Annex 3: Employment Benefits and Support Measures data tables

From: Employment and Social Development Canada

Official title : Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2018 and ending March 31, 2019: Annex 3 : Employment Benefits and Support Measures data tables

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List of abbreviations

This is the complete list of abbreviations for the Employment Insurance Monitoring and Assessment Report for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2018 and ending March 31, 2019.

Abbreviations
ASETS
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy
ATSSC
Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada
B/C Ratio
Benefits-to-Contributions ratio
B/U Ratio
Benefits-to-Unemployed ratio
B/UC Ratio
Benefits-to-Unemployed Contributor ratio
BDM
Benefit Delivery Modernization
CANSIM
Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System
CAWS
Citizen Access Workstation Services
CCAJ
Connecting Canadians with Available Jobs
CCB
Canada Child Benefit
CCDA
Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship
CEIC
Canada Employment Insurance Commission
COLS
Community Outreach and Liaison Service
CSO
Citizen Service Officer
CPI
Consumer Price Index
CPP
Canada Pension Plan
CRA
Canada Revenue Agency
CRF
Consolidated Revenue Fund
CUSMA
Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement
CX
Client Experience
EBSMs
Employment Benefits and Support Measures
ECC
Employment Contact Centre
EF
Enabling Fund
EI
Employment Insurance
EI PAAR
Employment Insurance Payment Accuracy Review
EI PRAR
Employment Insurance Processing Accuracy Review
EICS
Employment Insurance Coverage Survey
eROE
Electronic Record of Employment
ESDC
Employment and Social Development Canada
FLMM
Forum of Labour Market Ministers
FY
Fiscal Year
G7
Group of Seven
GDP
Gross Domestic Product
HCCS
Hosted Contact Centre Solution
HRSDC
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
IQF
Individual Quality Feedback
IVR
Interactive Voice Response
LFS
Labour Force Survey
LMDA
Labour Market Development Agreements
LMI
Labour Market Information
LMP
Labour Market Partnerships
MIE
Maximum Insurable Earnings
MSCA
My Service Canada Account
NAICS
North American Industry Classification System
NAFTA
North American Free Trade Agreement
NAS
National Apprenticeship Survey
NERE
New-Entrant/Re-Entrant
NESI
National Essential Skills Initiative
NIS
National Investigative Services
NOS
National Occupational Standards
NQCP
National Quality and Coaching Program for Call Centres
OAS
Old Age Security
OECD
Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development
PPEs
Clients who are Premiums Paid Eligible
P/Ts
Provinces and Territories
PPTS
Percentage points
PRP
Premium Reduction Program
QPIP
Quebec Parental Insurance Plan
RAIS
Registered Apprenticeship Information System
ROE
Record of Employment
RSOS
Red Seal Occupational Standards
SA
Social Assistance
SCC
Service Canada Centres
SDP
Service Delivery Partner
SEPH
Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours
SIN
Social Insurance Number
SIR
Social Insurance Registry
SME
Small and medium sized enterprises
SO
Scheduled Outreach
SST
Social Security Tribunal
STDP
Short-term disability plan
SUB
Supplemental Unemployment Benefit
UV
Unemployed-to-job-vacancy ratio
VBW
Variable Best Weeks
VER
Variable Entrance Requirement
WWC
Working While on Claim

Annex 3.1 - Overview of Labour Market Development Agreements

Province/Territory Signature date Implementation date FY1920
Allocations ($000)1
FY1819
Allocations ($000)1
FY1718
Allocations ($000)1
Additional targeted funding made available in FY1819
Allocations ($000)1
Additional $250M2 $1.95B envelope Total LMDA funding Additional $225M2 $1.95B envelope Total LMDA funding Additional $125M2 $1.95B envelope Total LMDA funding Seasonal Steel and aluminium Softwood lumber3
Newfoundland and Labrador September 4, 2008 November 2, 2009 9,941 125,599 135,541 7,797 125,599 133,397 4,602 125,651 130,253 1,631 500 500
Prince Edward Island September 5, 2008 October 5, 2009 2,425 24,124 26,549 2,147 24,124 26,271 1,123 24,484 25,607 525 500 500
Nova Scotia June 13, 2008 July 1, 2009 10,346 77,374 87,720 8,643 77,374 86,018 4,639 77,960 82,599 1,562 500 521
New Brunswick December 13, 1996 April 1, 1997 9,968 89,192 99,161 8,964 89,192 98,156 4,884 89,599 94,483 2,249 500 950
Quebec April 21, 1997 April 1, 1998 65,579 569,315 634,894 59,869 569,315 629,184 33,988 574,763 608,751 7,967 6,609 14,667
Ontario November 23, 2005 January 1, 2007 81,072 571,427 652,499 71,719 571,427 643,146 40,092 574,961 615,053 3,482 12,027 3,318
Manitoba April 17, 1997 November 27, 1997 7,725 42,955 50,680 6,786 42,955 49,741 3,598 42,806 46,404 250 624 583
Saskatchewan February 6, 1998 January 1, 1999 7,203 35,943 43,146 6,140 35,943 42,083 3,226 35,158 38,384 354 709 500
Alberta December 6, 1996 November 1, 1997 29,686 127,676 157,362 29,290 127,676 156,966 14,822 116,795 131,617 743 1,468 1,110
British Columbia February 20, 2008 February 2, 2009 25,185 276,944 302,129 22,847 276,944 299,791 13,576 278,354 291,931 986 1,563 4,955
Northwest Territories February 27, 1998 October 1, 1998 227 2,964 3,191 292 2,964 3,256 162 3,000 3,162 250 n/a 500
Yukon July 8, 2009 February 1, 2010 340 3,762 4,101 247 3,762 4,009 140 3,708 3,848 250 n/a 500
Nunavut May 11, 2000 April 1, 2000 303 2,725 3,028 257 2,725 2,983 147 2,761 2,908 250 n/a 500
Canada n/a n/a 250,000 1,950,000 2,200,000 225,000 1,950,000 2,175,000 125,000 1,950,000 2,075,000 20,500 25,000 29,104
  • 1Funds that are transferred to cover administrative costs are not included in the amounts. Please refer to Annex 3.12 for administrative costs.
  • 2Announced in Budget 2017.
  • 3 Includes approximately $4.1M in funding repurposed from the Targeted Earnings Supplements measure announced as part of the Softwood Lumber Action Plan in 2017.

Annex 3.2 – Employment Insurance (EI) Part II – General definitions

Eligibility for Employment Benefits and Support Measures (EBSMs) or similar programs funded under Part II

In FY1819, to be eligible for Employment Benefits, individuals must be unemployed and have a current Employment Insurance (EI) claim as an “active EI client” or a claim that ended in the preceding 5 years as a “former EI client.” Those who began a maternity or parental claim in the preceding 5 years, after which they left the labour market to care for their newborn or newly adopted children, also qualify as former EI clients and are eligible for Employment Benefits upon re-entry into the labour market. In addition, in FY1819, eligibility for Employment Benefits was expanded to include all unemployed individuals who have made EI premium contributions above the premium refund contribution threshold ($2,000 in earnings annually) in at least 5 of the last 10 years. These clients are said to be Premium Paid Eligible (PPE).

Unemployed individuals who are neither active, former EI clients, nor PPEs are considered “non-insured” and are eligible to participate in Employment Assistance Services (EAS), as well as self-services provided by the National Employment Service. In FY1819, eligibility to EAS was expanded to include employed Canadians.

Labour Market Development Agreements (LMDAs)

LMDAs provide the frameworks within which EBSM delivery takes place. EBSMs are flexible by design, allowing provincial and territorial jurisdictions (P/Ts) to develop and deliver programs that respond to local and regional labour market needs. With the implementation of the Canada-Yukon LMDA on February 1, 2010, all provinces and territories are now fully responsible for the design and delivery of programs similar to EBSMs established under Part II of the EI Act. In support of these activities, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) transfers LMDA funding to the provinces and territories and focuses on accountability, evaluation and ongoing policy development. ESDC also delivers Pan-Canadian programming and maintains, in partnership with the provinces and territories, specific projects and activities in the national interest under Part II of the EI Act. Canada retains responsibility for the delivery of insurance benefits under Part I of the EI Act and for the aspects of labour market development reflective of national interests.

Apprentices

Apprentices are paid by their employer during periods of practical training. During the classroom portion of their training, apprentices are eligible for regular benefits under Part I of the EI Act. The apprentice requires a referral under the authority of Section 25 of the EI Act to access these benefits. Depending on the regional and local priorities of the province or territory, the apprentice may receive EI Part II support to cover classroom-related expenses.

Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS)

ESDC negotiates agreements with indigenous organizations to design and deliver employment programs and services for indigenous people at the community level. Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy (ASETS) is the successor to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy (AHRDS), which expired on March 31, 2010.

The sunsetting of AHRDS and the modernization of ESDC's Aboriginal labour market programming—through ASETS—coincides with ESDC’s process of modernizing the administration of grants and contributions. The ASETS advances labour market outcomes for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit via demand-driven skills development, strategic partnerships with provinces, territories and the private sector, and via increased accountability. It also supports the development of a skilled Aboriginal workforce, which is one of the Aboriginal Economic Development Framework’s objectives. This program transitioned to the Indigenous Skills and Employment Training (ISET) program as of April 1, 2019.

Job Bank

Job Bank is an Internet service that helps connect employers and workers. It is the largest web-based network of job advertisements across Canada and is available to Canadian employers and job seekers free of charge.

Annex 3.3 – EBSM program descriptions

Employment benefits

Targeted Wage Subsidies assist insured participants to obtain on-the-job work experience by providing employers with financial assistance toward the wages of participants. This benefit encourages employers to hire unemployed individuals whom they would not normally hire in the absence of a subsidy.

Self-Employment provides financial assistance and business planning advice to EI-eligible participants to help them start their own business. This financial assistance is intended to cover personal living expenses and other expenses during the initial stages of the business.

Job Creation Partnerships projects provide insured participants with opportunities to gain work experience that will lead to ongoing employment. Activities of the project help develop the community and the local economy.

Skills Development helps insured participants to obtain employment skills by giving them direct financial assistance that enables them to select, arrange for and pay for their own training.

Support measures

Employment Assistance Services provide funding to organizations to enable them to provide employment assistance to unemployed persons. The services provided may include individual counselling, action planning, job search skills, job-finding clubs, job placement services, the provision of labour market information, case management and follow-up.

Labour Market Partnerships provide funding to help employers, employee and employer associations, and communities to improve their capacity to deal with human resource requirements and to implement labour force adjustments. These partnerships involve developing plans and strategies, and implementing adjustment measures

Research and Innovation supports activities that identify better way of helping people to prepare for or keep employment and to be productive participants in the labour force. Funds are provided to eligible recipients to enable them to carry out demonstration projects and research for this purpose.

Annex 3.4 – EBSM overview

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Clients served2 FY18191
Gender Percentage
Men 56.7%
Women 43.3%
  • 1In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Clients with an unknown gender were added to the male category.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table B: Age3 FY18191
Age3 Percentage
15 to 19 7.0%
20 to 24 15.3%
25 to 29 14.5%
30 to 34 12.4%
35 to 39 11.0%
40 to 44 9.1%
45 to 49 8.1%
50 to 54 7.8%
55 and older 13.4%
Unknown 1.3%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 3 SD-Apprentices and Group Services are excluded from the distribution because client date of birth is not collected.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table C: EI clients served FY18191
EI clients served Percentage
Active claimants 62.8%
Former claimants 22.4%
PPE 14.8%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table D: Intervention-to-client ratio FY18191
Intervention-to-client ratio Totals
Clients 695,610
Interventions 1,067,991
Ratios 1.54
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table E: Participation in interventions as a percentage of total FY18191
Employment benefits Percentage
Targeted Wage Subsidies 1.7%
Self-Employment 0.5%
Job Creation Partnerships 0.3%
Skills Development - Regular 6.8%
Skills Development - Apprentices 6.2%
Targeted Earning Supplements 0.0%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table F: Participation in interventions as a percentage of total (support measures) FY18191
Support measures: Employment Assistance Services Percentage
Employment services 47.5%
Group services 1.4%
Individual counselling 31.4%
Pan-Canadian 4.2%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table G: Designated group participation in EBSMs FY18191
Designated group participation in EBSMs Percentage
Women 45.5%
Indigenous peoples4 10.7%
Persons with disabilities4 13.5%
Visible minorities4 7.1%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 4 Reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.
Table H: Labour market FY18191
Labour market Total/Percentage
Employment 18,747,100
Unemployment rate 5.8%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • Sources: Client and Participant datasets.

Annex 3.5 – EBSM clients: Clients served, by client type

Annex 3.5 – EBSM clients: Clients served, by client type1,2 FY1819
Provinces
and
territories
Insured clients: Active claimants target3 Insured clients: Active claimants served Insured clients: Former claimants served Insured clients: PPE Total insured clients served Non-insured clients served Total clients served
Newfoundland and Labrador 9,000 7,716 1,371 124 9,211 542 9,753
Prince Edward Island 2,860 3,624 712 438 4,774 1,595 6,369
Nova Scotia 9,500 9,466 1,901 1,041 12,408 3,040 15,448
New Brunswick 10,000 10,387 2,263 1,327 13,977 7,550 21,527
Quebec 136,500 116,261 23,005 17,248 156,514 58,228 214,742
Ontario 60,000 53,221 26,626 25,228 105,075 100,631 205,706
Manitoba 8,900 8,453 3,085 2,518 14,056 10,022 24,078
Saskatchewan 11,475 8,850 6,058 7,772 22,680 2,527 25,207
Alberta 48,000 30,363 13,036 8,388 51,787 31,484 83,271
British Columbia 33,000 28,399 7,055 2,904 38,358 23,332 61,690
Northwest Territories 300 266 205 229 700 355 1,055
Yukon 250 189 35 39 263 75 338
Nunavut n/a 142 177 234 553 694 1,247
National Headquarters n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Total EBSMs 329,785 277,337 85,529 67,490 430,356 240,075 670,431
Indigenous Pan-Canadian n/a 8,860 16,319 n/a 25,179 n/a 25,179
Canada 329,785 286,197 101,848 67,490 455,535 240,075 695,610
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 This table includes clients served between April 1, 2018, and March 31, 2019, with one count per client served.
  • 3 Each jurisdiction's target refers to the number of EI active clients served, except in Quebec, where it includes both active and former clients served.
  • Source: Client dataset.

Annex 3.6 – New EBSM interventions

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits: New EBSM interventions1,2
Employment benefits N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.3 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 802 562 928 3,254 8,196 3322 31 0 179 1,501 14 4 0 n/a 18,793
Self-Employment 267 151 558 248 1,638 0 83 67 260 1,690 11 0 5 n/a 4,978
Job Creation Partnerships 1,386 59 133 0 0 113 240 0 987 204 0 0 0 n/a 3,122
Skills Development – Regular 3,244 2,398 3,510 7,208 23,376 9,564 2,515 15,783 1,284 2,944 87 29 284 n/a 72,226
Skills Development – Apprentices 1,547 305 2,007 2,054 0 18,692 3,997 7,125 15,422 13,843 126 164 41 n/a 65,323
Targeted Earning Supplements 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a 0
Total employment benefits 7,246 3,475 7,136 12,764 33,210 31,691 6,866 22,975 18,132 20,182 238 197 330 n/a 164,442
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Interventions in this table refer to all new starts between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019.
  • 3 Ontario counts one individual counselling intervention per client.
  • Source: Participant dataset.
Table B: Support measures: EAS: New EBSM interventions1,2
Support measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.3 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Employment services 5,091 4,502 17,570 8,988 184,608 0 34,994 6,928 140,687 100,236 0 207 1,371 n/a 505,182
Group services 3,603 0 808 0 13,929 0 0 300 0 58 0 0 0 n/a 18,698
Individual counselling 4,993 2,386 1,854 19,346 38,836 200,387 19,049 5,563 0 40,995 1,762 0 0 n/a 335,171
Total support measures: EAS 13,687 6,888 20,232 28,334 237,373 200,387 54,043 12,791 140,687 141,289 1,762 207 1,371 n/a 859,051
Total support measures: EAS–without group services 10,084 6,888 19,424 28,334 223,444 200,387 54,043 12,491 140,687 141,231 1,762 207 1,371 n/a 840,353
Total benefits and support measures: EAS 20,933 10,363 27,368 41,098 270,583 232,078 60,909 35,766 158,819 161,471 2,000 404 1,701 n/a 1,023,493
Indigenous Pan-Canadian 397 139 724 613 3,425 7,420 7,402 7,427 4,324 11,332 524 228 229 314 44,498
Grand total–benefits and support measures: EAS 21,330 10,502 28,092 41,711 274,008 239,498 68,311 43,193 163,143 172,803 2,524 632 1,930 314 1,067,991
Grand total–without group services 17,727 10,502 27,284 41,711 260,079 239,498 68,311 42,893 163,143 172,745 2,524 632 1,930 314 1,049,293
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Interventions in this table refer to all new starts between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019.
  • 3 Ontario counts one individual counselling intervention per client.
  • Source: Participant dataset.

Annex 3.7 – EBSM designated members – Women

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2
Employment benefits N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 59.6 40.7 45.5 57.2 44.9 46.7 61.3 0 48.0 47.3 42.9 50.0 0 n/a 47.8
Self-Employment 53.2 45.0 50.2 43.1 49.2 0 36.1 46.3 49.6 52.1 45.5 0 40.0 n/a 49.8
Job Creation Partnerships 41.9 52.5 55.6 0 0 76.1 40.0 0 46.8 38.7 0 0 0 n/a 45.1
Skills Development–Regular 43.6 57.5 51.7 52.8 46.0 54.7 52.2 57.3 65.2 59.2 54.0 44.8 59.5 n/a 52.0
Skills Development–Apprentices 8.3 7.2 6.9 4.2 0 2.7 2.9 5.1 6.1 6.1 3.2 7.3 4.9 n/a 4.8
Targeted Earning Supplements 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a 0
Total employment benefits 36.2 49.8 38.3 45.9 45.9 23.3 22.9 41.1 13.6 21.1 26.1 13.7 52.4 n/a 32.5
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819).
  • Source: Participant dataset.
Table B: Support measures: EAS: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2
Support measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Employment services 44.8 53.4 52.0 48.4 45.2 0 50.6 36.2 49.1 50.0 0.0 59.4 49.7 n/a 47.9
Individual counselling 44.3 52.8 57.5 48.0 46.2 48.4 51.5 46.7 0 49.4 35.7 0 0 n/a 48.4
Total support measures: EAS 44.6 53.2 52.5 48.1 45.3 48.4 50.9 40.9 49.1 49.8 35.7 59.4 49.7 n/a 48.1
Total benefits and support measures: EAS 39.2 52.1 48.7 47.4 45.4 45.0 47.8 41.0 45.1 46.2 34.6 37.1 50.2 n/a 45.5
Indigenous Pan-Canadian 37.8 42.4 50.4 43.7 52.2 47.9 45.5 49.7 37.3 43.6 51.7 32.5 62.9 63.1 46.0
Grand total, benefits and support measures: EAS 39.2 51.9 48.7 47.4 45.5 45.1 47.5 42.5 44.8 46.1 38.1 35.4 51.7 63.1 45.5
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819).
  • Source: Participant dataset.

Annex 3.8 – EBSM designated members – Persons with disabilities

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2
Employment benefits N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 0.0 2.7 20.8 4.9 51.4 10.4 9.7 0.0 2.8 32.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 n/a 29.6
Self-Employment 0.0 0.0 17.7 2.0 2.9 0.0 3.6 7.5 3.1 34.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 n/a 15.2
Job Creation Partnerships 0.0 1.7 15.0 0.0 0.0 7.1 9.6 0.0 2.6 34.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 n/a 4.8
Skills Development–Regular 0.0 3.0 7.6 5.3 5.8 16.0 4.4 9.7 2.2 40.4 1.1 13.8 2.1 n/a 9.0
Skills Development–Apprentices 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.4 0.1 3.0 0.0 0.4 0.8 0.0 0.0 n/a 0.6
Targeted Earning Supplements 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 n/a 0.0
Total employment benefits 0.0 2.5 8.1 4.4 16.9 6.2 2.1 7.6 0.4 11.8 0.8 2.0 1.8 n/a 8.0
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Source: Participant dataset.
Table B: Support measures: EAS: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2
Support measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Employment services 0.0 33.0 29.5 15.6 9.6 0.0 9.3 10.3 5.0 41.0 0.0 2.9 1.2 n/a 15.5
Individual counselling 0.0 10.9 40.1 10.6 7.4 10.7 7.8 11.2 0.0 43.7 1.7 0.0 0.0 n/a 14.3
Total support measures: EAS 0.0 25.3 30.5 12.2 9.2 10.7 8.8 10.7 5.0 41.8 1.7 2.9 1.2 n/a 15.0
Total benefits and support measures: EAS 0.0 17.7 24.5 9.7 10.2 10.1 8.0 8.7 4.5 38.0 1.6 2.5 1.3 n/a 13.9
Indigenous Pan-Canadian 3.3 7.2 6.6 5.2 0.7 4.2 6.6 12.7 2.4 6.4 0.8 0.4 0.9 4.8 6.1
Grand total, benefits and support measures: EAS 0.1 17.5 24.0 9.7 10.1 9.9 7.9 9.4 4.4 36.0 1.4 1.7 1.2 4.8 13.5
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Source: Participant dataset.

Annex 3.9 – EBSM designated members – Indigenous peoples

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2
Employment benefits  N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 0.0 1.1 4.3 2.5 0.5 1.0 58.1 0.0 1.1 9.0 64.3 25.0 0.0 n/a 2.0
Self-Employment 0.0 1.3 4.3 1.6 0.4 0.0 22.9 9.0 6.9 9.3 18.2 0.0 40.0 n/a 4.8
Job Creation Partnerships 0.0 0.0 4.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 34.6 0.0 11.0 19.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 n/a 7.6
Skills Development–Regular 0.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 0.9 1.5 28.7 7.4 2.9 11.3 87.4 31.0 75.0 n/a 4.5
Skills Development–Apprentices 0.1 0.0 0.6 0.4 0.0 0.1 3.7 0.0 0.2 0.2 21.4 0.0 51.2 n/a 0.5
Targeted Earning Supplements 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 n/a 0.0
Total employment benefits 0.0 1.1 1.9 2.8 0.8 0.6 14.4 5.1 1.1 3.5 47.9 5.1 71.5 n/a 2.7
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Source: Participant dataset.
Table B: Support measures: EAS: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2
Support measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Employment services 0.0 0.8 3.8 2.3 0.8 0.0 35.3 12.7 10.8 13.8 0.0 9.2 73.9 n/a 9.1
Individual counselling 0.0 0.8 4.7 3.2 2.0 1.0 27.9 12.5 0.0 14.8 77.1 0.0 0.0 n/a 5.1
Total support measures: EAS 0.0 0.8 3.9 2.9 1.0 1.0 32.7 12.6 10.8 14.1 77.1 9.2 73.9 n/a 7.5
Total benefits and support measures: EAS 0.0 0.9 3.3 2.8 1.0 0.9 30.7 7.8 9.7 12.8 73.6 7.2 73.4 n/a 6.7
Indigenous Pan-Canadian 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100.0
Grand total, benefits and support measures: EAS 3.6 2.2 5.9 4.3 2.3 4.0 38.2 23.7 12.1 18.5 79.1 40.7 76.6 100.0 10.7
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Source: Participant dataset.

Annex 3.10 – EBSM designated members – Visible minorities

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2,3
Employment benefits N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 0.0 3.4 4.5 2.4 0.0 8.8 16.1 0.0 1.1 10.1 14.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.2
Self-Employment 0.0 4.6 4.7 0.4 0.0 0.0 6.0 7.5 3.1 10.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.5
Job Creation Partnerships 0.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 0.0 5.3 10.8 0.0 1.6 10.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.5
Skills Development–Regular 0.0 3.5 1.3 2.9 0.0 13.3 24.7 12.4 3.2 11.0 19.5 3.4 1.1 0.0 6.3
Skills Development–Apprentices 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.7 0.8 3.9 0.0 0.2 1.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7
Targeted Earning Supplements 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total employment benefits 0.0 3.2 1.8 2.3 0.0 5.4 10.0 9.8 0.4 3.4 8.8 0.5 0.9 0.0 3.6
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Quebec, and NHQ did not report participation levels for members of the visible minority groups. Therefore, these jurisdictions were excluded from the calculation of the national average.
  • 3All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Source: Participant dataset.
Table B: Support measures: EAS: New starts, by intervention (%) FY18191,2,3
Support measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Employment services 0.0 15.9 9.4 16.9 0.0 0.0 24.3 8.3 1.8 15.8 0.0 0.0 0.8 0.0 6.3
Individual counselling 0.0 6.9 7.2 7.1 0.0 11.0 29.2 9.4 0.0 15.2 19.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.0
Total support measures: EAS 0.0 12.8 9.2 10.2 0.0 11.0 26.1 8.8 1.8 15.6 19.4 0.0 0.8 0.0 8.1
Total benefits and support measures: EAS 0.0 9.6 7.2 7.8 0.0 10.2 24.3 9.4 1.7 14.1 18.1 0.2 0.8 0.0 7.4
Indigenous Pan-Canadian 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Grand total, benefits and support measures: EAS 0.0 0.0 7.0 7.6 0.0 9.9 21.6 7.8 1.6 13.2 14.3 0.2 0.7 0.0 7.1
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Quebec, and NHQ did not report participation levels for members of the visible minority groups. Therefore, these jurisdictions were excluded from the calculation of the national average.
  • 3All percentages are based on new start interventions only (the number of interventions started in FY1819). These reported counts are generally lower than actual numbers because data are collected through self-identification.
  • Source: Participant dataset.

Annex 3.11 - EBSM and Pan-Canadian activities ― Part I - Final expenditures

Intervention – In $000s by intervention FY1819
Intervention N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Self-Employment 1,338 941 2,244 2,517 5,757 28 672 327 1,379 2,432 129 0 11 0 17,775
Job Creation Partnerships1 1,109 132 168 19 50 120 267 6 7 142 0 0 0 0 2,020
Skills Development 17,964 16,656 27,558 50,618 44,258 81,727 28,166 19,459 83,025 53,821 852 673 206 0 424,983
TOTAL2 20,411 17,729 29,970 53,154 50,065 81,875 29,105 19,792 84,411 56,395 981 673 217 0 444,778
  • 1 In Quebec, this amount refers only to pan-Canadian activities.
  • 2 Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • Source: Benefit and Overpayment System

Annex 3.12 - EBSM final expenditures

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits – In $000s by intervention FY1819
Employment benefits N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.4 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun.6 NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 7,519 3,696 3,293 16,883 93,219 6,258 150 0 1,662 9,037 230 12 400 n/a 142,358
Self-Employment 6,507 1,986 6,218 5,202 22,832 0 1,232 339 1,906 14,178 216 0 18 n/a 60,634
Job Creation Partnerships 8,509 734 884 0 0 1,281 1,682 0 13,323 7,484 144 0 0 n/a 34,041
Skills Development 90,792 14,923 37,942 56,047 218,048 171,819 29,620 29,952 75,494 148,902 1,166 1,496 1,501 n/a 877,703
Targeted Earning Supplements n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Total5 employment benefits 113,327 21,338 48,338 78,132 334,099 179,358 32,684 30,291 92,385 179,601 1,756 1,508 1,918 n/a 1,114,735
  • 4 Expenditures for Ontario TWS (Job Placement with Incentives) were estimated by Ontario. In Ontario's financial statements, actual expenditures for Ontario's TWS-similar interventions were included in total EAS expenditures, because the province has integrated these services in its employment service model, in order to maximize the flexibility of program delivery by third-party service providers.
  • 5 Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • 6Expenditures are estimates as Nunavut was unable to provide an audited financial statement at time of writing, as Government of Nunavut networks were impacted by ransomware in late 2019.
  • Source: provincial/territorial audited statements.
Table B: Support measures: EAS – In $000s by intervention FY1819
Support measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.4 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun.6 NHQ Canada
Employment assistance 10,060 4,651 33,414 7,656 146,589 323,004 10,092 10,885 56,657 99,723 958 1,544 150 n/a 705,383
Total5 support measures: EAS 10,060 4,651 33,414 7,656 146,589 323,004 10,092 10,885 56,657 99,723 958 1,544 150 n/a 705,383
Sub-total : Employment benefits and support measures: EAS 123,388 25,989 81,752 85,789 480,688 502,361 42,776 41,176 149,042 279,324 2,714 3,052 2,068 n/a 1,820,118
  • 4 Expenditures for Ontario TWS (Job Placement with Incentives) were estimated by Ontario. In Ontario's financial statements, actual expenditures for Ontario's TWS-similar interventions were included in total EAS expenditures, because the province has integrated these services in its employment service model, in order to maximize the flexibility of program delivery by third-party service providers.
  • 5 Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • 6Expenditures are estimates as Nunavut was unable to provide an audited financial statement at time of writing, as Government of Nunavut networks were impacted by ransomware in late 2019.
  • Source: provincial/territorial audited statements.
Table C: Other support measures – In $000s by intervention FY1819
Other support measures N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.4 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun.6 NHQ Canada
Labour Market Partnerships 7,448 1,731 4,727 12,073 113,338 90,781 5,669 1,405 4,995 10,955 75 0 172 n/a 253,371
Research and Innovation 3,123 0 267 294 4,533 68,831 1,296 451 0 15,080 77 51 0 n/a 94,004
Total5 other support measures 10,572 1,731 4,994 12,368 117,872 159,612 6,965 1,856 4,995 26,035 152 51 172 n/a 347,375
Total EBSM— Part II 133,959 27,720 86,746 98,156 598,559 661,973 49,741 43,032 154,037 305,359 2,866 3,103 2,240 n/a 2,167,493
Overcontribution1 1,081 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,935 390 886 992 0 5,284
Pan-Canadian (see details in Annex 3.13) 9,797 1,529 6,436 5,710 45,179 72,063 47,445 46,665 48,356 51,844 16,827 4,816 5,710 27,379 139,000
  • 1 Overcontributions will be recovered during FY1920.
  • 4 Expenditures for Ontario TWS (Job Placement with Incentives) were estimated by Ontario. In Ontario's financial statements, actual expenditures for Ontario's TWS-similar interventions were included in total EAS expenditures, because the province has integrated these services in its employment service model, in order to maximize the flexibility of program delivery by third-party service providers.
  • 5 Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • 6 Expenditures are estimates as Nunavut was unable to provide an audited financial statement at time of writing, as Government of Nunavut networks were impacted by ransomware in late 2019.
  • Source: provincial/territorial audited statements.
Table D: Adjustment – In $000s by intervention FY1819
Adjustment2 N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont.4 Man. Sask. Alta. B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun.6 NHQ Canada
Adjustment (1,430) 0 0 0 0 25,435 (35) 0 0 (4,415) (253) (364) (521) (27,379) (8,962)
Total5 including Pan-Canadian 136,195 27,966 88,584 99,593 611,254 710,255 65,792 56,545 168,670 318,321 6,221 4,997 8,422 0 2,302,815
Administrative costs related to LMDAs3 9,424 2,771 10,983 8,922 58,920 57,277 6,079 6,636 12,523 19,761 1,450 409 546 n/a 195,700
  • 2 This adjustment reflects overpayments established, refunds of previous years' expenditures and other accounting adjustments. CFOB is currently working on it and will provide them shortly.
  • 3 Net Administrative costs include $181 million (salary and non-salary) to administer LMDAs and $11 million for rent.
  • 4 Expenditures for Ontario TWS (Job Placement with Incentives) were estimated by Ontario. In Ontario's financial statements, actual expenditures for Ontario's TWS-similar interventions were included in total EAS expenditures, because the province has integrated these services in its employment service model, in order to maximize the flexibility of program delivery by third-party service providers.
  • 5 Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • 6 Expenditures are estimates as Nunavut was unable to provide an audited financial statement at time of writing, as Government of Nunavut networks were impacted by ransomware in late 2019.
  • Source: provincial/territorial audited statements.

Annex 3.13 - EI Part II Pan-Canadian ― Final expenditures

Pan-Canadian – Programming funds – In $000s by intervention FY1819
Pan-Canadian - Programming funds N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que. Ont. Man. Sask. Alberta B.C. N.W.T. Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy 2,584 246 1,838 1,437 12,695 22,846 16,086 13,513 14,633 15,443 3,219 1,372 5,710 1,228 112,848
Labour Market Partnerships 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 22,486 22,486
Research and Innovation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3,665 3,665
Grand total1 Pan-Canadian 2,584 246 1,838 1,437 12,695 22,846 16,086 13,513 14,633 15,443 3,219 1,372 5,710 27,379 139,000
  • 1 Totals may not add due to rounding.
  • Source: SAP

Annex 3.14 - Returns to employment and unpaid benefits indicators

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Clients who returned to employment2 FY18191
Province/Territory Targets3 SD-Apprentices results Group services results Other4 results Total results Results vs. targets (%)
Newfoundland and Labrador 4,000 1,134 3 1,918 3,055 76%
Prince Edward Island 2,201 220 0 2,250 2,470 112%
Nova Scotia 5,250 1,308 342 3,425 5,075 97%
New Brunswick 8,300 1,523 0 6,508 8,031 97%
Quebec 50,900 0 6,900 67,635 74,535 146%
Ontario 37,000 14,670 0 32,730 47,400 128%
Manitoba 6,000 2,874 0 1,596 4,470 75%
Saskatchewan 6,700 3,095 99 1,954 5,148 77%
Alberta 24,000 13,117 0 5,552 18,669 78%
British Columbia 20,000 9,484 22 12,009 21,515 108%
Northwest Territories 200 98 0 83 181 91%
Yukon 160 93 0 27 120 75%
Nunavut n/a 24 0 24 48 n/a
Canada 164,711 47,640 7,366 135,711 190,717 116%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 ASETS activity resulted in 12,032 returns to employment and $16.9 million in unpaid benefits. These amounts are not included in the provincial totals.
  • 3 Targets are for EBSM regular clients only.
  • 4 The “Other” category includes all other EBSMs. SD-Apprentices and group services are reported separately because a different methodology is used to calculate returns to employment for these 2 measures.
  • Source: Results dataset.
Table B: Unpaid benefits ($ millions)2 FY18191
Province/Territory Targets3 SD-Apprentices results Group services results Other4 results Total5 results Results vs. targets (%)
Newfoundland and Labrador 24.0 12.2 0.0 4.0 16.2 67%
Prince Edward Island 7.0 2.6 0.0 4.1 6.7 96%
Nova Scotia 24.0 15.6 2.2 8.6 26.4 110%
New Brunswick 30.5 16.5 0.0 8.5 25.0 82%
Quebec 262.0 0.0 43.7 250.2 293.9 112%
Ontario 246.0 167.8 0.0 97.5 265.2 108%
Manitoba 44.0 32.3 0.0 9.9 42.2 96%
Saskatchewan 50.0 39.2 0.8 9.2 49.1 98%
Alberta 240.0 169.4 0.0 36.5 205.9 86%
British Columbia 136.0 110.7 0.1 26.0 136.8 101%
Northwest Territories 2.5 1.3 0.0 0.3 1.6 66%
Yukon 1.2 0.9 0.0 0.1 1.1 89%
Nunavut n/a 0.4 0.0 0.2 0.6 n/a
Canada 1,067 568.8 46.8 455.1 1,071 100%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 ASETS activity resulted in 12,032 returns to employment and $16.9 million in unpaid benefits. These amounts are not included in the provincial totals.
  • 3 Targets are for EBSM regular clients only.
  • 4 The “Other” category includes all other EBSMs. SD-Apprentices and group services are reported separately because a different methodology is used to calculate returns to employment for these 2 measures.
  • 5 Some unpaid benefit figures have been rounded.
  • Source: Results dataset.

Annex 3.15 - Returns to employment by EBSM intervention

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table A: Employment benefits – FY18191,2
Employment benefits N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que.4 Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C.4 N.W.T4 Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Targeted Wage Subsidies 123 337 311 859 2,380 1,486 0 0 37 943 3 0 0 n/a 6,479
Self-Employment 143 110 295 196 1,034 0 8 11 60 849 10 0 0 n/a 2,716
Job Creation Partnerships 330 21 45 0 0 22 12 0 249 92 0 0 0 n/a 771
Skills Development — Regular 1,009 727 473 2,547 8,647 2,122 175 309 28 1,427 32 4 7 n/a 17,507
Skills Development—Apprentices3 1,134 220 1,308 1,523 0 14,670 2,874 3,095 13,117 9,484 98 93 24 n/a 47,640
Targeted Earning Supplements 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a 0
Total benefits 2,739 1,415 2,432 5,125 12,061 18,300 3,069 3,415 13,491 12,795 143 97 31 n/a 75,113
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Results associated solely with the ASETS are not available.
  • 3Results for SD-Apprentices do not match those in Annex 3.14. Results presented in this Annex are associated with the last intervention in which a client participated. Employment Benefits participation supersedes participation in Employment Services.
  • 4 Due to the methodology difference, these numbers are different from the POB's result.
  • Sources: Results dataset and Common System for Grants and Contributions (CSGC)
Table B: Support measures: EAS – FY18191,2
Suppport measures: EAS N.L. P.E.I. N.S. N.B. Que.4 Ont. Man. Sask. Alta. B.C.4 N.W.T4 Yk. Nun. NHQ Canada
Employment services 152 722 2,086 472 49,379 0 624 599 5,178 4,826 1 23 17 n/a 64,079
Group services 3 0 342 0 6,900 0 0 99 0 22 0 0 0 n/a 7,366
Individual counselling 161 333 215 2,434 6,195 29,100 777 1,035 0 3,872 37 0 0 n/a 44,159
Total support measures: EAS 316 1,055 2,643 2,906 62,474 29,100 1,401 1,733 5,178 8,720 38 23 17 n/a 115,604
Total employment benefits and support measures: EAS 3,055 2,470 5,075 8,031 74,535 47,400 4,470 5,148 18,669 21,515 181 120 48 n/a 190,717
Target 4,000 2,201 5,250 8,300 50,900 37,000 6,000 6,700 24,000 20,000 200 160 n/a n/a 164,711
Results vs. targets (%) 76% 112% 97% 97% 146% 128% 75% 77% 78% 108% 91% n/a n/a n/a 116%
  • 1 In FY1314, Newfoundland and Labrador implemented a new case management system. In the context of the transition to this new system, FY1819 administrative data counts for the province on clients and interventions presented in this year’s report are estimates, based on partial counts and other sources of information, such as the audited financial statements and temporary transitional data capturing processes for that period. As such, Newfoundland and Labrador’s estimates should be interpreted with caution in the context of national results.
  • 2 Results associated solely with the ASETS are not available.
  • 4 Due to the methodology difference, these numbers are different from the POB's result.
  • Sources: Results dataset and Common System for Grants and Contributions (CSGC)

Annex 3.16 - Incremental impacts of EBSMs at the national and provincial levels

The following presents the results from an analysis of EBSM incremental impacts over 3 years after participation for active claimants who started participating in 2007 to 2008 or between 2006 and 2008 (that is, post-program impacts over 3 consecutive years between 2008 and 2012 or 2006 and 2012). The national results from this analysis were presented in the FY1314 EI MAR. This section of Annex 3 presents the national results as well as those at the provincial levels.

1. Study objective and methodology

Incremental impacts of EBSMs represent the direct effect of program participation on participants’ labour market experience (this is, earnings from employment/self-employment, incidence of employment and use of EI) after participation. The role of the incremental impact analysis is to isolate the effects of participation from other factors such as:

  • inflation
  • economic cycles
  • layoff

In order to achieve this, the incremental impact analysis compares the labour market experience of participants before and after their participation, with that of non-participants before and after the same period (see diagram).

The analysis covered up to 100% of active and former claimants who started their participation in EBSMs between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2008 or between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008. This analysis was conducted at the national level with participants from the 13 PTs. It was also conducted at the provincial level for 9 provinces. Results were not produced for Quebec since the Quebec Government is responsible for evaluating its LMDAFootnote 1. As well, it was not possible to produce incremental impacts for the territories because the number of participants was too low to generate reliable results. The 2007 to 2008 reference period was used at the national level as well as in provinces where the number of participants was sufficient to produce results. The period was extended by one year (2006 to 2008) in other provinces in order to increase the sample size. Despite adding this year, the number of participants for some EBSMs was still too low to generate impacts for those program and services.

Example of incremental impact calculation

Example of incremental impact calculation
Example of incremental impact calculation - Text description follows
Example of incremental impact calculation – Text version
Participation Participants
average annual earnings
Comparison group
average annual earnings
Incremental impact
(change due to program participate)
Before participation period $30,000 $31,000 n/a
After participation period $38,000 $36,000 n/a
Change in earnings +$8,000 +$5,000 +$3,000
(that is, $8,000 to $5,000)

The analysis was conducted using linked administrative data from EI Part I and II and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). The comparison group was composed of active claimants who were eligible to participate in EBSMs but did not start participation in 2007 or 2008 or between 2006 and 2008.

The impacts of EBSM participation on improving the labour market experience of participants were measured using the following indicators:

  • average earningsfrom employment and/or self-employment: An increase in earnings indicates that participants improved their employment situation by either working more hours or by having a better paying job than they did before participation
  • incidence of employment (that is, incidence of having earnings from employment and/or self-employment): Measures whether participants were more likely to be employed after participation. A gain means that a higher proportion of participants were employed after participation than they would have been if they had not participated or if they had received minimal employment services
  • amount of EI benefits received: Measures the average amount of EI benefits collected
  • average number of weeks in receipt of EI: Measures the average number of weeks participants spent on EI

The same methodology was used at national and at the provincial levels.

2. National results

The following presents results at the national level and for the 9 provinces covered by this analysis. The national results are presented along with a text description to help readers understand how to interpret the results. The provincial results are presented in table format only. Since different reference periods were used at the national level and across provinces (that is, 2007 to 2008 or 2006 to 2008) the results are not directly comparable.

The national analysis covered active claimants in the 2007 to 2008 period. Key results are as follows:

Skills Development (SD): As shown in Table 1 below, SD participants experienced earnings gains in each of the 3 years after participation but those increases became larger over time. The incremental gains averaged $2,300 per year. Active claimants also had an average incremental increase of 4.7 percentage points in their incidence of employment in the 3 years following participation. As well, SD participation resulted in lower use of EI benefits. The incremental decreases averaged $400 per year.

Targeted Wage Subsidies (TWS): Active claimants had incremental gains in earnings in each of the 3 years following the end of their TWS participation averaging $1,300 per year. These gains were accompanied by incremental increases in incidence of employment in each year after participation averaging 6.1 percentage points per year. Most impacts on EI benefits collected were not statistically significant at the 95% level. In this context, it is not possible to draw any clear conclusion about TWS effectiveness in reducing the use of EI after participation.

Self-Employment (SE): Over the 3-year period following the end of their participation, active claimants had an average incremental reduction of $10,200 per year in their earnings from employment and/or self-employment and a reduction of 19 percentage points per year in their incidence of employment.

The earnings results should be interpreted with caution, as they may not fully capture the financial situation of participants. Impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example:

  • unemployed
  • paid employee, or
  • self-employed

According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes.Footnote 2 Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial situation of SE participants after their participation.

The incremental impact analysis also shows that SE participants collected $1,600 less in EI benefits per year on average. Those results should also be interpreted carefully since the time worked under self-employment does not allow self-employed Canadians to qualify for regular EI benefits.

Job Creation Partnerships (JCP): Participation in JCP improved active claimants’ earnings by an average of $1,200 per year. They also had incremental increases in the incidence of employment in each of the 3 years after participation, averaging 4.9 percentage points per year. As well, on average, active claimants collected $300 less in EI benefits annually.

Employment Assistance Services only (EAS-only): Impacts were measured for the active claimants who only participated in EAS without receiving other programs or services. EAS participation was effective at helping active claimants to return to employment. Incremental impact results show that they improved their incidence of employment, while reducing their use of EI in the 3 year period after participation. Specifically, they had an average incremental gain of 0.6 percentage points per year in their incidence of employment, as well as average incremental decreases of $390 per year in their use of EI benefits.

Active claimants had incremental decreases in their earnings averaging $465 per year. However, the result should be interpreted with caution, as EAS is a short term and low intensity measure that is not focused on human capital development. EAS mostly includes services such as counselling, help with job search, development of return-to-work action plans and, in some cases, very short training such as first aid. In this context, it may not be reasonable to expect that participation in EAS-only would result in improving participants’ earnings. However a recent evaluation on the timing of participation in EAS showed that participants who started their EAS within 4 weeks after initiating an EI claim had earnings gains in both the short- and medium-term after participation and achieved quicker return to employment.

Overall, results at the national level are similar to those in the provinces, with modest differences.

2.1 Canada

Table 1. Incremental impacts at the national level (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 1A. Incremental impacts at the national level: Skills Development (n=18,025)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) 292*** 2,745*** 3,904*** 2,314*** 6,943***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
3.1*** 5.2*** 5.8*** 4.7*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -755*** -298*** -191*** -415*** -1,244***
EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -0.9*** -0.5*** -1.2*** -3.7***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 1B. Incremental impacts at the national level: Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=9,114)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) 1,270*** 1,112*** 1,580*** 1,338*** 4,014***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
7.7*** 5.3*** 5.6*** 6.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -32 -55 -209** -99 -296
EI weeks (weeks) 0.3 0.2 -0.3 0.1 0.2
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 1C. Incremental impacts at the national level: Self-Employment (n=10,220)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -11,412*** -9,929*** -9,375*** -10,236*** -30,708***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-22.7*** -18.3*** -16.1*** -19.0*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -2,038*** -1,473*** -1,172*** -1,561*** -4,682***
EI weeks (weeks) -5.7*** -4.0*** -3.1*** -4.2*** -12.7***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Table 1D. Incremental impacts at the national level: Job Creation Partnerships (n=2,456)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) 1,427*** 1,286** 850 1,179** 3,537**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
6.1*** 4.5*** 3.8*** 4.9*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -513*** -404*** -44 -320*** -961***
EI weeks (weeks) -0.8** -0.8** 0.3 -0.5 -1.4
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 1E. Incremental impacts at the national level: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=108,230)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -1,113*** -368*** 87 -465*** -1,395***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
0.6*** 0.6*** 0.8*** 0.6** n/a
EI benefits ($) -512*** -371*** -288*** -390*** -$1,171
EI weeks (weeks) -1.7*** -1.1*** -0.8*** -1.2*** -3.6***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.2 Newfoundland and Labrador

Table 2. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 2A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador: Skills Development (n=8,611)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $1,820*** $3,836*** $6,477*** $4,046*** $12,139***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
1.0** 2.5*** 2.9*** 2.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$800*** -$319*** -$200*** -$440*** -$1,319***
EI weeks (weeks) -3.4*** -1.8*** -1.4*** -2.2*** -6.6***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 2B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador: Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=728)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $4,229*** $3,331*** $3,234*** $3,598*** $10,795***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
6.5*** 5.3*** 4.9*** 5.6*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$1,677*** -$1,229*** -$1,055*** -$1,320*** -$3,961***
EI weeks (weeks) -4.4*** -3.1*** -2.5*** -3.3*** -9.9***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 2C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador: Self-Employment (n=314)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$8,102*** -$5,771*** -$5,647*** -$6,507*** -$19,520***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-19.9*** -18.3*** -14.8*** -17.7*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$3,860*** -$2,951*** -$2,268*** -$3,026*** -$9,079***
EI weeks (weeks) -12.0*** -8.9*** -7.0*** -9.3*** -27.9***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Table 2D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador: Job Creation Partnerships (n=1,346)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$300 -$678 -$837* -$605 -$1,815
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
3.2*** 1.6 2.3** 2.4*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$714*** -$445*** -$116 -$425*** -$1,275***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.0** -0.2 0.9** -0.1 -0.2
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 2E. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Newfoundland and Labrador: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=11,904)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $927*** $2,158*** $2,503*** $1,863*** $5,588***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
2.0*** 2.2*** 2.1*** 2.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$375*** -$176*** -$128** -$226*** -$679***
EI weeks (weeks) -0.9*** -0.3** -0.1 -0.4*** -1.3***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.3 Prince Edward Island

Table 3. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Prince Edward Island (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 3A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Prince Edward Island: Skills Development (n=1,516)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $2,635*** $4,591*** $5,054*** $4,091*** $12,273***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
1.7** 3.0*** 2.6*** 2.4*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$477*** -$393*** -$168 -$346*** -$1,038***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.1*** -1.1** -0.7 -1.0*** -2.9***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Targeted Wage Subsidies

Not available due to low sample size.

Self-Employment

Not available due to low sample size.

Job Creation Partnerships

Not available due to low sample size.

Table 3B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Prince Edward Island: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=1,635)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $426*** $870 $1,089** $795** $2,386**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
1.7** 2.0** 1.0 1.6** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$645*** -$330** -$506 -$494*** -$1,481*
EI weeks (weeks) -1.8*** -0.6 -1.2*** -1.2*** -3.6***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.4 Nova Scotia

Table 4. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 4A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia: Skills Development (n=4,911)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $3,427*** $5,996*** $7,728*** $5,714*** $17,142***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
6.3*** 8.3*** 9.7*** 8.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$1,051*** -$532*** -$440*** -$675*** -$2,024***
EI weeks (weeks) -3.2*** -1.7*** -1.3*** -2.1*** -6.2***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 4B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia: Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=307)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $3,889*** $2,642** $3,151** $3,228** $9,683**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
6.2** 6.4** 7.7** 6.8** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$1,374*** -$834*** -$835** -$1,015*** -$3,044***
EI weeks (weeks) -4.3*** -2.3** -2.5** -3.0*** -9.1***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 4C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia: Self-Employment (n=846)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$10,302*** -$8,752*** -$9,691*** -$9,561*** -$28,683***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-29.5*** -25.4*** -22.4*** -25.8*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$2,506*** -$2,116*** -$1,814*** -$2,145*** -$6,436***
EI weeks (weeks) -7.3*** -5.7*** -5.0*** -6.0*** -18.0***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Table 4D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia: Job Creation Partnerships (n=350)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $571 $543 -$923 $64 $191
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
3.9* -1.1 -1.4 0.5 n/a
EI benefits ($) -$664** -$426 -$245 -$445* -$1,335*
EI weeks (weeks) -2.3** -1.3 -0.7 -1.4* -4.3*
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 4E. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Nova Scotia: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=9,456)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $177 $1,346*** $1,653*** $1,059*** $3,176***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
1.2*** 1.9*** 1.4*** 1.5*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$705*** -$579*** -$414*** -$566*** -$1,698***
EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -1.7*** -1.2*** -1.7*** -5.1***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.5 New Brunswick

Table 5. Incremental impacts for active claimants in New Brunswick (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 5A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in New Brunswick: Skills Development (n=4,528)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $1,051 $5,158*** $7,120*** $4,443*** $13,328***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
9.4*** 9.9*** 11.9*** 10.4*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$752*** -$294 $86 -$320* -$960*
EI weeks (weeks) -0.8 0.5 0.8 0.2 0.5
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 5B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in New Brunswick: Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=388)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $1,998** $1,276 $1,777** $1,684** $5,051*
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
7.6*** 6.0*** 7.7*** 7.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) $441 $802** $720** $655** $1,964**
EI weeks (weeks) 2.0** 2.9*** 2.2** 2.4*** 7.2***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 5C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in New Brunswick: Self-Employment (n=628)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$9,224*** -$8,154*** -$7,771*** -$8,383*** -$25,149***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-26.7*** -26.1*** -20.2*** -24.3*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$3,297*** -$2,804*** -$2,512*** -$2,871*** -$8,613***
EI weeks (weeks) -8.6*** -7.0*** -6.1*** -7.2*** -21.7***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Job Creation Partnerships

JCP was not delivered in New Brunswick during the observed period.

Table 5D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in New Brunswick: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=12,841)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $1,636*** $2,528*** $2,668*** $2,277*** $6,832***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
3.1*** 3.7*** 3.8*** 3.5*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$117 $6 $183* $24 $72
EI weeks (weeks) 0.0 0.5* 1.0*** 0.5** 1.5**
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.6 Ontario

Table 6. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 6A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario2: Skills Development in Ontario (n=17,015)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$1,959*** $379 $1,607*** n/a n/a
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
4.2*** 5.4*** 6.0*** 5.2*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$799*** -$233*** -$187*** -$406*** -$1,219***
EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -0.6*** -0.5*** -1.1*** -3.4***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 2In Ontario, participation in SD is up to 3 years in length. In the incremental impact analysis, the participation period is defined as 2 years. As a result, participants may still be in training during the first year of post-program results. Therefore, it is not unexpected to observe incremental decreases in earnings, as participants are not available for full time work in year 1 and will be transitioning into employment in year 2. To interpret trends for Ontario, the third year is the most relevant period to consider for incremental impacts. As a result, the average annual impact and total impact are not applicable for Ontario.
Table 6B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario2: Targeted Wage Subsidies in Ontario (n=2,530)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $2,176* $2,439* $2,650* $2,479** $7,437**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
7.3*** 11.3*** 8.6*** 9.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) $442* $61 -$104 $133 $399
EI weeks (weeks) 1.4* 0.2 0.0 0.6 1.7
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 2In Ontario, participation in SD is up to 3 years in length. In the incremental impact analysis, the participation period is defined as 2 years. As a result, participants may still be in training during the first year of post-program results. Therefore, it is not unexpected to observe incremental decreases in earnings, as participants are not available for full time work in year 1 and will be transitioning into employment in year 2. To interpret trends for Ontario, the third year is the most relevant period to consider for incremental impacts. As a result, the average annual impact and total impact are not applicable for Ontario.
Table 6C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario22: Self-Employment in Ontario (n=3,731)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$10,930*** -$9,433*** -$8,575*** -$9,646*** -$28,937***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-23.9*** -18.4*** -14.5*** -18.9*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$1,681*** -$1,099*** -$794*** -$1,191*** -$3,573***
EI weeks (weeks) -4.7*** -2.9*** -2.0*** -3.2*** -9.6***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

  • 2In Ontario, participation in SD is up to 3 years in length. In the incremental impact analysis, the participation period is defined as 2 years. As a result, participants may still be in training during the first year of post-program results. Therefore, it is not unexpected to observe incremental decreases in earnings, as participants are not available for full time work in year 1 and will be transitioning into employment in year 2. To interpret trends for Ontario, the third year is the most relevant period to consider for incremental impacts. As a result, the average annual impact and total impact are not applicable for Ontario.
Table 6D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario2: Job Creation Partnerships in Ontario (n=668)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $2,248* $3,513*** $3,290** $3,017** $9,051**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
7.3*** 7.2*** 5.8*** 6.8*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$518* -$381 $70 -$276 -$829
EI weeks (weeks) -1.9*** -1.2* -0.3 -1.1** -3.4**
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 2In Ontario, participation in SD is up to 3 years in length. In the incremental impact analysis, the participation period is defined as 2 years. As a result, participants may still be in training during the first year of post-program results. Therefore, it is not unexpected to observe incremental decreases in earnings, as participants are not available for full time work in year 1 and will be transitioning into employment in year 2. To interpret trends for Ontario, the third year is the most relevant period to consider for incremental impacts. As a result, the average annual impact and total impact are not applicable for Ontario.
Table 6E. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Ontario2: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) in Ontario (n=35,302)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$654*** $465*** $895*** $235 $706
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
2.8*** 3.1*** 3.3*** 3.1*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$669*** -$280*** -$162*** -$370*** -$1,111***
EI weeks (weeks) -2.2*** -0.7*** -0.5*** -1.1*** -3.3***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 2In Ontario, participation in SD is up to 3 years in length. In the incremental impact analysis, the participation period is defined as 2 years. As a result, participants may still be in training during the first year of post-program results. Therefore, it is not unexpected to observe incremental decreases in earnings, as participants are not available for full time work in year 1 and will be transitioning into employment in year 2. To interpret trends for Ontario, the third year is the most relevant period to consider for incremental impacts. As a result, the average annual impact and total impact are not applicable for Ontario.

2.7 Manitoba

Table 7. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 7A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba: Skills Development (n=3,750)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $3,387*** $5,971** $7,032** $5,461** $16,384**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
10.6** 10.1** 11.8** 10.8** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$546*** -$458*** -$212** -$405*** -$1,215***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.8*** -1.3*** -0.6** -1.2*** -3.7***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 7B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba: Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=339)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$1,345 -$768 -$86 -$722 -$2,166
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
6.9* 2.6 2.7 4.1 n/a
EI benefits ($) -$407 -$751** -$251 -$470 -$1,409
EI weeks (weeks) -1.4 -1.8 -0.5 -1.3 -3.8
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 7C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba: Self-Employment (n=517)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$12,450*** -$9,940*** -$9,231*** -$10,540*** -$31,621***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-26.6*** -21.3*** -19.1*** -22.3*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$1,364*** -$1,177*** -$999*** -$1,180*** -$3,541***
EI weeks (weeks) -3.8*** -3.0*** -2.5*** -3.1*** -9.3***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Table 7D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba: Job Creation Partnerships (n=286)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $4,126*** $4,655*** $5,029*** $4,470*** $13,409***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
8.1*** 7.5*** 9.9*** 8.5*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$549** -$427 -$130 -$369* -$1,106*
EI weeks (weeks) -1.8** -1.7** -0.6 -1.4** -4.1**
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 7E. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Manitoba: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=15,131)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$320 $266 $407* $118 $353
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
2.8*** 3.5*** 1.7*** 2.7*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$363*** -$235*** -$253*** -$284*** -$851***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.4*** -0.8*** -0.8*** -1.0*** -3.0***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.8 Saskatchewan

Table 8. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Saskatchewan (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 8A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Saskatchewan: Skills Development (n=1,375)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $2,299*** $5,189*** $6,961*** $4,839*** $14,517***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
5.8*** 6.4*** 6.5*** 6.2*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$401*** -$223** $83 -$180** -$541**
EI weeks (weeks) -1.0*** -0.7*** 0.1 -0.5** -1.6**
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Targeted Wage Subsidies

Not available due to low sample size.

Self-Employment

Not available due to low sample size.

Job Creation Partnerships

JCP was not delivered by Saskatchewan during the observed period.

Table 8B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Saskatchewan: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=5,269)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$371 $731** $1,381*** $580** $1,741**
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
1.9*** 2.1*** 0.9 1.6*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$442*** -$332*** -$278*** -$351*** -$1,052***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.3*** -1.0*** -0.8*** -1.0*** -3.1***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.9 Alberta

Table 9. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Alberta (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2006 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 9A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Alberta: Skills Development (n=2,536)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$121 $1,044 $2,359** $1,108 $3,324
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
9.3*** 10.0*** 10.6*** 10.0*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$277* $137 $42 -$33 -$98
EI weeks (weeks) -1.0** 0.2 0.0 -0.3 -0.7
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Targeted Wage Subsidies

Not available due to low sample size.

Table 9B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Alberta: Self-Employment (n=658)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$13,493*** -$12,430*** -$13,046*** -$12,990*** -$38,970***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-14.7*** -14.4*** -13.9*** -14.3*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$971*** -$658*** -$308* -$646*** -$1,938***
EI weeks (weeks) -2.4*** -1.6*** -0.8* -1.6*** -4.9***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Table 9C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Alberta: Job Creation Partnerships (n=521)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $144 -$950 -$1,144 -$650 -$1,950
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
7.0*** 9.8*** 3.7 6.8*** n/a
EI benefits ($) $314 $616*** $503** $478*** $1,433***
EI weeks (weeks) 0.9 1.6*** 1.4** 1.3*** 4.0***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 9D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in Alberta: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=20,997)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$969*** -$627** -$602** -$733*** -$2,198***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
1.7*** 1.6*** 0.8* 1.4*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$530*** -$253*** -$164*** -$315*** -$946***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.5*** -0.6*** -0.4*** -0.8*** -2.5***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.10 British Columbia

Table 10. Incremental impacts for active claimants in British Columbia (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 10A. Incremental impacts for active claimants in British Columbia: Skills Development (n=4,090)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $2,560*** $5,559*** $6,395*** $4,824*** $14,471***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
5.8*** 7.2*** 6.9*** 6.6*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$768*** -$448*** -$173** -$463*** -$1,389***
EI weeks (weeks) -2.3*** -1.3*** -0.5*** -1.4*** -4.1***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 10B. Incremental impacts for active claimants in British Columbia: Targeted Wage Subsidies (n=1,491)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) $3,121*** $3,141*** $3,756*** $3,319*** $9,957***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
7.1*** 5.9*** 6.5*** 6.5*** n/a
EI benefits ($) $113 -$161 -$111 -$53 -$158
EI weeks (weeks) 0.5 -0.3 -0.4 -0.1 -0.2
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 10C. Incremental impacts for active claimants in British Columbia: Self-Employment (n=1,764)1
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$10,521*** -$8,450*** -$7,806*** -$8,915*** -$26,746***
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
-17.7*** -13.8*** -13.1*** -14.8*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$1,723*** -$1,155*** -$735*** -$1,204*** -$3,613***
EI weeks (weeks) -4.7*** -3.1*** -1.8*** -3.2*** -9.5***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Job Creation Partnerships

Not available due to low sample size.

Table 10D. Incremental impacts for active claimants in British Columbia: Employment Assistance Services (EAS) (n=28,985)
Indicators Post-program period
1st year
Post-program period
2nd year
Post-program period
3rd year
Average annual impact Total impact
Earnings ($) -$511*** $299*** $801*** $196 $589
Incidence of employment
(percentage points)
3.6*** 2.6*** 3.0*** 3.0*** n/a
EI benefits ($) -$507*** -$337*** -$298*** -$381*** -$1,142***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.7*** -0.9*** -0.8*** -1.1*** -3.4***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

2.11 Total impacts by province

Table 11. Total impacts for active claimants by province (for active claimants who started an EBSM between 2007 and 2008)

For accessibility reasons, the table has been simplified. Consult the PDF version for the full table.

Table 11A. Total impacts for active claimants by province: Skills Development
Indicators Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
Earnings ($) $12,139*** $12,273*** $17,142*** $13,328*** n/a $16,384** $14,517*** $3,324 $14,471***
EI benefits ($) -$1,319*** -$1,038*** -$2,024*** -$960* -$1,219*** -$1,215*** -$541** -$98 -$1,389***
EI weeks (weeks) -6.6*** -2.9*** -6.2*** 0.5 -3.4*** -3.7*** -1.6** -0.7 -4.1***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 11B. Total impacts for active claimants by province: Targeted Wage Subsidies
Indicators Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
Earnings ($) $10,795*** Not available due to low sample size. $9,683** $5,051* $7,437** -$2,166 Not available due to low sample size. Not available due to low sample size. $9,957***
EI benefits ($) -$3,961*** Not available due to low sample size. -$3,044*** $1,964** $399 -$1,409 Not available due to low sample size. Not available due to low sample size. -$158
EI weeks (weeks) -9.9*** Not available due to low sample size. -9.1*** 7.2*** 1.7 -3.8 Not available due to low sample size. Not available due to low sample size. -0.2
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 11C. Total impacts for active claimants by province: Self-Employment1
Indicators Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
Earnings ($) -$19,520*** Not available due to low sample size. -$28,683*** -$25,149*** -$28,937*** -$31,621*** Not available due to low sample size. -$38,970*** -$26,746***
EI benefits ($) -$9,079*** Not available due to low sample size. -$6,436*** -$8,613*** -$3,573*** -$3,541*** Not available due to low sample size. -$1,938*** -$3,613***
EI weeks (weeks) -27.9*** Not available due to low sample size. -18.0*** -21.7*** -9.6*** -9.3*** Not available due to low sample size. -4.9*** -9.5***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
  • 1 Earnings results for Self-Employment should be interpreted with caution. They may not fully capture the financial wellbeing of participants. The impacts were examined using individual earnings reported in the T1 and T4 taxation files from CRA, and measured relative to active claimants who did not participate in SE and may have been in any employment/unemployment situation following participation. For example :
    • unemployed
    • paid employee, or
    • self-employed

    According to a study from Statistics Canada, self-employed individuals in Canada have a lower average annual income than paid employees ($46,200 versus $52,400 in 2009), but the average net worth of their households is 2.7 times that of the paid employee households, which indicates that some self-employed individuals may leave funds within their business for reinvestment purposes (Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté and Sharanjit Uppal, "The Financial Well-Being of the Self-Employed," Perspectives on Labour and Income, vol. 23, no. 4, Winter 2011). Since the incremental impacts of SE were measured relative to a comparison group that also included paid employees and did not take the net worth of participants and comparison cases into account, the results may not be fully reflective of the financial wellbeing of SE participants after their participation. As well, the decreases in EI use may be due to EI eligibility effect as self-employed Canadians cannot qualify for regular EI benefits.

Table 11D. Total impacts for active claimants by province: Job Creation Partnerships
Indicators Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
Earnings ($) -$1,815 Not available due to low sample size. $191 JCP was not delivered in New Brunswick during the observed period. $9,051** $13,409*** JCP was not delivered by Saskatchewan during the observed period. -$1,950 Not available due to low sample size.
EI benefits ($) -$1,275*** Not available due to low sample size. -$1,335* JCP was not delivered in New Brunswick during the observed period. -$829 -$1,106* JCP was not delivered by Saskatchewan during the observed period. $1,433*** Not available due to low sample size.
EI weeks (weeks) -0.2 Not available due to low sample size. -4.3* JCP was not delivered in New Brunswick during the observed period. -3.4** -4.1** JCP was not delivered by Saskatchewan during the observed period. 4.0*** Not available due to low sample size.
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%
Table 11E. Total impacts for active claimants by province: Employment Assistance Services (EAS)
Indicators Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick Ontario Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
Earnings ($) $5,588*** $2,386** $3,176*** $6,832*** $706 $353 $1,741** -$2,198*** $589
EI benefits ($) -$679*** -$1,481* -$1,698*** $72 -$1,111*** -$851*** -$1,052*** -$946*** -$1,142***
EI weeks (weeks) -1.3*** -3.6*** -5.1*** 1.5** -3.3*** -3.0*** -3.1*** -2.5*** -3.4***
  • Significance level *** 1%; ** 5%; * 10%

Important: Incremental impacts in any given province cannot be compared to those of another province, due to differences in the macroeconomic context in each of the jurisdictions.

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