Community-nominated priority places for species at risk: proposal guide 2021-2022

Notice: 

The application submission period for projects commencing in 2021-22 is now closed.

Please note

The expression of interest is due February 26, 2021 and should be sent to dawn.andrews@canada.ca. Where possible, we encourage expressions of interest to be sent in before February 26, 2021 in order to be able to provide feedback to you, and provide more time for the completion of the full proposal. The deadline for formal proposals, along with supporting documents, is April 15, 2021, and all materials must be submitted through the Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) web portal called the Grants and Contributions Enterprise Management System (GCEMS).

Part 1: Description of community-nominated priority places for species at risk

1. Canada Nature Fund: Community-nominated priority places for species at risk

Canada Nature Fund: Community-Nominated Priority Places (CNPP) for Species at Risk is a 4-year (2019 to 2020 through 2022 to 2023) funding initiative administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC). CNPP is seeking joint proposals (lead applicant plus one or more partners) for the second two-year period of the initiative (2021 to 2023) for projects in Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, or the Yukon that:

  • identify defined priority places where there are opportunities to protect and recover multiple terrestrial species at risk listed under the Species at Risk Act and their habitat; and
  • implement coordinated, multi-partner conservation actions in these identified community-nominated priority places

Projects should result in a high return on investment and benefits to multiple species.

Federal, provincial, and territorial governments have already selected 11 priority places to focus collaborative conservation action following the concept outlined in the Pan-Canadian Approach to Transforming Species at Risk Conservation in CanadaFootnote 1. Through the first CNPP call for proposals, ECCC expanded on this initiative to fund 15 projects in additional areas that were not included in these 11 priority places.

The second call for proposals targets projects in Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, or the Yukon, excluding the South Beringia priority place in the Yukon. The map below highlights the location of the South Beringia priority place in the territories. If you have a proposed project that overlaps with one or a few of the very small areas at the edge of the South Beringia priority place, please contact your northern regional coordinator, Dawn Andrews (dawn.andrews@canada.ca), to discuss whether it is appropriate to apply to CNPP.

Map of community-nominated priority places for species at risk in south Beringia
Long description

This map shows the location of the South Beringia priority place in the territories. South Beringia is a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Priority Place. Community-nominated priority places must be located outside of the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Priority Places.

A priority place may be described as a defined geographic area of high biodiversity value with a recognizable ecological theme and social relevance that may be intuitively identified as a distinct “place” by the people that live there and manage its infrastructure and renewable and non-renewable natural resources. The size and boundaries of the nominated priority place should enable the effective conservation of species at risk and their habitats (e.g. biosphere reserves, small watersheds or sub-watersheds, ecosystems, regional district or municipal boundaries, etc.).  A “community”, as used in the title of the funding initiative, refers to the partners (e.g. Indigenous peoples, non-profit and for-profit organizations, individual landowners, local governments) that are interested in working together to undertake action in the proposed community-nominated priority place.

To make a collective impact within a priority place, partners should work together to develop a coordinated and integrated approach to identify and implement priority conservation actions. Adaptive management approaches such as the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation may be used to guide the process, informed by species at risk recovery strategies, action plans, and management plans, if available. 

In general, activities that could be implemented in an identified community-nominated priority place could include the following:

  1. cooperative multi-species, ecosystem/area-based action planning
    • develop goals, objectives, strategies, and project monitoring and implementation plans for selected conservation targets
    • activities could include data collection, mapping, governance-building, stakeholder engagement, capacity building for the use of adaptive management tools
  2. implementation of planned actions
    • implement on the ground recovery and protection actions  (e.g. species management and restoration, species and habitat protection, habitat improvement, threat reduction)
  3. monitoring, analysis and evaluation
    • gather and analyze project monitoring data and update monitoring plan (e.g. Are threats reduced? Are strategies effective?); adapt actions as needed.

In cases where applicants have already completed initial stages, such as action planning, proposals can focus on implementation and other subsequent stages. In order to achieve conservation action on the ground quickly, it is recommended that projects do not allocate more than 50% of all funds requested to planning activities.

Proposals for CNPP should address the following priorities:

  • contributes towards recovery of species at risk
  • advances partnerships and collaboration, including with Indigenous peoples
  • contributes to priority co-benefits (e.g.  contribution to achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1Note de bas de page 2 , provision of ecosystem services, climate change adaptation and mitigation, socio-economic benefits)

Elements of an example community-nominated priority place proposal are included below for illustrative purposes (complete criteria are included in the application guide):

  • joint proposal demonstrates how partners from across the community will work together to achieve better outcomes for species at risk than could be achieved by working independently. The proposal includes:
    • multiple species at risk listed under the Species at Risk Act (e.g. 8 species at risk), as well as migratory birds and other important wildlife (e.g. species known to be important to Indigenous peoples), being targeted for conservation actions
    • a sound understanding of the threats to biodiversity in the proposed community-nominated priority place and meaningful actions that would be taken to address them
    • a landscape-scale, but pragmatically-sized area where partners would be able to facilitate local coordination and site management and achieve results (e.g. 1000 km2 watershed)
    • a plan that will begin to achieve significant and measurable conservation outcomes that are feasible within a reasonable timeframe (e.g. 5–10 years)

It is anticipated that 3 community-nominated priority places (approximately 1 per territory) will be selected through this call for proposals. Federal contributions will be no more than $500,000 per recipient per fiscal year of the funding agreement.

Joint proposals (i.e. lead applicant plus one or more partners) are required. It is expected that the lead applicant will be the sole recipient of funding and responsible for then distributing funding to the other partners.

Interested applicants will need to meet the following eligibility requirement:

  • matching funding of at least 0.2:1 for Indigenous recipients from non-federal sources ($0.20 confirmed match for each $1 of federal funding) and at least 1:1 for other recipients from non-federal sources ($1 confirmed match for each $1 of federal funding). Match may include in-kind sources

2. Proposal process

Project proposals can be submitted to CNPP in a two-step proposal process.

Step one - Expression of interest

The first step is an Expression of Interest (EOI). This step is strongly recommended as the EOI will provide an opportunity to initiate discussions with Environment and Climate Change Canada staff on the suitability of the project for CNPP (see Part 2 for the EOI template). Applicants can use this step to confirm the project’s fit with CNPP priorities and receive input from ECCC staff. EOIs must be submitted by February 26, 2021 to dawn.andrews@canada.ca

Step two - Formal proposal

The second (required) step will be the submission of a detailed Formal Proposal (see Part 3 for Formal Proposal Guidance) with a complete and detailed work plan, budget and letters of support (see Annex 2 for eligible activities and costs). ECCC will undertake a complete review and assessment of the Formal Proposal on the basis of criteria described in Annex 3.

This two-step approach provides opportunities for proponents to work with relevant partners such as territorial governments, Indigenous governments and organizations, and non-profit or private sector organizations to work together to prepare project proposals, provide feedback, and facilitate funding partnerships.

ECCC will only review proposals as submitted, so it is important that the applicant provides clear and comprehensive information. All proposals once submitted are considered final; no further changes or additions will be permitted. Each proposal will be assessed and ranked based on a weighted evaluation of eligibility and merit criteria (see Annex 3).

Key dates

January 19, 2021: Launch of CNPP Expression of Interest stage

February 26, 2021 (noon Pacific Standard Time): Deadline for submission of CNPP Expression of Interest

April 15, 2021 (noon Pacific Daylight Time): Deadline for submission of CNPP Formal Proposal through the ECCC web portal called the Grants and Contributions Enterprise Management System (GCEMS)

Deadlines are final; no submissions will be accepted after these dates. Proposals once submitted are final; only letters from other interested parties acknowledging that they are aware of the proposal and/or that they support the proposal may be sent subsequent to the proposal submission.

For more information about Community-Nominated Priority Places, please contact us at ec.lpdc-cnpp.ec@canada.ca or the northern regional CWS coordinator, Dawn Andrews (dawn.andrews@canada.ca).

3. Confidentiality

Purpose of records

All records provided by an Applicant to ECCC in a proposal and in communications in relation to a proposal is collected, retained and used by ECCC solely for the purposes of CNPP or for a use consistent with these purposes.

Potential disclosure under federal legislation

There are potentially applicable legal requirements for federal government institutions, including ECCC, to disclose records provided by an applicant to ECCC in or in relation to a proposal that arise at law. In particular, there are such potentially applicable legal requirements set out in federal legislation, including in the Access to Information Act, the Privacy Act, the Canada Evidence Act and the Library and Archives of Canada Act.

Consent to disclosure to governments and third parties

In submitting its proposal, the Applicant consents, for the purposes of CNPP or for a use consistent with these purposes, with respect to all records it submits to ECCC in or in relation to its proposal, to the publication of such records and to their disclosure to other federal government institutions or third parties.

Part 2: Expression of interest phase

Community-nominated priority places for species at risk expression of interest

The Expression of Interest (EOI) will be used to initiate a discussion between the applicant and ECCC staff on suitability of the proposed project for Community-Nominated Priority Places. Applicants can use this step to confirm the project’s fit with CNPP priorities and requirements. Although not mandatory, it is strongly encouraged that an EOI is completed and sent to ECCC. The goal is to support the applicant to prepare the strongest possible proposal.

In order for ECCC staff to be able to provide feedback to you, as well as to provide you more time for the completion of the full proposal, please submit your EOI by February 26, 2021 to dawn.andrews@canada.ca. Formal proposals will be due by April 15, 2021.

What to include in your EOI

  1. project title
  2. project location (territory, eco-region, municipality, nearest city/town; be as specific as possible)
  3. key contacts (organization name, contact name, email, phone number, address, postal code)
  4. project description (up to 1000 words)
    1. describe the priority place and why it is being chosen
      • describe the location (with boundaries if possible)
      • list the species at risk and other biodiversity values
    2. describe the project, and how your proposed work will contribute towards the recovery of species at risk (SAR)
      • state your project’s goal(s)
      • how will this project build and enhance past and ongoing species at risk recovery and biodiversity conservation efforts to date, if applicable (e.g implementation of action plans)
      • what conservation targets (e.g. species at risk, habitats, other biodiversity values) will this project will focus on
      • what threats to conservation targets will this project address
      • what are the conservation opportunities
      • what types of activities do you plan to undertake
      • what does success look like at the end of your project? i.e. what conservation outcomes will be achieved
    3. provide a list of confirmed or anticipated project partners (e.g. Indigenous governments and organizations; government departments or agencies; non-profit and private sector organizations; land owners) and a statement on their proposed involvement in the project, and how these partners have been involved in SAR or biodiversity conservation in the proposed priority place, if applicable
    4. estimate the overall project cost and the amount of funding support you will be requesting from CNPP
    5. identify already confirmed and potential non-federal sources of match funding
  5. optional information (up to 250 words)
    1. please share any additional information about your proposed project that you feel will be useful to the ECCC regional coordinator. This could include additional benefits of the project, such as contribution to achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1Footnote 2 , provision of ecosystem services, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and socio-economic benefits, or any other aspects of the project

For questions about your EOI, please contact your northern regional coordinator:  Dawn Andrews (dawn.andrews@canada.ca)

Consent to disclosure to governments and third parties

In submitting its proposal, the Applicant consents, for the purposes of CNPP or for a use consistent with these purposes, with respect to all records it submits to ECCC in or in relation to its proposal, to the publication of such records and to their disclosure to other federal government institutions or third parties.

Part 3: Formal proposal guidance

The Formal Proposal step will be managed through the ECCC web portal called Grants and Contributions Enterprise Management System (GCEMS). On GCEMS, you will be able to complete the online application form.

Important information about CNPP, including eligibility requirements, is found in Annexes 1-3. An overview of how proposals will be evaluated is found in Annex 3.

Proposals, along with photographs of the project site(s) and supporting documents, must be submitted using the GCEMS application form. Questions and inquiries related to proposal submission should be sent to ec.lpdc-cnpp.ec@canada.ca. The deadline for Formal Proposal submission is April 15, 2021.

Successful applicants will be required to assess the official language requirements that may apply to the project so that associated necessary activities are factored into your budget.

Grants and Contributions Enterprise Management System (GCEMS)

Completion of the Formal Proposal involves the following mandatory steps:

  • create a GCEMS account, which will give you access to the Formal Proposal Application. Refer to the GCEMS Technical Assistance and Applicant User guides, which were sent to you upon receipt of your EOI or see contact below to request copies
  • before beginning your CNPP application download the documents you’ll need from the ‘Publications and Resources’ section in the funding opportunity home page in GCEMS
    • proposal guide
    • tables A through C
  • complete the Formal Proposal Application by working through all modules in the GCEMS portal. Part 3 of this guide walks you through these modules
  • attach completed Tables A through C along with other required documents in the ‘Other supporting information’ module in GCEMS
  • certify all content and submit your proposal in GCEMS
  • if you need technical assistance, please contact ec.sgesc-gcems-sgesc-gcems.ec@canada.ca

Remember: Save your work often. GCEMS will automatically sign you off if you are inactive (no clicks) for up to 15 minutes. Any unsaved information will be lost.

1. Applicant information (tombstone data)

  • organization - name, address, email, phone
    • the organization name must be the full legal name of the applicant (individual or organization). Joint proposals (i.e. lead applicant identified in this section plus one or more partners) are required for CNPP. Please include partner information in the Priority Place Partners and Identification section of the application
  • principal applicant representative – name, title, phone, email
    • the contact provided must be knowledgeable on the contents of the application
  • organization identification type (e.g. business number, charitable number, registration number, GST number, First Nations band number, other) and identification number
  • organization type
    • select the relevant type for your organization (e.g. environmental non-governmental organization, not-for profit organization, Indigenous organization/community/government, individual, private corporation/for profit, etc.). Please note that territorial governments are not eligible to apply to CNPP
  • organization description
    • provide a brief description of your organization, including your organization's mandate
  • organization experience
    • indicate your organization’s funding history with ECCC or other federal government departments

2. Project summary

This section should be written in a manner and with sufficient detail such that reviewers who are unfamiliar with the targeted geographic area, species at risk, habitat or activity can gain a full understanding of the project using only the information contained in this proposal.

Project start date and project end date

Indicate the project start and end dates. Note that for projects starting in 2021, proposed projects and related activities in the proposal should not start before June 2021. Projects may have benefited from previous activities and funding, but for the purposes of this proposal 'Project' refers to activities requiring funding from CNPP.

Project location

For the proposed priority place, please indicate the:

  • city – indicate the nearest city
  • territory - indicate in which territory the priority place is located
  • region – indicate the ecozone in which the priority place is located. A map and description of ecozones in Canada can be found online
  • longitude and latitude – an interactive map is provided within GCEMS that can be used to determine latitude and longitude decimal coordinates. The coordinates should be for the centroid of the priority place location, and provided in decimal degrees

Project goals and objectives

Please clearly state the goal(s) and objective(s) of the project.

The project goals should include a statement detailing a desired impact of conservation and recovery efforts, such as a desired future state of a habitat or species. A good goal is linked to targets (e.g. species at risk, habitats), impact-oriented, measurable, time limited, and specific.

The project objectives should include a formal statement detailing a desired outcome of a project such as reducing a critical threat. Criteria of a good objective: results oriented, measurable, time limited, specific, and practical. 

Project description

Please provide a summary description of your project, showing the link between the project, the stated goals and CNPP’s objectives.

The project description should tell a succinct story from start to finish that communicates to a lay audience why the project needs to happen, when it will happen, and what the expected results and benefits will be. Explain how the project’s goals will address the priorities of CNPP:

  • contribute towards the recovery of species at risk
  • advance partnerships and collaboration including with Indigenous peoples
  • contribute to priority co-benefits (e.g. contribution to achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1Footnote 2 , provision of ecosystem services, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and/or socio-economic benefits)

Provide enough detail to ensure that reviewers (who may be unfamiliar with the targeted species at risk, habitat, area or methodology) can gain a full understanding of the project, partners’ roles, and rationale for the approach.

Project team experience

Please describe any relevant qualifications and experience of the project team members that could help demonstrate the organization's experience and capacity to carry out the proposed project, specifically as it relates to species at risk conservation in Canada and the proposed priority place, if applicable. If the proposed project is similar to one that has been previously completed, final project reports or Web links can be submitted with the proposal form as attachments under “Other Supporting Information”. If the completed projects were supported through Environment and Climate Change Canada contribution funding, you only need to provide the project name, contribution agreement number, and year.

Project delivery experience

Financial capacity - Please describe you organization's financial capacity to undertake this project. This could include defining the other sources of funding for the project.

Project management capacity - Please describe your organization's experience in managing and delivering projects, including conservation-based projects. Identify relevant qualifications and experiences of the project team members to demonstrate the group’s experience and capacity to carry out the project.

3. Program-specific module: community-nominated priority places for species at risk

Other project partners and brief description of their role(s)

Joint proposals (i.e. the lead applicant identified in the Applicant Information section plus one or more partners) are required for CNPP. In this section, please:

  1. identify project partner(s), include the organization complete legal name, and a contact person per partner listed
  2. describe relevant experience of each partner, including how these partners have been involved in species at risk or biodiversity conservation in the proposed priority place, if applicable; and
  3. be sure to include letters of support stating partner support for the project and the lead applicant as attachments under “Other Supporting Information”

Note that partners who do not apply directly to CNPP, but receive their funding from recipients who have been awarded funding from CNPP are considered ultimate recipients.

Priority place description

  • name of priority place
  • area (# of hectares)
  • brief description of the priority place (1 paragraph):
    • ecological aspects (e.g. major habitats and ecosystems, ecozones, important disturbance regimes)
    • human and cultural aspects (e.g. population size, principle land uses, Indigenous interests, etc.)
    • ecological and conservation significance

Considerations for identification of community-nominated priority place

Contribution towards recovery of species at risk

Biodiversity values: Identification of significant species at risk and other biodiversity values on a regional or national scale

  • high numbers of species at risk (2-3 sentences)
    • summarize the value of the area for species at risk (species listed under Schedule 1 of SARA, species assessed as at risk by COSEWIC but not yet listed under SARA, species listed as at risk by territory, etc.). Include consideration of aquatic species if they are important to the conservation context. Do not need to list actual species – include that information in Table A
  • high biodiversity, including other wildlife that are not at risk (including migratory birds, fish, and other aquatic species, and species of traditional and customary importance to Indigenous Peoples) (2-3 sentences)
    • summarize the value of the area for important not-at-risk species, habitats, etc. Include consideration of aquatic species if they are important to the conservation context. Do not need to list actual species – include that information in Table B
    • important species and habitats could include high priority species from Bird Conservation Region Strategies, species flagged as presumed to be at risk in Wild Species reports but not yet assessed by COSEWIC, species known to be important to Indigenous peoples, keystone or umbrella species within the priority place, etc.
  • unique assemblages of biodiversity, species at risk, and other wildlife (1-2 sentences)
    • summarize the ways in which the area may be biologically unique or exceptional. Also include consideration of unique or rare features, habitats and ecosystems as appropriate.

Conservation status: A recognition that biodiversity values are declining and being impacted by identifiable human-caused threats

  • extent of species at risk critical habitat (identified and potential) and wildlife habitat (2-3 sentences or bullets)
    • number of species with
      • critical habitat identified
      • critical habitat required but not yet identified
      • important habitat identified or known (could include high priority migratory birds, species of special concern, etc.)
    • if possible, provide an estimate of the coverage of critical habitat and important habitat (i.e., % area of the priority place considered to be critical or important habitat)
  • risk of species at risk critical habitat and wildlife habitat destruction (2-3 sentences)
    • estimate the overall risk of destruction of critical and important habitat, and briefly describe the main drivers of destruction

Boundary optimization: An appropriate spatial size to focus conservation efforts

  • ecosystems, watersheds and habitats (1-2 sentences)
    • indicate the extent to which the priority place size and boundaries enable effective conservation of important ecosystems, watersheds, and habitats
  • land title/tenure and activities (1-2 sentences)
    • indicate the extent to which the priority place size and boundaries enable effective conservation based on land tenure and activities
  • biodiversity values (1-2 sentences)
    • indicate the extent to which the priority place size and boundaries enable effective conservation action for the biodiversity values discussed above
  • threats/sectors (Table C) (1-2 sentences)
    • indicate the extent to which the priority place size and boundaries enable effective conservation action towards key threats and sectors
  • communities with primary interests in conservation outcomes and therefore public profile (1-2 sentences)
    • indicate the extent to which the priority place size and boundaries enable effective conservation based on active conservation groups or communities and public profile for conservation

Achievability of conservation outcomes: A pragmatic opportunity to begin to achieve significant and measurable conservation outcomes within a reasonable timeframe (5-10 years), recognizing improvements in conservation status usually takes a long time (10-50 years) and conservation efforts must be ongoing to sustain gains

  • conservation opportunities for preventing extirpation and/or extinction of species at risk (1-2 paragraphs)
    • general assessment of conservation opportunities (scientific knowledge, technical knowledge and tools, willing partners and stakeholders, potential for species and habitats to respond to conservation efforts, etc) to prevent extinction/extirpation, advance recovery and protection, and prevent species from becoming at risk. If appropriate, also consider conservation efforts aimed at non-species at risk and/or habitat and ecosystem initiatives.
  • conservation opportunities for advancing protection and recovery of species at risk consistent with population and distribution objectives (1-2 paragraphs)
    • general assessment of conservation opportunities (scientific knowledge, technical knowledge and tools, willing partners and stakeholders, potential for species and habitats to respond to conservation efforts, etc) to prevent extinction/extirpation, advance recovery and protection, and prevent species from becoming at risk. If appropriate, also consider conservation efforts aimed at non-species at risk and/or habitat and ecosystem initiatives.
  • conservation opportunities to prevent species from becoming at risk and maintaining/improving ecosystem services (1-2 paragraphs)
    • general assessment of conservation opportunities (scientific knowledge, technical knowledge and tools, willing partners and stakeholders, potential for species and habitats to respond to conservation efforts, etc) to prevent extinction/extirpation, advance recovery and protection, and prevent species from becoming at risk. If appropriate, also consider conservation efforts aimed at non-species at risk and/or habitat and ecosystem initiatives.
  • threat/risk management potential (effectiveness) (1 paragraph)
    • general assessment of ability (scientific knowledge, technical knowledge and tools, cost-effectiveness, willing partners and stakeholders, etc) to manage key threats, including restoration from past threats and management of cumulative effects
  • partnership leveraging opportunities (resources and influence) (1 paragraph)
    • general assessment of opportunity to leverage partnership funding and engage partners that are critical to achieving outcomes

Advancement of partnerships and collaboration including with Indigenous peoples

Leadership and partnership opportunities: A multi-jurisdictional context that includes mandates, responsibilities, and roles for Indigenous governments and communities, non-profit and for-profit organizations, and municipalities, and others

  • existing partnerships (1 paragraph)
    • brief overview of existing partnerships most important to effective implementation
  • potential for expanded new partnerships (1 paragraph)
    • general assessment of potential to expand important partnerships
  • opportunities to address other federal or territorial government or Indigenous peoples priorities (e.g., sustainable development, existing or planned land use plans) and optimize outcomes across multiple objectives(1 paragraph)
    • general assessment of opportunities for co-benefits to other priorities to achieve multiple objectives and maximize ‘return on investment’
  • ability to expand on, “scale up”, and export successes and lessons learned (1 paragraph)
    • general assessment of the potential for novel learning opportunities and ability to replicate the approach in other areas
  • consistency with jurisdictional responsibilities and roles under SARA and other legislation for the management of fish, wildlife, and other natural resources (2-3 sentences)
    • indication of whether jurisdictional leads for wildlife and natural resources on various land tenures within the priority place will be involved and supportive

Contribution to priority co-benefits

  • contribution to achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1Footnote 2  (1 paragraph)
    • description of the contribution towards achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1, such as size of area to be newly protected or conserved in contribution to reaching the target
  • provision of ecosystem services (1 paragraph)
    • description of benefits to water quality, flood control, drought resistances, or other ecosystem services
  • climate change adaptation and mitigation (1 paragraph)
    • description of how this project will enable communities and ecosystems to mitigate and adapt to climate change
  • socio-economic benefits (1 paragraph)
    • description of benefits to society and the economy, such as number of jobs created, increase in tax revenue, increase in recreational users within a priority place
Table A. List of species at riska
Common name Scientific name Taxon COSEWIC status SARA status
[insert information] [insert information] [insert information] [insert information] [insert information]

a Include species that regularly occur within the priority place (i.e., not vagrants, etc.)

Table B.  List of other importanta species
Common Name

Scientific Name

Taxon

Sourceb
[insert information] [insert information] [insert information] [insert information]

a Important species could include high priority species from Bird Conservation Region Strategies, species flagged as presumed to be at risk in Wild Species reports but not yet assessed by COSEWIC, species known to be important to Indigenous peoples, keystone or umbrella species within the priority place, etc.

b Sources could include but are not limited to Wild Species Reports, Bird Conservation Region Strategies, importance to Indigenous peoples, etc.

Table C. Key sectors/threats
Sector/Threata Estimated Scope (% of area impacted): Very High, High, Medium, Lowb
[insert information] [insert information]

a Use level 2 of the IUCN/CMP classification system (available in English only) for naming sectors/threats (e.g., 1.1 Housing and Urban Areas)

b Very high: The threat is likely to be pervasive in its scope, affecting the priority place across all or most (71-100%) of its area. High: The threat is likely to be widespread in its scope, affecting the priority place across much (31-70%) of its area. Medium: The threat is likely to be restricted in its scope, affecting the priority place across some (11-30%) of its area. Low: The threat is likely to be very narrow in its scope, affecting the priority place across a small proportion (1-10%) of its area

4. Project budget

For eligibility under CNPP, projects must secure match funding. Proposals must include matching funding of:

  • At least 0.2:1 for Indigenous recipients from non-federal sources ($0.20 confirmed match for each $1 of federal funding);
  • At least 1:1 for other recipients from non-federal sources ($1 confirmed match for each $1 of federal funding); 
  • Match may include in-kind sources such as volunteer hours, etc.

All funding sources must be listed in the proposal.

Total project funding

Present all sources of funding for the project, including funds requested from ECCC in this application. Please include the contributor name, the contributor type (i.e. ECCC, other federal department, territorial government, municipal government, other), and the funding amount per fiscal year.

Confirmation of partner contributions should be submitted with the proposal to the extent possible, as this goes to technical merit. Confirmation of partner contributions must be received before ECCC can sign a Contribution Agreement for a successful proposal.

Total project expenditures

Present your project's total project expenditures for each fiscal year, including the use of cash and in-kind contributions from all project partners. A quarterly breakdown is required for the first year of funding.

Indicate the expenditure type using the drop-down menu and describe the expense. Expenditure types include:

  • communications and printing, production and distribution costs
  • contractors
  • equipment rentals
  • land acquisitions, leases, easements, covenants, servitudes
  • management and professional services
  • overhead
  • purchase of capital assets
  • salaries and wages
  • travel
  • vehicle rental and operation costs
  • other expenditures

Please note that while considered an eligible activity, applicants are encouraged not to submit proposals for land acquisition (e.g. fee simple land purchases), due to the relatively high cost of the activity. In general, a partner organization on a project may acquire a property as an in-kind match for a project; however, they may only do so if that property was not acquired via federal funds. If ECCC supported the partner organization in acquiring the property through a contribution agreement or tax benefits, that property would count as indirect federal match and would not fulfill that obligation. If you are considering using land acquisition as matching funding, it is recommended you confirm the details with ECCC.

Refer to Annex 2 for eligible activities and costs.

ECCC funding

Indicate the specific expenditures (or portion of expenditures) that will be using ECCC funding. The types of expenditures should match information in the Total Project Expenditures, but will allow ECCC to view which activities will be funded directly by ECCC funding.

5. Project work plan

Adaptive management approaches such as the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation may be used to develop the work plan, informed by species at risk recovery strategies, action plans, and management plans, if available. In cases where applicants have already completed initial stages of work, such as action planning, proposals can focus on implementation and other subsequent stages.

Work plan template

Please complete the work plan template for each activity that to that will be undertaken throughout the project:

  • activity category: Select the appropriate activity category. Please use one of the following activity categories:
    • activity category 1: Cooperative multi-species, ecosystem/area-based action planning. This could include:
      • develop goals, objectives, strategies, and project monitoring and implementation plans for selected conservation targets
      • activities could include data collection, including Indigenous Knowledge, mapping, governance-building, stakeholder engagement, capacity building for the use of adaptive management tools
    • activity category 2: Implementation of planned actions. This could include:  
      • implement on the ground recovery and protection actions  (e.g. species management and restoration, species and habitat protection, habitat improvement, threat reduction)
    • activity Category 3: Monitoring, analysis and evaluation. This could include:    
      • gather and analyze project monitoring data and update monitoring plan (e.g. Are threats reduced? Are strategies effective?); adapt actions as needed.
    • activity category 4: Other (if the activity is not covered by the above categories).
  • description: Describe the activity and note the corresponding objective that it meets, as identified in the Project Summary Section.
  • expected results: Indicate the expected result of the activity (i.e., the reason you are conducting the activity). Please ensure that you are providing a measurable result.
  • start and end dates: Indicate the general timeframe of the activity
  • total estimated costs/percentage of budget for each activity: Indicate the percentage of the budget allocated for each activity.

6. Evaluation plan and performance measures

Expected results

Explain the expected results of your proposed project based on the project’s objectives established in the Project Summary section and activities identified in the Project Work Plan section. Please ensure that the expected results include those communicated in the Project Work Plan section.

Project evaluation plan

Describe how the project's goals and objectives will be achieved. Outline the methodology that will be used to measure the project's expected results.

Key performance indicators

Indicate the target value for the key performance indicators that the project will be measured against. Performance indicators should reflect the priorities of CNPP. You may select from the example indicators below or develop additional indicators that reflect the CNPP priorities. Please note, however, that starred indicators (*) are mandatory.

CNPP Priority: Project contributes towards recovery of species at risk

*Number of species at risk for which protection and recovery actions are being implemented

  • total area that has been protected for species at risk (# of hectares)
  • total land area that has been improved or restored to benefit wildlife (# of hectares)
  • length of shoreline that has been improved or restored to benefit wildlife (# of kilometers)
  • change in number of mortality events for species at risk
  • change in threat level
  • change in size (or other relevant statistics) of species at risk population(s)
  • number of beneficial conservation behaviours adopted
  • number best management practices implemented

CNPP Priority: Project advances partnerships and collaboration including with Indigenous peoples

  • number of Indigenous organizations, communities or individual recipients receiving project funding
  • number of collaborators receiving project funding
  • number of new partnerships developed
  • number of participants involved in activities identified in the Work Plan section
  • number of conservation opportunities identified through collaboration

CNPP Priority: Project contributes to priority co-benefits

  • contribution to achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1 co-benefit: e.g. the total area of land protected or conserved, as specified under Target 1 (# of hectares)
  • provision of ecosystem services co-benefit: e.g. surface water run-off from land retained (# of cubic metres of water retained/stored)
  • climate change adaptation and mitigation co-benefit: e.g. number of trees planted
  • socio-economic benefits co-benefit: e.g. number of jobs created

7. Other supporting information

Please provide any additional information that could enhance your application. Please upload files and provide a brief description of the file in the comments box beside the file.

The following attachments are required:

  • where cash support has been confirmed in the Project Budget, a copy of the confirmation letter/email must be submitted as supporting information
  • you must include letters from relevant interested parties whose support is or will ultimately be needed, including Indigenous communities where appropriate, acknowledging that they are aware of the proposal and/or that they support the proposal
  • photographs of the project area
  • a map of the proposed priority place
  • species and threat lists

Please note: Successful applicants will be required to submit geospatial data with metadata for the project area; if the applicant does not have that capacity, paper maps can be submitted (obtain the physical mailing address from your regional coordinator).

Annex 1: Eligible recipients

Applicants to the Canada Nature Fund Community-Nominated Priority Places must fall within the following list of eligible recipients:

  • domestic or international not-for-profit organizations, such as charitable and volunteer organizations, professional associations, and non-governmental organizations
  • domestic or international Indigenous organizations, governments, individuals, boards, commissions, communities, associations and authorities, including:
    • indigenous not-for-profit organizations
    • district councils, Chiefs councils and Tribal councils
    • indigenous research, academic and educational institutions
    • indigenous for-profit organizations
  • domestic or international research, academic and educational institutions
  • Canadian individuals
  • domestic or international for-profit organizations, such as small businesses with less than 500 employees, companies, corporations, and industry associations
  • local organizations such as community associations and groups, seniors’ and youth groups, and service clubs; and
  • municipal and local governments and their agencies

Recipients may further distribute federal funds to eligible ultimate recipients subject to ultimate recipient agreements and qualification of ultimate recipients to the same conditions above (ultimate recipients do not apply directly to Community-Nominated Priority Places, but receive their funding from recipients who have been awarded funding from Community-Nominated Priority Places).

Ultimate recipients must be the same as those listed above as eligible recipients. Ultimate recipients do not apply directly to the CNPP but receive their funding from recipients who have been awarded funding from the Community-Nominated Priority Places.

Annex 2: Eligible activities and costs

1. Eligible activities

Initiatives and projects that are eligible for funding include:

  • research on alternative conservation, governance and financing tools
  • science
  • surveys
  • inventories and monitoring
  • collection and gathering of Indigenous traditional knowledge
  • consulting (e.g. on legislative processes)
  • conservation planning
  • outreach and education
  • best management land-use guidance and practices
  • negotiation
  • capacity building
  • training
  • species management/restoration
  • species protection
  • species and habitat threat abatement
  • habitat improvement
  • habitat management for maintenance and improvement of ecosystem services
  • habitat protection
  • human impact mitigation; and
  • project evaluation

2. Funding Parameters

Funding scope

The eligible costs described in the application are limited to the life of the funding agreement with ECCC. Any costs for any activities prior to this approval of the project period must be excluded from the application. Costs of activities taking place after this period (2023) must be excluded from the application.

Maximum funding levels

For CNPP, federal contributions will be no more than $500,000 per recipient per fiscal year of the funding agreement.

3. Eligible project costs

Expenditures deemed necessary, for the recipient and the ultimate recipient, to support the purpose and objectives of the approved project and of the Canada Nature Fund include:

  • human resource costs, including salaries and benefits
  • management and professional service costs, such as accounting, monitoring, communications, official languages translation, audit and legal charges
  • travel including field costs in accordance with the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Directive on Travel, Hospitality, Conference, and Event Expenditures
  • material and supplies costs
  • printing, production, and distribution costs
  • equipment and capital assets purchase or rental (though capital asset purchase is not an eligible expenditure for for-profit recipients)
  • lease of office space
  • vehicle rental and operation costs
  • contractors required to perform activities related to the project
  • cost associated with land acquisition or other means of land securement through the acquisition of lands, conservation agreements, the acquisition of development rights (e.g., mineral, timber and exploration rights) and other interests in land or real rightsFootnote 3
  • a reasonable share (10% or less) of overhead and/or administrative costs which are directly attributable to the carrying out of the project
  • any GST/HST that is not reimbursable by Canada Revenue Agency and any PST not reimbursable by the provinces; and
  • costs, other than those herein allowed, are ineligible unless specifically approved in writing by the Minister

Eligible project costs incurred prior to the signing of the funding agreement can be reimbursed if they were incurred on or after the date when the recipient was informed officially in writing by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change or his/her representatives that the project may, subject to the signing of the funding agreement, be eligible for funding. Eligible costs outlined above can be reimbursed to the recipient only if incurred within the fiscal year covered by the funding agreement, and only following the signing of the funding agreement in respect of the project.

4. Match funding requirements

For eligibility under the Canada Nature Fund: Community-Nominated Priority Places, projects must secure match funding. Projects without match funding are not eligible. Proposals must include matching funding of:

  • at least 0.2:1 for Indigenous recipients from non-federal sources ($0.20 confirmed match for each $1 of federal funding)
  • at least 1:1 for other recipients from non-federal sources ($1 confirmed match for each $1 of federal funding) 
  • match may include cash and in-kind sources such as donations of land

Annex 3: Evaluation criteria

Proposals to CNPP will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

Evaluation against priorities broken down as:

  1. contributes towards recovery of species at risk
    • biodiversity values: Identification of significant species at risk and other biodiversity values on a regional or national scale
      1. high numbers of species at risk
      2. high biodiversity, including other wildlife that are not at risk (including migratory birds, fish and other aquatic species, and species of traditional and customary importance to Indigenous peoples); and
      3. unique assemblages of biodiversity, species at risk, and other wildlife
    • conservation status: A recognition that biodiversity values are declining and being impacted by identifiable human-caused threats
      1. extent of species at risk critical habitat (identified and potential) and wildlife habitat
      2. risk of species at risk critical habitat and wildlife habitat destruction; and
      3. extent of existing or potential conservation actions with high probability of success
    • boundary optimization: An appropriate spatial size to focus conservation efforts
      1. ecosystems, watersheds and habitats
      2. land title/tenure and activities
      3. biodiversity values
      4. threats/sectors; and
      5. communities with primary interests in conservation outcomes and therefore public profile
    • achievability of conservation outcomes: A pragmatic opportunity to begin to achieve significant and measurable conservation outcomes within a reasonable timeframe (5–10 years), recognizing improvements in conservation status usually takes a long time (10-50 years) and conservation efforts must be ongoing to sustain gains
      1. conservation opportunities for preventing extirpation and/or extinction of species at risk
      2. conservation opportunities for advancing protection and recovery of species at risk consistent with population and distribution objectives
      3. conservation opportunities to prevent species from becoming at risk and maintaining/improving ecosystem services
      4. threat/risk management potential (effectiveness); and
      5. partnership leveraging potential (resources and influence)
  2. advances partnerships and collaboration including with Indigenous peoples
    • leadership and partnership opportunities: A multi-jurisdictional context that includes mandates, responsibilities, and roles for the Government of Canada, territories, Indigenous peoples, municipalities, and others
      1. existing partnerships
      2. potential for expanded or new partnerships (with territories, Indigenous peoples and other partners, including municipalities, industry, landowners, environmental non-government and community-nominated organizations, academia, and Canadians)
      3. opportunities to address other FPT government’ or Indigenous peoples’ priorities (e.g. sustainable development, existing or planned land use plans) and optimize outcomes across multiple objectives
      4. ability to expand on, “scale-up,” and export successes and lessons learned; and
      5. consistency with jurisdictional responsibilities and roles under SARA and other legislation for the management of fish, wildlife, and other natural resources
  3. contributes to priority co-benefits
    • contribution to achieving Pathway to Canada Target 1Note de bas de page 2 
    • provision of ecosystem services
    • climate change adaptation and mitigation
    • socio-economic benefits

Technical Evaluation, including the following considerations:

  • operating plan demonstrating how the priorities will be addressed
  • clear on how to involve multiple partners
  • experienced applicant and potential for delivering project as planned
  • feasible and suitable approach to achieving goals 
  • quantifiable performance measures
  • clear, logical and concise presentation

Annex 4: Official languages questionnaire

It is now a mandatory requirement for all ECCC applications to complete the Official Languages Questionnaire. This section will form the basis of the Official Languages Clauses to add to Section 14 in Appendix A of the funding agreement. Each question is yes or no. All organizations, no matter the size, will have to respond to the questions.

Is the organization international, national, provincial or territorial in scope?

Is the project international, national, provincial, or territorial in scope?

Is the project delivered in a geographic area with official language minority communities (OLMCs)?

Is the project’s target audience composed of individuals or groups belonging to both official language communities?

Is the target audience composed of individuals or groups belonging exclusively to an official language minority community?

Do the project activities include any public events, signage, promotional or other communication activities?

Is there an opportunity for involvement of official language minority communities to participate?

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