Revised questions and answers on the Federal Renewable Fuels Regulations: preface

General Questions

A.1: Who is affected by the Renewable Fuels Regulations?

Persons who are affected by the regulations are:

  • Persons who produce and/or import gasoline, diesel fuel or heating distillate oil;
  • Persons who produce and/or import renewable fuel;
  • Persons who elect under section 11 of the regulations to create compliance units as participants in the trading system; and
  • Persons who sell for export renewable fuel or liquid petroleum fuel that contains renewable fuel.

The regulations place various requirements on these persons, depending on the nature of their activity. The details of these requirements are described in this document. Refer to question DD.8 for a summary of specific sections of the regulations that apply to persons carrying out different activities.

A.2: Why is the Government requiring renewable content in fuels?

The Government of Canada is committed to expanding the production and use of renewable fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel. The Government has a four-pronged strategy for renewable fuels in order to:

  • Reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases resulting from fuel use;
  • Encourage greater production of biofuels;
  • Accelerate the commercialization of new biofuel technologies; and
  • Provide new market opportunities for agricultural producers and rural communities.

The government's comprehensive strategy for renewable fuels has four components:

  1. Increasing the retail availability of renewable fuels through regulation (that is, the federal Renewable Fuels Regulations);
  2. Supporting the expansion of Canadian production of renewable fuels;
  3. Assisting farmers to seize new opportunities in this sector; and
  4. Accelerating the commercialization of new technologies.

The Government announced the first component of the strategy, increasing the retail availability of renewable fuels through regulation in December 2006 and Environment Canada issued a Notice of intent to develop a federal regulation requiring renewable fuels in the Canada Gazette later that month.

A.3: Where can I get information on the Government of Canada's strategy for renewable fuels?

The strategy is described in detail on the Government of Canada's ecoACTION website.

A.4: How do these regulations relate to other federal fuel regulations?

There are a number of other federal fuel regulations: namely,

  • Fuels Information Regulations, No. 1,
  • Gasoline Regulations [Lead and Phosphorous],
  • Benzene in Gasoline Regulations,
  • Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations,
  • Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulations,
  • Contaminated Fuels Regulations,
  • Regulations Prescribing Circumstances of Granting Waivers Pursuant to Section 147 of the Act, and
  • Gasoline and Gasoline Blend Dispensing Flow Rate Regulations.

Some of the regulations apply to producers and importers of gasoline, some apply to producers and importers of diesel fuel, and others apply to persons engaged in other activities. Each of the regulations has specific requirements, such as compositional, recordkeeping and reporting requirements. All of these regulations must be complied with.

A.5: How do these regulations relate to provincial renewable fuel regulations?

The federal regulations are made under the authorities of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The overall structure is similar to the Renewable Fuel Standard in the United States, with the point of compliance being the point of production or importation (whereas the provincial regulations are generally based on the point of "first" sale). Both the Canadian and U.S. regulatory regimes are based on company-wide compliance, as are the provincial regulations.

Because of the differing points of compliance, the use of tradeable compliance units, differing policies and scope, and differing legal authorities, there will be differences in requirements between the federal and provincial regulations. In addition, the enforcement aspects of the federal and provincial regulations differ in the fines and penalties that can be imposed for non-compliance.

A.6: If I fully comply with a provincial regulation that has the same or higher renewable fuel requirement, am I automatically in compliance with the federal regulations?

No. Each regulatory regime has its own set of requirements. Even if the requirements for renewable fuel content are the same or similar between regimes, there are different pools of fuel required to have renewable content, and different recordkeeping, reporting and auditing requirements. Both the federal and provincial regulations must be complied with. Compliance with one does not necessarily mean compliance with the other.

A.7: Can there be an equivalency agreement between the federal government and one or more provincial governments in regards to the Renewable Fuels Regulations?

Under equivalency agreements, federal and provincial governments agree that a federal regulation does not apply within a province where there is an equivalent provincial regulation. Equivalency agreements are authorized under section 10 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. However, section 10 of the Act does not cover regulations made under section 140 of the Act, which is the provision under which most federal fuel regulations are made, including the Renewable Fuels Regulations. Consequently, there cannot be equivalency agreements for the Renewable Fuels Regulations.

A.8: Why are the regulations so complicated?

The regulations deal with three petroleum fuels (gasoline, diesel fuel and heating distillate oil) that are generally produced at one facility and to which renewable fuel is added at another facility, which is often at an entirely separate location from the first facility. The regulations must bridge the gap between the point of production of the petroleum fuels and the point of blending of the renewable fuels into the petroleum fuels.

In addition, the regulations include a number of flexibilities provided to the regulatee, including annual averaging, a trading system for compliance units, carry forward and carry back of compliance units, creation of compliance units for having renewable fuel content in fuels other than gasoline, creation of compliance units from the use of biocrude, etc. These flexibilities were incorporated to reduce the cost of compliance for regulatees by not requiring to have renewable fuel in each batch of petroleum fuel, while ensuring the benefits of renewable fuels.

The inclusion of these flexibilities requires full recordkeeping, reporting, auditing and other administrative requirements. These are necessary to ensure the robustness and enforceability of the regulations.

The overall structure of the regulations has design elements that allow the regulations to be significantly simpler than similar regulations in the United States.

A.9: Why are the federal regulations not sales-based, as are the provincial renewable fuel regulations?

The federal regulations are made under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which sets out authorities to regulate fuels. Working within these authorities, and also considering interactions and transactions within the petroleum industry across all of Canada and the multiple refinery orbits covered in a national regulation, the sales approach was not considered to be viable for the federal regulations.

A.10: I only produce or import gasoline-like blendstock, not gasoline. Do the regulations apply to me?

The definition of "gasoline" in the Regulations includes sub-octane blending components. If your blendstock meets the definition of gasoline, you are obligated to meet the renewable fuel requirements of the regulations for your gasoline pool (section 5 of the regulations).

A.11: If I only buy fuel, but do not refine or import myself, what requirements must I meet?

If that is your only activity, the regulations do not apply to you.

A.12: If I only sell fuel, what requirements must I meet?

If that is your only activity, the regulations do not apply to you, unless you sell for export renewable fuel or fuel containing renewable content. If you sell fuel for export, there are some recordkeeping and reporting requirements that apply to you (sections 36 to 39 of the regulations).

A.13: If I only export fuel, what requirements of the regulations must I meet?

You do not have any requirements if you only sell for export petroleum fuel that does not have any renewable content.

Under the regulations, if you sell renewable fuel or fuel with renewable content for export:

  • You must meet the recordkeeping and reporting requirements of section 36.
  • A format for your reports may be specified under Section 27.
  • Records must be made "as soon as feasible" under section 37 (but no later than 15 days after the required information becomes available).
  • Your records and supporting documentation must be kept in Canada for five years, pursuant to section 38.
  • Your volumes must be measured in accordance with section 4.
  • You must submit samples or information, upon request, pursuant to Section 26.

If you sell for export less than 1000 m³ of renewable fuel or of liquid petroleum fuel containing renewable fuel during a gasoline compliance period, these requirements do not apply to you. The threshold is the volume sold for export during calendar year, except between December 15, 2010 and December 31, 2012, when the volume covers exports for that entire period.

A.14: If I only produce or import renewable fuel, what requirements must I meet?

You must meet the recordkeeping and reporting requirements of section 34 of the regulations. These records and reports are required in order to monitor the effectiveness of the regulations and for enforcement purposes. In addition:

  • A format for your reports may be specified under Section 27.
  • Records must be made "as soon as feasible" under section 37 (but no later than 15 days after the required information becomes available).
  • Your records and supporting documentation must be kept in Canada for five years, pursuant to section 38.
  • Volumes must be measured in accordance with section 4 and a report on measurement methods is required, under section 35.

If you only produce and/or import less than 400 m³ of renewable fuel in a year, for that compliance period (that is, in any 12-month period of the compliance period), these requirements do not apply to you (refer to subsection 2(2) of the regulations).

A.15: If I only blend renewable fuel, what requirements must I meet?

You do not have to meet any requirements unless you opt to become an elective participant in the trading system. In that case, you must meet all the requirements of the regulations for such a person (refer to Parts 2 and 3 of the regulations).

A.16: If I sell a renewable fuel in Canada, must it be added into a liquid petroleum fuel in Canada?

No, it need not. However, to create compliance units, it must be added to a liquid petroleum fuel or used in its neat form.

A.17: Why don't the regulations target the blenders of gasoline, diesel fuel and heating distillate oil, instead of targeting the producers and importers of petroleum fuels?

The intent of the regulations is to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases through the replacement of a portion of liquid petroleum fuels with renewable fuels. Thus, the producers and importers of the liquid petroleum fuels must have an annual minimum renewable fuel content.

A.18: What fuels are required to have renewable content?

Producers and importers of gasoline, diesel fuel or heating distillate oil must meet the minimum renewable content requirements in those fuels over each compliance period, which is usually a calendar year. Renewable fuels blended into petroleum fuels other than those listed, as well as the use of biocrude, may also qualify towards meeting the renewable fuel requirement for gasoline.

A.19: Are there fuels that are not subject to the regulations?

These regulations apply to gasoline, diesel fuel and heating distillate oil; other petroleum fuels are not covered. However, if a person wishes to create compliance units from the addition of renewable fuel to these other petroleum fuels, they may, provided that they meet all the applicable requirements of the regulations.

In addition, certain special-use fuels may be excluded from a person's volumetric pool of fuel that they produced and imported. These are fuels for use:

  • in aircraft,
  • in competition vehicles,
  • in scientific research,
  • as feedstock in the production of chemicals (other than fuels) in a chemical manufacturing facility,
  • in the North (Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Quebec north of 60°N),
  • in the case of gasoline, in Newfoundland and Labrador, and
  • in the case of diesel fuel and heating distillate oil,
    • in military combat equipment,
    • represented as kerosene and sold for or delivered for use in unvented space heaters, wick-fed illuminating lamps, or flue-connected stoves and heaters.

In addition, a primary supplier may subtract from its distillate pool any diesel fuel or heating distillate oil that was, until December 31, 2012, for use in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Quebec on or south of 60°N.

Fuel for export, or fuel in transit through Canada from a place outside Canada to another place outside Canada, may also be excluded from a person's pool. You should also refer to question G.35.

A.20: What are unvented space heaters, wick-fed illuminating lamps and flue-connected stoves and heaters? Can you give examples of them? Where did these terms come from?

These terms are common industry terminology and are used in industry standards, such as the Canadian General Standard Board's standard for kerosene (CAN/CGSB-3.3-2007, section 1.2). A description of these types of combustion devices follows:

  • Unvented space heaters: Small heaters typically used to heat small parts of buildings. Unvented space heaters are typically portable and use the surrounding air for combustion, venting their combustion by-products back into the room.
  • Wick-fed illuminating lamps: A lamp that uses a flame for illumination, fed by a wick. A wick is typically a piece of fibre, string, cord or wood that conveys fuel to a flame. A wick fed illuminating lamp provides light, through the burning of a flame with the fuel supplied via a wick saturated in a combustible liquid. An example would be a hurricane or kerosene lamp.
  • Flue-connected stoves and heaters: Flue connected stoves and heaters are those stoves and heaters that have a duct, pipe or chimney that convey the combustion exhaust gases to the outdoors.

A.21: My only activity is importing one of the special-use fuels listed in the response to question A.19. Do the regulations apply to me?

You are exempt from the provisions of the regulations, except for some recordkeeping requirements. Refer to subsection 2(3) of the regulations. However, if you wish to create compliance units and participate in the trading system, you may opt into the trading system by sending a notice to the Minister, as set out in section 3 of the regulations. In that case, you must meet all the requirements of the regulations that apply to primary suppliers.

A.22: The regulations do not include requirements that renewable fuels used have lower greenhouse gas emissions than conventional fuels. Why not?

The impact of a renewable fuel on emissions of greenhouse gases vary depending on the feedstock used to produce the fuel, what processes are used to produce the fuel, and where it is produced in relation to where it is used. There is considerable controversy as to methodologies for estimating lifecycle emissions of various renewable fuels. The Government has decided that for the present the regulations will not have any such explicit requirements; however, in the future, when there is more information available, such requirements may be introduced into the regulations.

With the expected mix of renewable fuels in Canada, it is estimated that there will be a net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the use of renewable fuel. The Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement associated with the regulations provides an estimate of the expected reduction.

A.23: The regulations do not differentiate between conventionally produced renewable fuels and next generation renewable fuels, such as cellulosic ethanol. Why not?

There is a lack of robust information as to the appropriate "biases" for these next generation renewable fuels. The Government has decided that for the present the regulations will not have any such biases; however, in the future, when there is more information available, such biases may be introduced into the regulations.

A.24: Why do the requirements apply on a corporate basis? Won't this mean that renewable fuel blends may not be available in all regions of Canada?

The Government of Canada consulted widely on federal regulations for renewable fuels. It announced its intention in the Canada Gazette in 2006. Its decision to apply the requirements on a corporate basis reflects those consultations and the Government's subsequent announcement in May 2009, of the key elements and next steps.

Compliance on a corporate basis is consistent with the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard and provincial renewable fuel regulations.

Consequently, renewable fuel blends may not be available in all regions of Canada, as the overall national levels could be met through higher levels in other regions.

A.25: Why are the limits on a corporate basis rather than on a facility basis like under the Benzene in Gasoline and Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations?

The Renewable Fuels Regulations are concerned with reducing greenhouse gases, a global environmental issue. It is the overall quantity of petroleum fuels displaced by renewable fuels that provides the greenhouse gas benefit, rather than having renewable fuel blended at every facility. The other fuel regulations are concerned with regional air quality issues. Compliance on a corporate basis is consistent with the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard and provincial renewable fuel regulations.

A.26: Why are the limits on an average basis rather than per-litre limits like under the Sulphur in Diesel FuelRegulations?

The Renewable Fuels Regulations are concerned with reducing greenhouse gases, a global national issue. It is the overall quantity of petroleum fuels displaced by renewable fuels that provides the greenhouse gas benefit, rather than having renewable fuel blended at every facility. The Sulphur in Diesel Fuel Regulations were concerned with ensuring that emissions control equipment on vehicles operated as intended. This necessitated ensuring that every batch of diesel fuel did not exceed the required maximum sulphur content.

A.27: What is a compliance period?

A compliance period is the period over which a primary supplier must meet the 5% renewable fuel requirement for gasoline (the gasoline compliance period), and the 2% renewable fuel requirement for diesel fuel and heating distillate oil (the distillate compliance period).

Except for the first compliance period, a compliance period is equal to a calendar year, both for the gasoline compliance period, and the distillate compliance period. The first gasoline compliance period is a transitional period, 24 ½ months long. The first distillate compliance period is also a transitional period, 18 months long.

A.28: What are "compliance units"?

In a general sense, one compliance unit represents one litre of renewable fuel. Compliance units are created by activities such as adding renewable fuel to liquid petroleum fuel, or by using biocrude, and they are tradeable. Compliance units are used to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the regulations; sufficient compliance units must be owned by primary suppliers in order to demonstrate that they have the required volume of renewable fuels. For more details, refer to the questions and answers in Section K on the creation of compliance units.

A.29: When do I have to meet the requirement of 5% renewable fuel for my gasoline pool?

The requirement starts on December 15, 2010. The first gasoline compliance period is the period from December 15, 2010 to December 31, 2012 (a 24 ½-month period). You must have an average of 5% renewable fuel in your gasoline pool over this period.

Following the compliance period, there are a further three months for the associated trading period during which compliance units from the first period may be exchanged (e.g., until March 31, 2013 for the first gasoline compliance period).

For example, a primary supplier need not have any compliance units during the first few months of the first gasoline compliance period, but it must then make up for this deficiency, either through creating compliance units or acquiring them from others. If at the end of the first gasoline compliance period (December 31, 2012) the primary supplier still has a shortfall, it has until March 31, 2013 to acquire compliance units through trading with other participants in the trading system.

A.30: When do I have to meet the requirement of 2% renewable fuel for my distillate pool?

The requirement starts on July 1, 2011. The first distillate compliance period is the period from July 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012 (an 18-month period). You must have an average of 2% renewable fuel in your distillate pool over this period.

Following each compliance period, there are a further three months for the associated trading period during which compliance units from the first period may be exchanged (e.g., until March 31, 2013 for the first distillate compliance period).

For example, a primary supplier does not need to have any compliance units during the first few months of the first distillate compliance period, but it must then make up for this deficiency, either through creating compliance units or acquiring them from others. If at the end of the first distillate compliance period (December 31, 2012) the primary supplier still has a shortfall, it has until March 31, 2013 to acquire compliance units through trading with other participants in the trading system. It can also
carry back compliance units from the next compliance period as stated in sections 24 and 25 of the Regulations (see also questions P.1 to P.9 related to carry back provisions).

A.31: What are the important dates in the regulations?

Besides the dates for the renewable fuel requirements described in questions A.29 and question A.30A.30, there are various dates for reporting requirements. These are detailed in question EE.7.

A.32: Do the regulations require the use of ethanol or biodiesel?

The regulations do not require any specific renewable fuel to be used. Instead, any liquid renewable fuel may qualify for the creation of compliance units, provided it is produced from one or more of the listed renewable fuel feedstocks, complies with the maximum content of non-renewable substances allowed, and otherwise meets the definition of renewable fuel as set out in the regulations.

The renewable fuel feedstocks listed in the regulations are:

  • (a) wheat grain;
  • (b) soy grain;
  • (c) grains other than those mentioned in paragraphs (a) and (b);
  • (d) cellulosic material that is derived from ligno-cellulosic or hemi-cellulosic matter that is available on a renewable or recurring basis;
  • (e) starch;
  • (f) oilseeds;
  • (g) sugar cane, sugar beets or sugar components;
  • (h) potatoes;
  • (i) tobacco;
  • (j) vegetable oils;
  • (k) algae;
  • (l) vegetable materials or other plant materials, other than those mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (k), including biomass;
  • (m) animal material, including fats, greases and oils;
  • (n) animal solid waste; and
  • (o) municipal solid waste.

A.33: Are methanol or dimethyl ether renewable fuels? Are wood or other solid plant material renewable fuels?

A liquid fuel is considered to be a renewable fuel for the purposes of these regulations if it is produced from one or more of the listed renewable fuel feedstocks, complies with the maximum content of non-renewable substances allowed, and otherwise meets the definition of renewable fuel as set out in the regulations.

Gaseous and solid renewable fuels at standard ambient temperature and pressure are not covered by these regulations and cannot be used to create compliance units.

A.34: Is hydrotreated vegetable oil a renewable fuel? Is it a biocrude?

Vegetable oils are renewable fuel feedstocks from which a liquid renewable fuel can be produced. Hydrotreated vegetable oil would be considered to be a renewable fuel for the purposes of these regulations, provided it complies with the maximum content of non-renewable substances, and otherwise meets the definition of "renewable fuel". If used as a feedstock at a petroleum refinery, vegetable oil would be considered to be a biocrude for the purposes of these regulations provided it meets the definition of "biocrude".

A.35: What options do I have to meet the renewable content requirements?

Compliance with the renewable content requirements is entirely based on your ownership of compliance units at the end of the trading period in respect of a compliance period (e.g., by March 31, 2013 for the first gasoline and distillate compliance periods). You may create compliance units through a variety of ways (as set out in sections 13 to 16 of the regulations) or you may acquire compliance units from others (as set out in section 20 of the regulations).

A.36: How can I comply with the regulations if I have no available sources of renewable fuel?

You may acquire compliance units from other participants in the trading system (as set out in section 20 of the regulations).

A.37: Do imports and exports include inter-provincial transfers of fuel?

No, they do not. Imports and exports only include imports into Canada and exports from Canada. Where the regulations require reporting by province of import or province of export, this is in regard to volumes imported into Canada, or exported from Canada, via that province.

A.38: I import gasoline, diesel fuel or heating oil from one province into another. How do the regulations apply to me?

If that is your only activity, the regulations do not apply to you. Interprovincial transfers of fuels are not imports into Canada. Imports into Canada come from another country.

A.39: I reprocess used or virgin motor oil to create a fuel that can evaporate atmospheric pressure, that boils within the range of 130°C to 400°C and that is for use in diesel engines. Am I considered a producer of diesel fuel under these regulations?

Yes, the activity described is the production of diesel fuel for the purposes of the regulations.

A.40: Why does the definition of "gasoline" include sub-octane gasoline (i.e., having a "road" octane of less than 86)?

For the purposes of the regulations, "gasoline" includes sub-octane blendstocks (or unfinished gasoline). A primary supplier's pool of gasoline which is required to have 5% renewable content includes such volumes. This approach captures blendstocks that will be blended with renewable fuel to become finished gasoline (usually downstream of the point of production)

A.41: Why do these regulations not address "gasoline-like blendstock" as do the Benzene in Gasoline Regulations and Sulphur in Gasoline Regulations?

In those other regulations, gasoline-like blendstock is exempt from the compositional requirements. In the Renewable Fuels Regulations, gasoline-like blendstock (or unfinished gasoline) is part of a person's gasoline pool. This approach captures blendstocks that will be blended with renewable fuel to become finished gasoline.

A.42: As a retailer of fuels, are there any new special requirements or procedures for selling fuels with renewable content?

There are no special requirements under these regulations for retailers of fuels with renewable content.

A.43: Is fuel with renewable content compatible with my existing fuel storage tanks?

You should discuss this issue with your fuel provider.

A.44: Can the use of ethanol blends damage my vehicle engine, my boat engine, or smaller engines that I own (e.g., lawnmowers)?

Most vehicles and equipment powered by gasoline engines are compatible with ethanol blends of up to 10% (E10). However, some older (pre-1980) vehicles and equipment and some two-stroke engines may require additional maintenance or modification before you fill them with ethanol-blended gasoline. Please check your owners' manuals for information on the use of ethanol-blended gasoline with your vehicle or equipment.

A.45: Do the regulations ensure that a renewable fuel will work in my vehicle or engine?

The regulations do not specify any requirements that would dictate the fitness for use of a renewable fuel - that aspect is left to fuel producers and sellers and organizations that establish commercial specification and standards for fuels (e.g., the Canadian General Standards Board).

A.46: Do the regulations include labelling requirements at the fuel pump for fuel that is sold?

The regulations do not generally require labelling at the pump. However, if a person wishes to create compliance units from high-renewable-content fuels or neat renewable fuels, the person must have evidence establishing that the final consumer of the fuel was informed of the nature of the fuel, either through documents provided directly to the consumer or by appropriate labels on the fuel dispensing pump.

A.47: How does a consumer know if they are buying fuel with renewable content?

It is common practice in the industry to label fuel-dispensing pumps that may dispense fuel with renewable content. Other than as described in the above response to question A.46, the regulations do not set requirements for sellers of fuel to inform consumers of the renewable fuel content.

A.48: Who is the "Minister" referred to throughout the regulations?

The Minister referred to is the federal Minister of the Environment.

A.49: Will the Minister be granting a waiver from these regulations if there are fuel shortages?

On June 17, 2010, the federal government has recently passed Regulations Prescribing Circumstances for Granting Waivers Pursuant to Section 147 of the Act. Under those regulations, the Minister may grant temporary waivers to fuel regulations made under section 140 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, provided that there is a fuel shortage (or one is anticipated) and there has been a declaration of a national, provincial or territorial emergency or a declaration that the fuel shortage could affect national security. The Renewable Fuels Regulations are under section 140 of the Act and so are covered by the waiver regulations.

A.50: What are the penalties if I do not comply with the regulations?

Compliance with the regulations is mandatory. Environment Canada's Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 sets out the criteria for responses by Environment Canada enforcement officers to alleged violations.

Under sections 272 and 273 of the Act, every person who is found guilty of contravening or failing to comply with the Act or its regulations, or providing false or misleading information, is subject to fines or imprisonment. These sections should also be read in conjunction with section 276 of the Act which provides that where an offence is committed or continued on more than one day, then each day on which the offence occurred may be prosecuted as a separate offence.

In addition to financial and administrative penalties, if there is a contravention of the regulations, under section 148 of the Act the Minister may require a producer, processor, importer, retailer or distributor to take any or all of the following measures:

  • provide notification of the relevant characteristics of the fuel and of any danger to the environment or to human life or health that might be posed by the fuel;
  • replace the fuel with fuel that meets the applicable requirement;
  • accept return of the fuel from the purchaser and refund the purchase price;
  • take other measures to mitigate the effect of the contravention on the environment or on human life or health; and
  • report on the steps taken.

A.51: Will the reports required under these Regulations be used in the Parliamentary report provided for under subsection 140(7) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999?

It is possible that the information provided to Environment Canada under these Regulations would then be used to inform the Parliamentary report.

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