Technical approach for rapid screening of substances of lower ecological concern: appendix B

Appendix B

Sources of Information Not Used as Mechanical Filters
Information Source Description (Summary of the contextual information from the source) Interpretation / Significance
Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) 1999
Schedule 1
(Canada)
Schedule of CEPA 1999 (“List of Toxic Substances”) includes substances that are considered to be “toxic” under the Act. Risks from the substances identified by these sources are currently being addressed under Government of Canada programs.
Montreal Protocol Ozone Depleting Substances The Montreal Protocol is the first worldwide agreement designed to protect human health and the environment against the adverse effects of the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. The protocol is administered by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which maintains the list of ozone-depleting substances that are targeted for control practices, reductions, or total phase-outs (PDF Format, 142KB) Risks from the substances identified by these sources are currently being addressed under Government of Canada programs.
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Greenhouse Gas List (UNEP) In 1990, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report that outlines the contribution of individual greenhouse gases to the greenhouse effect. The greenhouse gases identified by the IPCC are both natural and anthropogenic substances that have been recognized by the international scientific community as having the potential to bring about climate change. Under the Kyoto Protocol, industrialized countries and those in transition to a market economy have agreed to limit or reduce their emissions of these greenhouse gases. Risks from the substances identified by these sources are currently being addressed under Government of Canada programs.
Known Carcinogens and Reproductive Toxicants (California) California's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 requires that the Governor publish, revise and republish at least once per year the list of chemicals known to the State to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm, and to inform citizens about exposures to such chemicals. A substances listing denotes a prohibition of discharge to sources of potential drinking water, and a requirement of prior disclosure to public exposure. Information pertains to human health and carcinogenicity. Carcinogenicity endpoints, along with genotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental toxicity, have been addressed by Health Canada during categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL).
International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) Carcinogen Group The mission of the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) is to coordinate and conduct research on the causes of human cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis, and to develop scientific strategies for cancer control. The Agency disseminates scientific information and classifies chemicals in regard to their carcinogenicity. Information pertains to human health and carcinogenicity. Carcinogenicity endpoints, along with genotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental toxicity, have been addressed by Health Canada during categorization of the DSL.
IARC Monograph (and Volume) The IARC Monographs series publishes authoritative independent assessments by international experts of the carcinogenic risks posed to humans by a variety of agents, mixtures and exposures. Information pertains to human health and carcinogenicity. Carcinogenicity endpoints, along with genotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental toxicity, have been addressed by Health Canada during categorization of the DSL.
Endocrine Disrupting Chemical List (European Union [EU]) The EU creates a list of chemicals that are endocrine disruptor or suspected to be. This priority list was established in two phases, first an independent review of evidence of endocrine disrupting effects and human/wildlife exposure and second a priority-setting exercise in consultations with stakeholders and the Commission Scientific Committees. Endocrine disruption is being addressed in the existing substances program as a standard ecological effects endpoint.
Great Lakes Bio-accumulative Chemicals of Concern (BCCs) The Great Lakes Bio-accumulative Chemicals of Concern list contains BCCs that have the potential to cause adverse effects after release to surface waters due to bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. These chemicals are further regulated by the mixing zone ban in the Great Lakes. The substances found on these lists are also found on other more robust or Canadian-specific lists (e.g. Great Lakes Binational Toxics List; Great Lakes 211 Air Toxics List; Air Toxics / Hot Spots chemicals (California); Persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) List (United States [US]); OSPAR List (EU)). Therefore, these sources of information are considered as redundant.
Clean Air Act Hazardous Pollutants (US) The US Congress amended the federal Clean Air Act in 1990 to address a large number of air pollutants that are known to cause or may reasonably be anticipated to cause adverse effects to human health or adverse environmental effects. The substances found on these lists are also found on other more robust or Canadian-specific lists (e.g. Great Lakes Binational Toxics List; Great Lakes 211 Air Toxics List; Air Toxics / Hot Spots chemicals (California); Persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) List (US); Oslo and Paris Commission (OSPAR) List (European Union [EU])). Therefore, these sources of information are considered as redundant.
Toxic Air Contaminants
(California)
The California Air Toxics Program establishes the process for the identification and control of toxic air contaminants and includes provisions to make the public aware of significant toxic exposures and for reducing risk. All hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) identified by the US EPA are included in California's list of toxic air contaminants. Chemicals have also been added to the list by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), based on toxicity and potential exposure. The substances found on these lists are also found on other more robust or Canadian-specific lists (e.g. Great Lakes Binational Toxics List; Great Lakes 211 Air Toxics List; Air Toxics / Hot Spots chemicals (California); PBT List (US); OSPAR List (EU). Therefore, these sources of information are considered as redundant.
OSPAR Chemicals for Priority Action and Commercial Status (EU) The substances on the List of Chemicals for Priority Action are those which the OSPAR Commission has determined to require priority action (http://www.ospar.org/welcome.asp?menu=0). The Commission was established by the Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic that was opened for signature at the Ministerial Meeting of the Oslo and Paris Commissions in Paris on 22 September 1992. The substances found on these lists are also found on other more robust or Canadian-specific lists (e.g. Great Lakes Binational Toxics List; Great Lakes 211 Air Toxics List; Air Toxics / Hot Spots chemicals (California); PBT List (US); OSPAR List (EU)). Therefore, these sources of information are considered as redundant.
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) Export Control List (Canada) The Export Control List (ECL) is a nondiscretionary list, multi and bilaterally developed, to monitor the sale and export of strategic or dual use goods. The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) may require export permits for specific goods and technology found on this list. The mandates of the Federal Departments or organisations that are responsible for these sources of information are largely focused on human health and have specific purposes (e.g. international trade, industry awareness, occupational safety). Thus, they are not likely to possess information relevant to an ecological risk assessment. However, some substances found in these sources of information may reach the environment through disposal or “down the drain” use, which has been addressed by the generic exposure scenarios component of rapid screening.
Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act - Annex on Chemicals (Canada) The annex on chemicals of the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (1995, c. 25) lists the toxics chemicals and, precursors and their mixtures in order to fulfill Canada’s Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) obligations, export (and import) controls. The mandates of the Federal Departments or organisations that are responsible for these sources of information are largely focused on human health and have specific purposes (e.g. international trade, industry awareness, occupational safety). Thus, they are not likely to possess information relevant to an ecological risk assessment. However, some substances found in these sources of information may reach the environment through disposal or “down the drain” use, which has been addressed by the generic exposure scenarios component of rapid screening.
Hazardous Products Act - Ingredients Disclosure List (Canada) The Ingredient Disclosure List (IDL) is a regulation (SOR 88-64) under the Hazardous Products Act (R.S., 1985, c. H-3). This regulation lists chemicals with a concentration "cut-off" of either 0.1% or 1.0% (weight/weight). Ingredients included in the IDL are one of the four categories of ingredients whose identity and concentration must be disclosed on a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) if found in a controlled product above the concentration cut-off. The mandates of the Federal Departments or organisations that are responsible for these sources of information are largely focused on human health and have specific purposes (e.g. international trade, industry awareness, occupational safety). Thus, they are not likely to possess information relevant to an ecological risk assessment. However, some substances found in these sources of information may reach the environment through disposal or “down the drain” use, which has been addressed by the generic exposure scenarios component of rapid screening.
Hazardous Inhalation Substance List (US) The US Department of Transportation (DOT) maintains a list of materials which have been designated as hazardous materials (inhalation) for purposes of transportation. Chemicals must be either gases or volatile liquids and must meet certain toxicity thresholds to be placed on the DOT list. The mandates of the Federal Departments or organisations that are responsible for these sources of information are largely focused on human health and have specific purposes (e.g. international trade, industry awareness, occupational safety). Thus, they are not likely to possess information relevant to an ecological risk assessment. However, some substances found in these sources of information may reach the environment through disposal or “down the drain” use, which has been addressed by the generic exposure scenarios component of rapid screening.
OSHA Air Contaminants (US) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sets enforceable permissible exposure limits (PELs) to protect workers against the health effects of exposure to hazardous substances. PELs are regulatory limits on the amount or concentration of a substance in the air. They may also contain a skin designation. The mandates of the Federal Departments or organisations that are responsible for these sources of information are largely focused on human health and have specific purposes (e.g. international trade, industry awareness, occupational safety). Thus, they are not likely to possess information relevant to an ecological risk assessment. However, some substances found in these sources of information may reach the environment through disposal or “down the drain” use, which has been addressed by the generic exposure scenarios component of rapid screening.
Regulated, Toxic, Explosive, or Flammable Substances (US) The federal Clean Air Act establishes the regulatory framework for the control of air pollutants. Section 112(r) established a list of substances which, if present in a process in a quantity in excess of a threshold, require that the facility establish a Risk Management Program to prevent chemical accidents and to prepare a risk management plan and submit the plan to the state and to the local emergency planning organization. The mandates of the Federal Departments or organisations that are responsible for these sources of information are largely focused on human health and have specific purposes (e.g. international trade, industry awareness, occupational safety). Thus, they are not likely to possess information relevant to an ecological risk assessment. However, some substances found in these sources of information may reach the environment through disposal or “down the drain” use, which has been addressed by the generic exposure scenarios component of rapid screening.
List of precursors and chemicals frequently used in the manufacture of illicit drugs (Portable document format, 1.8 Megabytes) (UN) This list has been prepared by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) as a tool to be used for the identification of substances scheduled in Tables I and II of the United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, 1988. These chemicals require pre-export notification in Canada.  
Cosmetics Hot List (Canada) The Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist is a science-based document that is reviewed and updated a few times per year as new scientific data become available. In this way, the Hotlist serves to keep the cosmetic industry aware of new substances of concern, in regards to section 16 of the Foods and Drugs Act.  
Cosmetics Directive (EU) European Union Cosmetics Directive 76/768/EEC with 6th Amendment and 24th Adaptation (March 2000) regulates use of substances in cosmetics in regards to consumer health in Europe. The list of colouring agents allowed for use in cosmetic products is presented in Annex IV. (http://www.greencouncil.org/doc/ResourcesCentre/
Annex_4_colouring_agents_in_cosmetic_products.pdf, PDF Format, 27KB)
 
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) - Everything Added to Food List (US) This is an informational database maintained by the US FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) under an ongoing program known as the Priority-based Assessment of Food Additives (PAFA). It contains administrative, chemical and toxicological information on substances directly added to food.  
FDA- Indirectly added to Food List (US) This database is maintained by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) under an ongoing program known as the Priority-based Assessment of Food Additives (PAFA). In general, these are substances that may come into contact with food as part of packaging or processing equipment, but are not intended to be added directly to food.  
List of Permissible Colourants (Australia [AU]) Colourants for cosmetics are not regulated in Australia for specific cosmetic applications. For any new colourant, an application for assessment under the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) must be submitted to Worksafe Australia with all of the chemical, safety and environmental data required under this scheme.  
Drink Water Contaminant Candidate Substance List (US) The drinking water Contaminant Candidate Substance List (CCL) is the primary source of priority contaminants for which the EPA conducts research to make decisions about whether regulations are needed. The contaminants on the list are known or anticipated to occur in public water systems. However, they are currently unregulated by existing US national primary drinking water regulations.  
Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Level (US) The Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels, listed under the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWRs or primary standards) are legally enforceable standards that apply to public water systems by limiting the levels of contaminants in drinking water. The Maximum Contaminant Level is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  
PCPA Toxicity Status for Formulants (Canada) The Pest Management Regulatory Agency’s (PMRA) Formulants program and lists, has categorized the formulants in Canadian pest control products based on the level of concern with respect to human health and the environment. The criteria and structure is similar to the US EPA List of Inert Ingredients, with some variation resulting from Canadian legislative/policy requirements. These lists include substances other than the active pesticidal ingredient. They are intentionally added to a pest control product to improve its physical characteristics (e.g., sprayability, solubility, spreadability and stability). By themselves, they are not primarily responsible for the effect of the pesticide products. The presence of a substance on one of these lists does not necessarily indicate that it has hazardous properties.
List of Pesticide Inerts Ingredients (US) The Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP) compared the 1995 list of inert ingredients (PDF Format, 149KB) with EPA’s chemical ingredient database on the World Wide Web and EPA’s Register of Lists (RoL) database. These lists include substances other than the active pesticidal ingredient. They are intentionally added to a pest control product to improve its physical characteristics (e.g., sprayability, solubility, spreadability and stability). By themselves, they are not primarily responsible for the effect of the pesticide products. The presence of a substance on one of these lists does not necessarily indicate that it has hazardous properties.
List of Inert Pesticide Ingredients (US) The Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) published a policy statement on inert ingredients in 1987. The policy established four categories of toxicological concern for the inert ingredients in existence at that time. These lists include substances other than the active pesticidal ingredient. They are intentionally added to a pest control product to improve its physical characteristics (e.g., sprayability, solubility, spreadability and stability). By themselves, they are not primarily responsible for the effect of the pesticide products. The presence of a substance on one of these lists does not necessarily indicate that it has hazardous properties.
Inert Pesticide Ingredient at Superfund / CERCLA sites (US) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implements the laws that regulate pollutants in our air and our water as well as laws that identify chemicals found at Superfund sites, which must be reported to state and local emergency planning and response committees, or which must be reported to EPA's Toxic Chemical Release Inventory. These lists include substances other than the active pesticidal ingredient. They are intentionally added to a pest control product to improve its physical characteristics (e.g., sprayability, solubility, spreadability and stability). By themselves, they are not primarily responsible for the effect of the pesticide products. The presence of a substance on one of these lists does not necessarily indicate that it has hazardous properties.
Design Institute for Physical Properties (DIPPR) Database (Physchem Database) The Design Institute for Physical Properties has developed a set of critically evaluated thermophysical and environmental property data to satisfy industry needs. The purpose of these databases is to provide information on a substance’s physical properties for industrial uses and purposes. They were judged as containing limited information of relevance to rapid screening.
STN Database CSChem The STN Database CSChem is a subscription based catalog file for commercially available chemicals. The records contain names of chemicals and chemical products, names of suppliers, and classifications for trade name products. CAS Registry Numbers and structures are also included for a majority of the chemicals in CSChem. The purpose of these databases is to provide information on a substance’s physical properties for industrial uses and purposes. They were judged as containing limited information of relevance to rapid screening.
STN Database: CSCorp The STN Database CSCorp is a subscription based directory for the chemical industry. The Chem Sources Company Directory contains directory information for chemical companies in over 130 countries. Subject Coverage include: business, chemistry and manufacturers. The purpose of these databases is to provide information on a substance’s physical properties for industrial uses and purposes. They were judged as containing limited information of relevance to rapid screening.
STN Database: CHEMCATS The STN Database CHEMCATS (Chemical Catalogs Online) is a subscription based catalog file containing information about commercially available chemicals as well as their worldwide suppliers. Records contain catalog information for the substance provided by the supplier, e.g., the catalog name, chemical and trade names, grade information,CAS Registry Number, structure diagram, properties, regulatory information, prices. Additionally, records contain the company names and addresses, as well as supplier information, e.g., pricing terms, products and services, packaging and shipping information, safety and handling information. The purpose of these databases is to provide information on a substance’s physical properties for industrial uses and purposes. They were judged as containing limited information of relevance to rapid screening.
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