadership, support, encouragement, promotion and information that facilitate healthy, active living opportunities for Canadians of all abilities across all settings and environments. The HLF also provided funding to Independent Living Canada for their project "Food For Thought, A Pan Canadian Initiative Addressing the Healthy Eating Goals of Persons with Disabilities." This project explores how food can be used as a vehicle to connect people, encourage physical activity and healthy eating, and reduce isolation. Independent Living Canada is a national non-profit association of Independent Living Centres run by and for people with disabilities who promote the Independent Living Philosophy. More information on the HLF and funded projects is available on the internet at the following three sites:
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/hlu-umvs/hlfund-fondspmvs-eng.php
www.ala.ca/content/home.asp 
www.ilcanada.ca/article/food-for-thought-429.asp

This concludes health and well being related indirect spending from Public Health Agency of Canada or PHAC.

In fiscal year 2009 to 2010 Veterans Affairs Canada or VAC spent 279 million dollars on the Treatment Benefits Program. The Treatment Benefits Program ensures that eligible veterans are provided with reasonable and timely treatment benefits that VAC considers to be an appropriate response to their health needs. Many of these benefits are available through “Programs of Choice,” where individuals with specific health needs can obtain benefits from the health professional or provider of their choice. Veterans with a disability pension are the primary clients of the Treatment Benefits Program. Other clients must first access provincial health care programs. More information on the Treatment Benefits Program is available on the internet at www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/services/health/treatment-benefits

This concludes Appendix D on health and well being.

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