Non-governmental organizations

Bird Studies Canada

https://birdscanada.org

President: Steven Price

Organizational profile:

Bird Studies Canada is a national charity built on the contributions of thousands of supporters and Citizen Scientists.

Founded in 1960, Bird Studies Canada works to conserve wild birds in Canada through research, public engagement, and science-based advocacy. Bird Studies Canada partners runs regional, national, and international programs. In its Canada State of Birds 2019 publication, Bird Studies Canada reports that Canada has lost 40-60% of shorebird, grassland bird, and aerial insectivore populations. In the last decade, 80% of bird species identified as threatened or endangered in Canada have been aerial insectivores or grassland birds.

Bird Studies Canada works closely ECCC and receives funding for various projects.

Canadian Council on Ecological Areas

https://www.ccea.org/  

Chairperson: Jessica Elliott

Organizational Profile:

The Canadian Council on Ecological Areas (CCEA) works to facilitate and assist Canadians with the establishment and management of a comprehensive network of protected areas representative of Canada’s terrestrial and aquatic ecological natural diversity.

CCEA provides services to its member agencies, the Canadian people and international community by:

CCEA’s work includes terrestrial ecosystem representation, a national framework for protected areas, approaches to gap analyses, marine conservation areas and data management.

CCEA regularly holds its meetings in different Canadian jurisdictions to discuss common issues and to address particular regional issues and achievements. CCEA brings together diverse regional viewpoints to achieve a larger cohesive ecological picture of relevance to all jurisdictions.

CCEA’s international portfolio is relevant to regional and national Canadian efforts related to international obligations such as those contained in the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. Internationally, CCEA works with organizations such as the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation, the governments of Zimbabwe and Mexico, the World Commission on Protected Areas, the World Conservation Union, and the World Conservation Monitoring Center.

Canadian Environmental Law Association

https://cela.ca/

Executive Director and Counsel: Theresa McClenaghan

Organizational Profile:

The Canadian Environmental Law Association (CELA) is a non-profit, public interest organization established in 1970 to use existing laws to protect the environment and to advocate environmental law reforms. CELA also works toward protecting public health and the environment by seeking justice for those harmed by pollution or poor decision-making and by changing policies to prevent problems in the first place. CELA also undertakes additional educational and law reform projects funded by government and private foundations.

CELA services include environmental law legal services, including representation before a variety of courts and tribunals as well as assistance to individuals representing themselves, summary advice, law and policy reform.

In addition to providing legal services to individuals and not-for-profit citizen or community groups, CELA undertakes policy work to help shape environmental laws and regulations:

Canadian Lung Association

https://www.lung.ca/

President and CEO: Terry Dean

Organizational Profile:

The Canadian Lung Association is a federated national charity comprising ten provincial associations, a national office and two professional societies - the Canadian Thoracic Society and the Canadian Respiratory Health Professionals. Together they work together to help the more than six million Canadians who have breathing problems.

Located in Ottawa, the Canadian Lung Association’s national office delivers high-quality online lung health information, leads national advocacy and awareness efforts and manages a national research program.

The Canadian Lung Association is the leading organization in Canada working to promote lung health and prevent and manage lung disease. It does this by advocates for action to minimize harms to lung health from residential wood burning, asbestos, cannabis, and tobacco.

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

https://cpaws.org/

National Executive Director: Sandra Schwartz

Organizational Profile:

The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) is a community-based, non-profit organization that focuses on establishing new marine and terrestrial parks and protected areas and making sure the needs of nature come first in their management. Since 1963, CPAWS has led in creating over two-thirds of Canada’s protected areas. Their vision is that Canada should protect at least half of Canada’s public land and water. As a national charity with 13 chapters, 60,000 supporters and hundreds of volunteers, CPAWS works collaboratively with governments, local communities, industry and Aboriginal peoples to protect Canada’s amazing natural places.

The organization’s mission is to achieve a healthy ecosphere where people experience and respect natural ecosystems. CPAWS works to achieve this by:

CPAWS’ major areas of work include:

Committee membership:

A representative of CPAWS, Florence Daviet, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act.

The Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution

http://csee-scee.ca/

President: Isabelle Côté

Organizational Profile:

The Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution (CSEE) is a non-partisan group of practicing ecologists and evolutionary biologists throughout Canada. It sponsors scientific programs aimed at synthesizing information on natural systems, developing new theory and providing unbiased scientific assessments on the ecological and evolutionary aspects of public policy. The CIEE is operated by a consortium of Canadian universities, including Carleton University, McGill University, University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto. In addition, CIEE is supported by the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution, the national learned society.

Committee membership:

A representative of the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution, Sarah (Sally) Otto, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act. 

Canadian Wildlife Federation

http://www.cwf-fcf.org/en/

President: Guy Vézina

Organizational Profile:

The Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) is a charitable, non-partisan, non-governmental organization working to conserve Canada’s wildlife and encourage the wise use of Canada’s natural resources through conservation, science, education and advocacy initiatives. CWF works on: fostering Canadians’ connection to wildlife, maintaining healthy wildlife populations, including species-at-risk recovery and conserving and restoring wildlife habitat. Founded in 1962, CWF represents and is entirely funded by 300,000 members and supporters.

CWF’s historical work includes a role in the establishment of the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), which was established to provide Canadians with a single, scientifically sound classification of wildlife species at risk and was subsequently incorporated into the Species at Risk Act (SARA) in 2002. CWF continues to be involved in species at risk, such as national research regarding purple loosestrife infestations, overfishing in the Atlantic and various species at risk such as whooping crane, swift fox and burrowing owl. Recently, CWF supported the reintroduction of black-footed ferrets into Grasslands National Park.

CWF delivers the Hinterland Who’s Who program supported by funding from the Department.

CWF’s ongoing activities and products include:

Committee membership:

A representative of CWF, James Page, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act.

David Suzuki Foundation

https://davidsuzuki.org/

CEO: Steve Cornish

Organizational Profile:

Co-founded in 1990 by Dr. David Suzuki and Dr. Tara Cullis, the David Suzuki Foundation is a non-profit, non-partisan charity registered in Canada and the U.S. that explores human impacts on the environment, with an emphasis on finding solutions. With a mission to protect the diversity of nature and quality of life, the Foundation works to achieve its goals through major projects (e.g., the Nature Challenge), education (e.g., guidebooks for consumers), research and publications and advocacy.

The Foundation works to achieve its goals with 50 staff working in five primary issue areas:

Committee membership:

A representative of the David Suzuki Foundation, Rachel Plotkin, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act.

The David Suzuki Foundation is a partner, alongside ECCC and PCA, of the Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership (CRP), a collective initiative to support efforts to advance Indigenous-led conservation in Canada.

The David Suzuki Foundation is also a core member of the Canadian Key Biodiversity Areas (KBA) Coalition.  Core members aid with communications and outreach, as well as providing data, expertise, analysis and facilitating partnerships to further the standardized identification of and reporting on areas important for biodiversity in Canada.

Ducks Unlimited Canada

https://www.ducks.ca/

CEO: Karla Guyn

Organizational Profile:

Established in 1938, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) is a national, private non-profit organization that has been working towards waterfowl habitat conservation for more than 70 years. DUC’s vision is to achieve a mosaic of natural, restored and managed wetlands and associated habitats for North America’s waterfowl.

DUC works towards wetland conservation through four primary methods:

Recognizing the transboundary nature of migratory species, water supplies and natural habitats, DUC is a program partner of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP). The objective of this international conservation program is restoring waterfowl populations to average levels enjoyed in the 1970s. The overall planning, design and management of the NAWMP is done through habitat joint ventures in Canada and the U.S. This international agreement unites federal, provincial/state and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, private companies and individuals in projects conserving wetlands across North America.

Ducks Unlimited is one of the partners in the Natural Heritage Conservation Program (NHCP), a federally funded program to safeguard important habitats for species at risk. The program will focus on support for privately protected areas in ecologically sensitive landscapes, from forests and endangered grasslands to wetlands and coastal regions.

Committee membership:

DUC is the co-chair, with ECCC, of the North American Wetlands Conservation Council (Canada) (NAWCC (Canada)). NAWCC (Canada) provides a national mechanism for implementation of the NAWMP.

DUC also co-chairs,  with the Canadian Federation of Agriculture,  the Canadian Wetlands Roundtable (CWR), a national multi-stakeholder working group aimed at advancing the sustainability, health and responsible management of Canada’s wetlands through legislation, policy, and stakeholder and resource industry action.

DUC is a partner, alongside ECCC and PCA, of the Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership (CRP), a collective initiative to support efforts to advance Indigenous-led conservation in Canada.

Earth Rangers

https://www.earthrangers.com/

President: Tovah Barocas

Organizational Profile:

Earth Rangers is a Canadian kids' conservation organization, dedicated to educating children and families about biodiversity and empowering them to become directly involved in protecting animals and their habitats. Earth Rangers’ programs include a School Outreach and Classroom Visit Program, community shows, a national television presence and ‘Bring Back the Wild’, an initiative that provides children with a tangible way to make a difference. These programs strive to inspire children across Canada to take action to help protect animals and their habitats.

The Bring Back the Wild campaign is a national education and fundraising initiative that teaches children about the importance of protecting animals by preserving their natural habitats and gives them the tools to contribute to conservation projects developed to ensure the survival of four native species each year.  The 2014-2015 current conservations projects are focused on protecting the eastern wolf, swift fox, western screech owl, and bobolink.

The Earth Rangers Educational Outreach Program is designed to help students understand the effects of human activity on our planet and the species that inhabit it. Earth Rangers provides an online catalogue of science-related resources for educators with curriculum-linked activities and lesson plans. These educational resources have been created to engage students and facilitate a connection to wildlife both inside and outside the classroom.

ECCC is providing three-year funding to Earth Rangers for Engaging Canadian Kids in Wildlife Conservation – a program that will help Canadian children learn to be active stewards of the natural world, protect Canada’s wildlife, and take action in conserving nature.  The funding includes support for the Earth Rangers School Assembly Program, and engaging children in tangible activities through action-oriented Missions, Bring Back the Wild projects, and local events as part of the Earth Rangers Membership Program.

Ecojustice

https://www.ecojustice.ca/

Executive Director: Devon Page

Organizational Profile:

Ecojustice (formerly Sierra Legal Defence Fund) is Canada’s largest environmental law charity. Established in 1990, Ecojustice aims to enable citizens to expose lawbreakers and hold governments accountable, while setting powerful precedents for, keeping fossil fuels in the ground and accelerating the transition to a clean energy future, clean water, natural spaces, healthy communities and global warming solutions. The organization employs more than 50 staff lawyers, scientists, and other key staff in Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Halifax, and Calgary.

Ecojustice undertakes the following activities to meet its environmental protection goals:

Ecojustice’s past clients have included more than 80 environmental organizations, community groups, individuals, and coalitions. Recent Ecojustice cases involving the federal government have addressed emissions cheating in the automobile industry, approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline project, modernizing environmental laws, unlawful and lengthy pesticides “phase out,” and assessment of oil-by-rail projects.

Committee membership:

A representative of Ecojustice, Liat Podolsky, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act. 

Environmental Defence Canada

https://environmentaldefence.ca/

Executive Director: Tim Gray

Organizational Profile:

Environmental Defence Canada is a non-profit organization made up of policy experts and community members supported by scientists, business leaders, lawyers and community members. They are working hard to protect Canada’s environment and human health. The organization’s goal is to cultivate the collaboration of individuals, industry, and government in : (1)  Empowering Canadians to take action in their own daily lives; (2) Working with industry to build a clean, prosperous economy; (3) Encouraging government to enact policies to protect Canadians’ environment.

Environmental Defence Canada’s priority issues are:

Équiterre

https://equiterre.org/en

Executive Director: Colleen Thorpe

Organizational Profile:

Founded in 1993, Équiterre is committed to offering concrete solutions to accelerate the transition towards a society in which individuals, organizations and governments make ecological choices that are both healthy and equitable. Through its four programs–ecological agriculture, fair trade, sustainable transportation and energy efficiency– the organization has developed projects that encourage individuals, organizations and governments to take concrete actions that bring about positive change for the environment and society.

Équiterre conducts research and advocacy on a number of environmental policy issues, targeted at the federal level and within the province of Quebec, and focusing largely on climate change policy.

Équiterre’s major areas of work include:

ETC Group: Action Group on Erosion, Technology and Concentration

https://www.etcgroup.org/

Co-Executive Directors: Jim Thomas and Neth Daño

Organizational Profile:

The ETC Group is a technology-based environmental organization working to address the socioeconomic and ecological issues surrounding new technologies that could have an impact on the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. It investigates ecological erosion; the development of new technologies; and monitors global governance issues including corporate concentration and trade in technologies. The ETC Group operates at the global political level while working closely with partner civil society organizations (CSOs) and social movements, especially in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The organization is:

The ETC Group currently concentrates on effecting change on six current primary areas of focus: Biodiversity (CBD, SBSTTA and IPBES), Climate & Geoengineering, Corporate Monopolies, Sustainable Development, Synthetic Biology, and Technology Assessment.

Federation of Canadian Municipalities

https://fcm.ca/en

CEO: Brock Carlton

Organizational Profile:

Greenpeace Canada

https://www.greenpeace.org/canada/en/

Executive Director: Christy Ferguson

Organizational Profile:

Greenpeace Canada is an independently-funded, non-governmental organization that works to protect the environment. It aims to change attitudes and behaviour, to protect and conserve the environment and to promote peace through research, lobbying, and quiet diplomacy, as well as high-profile, non-violent conflict to raise the level and quality of public debate. Greenpeace International was founded in Vancouver in 1971, has since opened offices in 40 countries, with Canadian offices in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and headquarters in Amsterdam.

Greenpeace Canada’s major areas of work include:

International Council on Clean Transportation

https://theicct.org/

Executive Director: Drew Kodjak

Organizational Profile:

The International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) is an independent nonprofit organization founded to provide first-rate, unbiased research and technical and scientific analysis to environmental regulators. ICCT mission is to improve the environmental performance and energy efficiency of road, marine, and air transportation, in order to benefit public health and mitigate climate change.

International Institute for Sustainable Development

https://www.iisd.org/

Interim President and CEO: Jane McDonald

Organizational Profile:

The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) is a Canadian-based not-for-profit organization that promotes change towards sustainable development by conducting policy research and providing a forum to engage governments, business, non-governmental organizations and other sectors in the development and implementation of sustainable development policies. Their mission is to promote human development and environmental sustainability through innovative research, communication and partnerships.

The institute has offices in Canada, Switzerland and the U.S., and operates in over 70 countries around the world.

IISD’s major areas of work include:

Living Oceans Society

https://www.livingoceans.org/

Executive Director: Karen Wristen

Organizational Profile:

Living Oceans Society is a not-for-profit organization advocating for oceans that are managed for the common good, according to science-based policies that consider ecosystems in their entirety.

Living Oceans Society’s mission is to:

Living Oceans Society’s major areas of work include:

Mersey Tobeatic Research Institute

http://www.merseytobeatic.ca/

Executive director: Amanda Lavers

Organizational Profile:

The Mersey Tobeatic Research Institute is a non-profit, cooperative research institute that operates a field station located in Queens County, Nova Scotia, between the communities of Kempt and Caledonia. It was established in 2004 to promote sustainable use of natural resources and biodiversity conservation in the Southwest Nova Biosphere Reserve (SNBR) and beyond through research, education, and the operation of a field station. MTRI has a diversity of projects on the go simultaneously. From Species at Risk research to aquatic connectivity, old forests, our human dimensions and youth outreach, it conducts a variety of short-term projects and continuing programs in the area.

Committee membership:

A representative of the Mersey Tobeatic Research Institute, Brad Toms, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act. 

Nature Canada

https://naturecanada.ca/

Executive Director: Graham Saul

Organizational Profile:

Founded in 1939, Nature Canada is a member-based non-profit conservation organization, representing a network of 45,000 supporters and more than 350 naturalist organizations operating at the local, regional and provincial levels across Canada. Nature Canada’s mission is to protect and conserve wildlife and habitats in Canada by engaging people and advocating on behalf of nature. Internationally, Nature Canada is a member organization of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as well as the Canadian co-partner of BirdLife International.

Nature Canada’s major areas of work include:

Canada Nature Fund:

Committee membership:

A representative of Nature Canada, Stephen Hazell attends, although not as a member, the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC) established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act.

Nature Conservancy of Canada

https://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/

President and CEO: John Lounds

Organizational Profile:

Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC), founded in 1962, is a national, non-profit land conservation organization that is dedicated to direct protection of ecologically significant areas through donations, purchase, conservation easements, the relinquishment of other legal interests in land and manage them for the long term. NCC’s vision is to protect areas of biological diversity for their intrinsic value and for the benefit of future generations. NCC’s plan of action is partnership building and creative deal-making with any individual, corporation, community group, conservation group or government body that shares its objectives. To date, NCC has helped to protect more than 2.6 million acres (1 million hectares) across the country.

NCC’s major areas of work include:

Natural Heritage Conservation Program (NHCP): The Nature Conservancy of Canada is one of the partners in the Natural Heritage Conservation Program (NHCP), a federally funded $100 million program to safeguard important habitats for species at risk. The program will focus on support for privately protected areas in ecologically sensitive landscapes, from forests and endangered grasslands to wetlands and coastal regions. The Nature Conservancy of Canada will oversee the NHCP with contributions from program partners Ducks Unlimited Canada and Canada’s land trusts (Canadian Land Trusts Working Group). Wildlife Habitat Canada will administer the local land trust portion of the program. 

The NHCP replaced the Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP), which was also administered by the NCC. The Natural Areas Conservation Program received funding of over $320 million between 2007 and 2018.  

Committee membership:

A representative of Nature Conservancy of Canada, Michael Bradstreet, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act. 

NatureServe Canada

https://www.natureserve.org/natureserve-network/canada

Executive Director: Patrick Henry

Organizational Profile:

NatureServe Canada is a registered charity that functions as a network of provincial and territorial Conservation Data Centres (CDCs) to develop, manage and distribute authoritative information critical to the conservation of Canada’s biodiversity. Data held by NatureServe Canada are widely used by federal and provincial agencies, private industry, researchers and conservation organizations to improve the management, use and conservation of biological resources in Canada. NatureServe Canada also represents Canadian CDCs within the broader international network of similar centres throughout the western hemisphere known as NatureServe.

NatureServe’s mission is to be the authoritative source for accessible, current, and reliable information on the distribution and abundance of Canada’s biological diversity. They aim to improve decision-making about natural resources and to serve the public by increasing awareness among Canadians of the nation’s natural heritage.

Key activities include:

Ocean Wise

https://ocean.org/

Vice President of Development: Jeremy Douglas

Organizational Profile:

Pembina Institute

https://www.pembina.org/

Executive Director: Simon Dyer

Organizational Profile:

The Pembina Institute is an independent, not-for-profit environmental policy research and education organization that aims to advance clean energy solutions through innovative research, education, consulting and advocacy. Founded in 1985, the Pembina Institute has offices in Vancouver, Yellowknife, Edmonton, Calgary and Toronto. The organization envisions a world in which both immediate and future needs are met in a manner that protects the earth's living systems, ensures clean air, land and water, prevents dangerous climate change and provides for a safe and just global community.

The Pembina Institute’s major areas of work include:

Pollution Probe

https://www.pollutionprobe.org/

CEO: Christopher Hilkene

Organizational Profile:

Pollution Probe is a Canadian charitable environmental organization, founded in 1969, that focuses on the intersection of communities, health and environment. It works to define environmental problems through research, promote understanding through education, and press for practical solutions through advocacy. Pollution Probe focuses on partnership-building, engaging government agencies, private businesses and other not-for-profit organizations to work towards clean air and clean water solutions. Pollution Probe’s mission is to improve the health and well-being of Canadians by advancing policy that achieves positive, tangible environmental change.

Pollution Probe’s major areas of work include:

Porpoise Conservation Society

https://porpoise.org/

President: Dr. Anna Hall

Organizational Profile:

Founded in 2015, this is the world’s first organization dedicated to the research and conservation of some of the smallest marine mammals – porpoises. The Porpoise Conservation Society was initiated with the goal of becoming the premier resource for education and conservation of all porpoise species. These species are found throughout the northern and southern hemispheres, and have been largely overlooked as a result of their small size and the difficulties of finding them in the wild.

Committee membership:

A representative of the Porpoise Conservation Society, Dr. Anna Hall, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act.  

Sierra Club Canada Foundation

https://www.sierraclub.ca/

Executive Director: John Bennett

Organizational Profile:

Sierra Club Canada Foundation is a member-based, charitable non-governmental organization that aims to empower people to protect, restore and enjoy a healthy and safe planet. Sierra Club Canada has been active since 1963, with the national office established in Ottawa in 1989. There are four active chapters in Canada: Prairie Chapter, Ontario Chapter, Quebec Chapter and Atlantic Canada Chapter. There is no British Columbia Chapter, but it is affiliated with the Sierra Club of BC Foundation. Sierra Club Canada has approximately 10,000 members, supporters, and youth affiliate members across Canada.

The mission of the organization is to empower people to be leaders in protecting, restoring and enjoying healthy and safe ecosystems.

Sierra Club Canada’s major areas of work include:

Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc.

https://www.sfiprogram.org/

President & CEO: Kathy Abusow

Organizational Profile:

SFI is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting forest sustainability and supporting the links between sustainable forests and communities through grant programs, carefully targeted research, youth education, supply chain assurances, and partnerships that effectively contribute to multiple conservation objectives.

Forests certified to the SFI Forest Management Standard cover 285 million acres/115 million hectares, while millions more acres benefit from the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard. The Sustainable Forestry Initiative is a North American 'forest certification standard' and program of SFI Inc., a non-profit organization. The Sustainable Forestry Initiative is the world's largest single forest certification standard by area. The SFI is headquartered in Ottawa.

Committee membership:

A representative of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc., Darren Sleep, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act. 

Wildlife Habitat Canada

https://whc.org/

Executive Director: Cameron Mack

Organizational Profile:

Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC) works to conserve, restore and enhance wildlife habitat in Canada. WHC funds habitat conservation projects, promote conservation action and foster coordination among conservation groups.

Their grant program has been providing funds that support habitat restoration, enhancement and protection all over Canada since 1985, including projects and initiatives related to waterfowl and migratory birds’ management based on an agreement with Environment Climate Change Canada.

WHC are members of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and strive to improve and enhance the state of migratory birds and their habitats in Canada.

World Wildlife Fund Canada

http://www.wwf.ca/

President and CEO: Megan Leslie

Organizational Profile:

World Wildlife Fund Canada (WWF-Canada), founded in 1967, is a national conservation non-partisan, non-governmental organization. WWF-Canada has more than 170,000 supporters and over 100 staff working in seven offices across the country. As a member of the WWF International Network, WWF-Canada contributes to the organization’s mission to stop the degradation of the planet's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by:

WWF employs a range of tools to achieve its conservation results, including field research, scientific mapping, public policy advocacy, market solutions and public education. WWF also created Earth Hour, a symbolic event where people around the world turn off their lights for one hour to show support for action on climate change.

WWF-Canada’s major areas of work include:

Committee membership:

A representative of WWF-Canada, Pete Ewins, is a member of the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), established under the Species at Risk Act to advise the Minister of ECCC on the administration of the Act. WWF is a partner, alongside ECCC and PCA, of the Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership (CRP), a collective initiative to support efforts to advance Indigenous-led conservation in Canada.

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