Reference method for measuring releases of fine particulate matter from stationary sources: method H


Method H: Determination of Condensable Particulate Matter (CPM)

  1. Applicability
  2. Principle
  3. Apparatus
  4. Reagents and Materials
  5. Procedures
  6. Calculations
  7.  Nomenclature

1.  Applicability

This method is used to measure condensable particulate matter (CPM) released from stationary sources. CPM is matter that is vapour phase at stack conditions but immediately forms a liquid or solid in the cooler ambient air once the stack gases are discharged to atmosphere. CPM is material that after passing through a filter held at 120 ± 14°C (248 ± 25°F) condenses at the near ambient temperature of this method. CPM is considered to be PM2.5.  

This method is used in conjunction with the Methods of Report EPS1/RM/8, December 1993, Standard Reference Method for Source Testing: Measurement of Releases of Particulate from Stationary Sources and it is subject to their limitations regarding stack gas conditions.

2.  Principle

Particulate matter is withdrawn from the stack and filtered at a temperature of 120 ± 14°C (248 ± 25°F). The filtered gas sample is then cooled in an ice-water jacketed coil condenser and any moisture that may condense is collected in a condensate trap or stemless impinger. Ethanol is added to this impinger to inhibit the oxidation of SO2that may be dissolved in the condensate. Any aerosol formed by the cooling of the sample gas is collected by a secondary or mist filter held at ambient temperature. At the completion of the test the sample is recovered quantitatively and the condensate is extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). The organic fraction is evaporated at ambient temperature, whereas the aqueous fraction is evaporated to near-dryness in a 105°C (220°F) oven. Both dryings are completed in a desiccator and the residue weighed.

Sampling isokinetically means that the velocity of the gas entering the sampling nozzle is equal to that of the undisturbed gas stream at the sampling point.

Three valid tests are required for the determination of condensable particulate matter. Each test must be a minimum of two hours and collect at least 1.7 (60 ft³) of stack gas on a dry basis at reference conditions. This method has not been evaluated beyond sampling durations of four hours and condensate catches beyond 250 grams. Contact Environment Canada if either of these conditions apply.

3.  Apparatus

3.1  Sample Collection

The items required for sample collection are similar to that of Method G, with the following additions:

Condenser.  Glass, coil type with water cooling jacket and ball joint endings, capable of cooling the sample stream to 30°C or less, as measured by the sensor installed in the secondary filter holder. Either horizontal or vertical condensers are acceptable. The water from the ice bath is used to cool the condenser.

Water pump.  A pump to circulate ice water through the water jacket condenser.

Condensate Trap.  A Greenburg Smith impinger without a stem or a glass condensate trap is required to collect the water knocked out in the upstream condenser.

Impingers.  Three Greenburg-Smith impingers connected in series. The second and third impingers are modified by replacing the tips and impaction plates of the standard design with a 13 mm (0.5 in) ID glass tube extending to within 13 mm (0.5 in) of the bottom of the impinger. The first impinger has the standard tip and impaction plate. The impingers are contained in an ice bath during sampling. A temperature sensor capable of measuring to within 1°C (2°F) shall be placed at the outlet of the last impinger.

Secondary (Mist) Filter Holder.  A glass filter holder fitted with a Teflon support capable of holding a greater than 47 mm membrane filter, with an inert filter support (Teflon plate, stainless steel perforated plate) fitted with soft sealing surfaces to prevent gas leakage into or around the filter. A Teflon filter support with fluoropolymer O-rings is recommended. The back half of the secondary filter holder must be fitted with a thermocouple to measure the compartment temperature to within 1°C (2°F).

The secondary filter holder is located above the impingers. The secondary filter holder may require heating to prevent freezing and plugging if the test is conducted at sub-zero ambient temperatures. In this situation, however, the temperature of the secondary filter holder must not exceed 30°C.

Pipet.  Graduated to measure one to five mL of liquid.

3.2  Sample Recovery

The items required for sample collection are similar to that of Method G.

4.  Reagents and Materials

4.1  Sample Collection

Water.  HPLC grade, for rinsing and sample recovery, shall have an evaporation residue ≤ 0.001 percent by weight.

Ethanol.  Reagent grade, for inhibiting the oxidation of SO2 that may dissolve in the condensate. Either denatured or absolute alcohol with an evaporation residue ≤ 0.001 percent by weight.

Filter.  A flash-fired glass fibre filter (organic binder removed) of a diameter compatible with the filter holder with an efficiency of at least 99.95% for 0.3 µm particles in accordance with the most recent version of ASTM Standard D2986. The manufacturer’s test data for the filter is sufficient. The filter material must be chemically inert to stack gas components such as sulphur dioxide (SO2). Depending on the nature of the source and the analyses required, other types of filter media may be used, subject to approval by Environment Canada.

The filter must be desiccated to a constant weight before being used. This may be accomplished by desiccating the filter for at least 24 hours with silica gel or equivalent desiccant at 20 ± 6°C (68 ± 10°F). Weigh the filter to the nearest 0.1 mg at intervals of six hours or more in a room where the relative humidity is 50% or less. The weighing must be completed within two minutes after the filter is removed from the desiccator. The constant weigh is attained when the difference between two consecutive readings is less than 0.5 mg. Place the pre-weighed filter in a clean labeled Petri dish to prevent contamination during transportation to the sampling site.

Polymer Membrane Filter.  The mist filter must be fibreless, have an efficiency of a least 99.95% for 0.3 micron particles, and have a 47 mm minimum diameter. The manufacturer’s test data for the filter is sufficient. These filters do not need taring or final weighing.

Petri Dishes.  Glass or plastic Petri dishes of a size greater than the filter. Each test run requires two Petri dishes: one for the glass fiber filter and another for the mist filter.

4.2  Sample Recovery

Water.  As noted in Section 4.1.

Acetone.  Reagent grade, for rinsing and sample recovery, shall have an evaporation residue ≤ 0.001 percent by weight.

Dichloromethane (DCM).  Distilled-in-glass, for extracting CPM and rinsing, shall have an evaporation residue ≤ 0.001 percent by weight. Distilled-in-glass hexane may be substituted for DCM only when prohibited by the plant, province or territory.

Caution: Precautions must be used when handing dichloromethane in the field. Ensure the recovery area is well-ventilated and use a respirator when handling this solvent. Use double layers of nitrile gloves when handling dichloromethane.

Ammonium Hydroxide.  0.1 N NH4OH volumetric solution that has been standardized against a NIST reference material, or equivalent.

Sample Jars.  Chemically inert wide-mouth sample jars of a capacity of 250 mL to store the rinses of the nozzle, probe liner and the front half of the filter holder. For CPM, wide-mouth glass sample jars with a capacity compatible with the volume of the HPLC water and solvent rinses of the train components. Use tared 250 mL jars with the same supplier catalogue number for final gravimetric determination. Pre-labeled jars are recommended.

pH Indicator.  Calibrated pH meter or pH indicator paper strips.

Extraction Vials and Sonicator.  Clear vials with a capacity of 40 mL and a sonication bath able to deliver a frequency of 20 kHz. 

Separatory Funnels.  Borosilicate glass with a capacity of 500 mL to 2 L with a PTFE stopcock valve and cap.

Drying Oven.  A vented temperature-controlled oven capable of controlling the temperature to 105°C (221°F) to within 3°C (5°F).

5.  Procedures

5.1  Taring

Place the labeled sample jars in an oven and bake at 105°C for a minimum of six hours. Then transfer the jars to a desiccator containing silica gel or equivalent desiccant for a minimum of six hours.

Calibrate the balance and record the time, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, the weight of a 200 g NBS Class “S” (or equivalent) weight and the reference jar and each jar of the set. One of the jars will serve as weight reference for the entire set. Correct the weight of each jar with respect to the reference jar (referenced weight).

The reference jar serves as an indicator of the buoyancy effect of the volume of glass in the jars. The buoyancy effect is dependent on temperature, barometric pressure and relative humidity, which affect the specific gravity of the air displaced by the glass in the jar. This will increase or decrease the apparent weight of a jar. The tracking of the reference jar apparent weight allows the correction for the buoyancy effect. The change in the reference jar apparent weight is used to correct the weight of the jars containing the residues.

After a minimum of six hours repeat the balance calibration, the ambient data recording and the weighing of the reference jar and each jar of the set. Correct the weight of each jar with respect to the reference jar (referenced weight).

If the consecutive (≥ 6 hrintervals) referenced weights are within 0.5 mg, then the final reading of the consecutive weights is the tare referenced weight of each jar. Otherwise, perform additional weighing until a constant referenced weight is achieved.

Review your weighing procedures if you are unable to achieve a 0.3 mg standard deviation for consecutive referenced weighing of empty 250 mL jars.

Cap and place each jar within a clean clear polyethylene bag for later use in the field. Keep the reference jar in the laboratory for later use as a reference while weighing the jars containing the sample residues.

Note:

The same reference jar must be used for tare and residue referenced weights.

5.2  Sample Collection

Preliminary.  In the absence of any previous knowledge of the stack variables, a preliminary test should be conducted to obtain the following data:

  • Number and location of the traverse points spaced in accordance to Reference Method EPS1/RM/8 Method A.
  • Velocity profile across the stack, stack temperature and pressure (Reference Method EPS 1/RM/8, Method B).
  • Stack gas molecular weight (Reference Method EPS 1/RM/8, Method C).
  • Stack gas moisture content (Reference Method EPS 1/RM/8, Method D).

All sampling train glassware shall be thoroughly cleaned in the laboratory prior to the test. A fresh set of glassware for the CPM portion of the train (condenser to the front-half mist filter) must be used for each run. No silicone grease shall be used to seal the glass joints subject to a DCM rinse. The glass joints must be sealed with fluoropolmer O-rings or Teflon tape.

Wash the glassware in a dishwasher with laboratory grade glass detergent. Some glass components such as the condenser and condensate trap may be cleaned by soaking overnight in a tub filled with water and detergent. After washing, rinse all glassware three times each with tap water, Type II water, acetone and finally with dichloromethane. The probe liner may be cleaned by brushing and rinsing the liner three times each with Type-II water and acetone. Cover the open ends of the glassware with cleaned aluminum foil.

Sampling Train Preparation and Operation.  Assemble the sampling train in a clean area to minimize contamination. Install the selected size nozzle on the probe. Mark the probe with heat resistant markings to denote the location of each sampling point. Use a pair of tweezers to place the labeled and tared filter in the filter holder.

Sampling train preparation is similar to Method E, Reference Method EPS 1/RM/8, except for the installation of the mist filter and the addition of ethanol in the first stemless impinger or condensate trap to inhibit the oxidation of SO2 in the condensate. Measure 3 mL of ethanol and make up to 10 mL with HPLC water and add to the condensate trap or stemless impinger. The first impinger contains 100 mL of HPLC water, the second impinger is left empty and the third one must contain 100 to 300 g of silica gel desiccant. The condensate/impinger setup is shown in Figure H-1. Record the weight of the impinger/condensate trap (after the ethanol addition), the condenser and the other three impingers to the nearest 0.5 g on the Moisture Analysis Data Sheet (Figure H-2)

Figure H-1 Method H Impinger Train Schematic

Figure H-1 Method H Impinger Train Schematic (See long description below)
Description of Figure H-1

Figure H-1 is a schematic depiction of the Method H impinger train, which is similar to the Method E train except for the following modifications:

  • The hot filtered sample gas is passed through a water cooled glass coil condenser
  • The cold box water is circulated to the water jacket, by an immersion pump
  • The condensate drips into a stem less condenser or condensate trap containing 3 ml of ethanol and 10 ml of HPLC water
  • The dried sample gas is then passed through a mist filter located above the cold box

 

Figure H-2 Moisture Analysis Data Sheet

Figure H-2 Moisture Analysis Data Sheet (See long description below)
Description of Figure H-2

Figure H-2 is a template used to determine the mass of moisture collected during a test run. The heading prompts the recording of the following data for each test run:

  • Plant
  • Location
  • Test number
  • Date
  • Test conducted by

The main body of the table has 3 columns: Components, Content, and Weight.

  • The Components are: Condenser coil; Condensate trap; 1st Impinger; 2nd Impinger; and 3rd. Impinger
  • The Content column describes the contents of the components at the beginning of the run.
  • The Weight column states the final weight, initial weight and the net gain of each of the impingers at the end of the run. The gains from all the components are added together to determine the moisture collected, in grams.

 

Follow the sampling procedures specified in Section 5.5.1 of Method E, Reference Method EPS 1/RM/8 for the collection of the train sample. These include the selection of the nozzle, pre- and post-test leak checks, sampling train operation and the recording of instrument readings.

5.3  Sample Recovery

Carefully disconnect the probe from the sampling train. Seal all openings. Exercise care in moving the train components from the test site to the sample recovery area to minimize the loss of collected sample or the gain of extraneous particulate matter.

In the sample recovery area, weigh the components of the sample train. Record the weight to the nearest 0.5 g of the condenser, condensate trap and each of the three impingers on the Moisture Analysis Data Sheet (Figure H-2).

Recover the sample as follows:

Nozzle, Probe Liner and Front Half of Filter Holder Rinses (Containers 1 and 2).  Carefully wipe any visible traces of particulate from the exterior surfaces of the nozzle and probe. Wash and brush the interior surfaces of the nozzle, probe liner and the front half of the filter holder with approximately 100 mL HPLC water. Store these rinsings in Container No.1. This container does not need to be tared. Then wash and brush the interior surfaces of the nozzle, probe liner and the front half of the filter holder with approximately 100 mL of acetone. Place these washings into Container No. 2. This container must be tared or quantitatively transferred to a tared container for the gravimetric determination. Seal and label the containers and mark the liquid levels. Use a fine tip marker to mark the levels on all the containers.

Primary Filter (Container 3).  Use a pair of clean tweezers or a flat edge to transfer the glass fibre filter and loose material that may adhere to the filter support into a Petri dish. Seal and label the sample container

Condensate and Water Rinses (Container 4). Transfer the condensate collected in the condensate trap to Container 4. Measure and record the pH. Then rinse the primary filter back-half holder, condenser, condensate trap, connecting glassware and the front half of the mist filter holder three times each using a total of 100 mL HPLC water. Add the water rinses to Container 4. Use a second sample container (Container 4b) if the condensate and rinsing volumes exceeds the capacity of the jar. Fill the primary filter back-half holder and the condenser with HPLC water and allow to soak for five minutes. Add these soaks to Container 4. Seal and label the containers and mark the liquid levels.

Condenser and Back-half Rinses (Container 5).  Fill the back half of the primary filter holder and the condenser coil with DCM and allow them to soak for five minutes. Add these soaks to Container 5. Then rinse the primary filter back-half holder, coil condenser, condensate trap, connecting glassware and the front half of the secondary filter three times each using a total of 100 mL DCM. Add these rinses to Container 5. Seal and label the container and mark the liquid level.

Secondary (Mist) Filter (Container 6).  Use a pair of clean tweezers to place the filter into a Petri dish. Seal and label the container.

Front-half HPLC Water/Acetone Blank (Containers 7 and 8).  Place 100 mL of water and 100 mL of acetone, each one taken directly from the corresponding wash bottle being used, into Containers No. 7 and 8, respectively. Container No. 7 does not need to be tared. Container No. 8 must be tared or quantitatively transferred to a tared container for the gravimetric determination. Seal and label the containers and mark the liquid levels.

Back-half HPLC Water/Ethanol Blank(Container 9).  Take approximately 200 mL blank sample of HPLC water, and add three mL of ethanol, both used in the test runs, providing that the same stock solvent was used for all runs. Otherwise take separate blanks samples for each test run. Seal and label the container and mark the liquid level.

Dichloromethane Blank (Container 10). Take approximately 200 mL blank sample of DCM used in the test runs, providing that the same stock solvent was used for all runs. Otherwise take separate blanks samples for each test run. Seal and label the container and mark the liquid level.

Secondary (Mist) Filter Blank (Container 11). Use a pair of clean tweezers or a flat edge to place the filter into a Petri dish. Seal and label the sample container. This is required to confirm that no filter media material is being liberated into the water or DCM after sonication.

The use of tared glass containers is recommended to avoid sample transfer losses. During preparation and sample recovery these containers must be handled with laboratory gloves and protected from any alteration of their tare weight (additional labeling must be limited to the plastic cap). Following recovery, the containers are returned to their original polyethylene bags until their analysis in the laboratory. The containers must remain in an upright position at all times during shipping and maintained below 30°C.   

5.4  Sample Analysis

All analyses shall be completed within two weeks of sampling in a clean laboratory equipped with a fume hood. The relative humidity of the room in which the weighing is performed should be maintained at or below 50%.

In the laboratory, remove the containers from their protecting polyethylene bags and verify that no liquid leaks had taken place. Leaks will invalidate the test results. Note the condition of the samples as received in the laboratory in Figure H-3.

Figure H-3 Description of Received Samples

Figure H-3 Description of Received Samples (See long description below)
Description of Figure H-3

Figure H-3 is a template to document the conditions in which the laboratory receives the samples from each test run. The heading prompts the recording of the following data for each run:

  • Plant
  • Location
  • Test number
  • Date
  • Test conducted by

The 3 columns of the main section of the table deals with the sample reception conditions: Container/Jar No.; Description; and Observations.

  • Each run produces 11 samples that that may be checked in the corresponding row.
  • The sample descriptions are listed in the second column:
    1. Water rinse of the nozzle, probe liner and front-half of the primary filter holder;
    2. Acetone rinse of the nozzle, probe liner and front-half of the primary filter holder;
    3. Filter;
    4. Condensate, soaks and HPLC water rinses of the back half of the primary filter holder, condenser, condensate trap, and front half of the mist filter;
    5. Dichloromethane (DCM) soaks and rinses of the back half of the primary filter holder, condenser, condensate trap, and front half of the mist filter;
    6. Mist filter;
    7. Front-half HPLC water blank;
    8. Front-half acetone blank;
    9. Back-half HPLC water/ethanol blank;
    10. Dichloromethane blank, and
    11. Mist filter blank.
  • The Observations column elicits answer to questions about leakage during transport, and sample container seal conditions.

 

Sample analysis requires numerous gravimetric determinations of evaporation residues. Follow the procedures in Method G for the processing of Containers 1, 2, 3, 7 and 8. The following procedures are required for the determination of CPM. Refer to Figures H-4 and H-5. The samples in Containers 4 to 6 and 9 to 11 are required for the determination of CPM. Follow the sequence and procedures below for the determination of inorganic and organic condensable particulate matter.

Figure H-4 CPM Sample Processing
Step Procedure
1 Extract the water soluble CPM from the secondary filter (Container 6) by folding the filter in quarters and placing it into a 40-mL extraction tube. Add enough water to cover the secondary filter (approx. 10 to 20 mL). Place the tube into a sonication bath for a minimum of two minutes. Decant the aqueous extract into Container 4 (or 4b, if used). Repeat this extraction step twice for a total of three extractions.
2 Extract the DCM soluble CPM from the water-extracted secondary filter (Container 6) by adding enough DCM to cover the filter (approx. 10 to 20 mL). Place the extraction tube into a sonication bath for a minimum of two minutes. Decant the DCM extract into Container 5. Repeat this extraction step twice for a total of three extractions.
3 Transfer contents of Container 4 (and 4b, if used) to a separatory funnel. Then add 30 mL of DCM to the funnel, mix well and drain off the lower organic phase into Container 5. Repeat twice with another 30 mL of DCM. This extraction should yield about 90 mL of organic extract. Each time, leave a small amount of DCM in the separatory funnel ensuring that no water is collected in the organic phase. Decant the aqueous phase back to Containers 4 (or 4b, if used).
Note: During the organic extraction process significant pressure may build up inside the separatory funnel. Make sure to relieve the pressure using the PTFE stopcock valve while mixing as a safety precaution.
4 Evaporate the contents of the DCM extract (Container 5) at room temperature and pressure in a laboratory hood. Desiccate the residue for approximately 24 hours in a desiccator containing silica gel or equivalent desiccant. Weigh to a constant weight (± 0.5 mg) and report the results to the nearest 0.1 mg.
5 Place Container 4(and 4b, if used) in a 105°C (220°F) oven to evaporate the aqueous phase to not less than five mL. Then remove the container from the oven and complete the evaporation at room temperature and pressure in a desiccator containing silica gel or equivalent desiccant. Desiccate the residue for approximately 24 hours. Weigh to a constant weight (± 0.5 mg) and report the results to the nearest 0.1 mg. If a constant weight cannot be obtained on the residue contained in Container 4 (and 4b, if used) in four attempts then the presence of sulfuric acid in the sample is suspected, and the procedure in Step 6 must be followed.
6 Redissolve the residue with 100 mL HPLC water. Neutralize the acid in Container 4(and 4b, if used) by titration with 0.1 N NH4OH solution. Determine the end point with a calibrated pH meter or a strip of pH indicating paper strip. Do not use liquid indicators, as even a few drops may add significant residue. Record the volume of titrant used.
 
Again place Container 4 (and 4b, if used) in a 105°C (220°F) oven to evaporate the aqueous phase to not less than 5 mL. Then remove the container from the oven and complete the evaporation at room temperature and pressure in a desiccator. Desiccate the residue for approximately 24 hours. Weigh to a constant weight (± 0.5 mg) and report the results to the nearest 0.1 mg. Subtract the weight of the ammonia contained in the titrant used by using the equation in Figure H-5.

Figure H-5 CPM Sample Processing Flow Diagram

Figure H-5 CPM Sample Processing Flow Diagrams (See long description below)
Description of Figure H-5

Figure H-5 is a compact summary, in flow diagram format, to serve as quick reference for extracting and separating organic CPM from inorganic CPM. The separation is followed by the neutralization of the aqueous extract; separate residue determinations; and processing of the corresponding blanks.

 

Residue Mass Determination.  The determination of the evaporation residue may be affected by the weight and volume of the storage containers. The container weight and volume is typically six orders of magnitude greater than the residue. Therefore the taring and weighing may be affected by changes in air buoyancy. 

Residue weighing should follow the procedure for taring the sample jars.

  • Following the drying and desiccation of all samples, weight them and the reference container again.
  • Calculate the loaded weights with respect to the final weight of the reference container.
  • Weigh them again six or more hours later until the consecutive referenced weights differ by less than 0.5 mg  
  • The residue is the difference of the referenced final weight and the referenced tare weight of each sample.

Container 9 (Water/Ethanol Blank).  Place Container 9 (which also contains the aqueous extract of the mist filter blank) in a 105°C (220°F) oven to evaporate the aqueous phase to not less than 5 mL. Then remove the container from the oven and complete the evaporation at room temperature and pressure. Desiccate the residue for approximately 24 hours in a desiccator containing silica gel or equivalent desiccant. Weigh to a constant weight and report the results to the nearest 0.1 mg.

Container 10 (DCM Blank).  Evaporate the contents of the DCM (Container 10) (which also contains the DCM extract of the mist filter blank) at room temperature and pressure in a laboratory hood. Desiccate the residue for approximately 24 hours in a desiccator containing silica gel or equivalent desiccant. Weigh to a constant weight and report the results to the nearest 0.1 mg.

Record the weights in Figure H-6. Use the calculation in Figure H-6 to correct for the mass of NH4+ added to the residue during the titration.

Figure H-6  Particulate Analytical Data Sheet

Figure H-6  Particulate Analytical Data Sheet (See long description below)
Description of Figure H-6

Figure H-6 is a template to record the gravimetric determinations required for filterable PM2.5 and CPM. The heading prompts the recording of the following data for each test run:

  • Plant
  • Location
  • Test number
  • Date
  • Test conducted by

The 6 columns of the main section of the table have the following titles:

  • Train Component
  • Description
  • Final Weight (mg)
  • Tare Weight (mg)
  • Weight of Particulate (mg)
  • Fraction

Columns 1, 2, and 6 are descriptive. The gravimetric results are entered in columns 3 and 4 and the net values are recorded in column 5.

Finally Figure H-6 includes the formulas to calculate PM, CPM, and TPM

 

Notes:

  • The weight of the blanks must not exceed 2 mg
  • Do not correct for negative blank values
  • No blank corrections are allowed when blank residue is above 2 mg

6.  Calculations

During a test run, field data should be entered in the units of the stack sampling equipment (Imperial or common practice metric units). The equations of this method follow the common practice units, to facilitate its application and to avoid errors. The results may be converted, if necessary, to the units specified in the applicable standards or guidelines. The use of term weight actually refers to mass. The abbreviation “W” is used for weight to avoid confusion with “M” which is used for molecular weight.

Calculate the stack gas parameters as per section 5.6 of Method E, Reference Method EPS 1/RM/8.

The method detection limit for the gravimetric determination of residues from jars is 0.42 mg. The total expanded uncertainty (95% probability) for filterable PM and condensable particulate matter is 1.4 mg. The inorganic CPM data from nine paired runs at industrial source was used to compare this method to EPA Method 202. A statistical analysis of the differences between the two methods yielded a t-value of 0.28 with an average difference of -0.16 mg (95% confidence interval -1.5 to 1.1 mg).

Concentration of PM or CPM or CPM.  Calculate the concentration of using Equation H-1  

Equation H-1

Equation H-1

Mass Emission Rate.  Calculate the mass emission or release rate of PM, CPM or TPM using Equation H-3.

Equation H-2

Equation H-2

7.  Nomenclature

C PM
concentration of filterable particulate matter in the stack gas on a dry basis at reference temperature and pressure, mg/m³

C CPM
concentration of condensable particulate matter in the stack gas on a dry basis at reference temperature and pressure, mg/m³

C TPM
concentration of total particulate matter in the stack gas on a dry basis at reference temperature and pressure, mg/m³

ER PM
mass emission rate of filterable particulate matter, kg/h

ER CPM
mass emission rate of condensable particulate matter, kg/h

ER TPM
mass emission rate of total particulate matter, kg/h

Q s
volumetric stack gas flow rate on a dry basis at reference temperature and pressure, m³/h

(V m) ref
volume of stack gas sample on a dry basis at reference temperature and pressure, m³

W PM
weight of filterable particulate collected during the test run, mg

W CPM
weight of condensable particulate collected during the test run, mg

W TPM
weight of total particulate collected during the test run, mg

10 -6
conversion, kg/mg
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