Technical approach for rapid screening of substances of lower ecological concern: appendix A

Appendix A

Sources of information used as mechanical filters
Exposure - quantities, releases and industrial information
Information Source Description (Summary of the contextual information from the source) Interpretation / Significance
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) High Production Volume (HPV) The OECD List of HPV Chemicals (portable document format (PDF), 1.10 megabytes [MB]) serves as the overall priority list from which chemicals are selected for Screening Information Data Set (SIDS) data gathering and testing and initial hazard assessment. The HPV list is compiled for substances which are produced or imported at levels ≥ 1000 tons per year in at least one Member country or in the European Union region. These international lists of high production volume (HPV) chemicals, particularly the United States (US) lists, are judged as important indicators of a substance potentially being in commerce in Canada in higher quantities.
ICCA HPV The global chemical industry, through the International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA), has undertaken to provide, as a first step, harmonized data sets on the intrinsic hazards of and initial hazard assessments for approximately 1000 HPV substances (Excel Spreadsheet, 284KB) by the end of 2004. The information will be submitted to the OECD for international agreement as part of its refocused HPV Chemicals Program. These international lists of high production volume (HPV) chemicals, particularly the United States (US) lists, are judged as important indicators of a substance potentially being in commerce in Canada in higher quantities.
US HPV

The U.S. high production volume (HPV) chemicals are those which are manufactured in or imported into the United States at levels ≥ 1000000 pounds per year. The U.S. HPV chemicals were identified through information collected under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory Update Rule (IUR). Reporting these organic chemicals is required every four years, leading to four lists of substances :

These international lists of high production volume (HPV) chemicals, particularly the United States (US) lists, are judged as important indicators of a substance potentially being in commerce in Canada in higher quantities.
US Extended HPV A chemical industry initiative that broadens current work on US HPV chemicals. The companies are being asked to provide health and environmental information for 574 "new" HPV chemicals (PDF, 244KB) (which now meet the volume threshold according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s 2002 Inventory). The companies will be asked to provide also information on use and exposure for both the "Extended" HPV as well as the original "Challenge Program" substances. These international lists of high production volume (HPV) chemicals, particularly the United States (US) lists, are judged as important indicators of a substance potentially being in commerce in Canada in higher quantities.
Japan HPV In 2005 the Japan HPV Challenge Program was started in partnership between Japanese government agencies and the Japanese Chemical Industry Association (JCIA), to collect and make public information on the safety of Japan's HPV chemicals which are not yet subject to the assessment by existing international and national programs. The target chemicals are organic substances produced or imported in Japan over 1000 tons per year. These international lists of high production volume (HPV) chemicals, particularly the United States (US) lists, are judged as important indicators of a substance potentially being in commerce in Canada in higher quantities.
Australia HPV National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) have compiled a list of industrial chemicals (mixtures/products) that are manufactured and imported in Australia in quantities of ≥ 100 tonnes during 2001 and 2002. A number of categories were exempt (articles, radioactive, incidentally and naturally chemicals and polymers). National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) have compiled a list of industrial chemicals (mixtures/products) that are manufactured and imported in Australia in quantities of ≥ 100 tonnes during 2001 and 2002. A number of categories were exempt (articles, radioactive, incidentally and naturally chemicals and polymers). These international lists of high production volume (HPV) chemicals, particularly the United States (US) lists, are judged as important indicators of a substance potentially being in commerce in Canada in higher quantities.
Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) 1999 Pilot Project (Canada) A Pilot Project for screening assessments was initiated by Environment Canada and Health Canada in 2001. The project identified 123 substances which had the potential to meet the categorization criteria 1) for persistence and/or bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms or 2) for high potential for exposure to Canadians. Additionally, a survey for all pilot substances was conducted in 2002 under authority of Section 71 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act,1999 (CEPA, 1999), requiring all parties to report use, import or manufacture in Canada. These sources provide recent Canadian information that merits further evaluation. Information was collected under the authority of CEPA 1999, or in relation to activities conducted under it.
CEPA 1999 Section 71 Notices (Canada) Other notices under Section 71 of CEPA, 1999 require submission of data regarding the presence of listed substances in the Canadian market and associated industry sectors. Substances covered by these Notices are identified, through categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL), to have potential for hazard to the environment or human health or as representing greatest potential for human exposure; or as substances of emerging concern and international interest. These sources provide recent Canadian information that merits further evaluation. Information was collected under the authority of CEPA 1999, or in relation to activities conducted under it.
Categorization Industry Submission (Canada) Substances are included on this list if industry voluntarily provided data on the substance in support of categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL), or if industry mentioned that the substance was of interest to them. This list was compiled during categorization. These sources provide recent Canadian information that merits further evaluation. Information was collected under the authority of CEPA 1999, or in relation to activities conducted under it.
Toxic Substances Control Act - Inventory Update Rule (US) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated a rule in 1986 for the partial updating of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Chemical Inventory database (75 000 industrial chemicals currently produced or imported into the United States). Manufacturers and importers of chemicals already on the TSCA Inventory which are being produced at one plant site or imported at production volume levels of 10 000 or more pounds (changed to 25 000 pounds in 2006) must report, unless either their chemical is excluded from the Inventory Update Rule (IUR) or they fall under the Small Business exemption. These sources provide information on quantities of substances in commerce in other countries. Several include data from multiple years, which can indicate temporal trends in quantity of substances in commerce or in the number of uses.
Toxic Substances Control Act - 12(b) Export Notification (US) TSCA section 12(b) export notification requirements delineated at 40 CFR part 707, subpart D. It requires any person who exports or intends to export a chemical substance or mixture to notify the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of such exportation if any of the cited actions have been taken under TSCA with respect to that chemical substance or mixture. Current list as of October 10, 2009 (PDF, 810KB). These sources provide information on quantities of substances in commerce in other countries. Several include data from multiple years, which can indicate temporal trends in quantity of substances in commerce or in the number of uses.
Chemical Industries Association List (United Kingdom [UK]) In 2004 United Kingdom Chemical Industries Association (UK CIA) unveiled plans to develop a database of chemicals marketed in the UK. This database is the first output of that work and covers the previous calendar year 2005. This database involves pure chemical substances that were marketed in the UK by CIA member companies at greater than 1 ton per company during 2005. These sources provide information on quantities of substances in commerce in other countries. Several include data from multiple years, which can indicate temporal trends in quantity of substances in commerce or in the number of uses.
Research Institute for Fragrance Materials The Research Institute for Fragrance Materials (RIFM) is an international organization that evaluates and distributes scientific data on the safety assessment of fragrance raw materials found in perfumes, cosmetics, shampoos, creams, detergents, air fresheners, candles and other personal and household products. RIFM's database contains information on chemical structure, quantity in commerce (0 to > 1 000 000 kilograms per year [kg/y]) and consumer exposure. This database is operated with the full cooperation of the Flavor and Extracts Manufacturing Association (FEMA) and is only available by subscription to RIFM and FEMA member. These sources provide information on quantities of substances in commerce in other countries. Several include data from multiple years, which can indicate temporal trends in quantity of substances in commerce or in the number of uses.
SPIN database (Scandinavian countries) Substances in Preparations in Nordic Countries (SPIN) database (http://195.215.251.229/fmi/xsl/spin/SPIN/report/list.xsl?-db=spinstof&-lay=overview&-max=all&-find) contains information on products on the market reported to each of the Nordic products registers (data on amounts of substances and in number of products and sectors the substances are used in). It provides data on the use of chemical substances in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Finland over the years 1999 to 2004. These sources provide information on quantities of substances in commerce in other countries. Several include data from multiple years, which can indicate temporal trends in quantity of substances in commerce or in the number of uses.
KEMI Index - surface water, air, soil, STP (Sweden) The Swedish Chemicals Inspectorate, KemI, is a supervisory authority under the Ministry of the Environment. KemI works in Sweden and in the European Union (EU) to promote legislation and rules which contribute to achieving a non-toxic environment. The KemI Index provides knowledge and information about important environmental aspects when diffuse emissions from articles are a component in efforts to reduce chemical risks. This index is made up of seven categories with emission levels going from low to high. These sources provide information on quantities of substances in commerce in other countries. Several include data from multiple years, which can indicate temporal trends in quantity of substances in commerce or in the number of uses.
National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) (Canada) National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) provides information on releases of listed substances to air, water, land and underground injection and off-site transfers for disposal or recycling. The current list (2005) consists of 323 substances or groups of substances. The NPRI is the only legislated, nation-wide, publicly-accessible inventory of its type in Canada. One of the fundamental objectives of the NPRI is to provide Canadians with access to pollutant release information for facilities located in their communities. Presence of a substance on a pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) demonstrates concern in at least some countries with the substance, as well as the existence of detailed information concerning it. The NPRI is particularly relevant, as it provides annual, Canada-specific data.
Toxics Release Inventory (US) The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a publicly-available database that contains information on chemical emissions from almost 23 000 facilities in the United States. The TRI contains information from companies and government facilities that report their air, land, and water releases and other waste management activities. TRI also contains some information about source reduction efforts. The reporting thresholds for most chemicals are 25 000 pounds for manufacturing or processing and 10 000 pounds for other uses. Persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) chemicals have reporting thresholds of 10 or 100 pounds except for the dioxin and dioxin-like compounds category that has a reporting threshold of 0.1g. Presence of a substance on a pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) demonstrates concern in at least some countries with the substance, as well as the existence of detailed information concerning it. The NPRI is particularly relevant, as it provides annual, Canada-specific data.
National Pollutant Inventory (Australia) The National Pollutant Inventory is an Internet pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) database that gives information on the types and amounts of pollutants being emitted to the environment. The reporting threshold is 10 tons (use). Presence of a substance on a pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) demonstrates concern in at least some countries with the substance, as well as the existence of detailed information concerning it. The NPRI is particularly relevant, as it provides annual, Canada-specific data.
Pollutant Release & Transfer Register (Japan) Japan started its pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) program in 2001. Reporting is done annually for any chemical that is “difficult to decompose, is bioaccumulative, and may be harmful to human health (Class I) or those which have low accumulation but do not readily decompose and may be harmful to human health when continually taken (Class II). Presence of a substance on a pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) demonstrates concern in at least some countries with the substance, as well as the existence of detailed information concerning it. The NPRI is particularly relevant, as it provides annual, Canada-specific data.

 

Hazardous substances lists or substance profiles
Information Source Description (Summary of the contextual information from the source) Interpretation / Significance
CEPA 1999 Section 200
Environmental Emergencies List (Canada)
Section 200 of CEPA 1999 allows the federal government to establish a list of substances that, if they enter the environment as a result of environmental emergency (E2): a) have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity b) constitutes or may constitute a danger to the environment on which human life depends, or c) constitutes or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health. An E2 plan would be required of all facilities that store or use any of these substances at or above specified threshold quantities. Substances on these lists have been identified through activities under CEPA as being of potential concern for the environment and/or human health in Canada.
Second Priority Substances List (PSL2) Nomination Dossiers
(Canada)
The PSL2 Information dossiers are documents that were prepared for substances nominated for PSL2. They contain: physicochemical data, environmental fate and behavior, toxicity, production and use in Canadian commerce, and release data. Data selected in the draft dossiers has been reviewed and selected based upon quality of the study and credibility of the source. Substances on these lists have been identified through activities under CEPA as being of potential concern for the environment and/or human health in Canada.
Forest Products Industry List (Canada) This list of substances on the DSL were identified by the Forest Products Section (Environment Canada) and the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) as representing substances of potential interest to that sector. This list is judged relevant as it identifies substances that have been labeled as being of interest to this sector in Canada, but this does not imply that these substances are necessarily of particular ecological concern.
Accelerated Reduction/Elimination of Toxics (ARET) List (Canada) The concept of ARET was developed in the early 1990's as a challenge to Canadian industry to voluntarily reduce or eliminate releases of 117 substances found in the Great Lakes Basin. Substances were scored based on available toxicity, persistence and bioaccumulation data. This listing was meant to guide priorities and was not meant to imply that actual harm was being caused by these substances. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of potential concern for the environment and/or human health in the Great Lakes region.
Great Lakes 211 Air Toxics (Canada/US) The Great Lakes Commission is a binational agency that promotes the orderly, integrated and comprehensive development, use and conservation of the water and related natural resources of the Great Lakes basin and St. Lawrence River. This list includes compounds listed as Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) within the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. It also includes several substances that have been identified as posing a potential threat to the Great Lakes ecosystem and human health within the region. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of potential concern for the environment and/or human health in the Great Lakes region.
Great Lakes Binational Toxics List (Canada/US) The Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Environment Canada to implement the Revised Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1978. The purpose of this binational strategy is to set forth a collaborative process by which Environment Canada and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, in consultation with other federal departments and agencies, Great Lakes states, the Province of Ontario, Tribes, and First Nations, work in cooperation with their public and private partners toward the goal of virtual elimination of persistent toxic substances resulting from human activity, particularly those which bioaccumulate, from the Great Lakes Basin. The strategy uses multiple screening criteria to identify substances that are present in the water, sediment, or aquatic biota of the Great Lakes system and that are exerting, singly or in synergistic or additive combinations, a toxic effect on aquatic, animal, or human life. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of potential concern for the environment and/or human health in the Great Lakes region.
NAPS (Canada) National Air Pollution Surveillance Network (NAPS) includes Semi-Volatile Organic Target List, Species Measured in Particulate Samples, and VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) Target List. Canadian environmental monitoring data is available for substances on these lists.
Environmental Technology Centre (ETC) Air Monitoring (Canada) This provides a list of chemicals monitored by Environment Canada’s Environmental Technology Centre. Canadian environmental monitoring data is available for substances on these lists.
Pest Control Products Act Registered Active Ingredients (Canada) Pesticides imported into, or sold or used in Canada are regulated federally under the Pest Control Products Act (PCP Act) and Regulations. Substances on these lists have recognized toxic properties as they are used as pesticides. Although pesticides and their uses are not covered under CEPA, non-pesticidal uses of the substances do fall under the Act.
Banned or Severely Restricted Pesticides (US) The U.S. EPA maintains the list of banned or severely restricted pesticides as part of its participation in a voluntary international program known as the Prior Informed Consent (PIC) procedure. Substances on these lists have recognized toxic properties as they are used as pesticides. Although pesticides and their uses are not covered under CEPA, non-pesticidal uses of the substances do fall under the Act.
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)/FAO/
World Health Organization (WHO) Inchem Pesticide Classification
(United Nations)
The classification distinguishes between the more and the less hazardous forms of each pesticide in that it is based on the toxicity of the technical compound and on its formulations. The classification is based primarily on the acute oral and dermal toxicity to the rat since these determinations are standard procedures in toxicology. Substances on these lists have recognized toxic properties as they are used as pesticides. Although pesticides and their uses are not covered under CEPA, non-pesticidal uses of the substances do fall under the Act.
Persistent bioaccumulative toxic chemicals (PBT) List (US) The U.S. EPA maintains a list of PBT chemicals to identify chemicals and chemical categories which may be found in hazardous wastes regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Air Toxics / Hot Spots Chemicals (California) California's Air Toxics "Hot Spots" Information and Assessment Act of 1987 (AB 2588) requires the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to compile and maintain a list of substances that pose chronic or acute threats to public health when present in the air. (PDF, 73KB) Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Clean Water Act Priority Pollutants (US) Section 307 of the U.S. federal Clean Water Act (CWA), defines a list of priority pollutants for which the U.S. EPA must establish ambient water quality criteria and effluent limitations. Decisions to expand the list must take into account the toxicity, persistence, and degradability of the pollutant; the potential presence and the importance of affected organisms in any waters; and the nature and extent of the effect of the toxic pollutant on such organisms. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Superfund Site Chemicals (US) The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) created the Superfund Program to clean up uncontrolled or abandoned hazardous-waste sites and to respond to accidents, spills, and other emergency releases of pollutants and contaminants. Section 101 defines a list of hazardous chemicals (PDF, 804KB) for which the U.S. EPA must establish regulations. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Hazardous Constituents Under RCRA (US) The Hazardous Constituents list (Appendix VIII) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is used to identify the universe of chemicals of concern under RCRA, the primary environmental law governing the proper disposal of hazardous wastes. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Nordic Council List of Chemicals Hazardous to Environment (EU) The European Economic Community first created a List of Dangerous Substances in 1967, classifying substances according to health hazards and physico-chemical properties. The list has subsequently been expanded, and the Nordic Council of Ministers conducted a special project to review available toxicity data in order to identify substances that should be classified as dangerous to the environment. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
OSPAR List (EU) The Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic was opened for signature at the Ministerial Meeting of the Oslo and Paris Commissions. The OSPAR List of Substances of Possible Concern is a dynamic working list and is regularly revised, as new information becomes available. This may lead to deletion of some substances on the current version of the OSPAR List of Substances of Possible Concern and to the addition of other substances if data on persistence, toxicity, ability to bioaccumulate, etc., show that they should be added. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Priority Substances List (EU) Article 8 of the Regulation states that the Commission, in consultation with the Member States of the European Union, will regularly draw up lists of priority substances (http://ecb.jrc.ec.europa.eu/existing-chemicals/) which require immediate attention because of their potential effects to man or the environment. The Commission and Member States utilize the information collection during step 1 of the regulation as a basis for selecting priority substances. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
Toxic Chemicals List (China) This is a list of toxic chemicals banned or severely restricted in the People's Republic of China. Substances on these lists have been identified as being of concern for the environment and/or human health in other countries.
PIC List (United Nations) In 1989, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) introduced provisions for Prior Informed Consent (PIC) procedures for banned or severely restricted chemicals in international trade. The purpose of the provisions was to protect countries from importing chemicals that have been banned or severely restricted for health or environmental reasons. The PIC list is used as a mechanism to identify substances that are prohibited or substantially restricted in other jurisdictions, the basis of which must be reviewed as required under section 75 of CEPA 1999.
Camford Product Information Profiles (Canada) Each chemical process industries (Camford Product Information (CPI)) profile is a handy market study covering a single chemical product. In a few pages, it provides the key information needed for effective marketing - data for the most recent five years and a three-year forecast. These sources may contain information about production, uses, releases, exposure and hazard. The fact that a chemical is included in these sources does not necessarily indicate that it is of ecological concern.
BUA Reports (DE) Comprehensive chemical monographs are published on chemicals suspected of having a hazardous potential. The BUA Reports serve the German federal government as a basis for measures to regulate environmental and health hazards. The reports present Information on physico/chemical properties, toxicity, environmental fate, etc. These sources may contain information about production, uses, releases, exposure and hazard. The fact that a chemical is included in these sources does not necessarily indicate that it is of ecological concern.
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Environmental Health Criteria (EHC) (United Nations) The International Program on Chemical Safety publishes EHC Documents on many industrial chemicals. The reports offer a comprehensive information source for: physicochemical data, environmental fate and behavior, environmental releases and concentrations, production and usage, aquatic, terrestrial and human toxicity (both acute and chronic), as well as further action/measures, if necessary, needed to mitigate harm caused by the substance. These sources may contain information about production, uses, releases, exposure and hazard. The fact that a chemical is included in these sources does not necessarily indicate that it is of ecological concern.
RAIS Tox Profile
(US)
The Risk Assessment Information System (RAIS) toxicity profiles in this database were developed using information taken from the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables (HEAST) and other regulatory sources. These sources may contain information about production, uses, releases, exposure and hazard. The fact that a chemical is included in these sources does not necessarily indicate that it is of ecological concern.
TSCATS
(US)
Toxicity studies are submitted by U.S. industry to EPAunder several sections of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA - TS or Test Submission). The database contains non-confidential studies covering chemical testing results and adverse effects of chemicals on health and ecological systems. These sources may contain information about production, uses, releases, exposure and hazard. The fact that a chemical is included in these sources does not necessarily indicate that it is of ecological concern.
Right-to know fact sheets (New Jersey) Hazardous Substance Fact Sheets are prepared for substances listed on the New Jersey Right to Know Hazardous Substance List. The Fact Sheets are prepared on pure substances and contain information on health hazards, exposure limits, personal protective equipment, proper handling, first aid, and emergency procedures for fires and spills. These sources may contain information about production, uses, releases, exposure and hazard. The fact that a chemical is included in these sources does not necessarily indicate that it is of ecological concern.

 

Miscellaneous properties and hazard databases
Information Source Description (Summary of the contextual information from the source) Interpretation / Significance
HSDB Record (US) HSDB (Hazardous Substances Data Bank) is a Toxicology Data File on the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) TOXNET® system. It focuses on the toxicology of potentially hazardous chemicals. The HSDB records represent a comprehensive data peer reviewed information source. It is enhanced with information on human exposure, industrial hygiene, emergency handling procedures, environmental fate, regulatory requirements, and related areas. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
NTP Reports / Studies (US) The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was established in 1978 by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to coordinate toxicology research and testing activities within the Department, to provide information about potentially toxic chemicals to regulatory and research agencies and the public, and to strengthen the science base in toxicology. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
International Uniform Chemical Information Database (IUCLID)
(EU)
IUCLID is the basic tool for data collection and evaluation within the EU-Risk Assessment Programme. In October 1999, IUCLID was accepted by the OECD as the data exchange tool under the OECD Existing Chemicals Programme. The data structure has been designed to describe the effects of substances on human health and the environment, in close collaboration between Member States, Industry and the European Chemicals Bureau (ECB). These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
AQUIRE
(US)
AQUIRE (Aquatic Toxicity Information Retrieval) is part of the US EPA's ECOTOX database. The AQUIRE database was established in 1981 by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN. Scientific papers published both nationally and internationally on the toxic effects of chemicals to aquatic organisms and plants are collected and reviewed for AQUIRE. Lethal, sublethal and bioconcentration effects are recorded for freshwater and marine organisms. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
TERRETOX (US) TERRETOX is part of the US EPA's ECOTOX database. TERRETOX is a terrestrial wildlife toxicity database established to provide data linking quantified chemical exposures with observed toxic effects. TERRETOX includes results for lethal, sublethal and bioaccumulation effects. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
PHYTOTOX (US) PHYTOTOX is part of the US EPA's ECOTOX database. The PHYTOTOX database is a computerized information resource that permits the rapid retrieval and comparison of data pertaining to lethal and sublethal responses, excluding residue effects, of terrestrial plants to the application of chemicals. Both natural and synthetic organic compounds administered to native, crop, or weed species have been considered. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
ChemFate - Syracuse Research Corporation (US) ChemFate is Syracuse Research Corporation’s Chemical fate Database. ChemFate is a data value file containing 25 categories of environmental fate and physical/chemical property information on commercially important chemical compounds. Actual experimental values are abstracted and retained in the file. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
Datalog - Syracuse Research Corporation (US) DATALOG is a bibliographic file indexed by Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) Registry number that contains eighteen types of environmental fate data. Data is indexed by such fields as: octanol-water partition coefficient, Henry’s Law Constant, hydrolysis, biodegradation, bioaccumulation, water solubility, vapour pressure, and effluent concentrations. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
CESARS - Ontario Database (CA/US) CESARS (Chemical Evaluation Search and Retrieval System) is provided by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Ontario Ministry of the Environment. The database contains comprehensive environmental and health information on chemicals. Each record consists of chemical identification information and provides descriptive data on up to 23 topic areas, ranging from chemical properties to toxicity to environmental transport and fate. These sources may contain information about physical-chemical and hazard properties. Availability of such data does not mean that a listed substance is of concern. However, such data is generally only produced for substances of higher commercial interest or of ecological or human concern.
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