Supplementary Information Tables 2019-20 Departmental Plan: Health Canada

Table of Contents

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) (Voted)
Start date
December 10, 2015
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy
Description
The contribution to CFHI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system, adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to support CFHI's work to identify and accelerate the spread of promising innovations across Canada by supporting health care organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, population health and value for money for health care system investments.
CFHI previously operated as the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF), an arm's-length, non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to fund health services research and promote the use of research evidence to strengthen the delivery of health services. CHSRF received $151.5 million in federal funding under three separate grants (1996-97 to 2003-04).
Expected results
CFHI's activities are expected to result in: health care leaders that are knowledgeable and skilled in carrying out health care improvements; patients, residents, family members, communities and others with lived experience that are engaged in health care improvement and co-design; and improvements to health care practices, delivery models and related policies of participating organizations. Over time, these best practices are expected to take hold in the system and be spread and/or scaled within and across organizations, regions, provinces/territories with improvements made to patient, resident and family experience of care, health of patients, value for money for health care system investments and the work life of health care providers. Ultimately, CFHI's work contributes to improvements in health care system performance in Canada.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issues of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CFHI, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
CFHI is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CFHI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CFHI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending

Note: CFHI is also reported under the “Up-Front Multi-Year Funding” section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000 17,000,000

Health Care Policy Contribution Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Health Care Policy Contribution Program (HCPCP) (Voted)
Start date
September 24, 2002
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2010-11
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy
Description
The HCPCP provides up to $26.9 million per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care systems priorities, including mental health, home and palliative care, health care systems innovation, and optimization of the health workforce. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to health care systems.
Expected results
Program funding will support a wide range of projects designed to ultimately contribute to improvements and transformation in health care systems. For example, health care innovation projects will support activities that develop, implement and evaluate tools, models, and practices that address identified health care systems priorities. Other projects will produce resources that enable health providers to maximize their roles in a range of settings; provide system managers and decision-makers with data and decision-making tools to enhance system planning and performance; and engage key stakeholders in collaborative efforts that contribute to specific health care systems improvements relevant to program priorities.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2018-19
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
Non-profit organizations, other levels of government and other national organizations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
The Program engages recipients, potential recipients, and the public in various ways, for example, through solicited proposal and open calls for proposals. Program recipients are engaged on a regular basis through project monitoring; analysis and follow-up of program and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 14,918,000 27,018,000 27,118,000  25,953,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,918,000 27,018,000 27,118,000  25,953,000

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2008
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 2: Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices
Description
CADTH is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.
Expected results
The purpose of the contribution agreement is to provide financial assistance to support CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Results include: the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that supports informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost. Additional funding announced in Budget 2017 is supporting CADTH's ongoing transition to a health technology management organization in order to deliver results that better meet the needs of the healthcare system.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issues of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CADTH, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
In response to the recommendations of the recipient-led evaluation, CADTH continues to improve its internal governance structures and priority setting processes while also examining how best to support the needs of its customers by improving its suite of products and services.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
CADTH, an independent, not-for-profit agency is the sole recipient of transfer payment funds.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
CADTH has produced numerous products and services including health technology reports, optimal use projects, environmental scans, therapeutic reviews and formulary listing recommendations. These deliverables provide guidance and evidence-based information to health care decision-makers regarding the cost-effectiveness and optimal use of health technologies. In particular, the formulary listing recommendations increases transparency across jurisdictions and provides consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions made by the participating public drug plans.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 20,058,769 23,058,769 26,058,769 29,058,769
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 20,058,769 23,058,769 26,058,769 29,058,769

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Payments to Provinces and Territories for the Purposes of Home Care and Mental Health (Voted)
Start date
November 9, 2017
End date
March 31, 2027
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 3: Home, Community and Palliative Care
Program 4: Mental Health
Description
The Government of Canada is investing $11 billion over ten years (2017-2027) to support the provinces and territories (PTs) in implementing home care ($6 billion) and mental health and addictions ($5 billion) initiatives in their jurisdictions as per the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities (CSoP) adopted on August 21, 2017.

By endorsing the CSoP, PTs fulfilled the conditions set out in the Budget Implementation Act, 2017 to receive funding for fiscal year 2017-18 through a statutory appropriation ($300 million). The remaining nine years of funding ($10.7 billion) will be provided through bilateral funding agreements.

On mental health and addictions, PTs have agreed to focus on:
  • Expanding access to community-based mental health and addiction services for children and youth (age 10-25), recognizing the effectiveness of early interventions to treat mild to moderate mental health disorders;
  • Spreading evidence-based models of community mental health care and culturally-appropriate interventions that are integrated with primary health services; and,
  • Expanding availability of integrated community-based mental health and addiction services for people with complex health needs.
On home and community care, PTs have agreed to focus on:
  • Spreading and scaling evidence-based models of home and community care that are more integrated and connected to primary health care;
  • Enhancing access to palliative and end-of-life care at home or in hospices;
  • Increasing support for caregivers; and,
  • Enhancing home care infrastructure, such as digital connectivity, remote monitoring technology and facilities for community based service delivery.

The federal government is now in the process of developing bilateral agreements with each province and territory that will set out funding conditions and details of how each jurisdiction will use federal funding in future years, based on the priority areas of action outlined in the Common Statement. As these agreements are completed, they are posted publicly here.

As part of the CSoP, all governments also agreed to develop a focused set of common indicators to measure progress on these priority areas. The Canadian Institute for Health Information led a collaborative process which culminated in May 2018 when federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Health endorsed a suite of 12 common indicators to be implemented over the coming years.

Expected results
It is expected that through these investments Canadians will experience tangible improvements in access to home and community care as well as mental health and addictions services. This will lead to better health outcomes and a more sustainable health care system, as care is shifted from expensive hospital care to more patient-centric settings in the home and in the community. These investments could also have a broader, positive impact on Canada's economy, by making the health care system more sustainable in the long term, and by enhancing workforce productivity and social participation.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Not applicable
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Provinces and territories
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
With respect to mental health and addictions, the Government of Canada has engaged with provinces and territories, National Indigenous Organizations, mental health stakeholders, provincial and territorial medical associations and treatment centres, and experts.

With respect to the home and community care, the Government of Canada has engaged with a range of home care stakeholders including representatives from national organizations working on home, community and palliative care, provincial home care providers, patient and family advocates, and national health professional associations (e.g., the Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Nurses Association and the College of Family Physicians of Canada), as well as experts.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending

Note: These amounts will be allocated to provinces and territories on an equal per capita basis based on population estimates from Statistics Canada.

Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 850,000,000 1,100,000,000 1,250,000,000 1,500,000,000
Total program 850,000,000 1,100,000,000 1,250,000,000 1,500,000,000

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program (MHCC) (Voted)
Start date
2000 as a Grant, but as of April 1, 2017 it has become a Contribution.
End date
March 31, 2021
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 4: Mental Health
Description
The MHCC, an arm's length, not-for-profit organization, was established in March 2007 with a ten-year mandate to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness. Between 2007 and 2017, the Government of Canada invested $130 million in the MHCC through a grant, to develop a mental health strategy for Canada, conduct an anti-stigma campaign and create a knowledge exchange centre. In 2016, the MHCC's mandate was renewed for a two-year period, from 2017-18 to 2018-19, with a contribution of $14.25 million per year to advance work on mental health priorities, including problematic substance use, suicide prevention, support for at-risk populations and engagement. This contribution has been extended for 2019-20.
Expected results
This initiative is expected to contribute, to the improved mental health and well-being of Canadians, specifically in the areas of problematic substance use, suicide prevention, and stigma reduction.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issues of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including MHCC, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
The MHCC is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Regular meetings with the recipient; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 14,250,000 14,250,000 0

Substance Use and Addictions Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) (Voted)
Start date
December 4, 2014
End date
March 31, 2022 (Grant)
Ongoing (Contribution)
Type of transfer payment
Grant and Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 5: Substance Use and Addictions
Description
The SUAP provides funding for a wide range of evidence-informed and innovative problematic substance use prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives across Canada at the community, regional and national levels. Initiatives target a range of psychoactive substances, including opioids, cannabis, alcohol and tobacco.
Expected results
Projects funded by the SUAP are expected to contribute to individual capacity and organizational, system and community level program, policy and practice change by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment and related system enhancements; and, improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
The SUAP will be evaluated as part of the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy horizontal initiative evaluation scheduled for 2019-20.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Community-based, regional and national non-profit organizations, including those in the health and education sectors; and, other levels of government and their agencies.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Applicants and recipients are engaged through: stakeholder outreach; solicitation processes; project development discussion; and performance reporting and monitoring tools, processes and activities. The program also supports knowledge translation and exchange opportunities between projects, Health Canada and other partners and stakeholders.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 100,000 200,000 200,000 200,000
Total contributions 47,161,916 52,398,985  56,820,235 51,880,854
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 47,261,916 52,598,985 57,020,235 52,080,854

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to Canada Health Infoway (Infoway) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2016
End date
March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 6: Digital Health
Description
Infoway is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada has invested $2.1 billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50 million over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare, with the funds flowing as a Contribution Agreement. Budget 2017 allocated $300 million over five years to Infoway to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, support the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, help patients to access their own health records electronically, and better link electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions. These funds are to flow as a Contribution agreement.
Expected results
Provincial/territorial governments and stakeholders engaged in expanding digital health technologies; health care providers and patients accessing, and equipped with the knowledge and skills to use, digital health technologies and digital health information; health care providers using digital health technologies to provide more efficient and high quality health care; and patients using digital health technologies to manage and/or improve their health to a modern and sustainable health care system where Canadians have access to appropriate and effective health care.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issue of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including Infoway, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
Infoway is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the Contribution Agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending

Note: Infoway is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 50,000,000 75,000,000 77,000,000 80,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 50,000,000 75,000,000 77,000,000 80,000,000

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 1999
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017–18
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 7: Health Information
Description
The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (F/P/T) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the F/P/T Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Between 1994 and 2018, the Government of Canada allocated approximately $1,232 million in total to CIHI through a series of funding agreements. Under the current agreement signed in early 2018, close to $365 million will be delivered to CIHI over 5 years (2017-18 to 2021-22). Presently, Health Canada funds 77% of CIHI's total budget, while the P/T governments contribute 17%. The remaining funds are generated largely through product sales.
Expected results
This funding allows CIHI to provide essential information on Canada's health care systems and the health of Canadians. CIHI provides comparable and actionable data and information that are used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across the continuum of care. CIHI's stakeholders use the broad range of the Institute's health system databases, measurements and standards, together with their evidence-based reports and analyses, in their decision-making processes. CIHI protects the privacy of Canadians by ensuring the confidentiality and integrity of the health care information they provide.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issues of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CIHI, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
CIHI is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CIHI to establish activities to be carried out under the Contribution Agreement, and maintains regular contact with CIHI to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 83,808,979 87,658,979 92,658,979 97,658,979
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 83,808,979 87,658,979 92,658,979 97,658,979

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2007
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 10: Cancer Control
Description
CPAC is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with more than 700 cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives:
  • Reduce the expected number of new cases of cancer among Canadians;
  • Enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer; and,
  • Lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer.

Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. CPAC was eligible to receive $250 million from the federal government for its first five-year term (2007 to 2012) and $241 million for its second five-year term (2012 to 2017). Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, which is governed by a five-year agreement (2017 to 2022) for $237.5 million.

Expected results
Enhance cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Indigenous organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments.

A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issues of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CPAC, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
CPAC is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement, and maintains regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 43,100,000 51,000,000 51,000,000 52,500,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 43,100,000 51,000,000 51,000,000 52,500,000

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2013
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2012-13
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 11: Patient Safety
Description
CPSI supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to improve the quality of health care services by providing a leadership role in building a culture of patient safety and quality improvement in the Canadian health care system through coordination across sectors, promotion of best practices, and advice on effective strategies to improve patient safety. CPSI received grant year funding via five year grant agreements from 2003-2013. A new five-year contribution agreement began on April 1, 2013 and has been extended to March 31, 2020.
Expected results
CPSI provides leadership and coordination of efforts to prevent and reduce harm to patients, with an emphasis on four key areas: safety improvement projects; making patient safety a priority across health care systems; influencing policy, standards, and regulations so that they incorporate best patient safety evidence and practices; and creating and strengthening alliances and networks with partners such as patients, governments, and industry who are committed to making care safer.

CPSI’s work is expected to contribute to sustained improvements in patient safety across Canada, resulting in reduced incidence rates of preventable harm, and healthier Canadians.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Health Canada's synthesis evaluation examining the issues of relevance and performance of the Pan-Canadian Health Organizations, including CPSI, is anticipated to be approved in fiscal year 2018-19.
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
CPSI is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada works with CPSI to establish activities to be carried out under the funding agreement and maintains regular contact with CPSI to monitor progress and compliance under the funding agreement.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000 7,600,000

Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Canadian Blood Services: Blood Research and Development (CBS - Blood R&D) Program (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2000
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2013-14
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 12: Blood System, Organs, Tissue and Transplantation
Description
The CBS - Blood R&D Program helps maintain and increase the safety, supply and efficiency of the Canadian blood system by advancing innovation and maintaining Canadian capacity in transfusion science and medicine. The program pursues these goals by fostering relevant discovery and development research, facilitating dissemination and application of knowledge, educating the next generation of scientific and health care experts, and engaging with an interdisciplinary network of partners in Canada and beyond.
Expected results
The CBS – Blood R&D Program is expected to generate numerous knowledge products (e.g., journal articles, reviews, etc.) and learning events (e.g., presentations at national and international conferences). It also plays a significant role in the development of highly qualified people through formal training in the important areas of basic and applied research. In particular, the program is expected to build and maintain research capacity in transfusion science and medicine (for example, through graduate fellowship programs, postdoctoral fellowship programs, and provision of training positions in research laboratories.) The Program is expected to develop research networks, collaborative arrangements, establish partnerships and award funding grants in support of R&D and training.

In addition, it is expected that various stakeholders, including Health Canada and blood operators in Canada, will use the knowledge generated by Blood R&D projects to inform changes to practices and standards. This will contribute to greater safety, supply and quality of the Canadian blood system.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2017-18
Decision following the results of last evaluation
The program was continued. Based on the evaluation recommendation to improve knowledge exchange of research projects and results among partners in the federal Health Portfolio, Health Canada actively promoted and facilitated the knowledge exchange to optimize awareness and uptake of research findings among Portfolio partners.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2022-23
General targeted recipient groups
CBS is the sole recipient.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada officials undertook numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with CBS program staff and senior management to discuss program progress. In addition, Health Canada continues to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

Official Languages Health Program

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Official Languages Health Program (OLHP) (Voted)
Start date
June 18, 2003
End date
March 31, 2022 (Grant)
Ongoing (Contribution)
Type of transfer payment
Grant and Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 13: Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems
Description
The OLHP has a total budget of $191.2 million over five years (2018-2023), and $38.46 million per year ongoing after 2023. The Program supports the federal government's commitment to maintain a strong and effective publicly funded health care system by ensuring that official language minority communities (OLMCs) have access to bilingual health services in their communities. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and micro-grants, Health Canada supports investments that improve the active offer of health services for OLMCs in priority areas, such as home care, mental health, palliative and end-of-life care.
Expected results
Program funding will support training and retention of health professionals, health networking and innovative projects to improve access to health services for OLMCs. These activities are expected to increase access to bilingual health professionals in OLMCs, and to increase the offer of health services targeted to OLMCs.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2016-17
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Eligible recipients under the program are individuals, non-profit entities, provincially-accredited postsecondary institutions and provincial and territorial government bodies.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
The program engages recipients, potential recipients and the public in various ways, for example through solicited proposals, through open calls for proposals and through consultation with funding recipients and program stakeholders. Program recipients are also engaged through regular meetings; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 50,000 125,000 125,000
Total contributions  35,940,000 37,330,000  37,255,000  37,475,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program  35,940,000  37,380,000  37,380,000  37,600,000

Canada Brain Research Fund Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Canada Brain Research Fund Program (CBRF) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2011
End date
March 31, 2020
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2016-17
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 14: Brain Research
Description
In Budget 2011 and 2016, the Government of Canada committed up to $120 million, in matched funding with non-federal government donors, to establish the Canada Brain Research Fund Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience, and accelerate discoveries to improve the health and quality of life for Canadians who suffer from brain disorders." The Government of Canada's objective in funding the Canada Brain Research Fund was: 1) to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding; and 2) to support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers.
Expected results
The Canada Brain Research Fund's support for brain research is expected to lead to discoveries that will improve the health and quality of life for Canadians who are at risk of or affected by brain diseases/disorders. To contribute to this outcome, the Recipient, in partnership with various donors and private organizations, funds competitively-awarded research grants across Canada.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2016-17
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Based on the evaluation recommendation, Health Canada made adjustments to the matched funding model that are reflected in the current Terms and Conditions.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
The current funding agreement ends in March 2020 and the program is not scheduled to undergo another evaluation.
General targeted recipient groups
The main target recipient is the national non-profit organization Brain Canada, which acts as a third-party research organization. Through the Canada Brain Research Fund that is delivered by Brain Canada, the program allocates grants to researchers across Canada targeting research institutes, hospitals and health charities.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
The Recipient is continuously engaged through regular monitoring activities such as reporting, performance measurement, meetings and ongoing communication in support of program delivery.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 23,500,000 13,174,646 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 23,500,000 13,174,646 0 0

Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program (Voted)
Start date
March 22, 2019 (previously known as the Thalidomide Survivors Contribution Program, which started on June 19, 2015)
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2018-19
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 15: Thalidomide
Description
The program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:
  1. receive ongoing tax-free payments based on their level of disability; and
  2. have transparent and timely access to the Extraordinary Medical Assistance Fund.
Expected results
Expected results are that thalidomide survivors will access care, treatment and/or support which in turn will contribute to their aging with dignity.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Not applicable
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
General targeted recipient groups
Canadian not-for-profit and for-profit organizations.
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Applicants and recipients are engaged through solicitation processes and regular monitoring activities such as reporting, performance measurement, meetings and ongoing communication to support simple, pro-active, accessible program delivery to meet the needs of thalidomide survivors. Key stakeholders are engaged in program design.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 8,489,664 13,418,765 14,546,067 12,503,960
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 8,489,664 13,418,765 14,546,067 12,503,960

Territorial Health Investment Fund

General Information

Name of transfer payment program
Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) (Voted)
Start date
April 1, 2014
End date
March 31, 2021
Type of transfer payment
Grant
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions
2017-18
Link to Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 16: The Territorial Health Investment Fund
Description
Building on an initial investment of $70 million (2014-15 to 2017-18), which flowed as contribution funding, the Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) was renewed as a grant program in 2017-18 with an additional $108 million over four years (2017-18 to 2020-21). Of this funding, $54 million will be allocated to Nunavut, $28.4 million to Northwest Territories and $25.6 million to Yukon. This funding will enable each territory to continue pursuing innovative activities in support of strong, sustainable health systems and to offset costs associated with medical travel to support Northerners' access to the health care they need.

The use of grant agreements rather than contribution agreements for the new investment will minimize the administrative burden on territories associated with participating in the program.
Expected results
The THIF will support territorial efforts to innovate and transform their health care systems and help offset costs associated with medical travel. The THIF is expected to result, for Northerners, in: improved access to health care services; health care need being met; and, improved health status.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
2018-19 (of previous contribution program)
Decision following the results of last evaluation
Continuation
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
No planned evaluations at this time.
General targeted recipient groups
Territorial governments (Government of the Northwest Territories, Government of Yukon, Government of Nunavut)
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients
Health Canada worked with territorial governments to establish four year work plans for use of the grant funding and to secure grant agreements. Health Canada will get annual updates on planned activities from the territorial governments (including through a Federal/Territorial Assistant Deputy Minister Working Group which will facilitate learning and information sharing across governments). Health Canada will work with territorial governments throughout the life of the agreements to monitor progress and compliance under the grant agreements.
Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
Total grants 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 27,000,000 27,000,000 27,000,000 0

Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million

Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Contribution to Strengthen Canada's Organs and Tissues Donation and Transplantation System (Voted)
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 12: Blood System, Organs, Tissue and Transplantation
Main objective
To support the development of a national organ and tissue donation and transplantation system that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting the federal role and interest in organ and tissue donation and transplantation.
Planned spending in 2019-20 (dollars)
$3,580,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Evaluation of the Canadian Blood Services Grant and Contribution Programs: 2017-18

Note: The Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Program was evaluated at the same time as the Canadian Blood Services - Research and Development Program because both programs are administered by the same recipient.
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable)
The Canadian Blood Services Contribution Programs: 2022-23

Note: The Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Program will be evaluated at the same time as the Canadian Blood Services - Research and Development Program because both programs are administered by the same recipient.
General targeted recipient groups
Canadian Blood Services is the sole recipient.

Climate Change and Health Adaptation Capacity Building Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Climate Change and Health Adaptation Capacity Building Program (Voted)
End date
2020-21 (Grant)
2021-22 (Contribution)
Type of transfer payment
Grant and Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Link to the Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 2: Health Protection and Promotion
Program 23: Climate Change
Main objective
To protect and improve the health of Canadians in a changing climate through better understanding of risks and effective adaptation measures, and by building needed capacity to implement them.
Planned spending in 2019-20 (dollars)
$78,000 (Grant)
$1,422,000 (Contribution)
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable)
2021-22
General targeted recipient groups
Provincial and territorial ministries of health; and established province-wide, regional and local health authorities and public health units.

Radon Outreach Contribution Program

General information

Name of transfer payment program
Radon Outreach Contribution Program (Voted)
End date
Ongoing
Type of transfer payment
Contribution
Type of appropriation
Estimates
Link to the Department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 2: Health Protection and Promotion
Program 31: Radiation Protection
Main objective
To protect and improve human health and well-being in Canada from the impacts of indoor radon exposure, by aiding in the education of Canadians about the importance of testing their homes, schools and workplaces for radon and reducing the radon levels where necessary.
Planned spending in 2019-20 (dollars)
$200,000
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable)
2020-21
General targeted recipient groups
Regional and local governments, including local health authorities; not-for-profit organizations (including voluntary organizations); professional associations; national Indigenous organizations; and educational institutions.

Horizontal Initiatives

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Statistics Canada (StatCan)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., Correctional Service Canada) are supporting the federal response to the opioid crisis. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission “Addressing the Opioid Crisis.”

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2018

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2023 and ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

Illegal drugs and problematic substance use have always presented health and safety challenges in Canada and around the world. Recently, however, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of overdoses and deaths due to problematic opioid use. In 2016, there were more than 2,900 opioid-related deaths in Canada, and nearly 4,000 lives were lost in 2017.

The federal government is taking significant actions in areas of federal jurisdiction to address the crisis. However, despite significant efforts to date, the opioid crisis in Canada continues.  According to data from the Public Health Agency of Canada, more than 9,000 people lost their lives in Canada between January 2016 and June 2018 related to opioids.  It is estimated that approximately 250,000 Canadians do not have access to treatment when seeking help for problematic substance use. Since people who use drugs have traditionally been stigmatized, Canadians struggling with substance use disorder often encounter barriers when accessing health, medical and social services. Further, fentanyl and its analogues continue to poison the illegal drug supply, contributing to increased overdoses among people who use illegal drugs.

While the Government of Canada is taking a number of actions to respond to the opioid crisis, this horizontal initiative is specific to measures announced in Budget 2018 to:

  • support additional prevention and treatment interventions through an expansion of the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP);
  • address the stigma surrounding people who use drugs, which creates barriers for those seeking treatment, through the launch of a public education campaign and training for law enforcement;
  • enhance capacity to identify and intercept illegal substances at the border by equipping border agents with additional tools at ports of entry; and,
  • improve the availability of and access to public health data by expanding public health surveillance, conducting special studies, and redesigning the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED).

Ultimately, these complementary activities are intended to contribute to a reduction in opioid-related harms and deaths in Canada.

Governance structures

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing a comprehensive federal response to the opioid crisis. Each department/agency will be responsible for leading its respective initiatives and providing updates to the interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level Working Group on Opioids chaired by the Associate-ADM of Health Canada’s Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch. This working group will be used as a forum for information and consultation on next steps toward a comprehensive, collaborative federal response to the opioid crisis. Updates and decisions from this working group will feed into the federal, interdepartmental Deputy Ministers Task Force on the Opioid Crisis as required. This Task Force, chaired by the Deputy Minister of Health Canada, serves as a time-limited forum to provide leadership and oversight of federal initiatives to respond to the opioid crisis. The Task Force will remain an established committee until such time that the public environment no longer requires it.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. Departments and agencies will provide updates to, and consult with, provincial and territorial colleagues as required through the federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) ADM-level Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee (PSUH), co-chaired by Health Canada and British Columbia and comprised of ADMs responsible for drug policy in their jurisdiction. They will also provide updates to and consult with PT colleagues as required through the FPT Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses (SAC), co-chaired by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada and Nova Scotia’s Chief Medical Officer of Health and comprising Chief Medical Officers of Health from each jurisdiction. While the PSUH is an established committee intended as a long-term forum for drug policy discussions, the SAC will be disbanded at such a time that the public environment no longer requires it.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$82,241,365

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

Not applicable

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

Not applicable

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

Planning highlights

All federal partners will work collaboratively to address the opioid crisis in a comprehensive, robust, and effective manner. Planning highlights specific to this horizontal initiative in 2019-20 will include:

  • reviewing project proposals received through the Substance Use and Addictions Program with a view to funding projects that support additional prevention and treatment interventions for problematic substance use;
  • continuing the roll-out of the public education campaign to address stigma that creates barriers for those seeking treatment;
  • delivering training to police service members so that they have the right tools and awareness to help those with problematic opioid use access treatment and harm reduction supports;
  • establishing new Designated Safe Examination Areas and regional screening facilities to conduct safe examinations of goods suspected of containing opioids at ports of entry;
  • leading special studies and epidemiologic investigations to understand the opioid crisis as it affects sub-populations; and,
  • collaborating with provinces and territories on the redesign of the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database.

Contact information

Health Canada

Guy Morissette
Director General
Key Initiatives
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Guy.Morissette@canada.ca
613-954-2686

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Shared outcome: Reducing harms and deaths related to opioid use
Name of theme Theme Area 1: Supporting additional prevention and treatment interventions Theme Area 2: Addressing stigma Theme Area 3: 
Taking Action at Canada’s Borders
Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base Internal Services

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, and program materials).

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Originally the Internal Services amount of $779,448 in the TB Submission included $571,916 of indirect costs and $207,532 of Custodial Accommodation costs. The Custodial Amounts have since been allocated according to salary costs to provide a breakdown by Activity.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Theme outcome(s) Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 1 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 2 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Enhanced quality surveillanceFootnote 3 data is available Not applicable
Health Canada $13,169,264 $12,456,900 Not applicable Not applicable $873,836
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable $30,254,740 Not applicable $3,125,260Footnote 4
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Enhancing surveillance (top-up) $14,928,466 $971,534
Public Safety Canada Not applicable $3,396,428 $346,828 Not applicable $723,217
Statistics Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable 1,905,286 $89,606
Planning information
Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Decrease in baseline year over year to 2021. Baseline for hospital admissions: 16.4 per 100,000 population in 2017. Baseline for apparent opioid-related deaths: 10.9 per 100,000 population in 2017.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Addressing the Opioid Crisis HC:
$26,500,000
CBSA:
$33,380,000
PHAC:
$15,900,000
PS:
$4,466,473
StatCan:
$1,994,892
HC:
$8,300,000
CBSA:
$8,063,000
PHAC:
$4,057,058
PS:
$1,335,784
StatCan:
$480,000
Reduced harms and deaths related to opioid use. Number of hospital admissions due to opioid poisoning (including overdoses) per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)
Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)
% reductionFootnote 1 March 31, 2021
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, program materials).

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Types of improvement is a reference to data that will be submitted to Health Canada by funded SUAP projects broken down by policy, program or practice change. Examples could include adopting policies to ensure the meaningful involvement of people with lived experience; changes to programs to make them more culturally relevant or trauma-informed; and practice changes that improve treatment service such as adopting current national opioid treatment guidelines.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Theme Area 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions

HC:
$13,169,264

HC:
$3,237,826

Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 1 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 2 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice

Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to opioid use policies, programs and practice (by type of improvementFootnote 3)

Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019

TBC in June 2019, once a baseline is established

Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Expanded contribution funding $13,169,264 $3,237,826 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 TBC in June 2019, once a baseline is established
ER 1.1.2 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Baseline: 74% in 2017

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Theme Area 2: Addressing Stigma

HC:
$12,456,900
PS:
$3,396,428

HC:
$4,843,006
PS:
$1,037,732

Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue

Percentage of Canadians who believe that the opioid crisis in Canada is a public health issue

Increase by 5%Footnote 1

March 31, 2021

Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Public education campaign $12,456,900 $4,843,006 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2020
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2021
Public Safety Countering Crime De-stigmatization awareness training for law enforcement $3,396,428 $1,037,732 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 March 31, 2020
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3: Taking Action at Canada’s Borders

PS:
$346,828
CBSA:
$30,254,740

PS:
$93,082
CBSA:
$7,361,066

Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry

Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs (compared to random resultant rate) A target will be established in 2019-20, once a baseline has been established. The objective will be to maintain or exceed previous years’ results March 31, 2021
Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, resulting from targeted examinations (compared to random resultant rate)
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Safety Countering Crime Information sharing with law enforcement and international partners $346,828 $93,082 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 31, 2020
Canada Border Security Agency Commercial-Trade
Facilitation and Compliance
Equipping safe examination areas and regional screening facilities $1,638,673 $581,253 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 March 31, 2020
Force Generation $2,153,613 $374,523
Buildings and Equipment $11,353,992 $3,354,521
Field Technology Support $7,951,329 $1,677,411 PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2023
PI 3.2.1.3 T 3.2.1.3 March 31, 2020
Targeting Augmenting intelligence and risk assessment capacity $2,041,704 $399,340 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2 T 3.2.2 TBD
Intelligence Collection and Analysis $3,284,279 $625,689 ER 3.2.3 PI 3.2.3 T 3.2.3 March 31, 2023
Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Enhancement of Detector Dog Program $1,831,150 $348,329 ER 3.2.4 PI 3.2.4.1 TBD TBD
PI 3.2.4.2 TBD TBD
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base

PHAC:
$14,928,466

StatCan:
$1,905,285

PHAC:
$3,815,738

StatCan:
$462,579

Enhanced quality surveillanceFootnote 1 data is available Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 2 disseminated publicly 11 March 31, 2020
Percentage of data files published on time 100% March 31, 2020
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion, and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Expansion of public health surveillance $14,928,466 $3,815,738 ER 4.1 PI 4.1 T 4.1 March 31, 2020
Statistics Canada Socio-economic Statistics Re-design and operation of the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED) $1,905,286 $462,579 ER 4.2 PI 4.2 T 4.2 TBC when target is established in March 2020
Total spending, all themes
Theme Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 $13,169,264 $3,237,826
Theme 2 $15,853,328 $5,880,738
Theme 3 $30,601,568 $7,454,148
Theme 4 $16,833,752 $4,278,317
Total, all themes $76,457,912 $20,851,029

Theme 1:  Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 1.1.1 Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to opioid use

ER 1.1.2 Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 1.1.1 Percentage of targeted stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they have the social and physical supports they need related to opioid use

PI 1.1.2 Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to opioid use policies, programs and practice

Targets

Health Canada

T 1.1.1   Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019

T 1.1.2   Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019

Theme 2:  Addressing Stigma

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 2.1.1 Increased sympathy among Canadians for people using opioids

ER 2.1.2 Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue

Public Safety Canada

ER 2.2 Increased awareness and support amongst law enforcement community about de-stigmatization of people who use opioids

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 2.1.1 Percentage of Canadians who have sympathy for people using opioids

PI 2.1.2 Percentage of Canadians who believe that opioid-related substance use disorder is a disease

Public Safety Canada

PI 2.2  Percentage of police service members who completed the online course

Targets

Health Canada

T 2.1.1   Increase by 5%Footnote 3

T 2.1.2   Increase by 5%Footnote 4

Public Safety Canada

T 2.2 25% of eligible police service members

Theme 3:  Taking Action at Canada’s Borders

Expected results

Public Safety Canada

ER 3.1   Increased knowledge generation and sharing of information on targeted issues related to reducing the illegal supply of opioids in Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 3.2.1 Increased capacity to identify high-risk goods at ports of entry

ER 3.2.2 Increased ability to risk assess and identify high risk shipments

ER 3.2.3 Increased communications related to threat assessment information and intelligence provided to personnel and partnering agencies

ER 3.2.4 Enhanced capabilityFootnote 5 to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at postal locations

Performance indicators

Public Safety Canada

PI 3.1  Percentage of completed planned engagement activities with law enforcement community, stakeholders and partners to address policy issues related with the illegal supply of opioids

Canada Border Services Agency

PI 3.2.1.1 Number of designated safe examination areas, allowing ports of entry to be equipped to identify, detect, and interdict opioids

PI 3.2.1.2 Percentage of CBSA officers at ports of entry identified for safe examinations training that have completed the required training

PI 3.2.1.3 Number of items per year of suspected opioid-containing packages sampled and identified at safe sampling areas (outside of the laboratory)

PI 3.2.2 Number of streams/risk rules supporting advanced risk assessment

PI 3.2.3 Number of intelligence products produced by the CBSA

PI 3.2.4.1 Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs (compared to random resultant rate)

PI 3.2.4.2 Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, resulting from targeted examinations (compared to random resultant rate)

Targets

Public Safety Canada

T 3.1 100%

Canada Border Services Agency

T 3.2.1.1 25

T 3.2.1.2 100%Footnote 6

T 3.2.1.3 1,000Footnote 7

T 3.2.2   TBD

T 3.2.3   Increase by 10%

T 3.2.4.1 A target will be established in March 2020, once a baseline has been established.

T 3.2.4.2 A target will be established in March 2020, once a baseline has been established.

Theme 4:  Enhancing the Evidence Base

Expected results

Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 4.1 Enhanced quality surveillance data is available

Statistics Canada

ER 4.2 Increased use and relevance of CCMED among stakeholders

Performance indicators

Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 4.1 Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 8 disseminated publicly

Statistics Canada

PI 4.2 Percentage of clients satisfied with statistical information from CCMED

Targets

Public Health Agency of Canada

T 4.1 11

Statistics Canada

T 4.2 A baseline and target will be established in March 2020, once CCMED is available

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Correctional Service Canada (CSC)
Department of Justice Canada (DOJ)
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC)
Global Affairs Canada (GAC)
Indigenous Services Canada (ISC)
Parole Board of Canada (PB)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC)
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2017

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 20 and ongoing

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Government of Canada is committed to a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, which uses a public health lens when considering and addressing problematic substance use. The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) is led by the Minister of Health, supported by Health Canada and 14 other federal departments and agencies. The CDSS covers a broad range of legal and illegal substances, including cannabisFootnote 9, alcohol, opioidsFootnote 1 and other kinds of substances that can be used problematically. The goal of the strategy is to protect the health and safety of all Canadians by minimizing harms from substance use for individuals, families and communities.

The CDSS formally restores harm reduction as a pillar of federal drug and substance use policy, alongside the existing prevention, treatment and enforcement pillars, supported by a strong, modern evidence base across all pillars. The public health focus on the CDSS, along with the inclusion of harm reduction as a core pillar of the strategy, will better enable the Government to address the current opioid crisis, and to work toward preventing the emergence of new challenges in substance use.

The CDSS recognizes that the national approach to substance use requires coordinated efforts from all levels of government working in their respective areas of jurisdiction. It also recognizes the importance of incorporating stakeholder views on an ongoing basis, including people with lived and living experience with substance use. Reducing the stigma experienced by people who use drugs is also integral to the CDSS and a priority for the Government of Canada.

Governance structures

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health. The Strategy is coordinated through a Director-General (DG) level steering committee that reports to Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs).

The DG Steering Committee is designed to reflect and support the CDSS’s comprehensive approach to drug and substance use issues. The committee is composed of DGs from federal departments/agencies whose mandates are relevant to drug and substance use (including departments that formally receive CDSS funding and those that do not). The committee, which meets at least twice a year and also on an ad hoc basis, is supported by three working groups: the Demand and Harm Reduction Working Group; the Supply Reduction Working Group; and the Evaluation and Reporting Working Group.

Current federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) engagement is achieved through a number of F/P/T mechanisms, including the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms that is co-chaired by HC and the Province of British Columbia. Secretariat support for the CDSS is provided by the Controlled Substances Directorate (CSD) within HC.

Total federal funding allocated (2017-18 to 2021-22) (dollars)

$661,466,035

Total federal planned spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars)

$125,760,708

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2018 (dollars)

$141,609,909

Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since the last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

Planning highlights

  • Analyze public input into CDSS consultation (held September – December 2018) for potential new activities;
  • Refresh CDSS logic model and performance measurement approach to better reflect the strategy’s current directions and focus;
  • Modernize prevention activities, including evidence-based public awareness activities, drug risk communications, and activities that address social determinants of problematic substance use;
  • Continue to support evidence-based treatment options, including removing unnecessary regulatory barriers, and evidence-based harm reduction measures (e.g., supervised consumption services, drug checking technologies);
  • Continue to undertake enforcement measures that address organized drug crime, protect border security and ensure compliance with federal controlled substances regulations;
  • Improve research, surveillance, and data collection on substance use issues, and continue to pursue the implementation of a Canadian drugs and substances observatory;
  • Work with partners to reduce stigma associated with substance use, including collaborative approaches between law enforcement and public health; and,
  • Advance and promote Canadian drug policy priorities at the international level, including the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

Contact information

Health Canada
Michelle Boudreau
Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate
Michelle.Boudreau@canada.ca
613-960-2496

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Shared outcome(s): Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to update the shared outcomes
Name of theme Theme Area 1:
Prevention
Theme Area 2:
Treatment
Theme Area 3:
Harm Reduction
Theme Area 4:
Enforcement
Theme Area 5:
Evidence Base
Internal Services

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Health Canada Internal Services include $2,436,740 for the Lead Role.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) consolidated funding is reported under the Prevention theme and continues to contribute to both the Prevention and Treatment themes.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme outcome(s) Preventing problematic substance use – note Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the prevention theme outcomes Supporting access to treatment services – note Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the treatment theme outcomes Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people with problematic drug or substance use Law enforcement and drug regulation activities – note Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the enforcement theme outcomes Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners Not applicable
Health CanadaFootnote 1 $131,657,028Footnote 2 Not applicable $35,692,017 $94,799,995 $8,520,776 $5,598,876
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $11,500,000 Not applicable $6,500,000
Canada Revenue Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $4,209,225 Not applicable $790,775
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Not applicable $6,874,990 Not applicable Not applicable $10,000,000 Not applicable
Correctional Services Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $9,258,480 Not applicable Not applicable
Department of Justice Canada Not applicable $26,593,901 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $42,375
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $0 Not applicable Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $4,500,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Indigenous Services Canada $14,376,000 $60,357,585 $15,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Parole Board of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $7,695,000 Not applicable $1,710,000
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable $30,000,000 Not applicable $844,603 $55,397
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $53,196,935 Not applicable $7,803,065
Public Safety Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $2,942,660 Not applicable $75,710
Public Services and Procurement Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $3,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $11,107,975 Not applicable Not applicable $82,644,400 Not applicable $14,118,267
Planning information
Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019-20 Planned spending (dollars) Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Funding includes internal services and lead role.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS)Footnote 1 $661,466,035 $129,763,848 Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to update the shared outcomes Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s) TBD TBD
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2012-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 1:
Prevention
$157,141,003 $29,851,231 Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBD TBD
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target

Footnotes

Footnote 1

This amount represents the global SUAP CDSS budget. The SUAP does not allocate or track funding by CDSS pillar/theme. SUAP funding will be allocated across the prevention and treatment theme areas.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

This amount represents the global SUAP CDSS budget for 2019-20. As above, there are no specific prevention and treatment budget allocations in the SUAP. Funding will be allocated to both prevention and treatment themes based on the results of the current 2018-19 call for proposals.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) Grants and Contributions Funding $113,937,570Footnote 1 $22,787,514Footnote 2 ER 1.1.1
ER 1.1.2
PI 1.1.1
PI 1.1.2
T 1.1
T 1.2
TBD
Controlled Substances Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) $17,719,458 $1,976,940 ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2020
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) $14,376,000 $2,900,000 Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) Federal Policing Public Engagement (FPPE) $11,107,975 $2,186,777 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1
PI 1.2.2
PI 1.2.3
PI 1.2.4
PI 1.2.5
T 1.2.1
T 1.2.2
T 1.2.3
T 1.2.4
T 1.2.5
March 31, 2020
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2:
Treatment
$93,826,476 $18,405,040 Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBD TBD
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Research in Priority Areas Research on Drug Treatment Model $6,874,990 $974,998 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 31, 2020
Department of Justice Canada Drug Treatment Court Funding Program Drug Treatment Court Funding Program $18,636,276 $3,767,000 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2020
Youth Justice Youth Justice Fund $7,957,625 $1,591,525 ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2020
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions – Mental Wellness Program $60,357,585 $12,071,517 Not applicable
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3:
Harm reduction
$80,692,017 $16,984,104 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users Percentage of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills 60% March 31, 2021
Average percentage of First Nations people and Inuit per community who received problematic substance use community-based supports 14.04% March 31, 2021
Percentage decrease of sharing drug use equipment among people who use drugs 10% decrease March 31, 2020
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy $25,692,017 $4,984,104 ER 3.1.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 31, 2020
Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) Grants and Contributions - Funding $10,000,000 $2,000,000 ER 3.1.2 PI 3.1.2 T 3.1.2 March 31, 2021
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions –First Nations and Inuit health programming $15,000,000 $3,000,000 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 31, 2020
Public Health Agency of Canada Communicable Diseases and Infections Control Grants and contributions - Transmission of Sexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infections $30,000,000 $7,000,000 ER 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 31, 2020
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4:
Enforcement
$273,746,695 $53,272,814 Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada is working with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBD TBD
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Office of Controlled Substances $31,221,420 $6,244,284 ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 31, 2020
Regulatory Operations and Enforcement Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities $9,753,510 $1,950,702 ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2 T 4.1.2 TBD
Drug Analysis Services $53,825,065 $10,765,013 ER 4.1.3
ER 4.1.4
PI 4.1.3
PI 4.1.4
T 4.1.3
T 4.1.4
March 31, 2020
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment Targeting Intelligence Security Screening $10,500,000 $2,100,000 ER 4.2.1
ER 4.2.2
ER 4.2.3
PI 4.2 T 4.2 March 31, 2020
Criminal Investigations $1,000,000 $200,000
Canada Revenue Agency Domestic Compliance Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate $4,209,225 $866,369 ER 4.3 PI 4.3 T 4.3 March 31, 2020
Correctional Service Canada Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $3,027,280 $773,046 ER 4.4 PI 4.4.1 T 4.4.1 March 31, 2020
PI 4.4.2 T 4.4.2
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $6,231,200 $1,078,651 PI 4.4.3 T 4.4.3
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program $0 $0 ER 4.5 PI 4.5 T 4.5 Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS) $4,500,000 $900,000 ER 4.6 PI 4.6.1
PI 4.6.2
T 4.6.1
T 4.6.2
March 31, 2020
Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions – (Provincial reviews) $5,557,500 $200,000 ER 4.7.1 PI 4.7.1 T 4.7.1 March 31, 2020
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Provincial reviews) $2,137,500 $97,000 ER 4.7.2 PI 4.7.2 T 4.7.2 March 31, 2020
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable $36,219,785 $7,243,957 ER 4.8.1 PI 4.8.1.1
PI 4.8.1.2
T 4.8 Not applicable
Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services $16,977,150 $3,395,430 ER 4.8.2 PI 4.8.2.1
PI 4.8.2.2
Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation $2,942,660 $588,532 ER 4.9 PI 4.9 T 4.9 March 31, 2020
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services Financial Intelligence Program $3,000,000 $600,000 ER 4.10 PI 4.10.1
PI 4.10.2
T 4.10 March 31, 2020
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) Investigations Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations $82,644,400 $16,269,830 ER 4.11 PI 4.11.1
PI 4.11.2
PI 4.11.3
T 4.11 Not applicable
Theme 5 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 5:
Evidence base
$19,365,379 $4,341,588 Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice TBD - Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019 TBD
Percentage of federal health publications in areas related to problematic substance use (from Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada) citing CIHR-funded research 18% March 31, 2022

Theme 5 horizontal initiative activities

Theme 5 details
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Drug Use Surveillance and Monitoring $8,520,776 $2,247,867 ER 5.1 PI 5.1 T 5.1 March 31, 2022
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Horizontal Health Research Initiative Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) $10,000,000 $2,000,000 ER 5.2 PI 5.2.1 T 5.2.1 March 31, 2022
PI 5.2.2 T 5.2.2
Public Health Agency of Canada Emergency Preparedness and Response Chronic Disease and Injury Surveillance $844,603 $93,721 ER 5.3 PI 5.3 T 5.3 March 31, 2020
Total spending, all themes
Theme Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2021-22 (dollars) 2019–20 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Funding does not include internal services and lead role.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Theme 1:  Prevention $157,141,003 $29,851,231
Theme 2:  Treatment $93,826,746 $18,405,040
Theme 3:  Harm reduction $80,692,017 $16,984,104
Theme 4:  Enforcement $273,746,695 $53,272,814
Theme 5:  Evidence base $19,365,379 $4,341,588
Total, all themesFootnote 1 $624,771,570 $122,854,777

Theme 1: Prevention

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 1.1.1  Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to substance use.

ER 1.1.2  Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on substance use to change policies, programs, and practice.

ER 1.1.3  Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 1.2 The RCMP will increase awareness of drugs and illegal substances among stakeholders by developing education products, supporting outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 1.1.1    Percentage of stakeholders and Canadians reporting that they gained knowledge.

PI 1.1.2    Percentage of targeted stakeholders reporting that they made evidence informed improvements to substance use policies, programs and practice.

PI 1.1.3 Percentage of pharmacies inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

PI 1.2.1    Number and nature of awareness products.

PI 1.2.2 Number and category (targeted audiences) of stakeholders reached.

PI 1.2.3 Percentage of partners and stakeholders who demonstrate an increase in awareness of illegal drugs.

PI 1.2.4 Number and nature of partnerships and collaborations.

PI 1.2.5 Number of new engagement opportunities identified.

Targets

Health Canada

T 1.1 TBD - Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019.

T 1.2 TBD - Target will be established by September 2019 following the establishment of an aggregated baseline by June 2019.

T 1.1.3 80%Footnote 10

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

T 1.2.1 5 drug related awareness products.

T 1.2.2 Approximately 500 stakeholders will be reached (stakeholders include Police, Public/Youth, and Industry/Other stakeholders).

T 1.2.3 50% of partners and stakeholders agree that Federal Policing contributed to an increased awareness/understanding of illegal drugs.

T 1.2.4 At least 5 partnerships/collaborations.

T 1.2.5 5

Theme 2:  Treatment

Expected results

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 2.1 CIHR, through the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM), will continue to fund research to enhance prevention, harm reduction and/or treatment for people living with problematic substance use; increase research capacity in the field of problematic drug and substance use disorder; build and strengthen relationships with health care practitioners, policy makers and people with lived experience; and complete a pan-Canadian clinical trial, OPTIMA, that compares two models of care for the treatment of opioid use.

Department of Justice Canada

ER 2.2.1  The criminal justice system supports alternative ways of responding to the causes and consequences of offending.

ER 2.2.2   Increased availability of, and access to, drug treatment services and programs for youth involved in the justice system.

Performance indicators

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

PI 2.1   Proportion of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals.

Department of Justice Canada

PI 2.2.1 Percentage of Drug Treatment Court participants retained for 6 months or longer in the court-monitored treatment program.

PI 2.2.2 Number of active projects funded under Youth Justice Fund’s Drug Treatment component per fiscal year.

Targets

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

T 2.1    100%

Department of Justice Canada

T 2.2.1 50%

T 2.2.2 The budget allocation is fully committed to support drug treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system.

Theme 3:  Harm reduction

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 3.1.1 Increased availability of harm reduction services.

ER 3.1.2 Increased availability of harm reduction services.

Indigenous Services Canada

ER 3.2 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users.

Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 3.3  Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 3.1.1 Percentage of applications for an exemption to operate a Supervised Consumption Site that received a decision within the service standard from the time the review is complete.

PI 3.1.2 Percentage of targeted Canadians reporting they used knowledge and skills.

Indigenous Services Canada

PI 3.2   Number of First Nations and Inuit communities that deliver harm reduction programming.

Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 3.3   Percentage decrease of sharing drug use equipment among people who use drugs.

Targets

Health Canada

T 3.1.1 90%

T 3.1.2 60%

Indigenous Services Canada

T 3.2 11

Public Health Agency of Canada

T 3.3 10% decrease

Theme 4:  Enforcement

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 4.1.1  Authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances and precursor chemicals are processed in a timely manner.

ER 4.1.2  Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

ER 4.1.3  Increased effectiveness in drug analysis.

ER 4.1.4  Data and research evidence on drugs and emerging drug trends are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners.

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 4.2.1  Continue to increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence of illegal drug issues relative to the border.

ER 4.2.2  Continue to increase intelligence and analytical support to regional enforcement activities to interdict goods entering and leaving Canada under the CDSS.

ER 4.2.3  Continue to improve relationships and communication with partner agencies under the CDSS to identify opportunities and improve intelligence activities such as targeting, information sharing and laboratory analysis related to illegal drugs and other goods (such as precursor chemicals) identified under the CDSS as they relate to the border.

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 4.3  30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Services Canada

ER 4.4  Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II).

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.

ER 4.5  Given the importance of the CDSS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 4.6  To assist the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States-Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS-CICAD) to fulfill their respective mandates in the fight against drugs and transnational crime, including efforts to reduce the supply and availability of illegal drugs. In 2019-2020, GAC will increase capacity of port officials in selected countries in the Americas to intercept and seize illegal drug smuggled via legal maritime containerized cargo.

Parole Board of Canada

ER 4.7.1  Conditional release decisions contribute to keeping communities safe.

ER 4.7.2  The timely exchange of relevant information with victims, offenders, observers, other components of the criminal justice system, and the general public.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

ER 4.8.1  Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA in all provinces and territories regardless of which police agency investigates the alleged offences, except Quebec and New Brunswick. In these two provinces, the PPSC prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the RCMP.

ER 4.8.2   Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

Public Safety Canada

ER 4.9  Coordinated enforcement action to address illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 4.10   Assist law enforcement agencies and prosecutors by providing forensic accounting services and expertise. These services assist in determining whether the assets identified were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Crown to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives from the crime.

ER 4.11   The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on the highest threats related to organized crime networks including those involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs, including illegal opioids.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 4.1.1 Overall percentage of High-Volume Regulatory Authorizations for controlled substances processed within service standards.

PI 4.1.2 Percentage of licensed dealers inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations.

PI 4.1.3 Percentage of samples analyzed within service standards (60 days or negotiated date).

PI 4.1.4 Number of alerts issued to clients and to provincial and territorial health authorities on newly identified potent illegal drugs in communities.

Canada Border Services Agency

PI 4.2   Average dollar value of goods, shipments and conveyances seized attributed to Intelligence.

Canada Revenue Agency

PI 4.3   80% or more of audits resulting in (re) assessments

Correctional Services Canada

PI 4.4.1 Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II) supervised by CSC.

PI 4.4.2 Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II) with a residency requirement.

PI 4.4.3 Total number of case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) completed for all provincial offenders.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

PI 4.5   Total number of FINTRAC disclosures of actionable financial intelligence made to regime partners, and the number of unique disclosures of actionable financial intelligence that relate to at least one drug-related offence.

Global Affairs Canada

PI 4.6.1 Number of illegal drug seizures made by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.

PI 4.6.2 Volume of illegal drug seized by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.

Parole Board of Canada

PI 4.7.1 Number and proportion of provincial offenders convicted of drug offences who successfully complete parole.

PI 4.7.2    Percentage of individuals (i.e., general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

PI 4.8.1.1    Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year.

PI 4.8.1.2    Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel.

PI 4.8.2.1    Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

PI 4.8.2.2    Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel where mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.

Public Safety Canada

PI 4.9   Timely sharing of evidence-based knowledge and intelligence to support law enforcement actions against illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

PI 4.10.1     Number of active CDSS files (projects) related to determining whether the assets of a suspect were derived from criminal activities. This is further measured by classifying the stage or status of each investigation (for example; still in legal process, proceed to trial, settled before trial or closed by client).

PI 4.10.2     Number of Forensic Accounting Reports produced during the fiscal year.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

PI 4.11.1 Number and percentage of Federal Serious and Organized Crime (FSOC) investigations with a transnational nexus.

PI 4.11.2 Number and type of drug-related charges laid by FSOC units.

PI 4.11.3 Number and type of drug seizures made by FSOC units, including amount of drugs seized.

Targets

Health Canada

T 4.1.1 90%

T 4.1.2 TBD - The risk-based methodologies behind assigning compliance ratings are evolving. In 2018-19, assigning compliance ratings were piloted using historical information. Once the data from the pilot is analyzed, a new baseline will be established. An appropriate target for 2019-20 will be established by March 31, 2020.

T 4.1.3 95% of certificates of analysis issued within service standards or negotiated date.

T 4.1.4 Demand driven

Canada Border Services Agency

T 4.2 9:1 ratio

Canada Revenue Agency

T 4.3 30 audits of taxpayers involved in the production and distribution of illegal drugs resulting in (re) assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Services Canada

T 4.4.1 45 (approximately)

T 4.4.2 15 (approximately)

T 4.4.3 808

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

T 4.5 FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

Global Affairs Canada

T 4.6.1 Illegal drug seizures are made in all beneficiary countries benefiting from GAC-financed/UNODC trained port control units.

T 4.6.2 At least 20 tons

Parole Board of Canada

T 4.7.1 100% of provincial offenders serving sentences for drug offences who are on parole are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.

T 4.7.2 92%

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

T 4.8 Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC’s workload and mandate.

Public Safety Canada

T 4.9 100% completion of planned coordination activities based on an integrated law enforcement work plan.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

T 4.10  The targets are dependent on the projects they assign to FAMG and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts dedicated to work with law enforcement agencies and prosecution services on CDSS files.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

T 4.11  Targets are not applicable as these will vary by province/territory and is based on need.

Theme 5:  Evidence base

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 5.1  Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 5.2  Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 5.3  Increase availability of national data and research evidence related to drugs and substances to support decision making.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 5.1   Percentage of United Nations Annual Report Questionnaire completed with Canadian data.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

PI 5.2.1 Percentage of grant recipients producing policy-relevant knowledge products, such as research publications, policy briefs, guidelines for policies or practice, presentations to policy audiences, and media mentions.

PI 5.2.2 Number of health research publications related to problematic substance use.

Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 5.3   Percentage of provinces and territories reporting.

Targets

Health Canada

T 5.1 90%

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

T 5.2.1 75%

T 5.2.2 100%

Public Health Agency of Canada

T 5.3 100%

Chemicals Management Plan

General information

Lead departments
Health Canada
Environment and Climate Change Canada
Federal partner organization(s)
Public Health Agency of Canada
Start date of the horizontal initiative
2007-08
End date of the horizontal initiative
2020-21
Description of the horizontal initiative
Originally launched in 2006, the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) enables the Government of Canada to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada.

Jointly managed by Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, the CMP brings all existing federal chemical programs together under a single strategy. This integrated approach allows the Government of Canada to address various routes of exposure to chronic and acute hazardous substances. It also enables use of the most appropriate management tools among a full suite of federal laws, which include the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA), the Fisheries Act and the Forestry Act.

The third phase (CMP3) includes both substance groupings and single substance assessments. Similar to CMP2, groupings are created where possible to gain efficiencies in the assessment process. Where groupings are not possible, single substance assessments are conducted.

Integration across government programs remains critical since many remaining substances are found in consumer, cosmetic, health, drug and other products. In addition to releases from products, substances may be released at various points along other areas of their life cycle, such as during the manufacturing and disposal.

The same core functions that have been part of phases one and two continue in phase three of the CMP:  risk assessment; risk management; compliance promotion and enforcement; research; monitoring and surveillance; stakeholder engagement and risk communications; and, policy and program management. Information gathering is a key activity undertaken to support these core functions.

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal.
Governance structures
In the overall delivery of the CMP, Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada have a shared responsibility in attaining objectives and results. In meeting their obligations pursuant to the CMP, the Departments fulfill their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures, as well as a joint CMP governance structure to address shared responsibilities. Efforts are also made to harmonize vertical and horizontal performance reporting indicators (e.g., CMP Performance Management Strategy, the CMP contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, etc.) for CMP.

The CMP has a horizontal governance framework which ensures integration, co-ordination, joint decision making and clear accountabilities. Under the CMP Integrated Horizontal Governance Framework, the joint CMP Assistant Deputy Ministers Committee (CMP ADM Committee) reports to both the Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada Deputy Ministers.

The CMP ADM Committee is supported by a Director General (DG) Committee. The CMP DGs Committee consists of DGs from all partner programs within Health Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, and provides strategic direction, oversight and a challenge function for the CMP's overall implementation. The CMP DGs also play a lead role in directing, monitoring and providing a challenge function for the core elements of the CMP, namely the delivery of the chemicals agenda under CEPA. This DG level committee is supported by the CMP Steering Committee, which is a Director level committee intended to provide oversight on CMP issues related to the CEPA chemicals agenda.
Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)
$1,308,179,400
Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)
$1,012,207,530
Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)
$969,153,090 (includes Phases I, II and Phase III)
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative
October 2014
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)
Phase three, $493,286,450; Source of funding: Budget 2015
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)
Not applicable
Total planned spending since the last renewal
$197,314,580
Total actual spending since the last renewal
$193,067,942
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2019-20
Planning highlights
In 2019-20, the program will continue to assess and manage the potential health and ecological risks from the remaining priority existing substances from CMP1 and CMP2 and continue science based assessments and risk management activities, as needed, on the potential health and ecological risks associated with approximately 1,550 existing substances included in CMP3.

A key activity undertaken to support the core functions of the CMP is information gathering. This involves a range of voluntary and mandatory activities, ensuring the engagement of stakeholders. Having up-to-date information and understanding trends in the Canadian marketplace are necessary to inform risk assessment and risk management activities and support sound decision making by the Government.

Draft Screening Assessment Reports covering approximately six petroleum stream sector substances and approximately 365 other substances are planned to be published in 2019-20, as are Final Screening Assessments Reports for approximately 87 petroleum stream sector substances and approximately 118 other substances.

Proposed and Final Risk Management Instruments will be developed and published in Part I or Part II of the Canada Gazette, as required. The program will also continue to use the new substances program to identify and manage, as appropriate, the human health and environmental risks of new substances before import to, or manufacture in, Canada.

In 2019-20, the program will continue to conduct risk assessments and develop and implement risk management measures to address identified risks posed by harmful chemicals in foods and food packaging materials, consumer products, cosmetics and drinking water. Work will also continue on substances/products regulated under the F&DA and on the re-evaluation of the remaining older chemicals (registered prior to 1995) and the cyclical re-evaluation of pesticides registered after 1995.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) will continue to work with passenger conveyance industry stakeholders in order to identify and address potential risks to travellers.

The program will conduct targeted monitoring and surveillance activities to address existing and emerging chemicals of concern, and to inform risk assessment needs and risk management activities. Research will continue in order to address outstanding questions and knowledge gaps related to the effects and exposure of chemical substances to humans and the environment to inform risk management, risk assessment and international activities.

The program will develop implementation strategies and will continue to deliver activities to raise regulatees' awareness and understanding of, and promote their compliance with, regulatory requirements for certain assessed CMP substances.

The program will continue to increase proactive communications to the public to raise awareness of the risks and safe use of substances, including greater use of partnerships to expand the reach of messaging, with a focus on vulnerable populations. Efforts to advance the sound management of chemicals through participation in a range of international activities that support domestic efforts will continue in 2019-20 as well.

Contact information

Health Canada
Suzanne Leppinen
Director, Chemicals and Environmental Health Management Bureau
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
Suzanne.Leppinen@canada.ca
613-941-8071

Environmental and Climate Change Canada
Nicole Davidson
Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement
Science and Technology Branch
Nicole.Davidson@canada.ca
819-938-5055
Planning information
Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019-20 Planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Chemicals Management Plan 493,286,450 98,657,290 Reduced threats to health and the environment from harmful substances. Long-term risk of a selected group of harmful substances where risk management actions have been put in place. Downward trend - This is a long term outcome with no specific targets. March 31, 2028
Risk management measures reduce the potential for exposure to harmful substances. Exposure or release levels of a select group of harmful substances where risk management measures have been put in place. (Substance-based Performance Measurement). Downward trend - This is a long term outcome with no specific targets. March 31, 2022
Canadians use the information (that meets their needs on the risks and safe use of substances of concern) to avoid or minimize risks posed by substances of concern. (i) Percentage of Canadians taking appropriate actions to address risks (targeted stakeholders/intermediaries). (i) 80% (i) March 31, 2022
(ii) Percentage of Canadians taking appropriate actions to address risks (general public). (ii) TBD (ii) TBD
(Public Opinion Research administered every 3-5 years)
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Health Impacts of Chemicals Health Products:
Risk Assessment
6,136,645 1,227,329 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2020
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Risk Assessment
6,186,965 1,237,393   PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 31, 2020
Env. Risks to Health:
Risk Assessment
51,766,940 10,353,388   PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2020
PI 1.1.4 T 1.1.4 March 31, 2020
Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials:
Risk Assessment
12,098,165 2,419,633   PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2020
Health Products:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
4,251,945 850,390 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
5,901,575 1,180,315        
Env. Risks to Health:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
35,431,185 7,086,237 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020
ER 1.3 PI 1.3 T 1.3 March 31, 2020
Consumer Product and Workplace Hazardous Materials:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
12,748,975 2,549,795 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2020
Health Products:
Research
- - N/A N/A N/A N/A
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Research
3,476,195 695,239 ER 1.4 PI 1.4 T 1.4 March 31, 2020
Env. Risks to Health:
Research
49,822,575 9,964,515        
Health Products:
Monitoring and Surveillance
- - N/A N/A N/A N/A
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Monitoring and Surveillance
4,757,430 951,486 ER 1.5 PI 1.5 T 1.5 March 31, 2020
Env. Risks to Health:
Monitoring and Surveillance
49,298,520 9,859,704        
Food Safety and Nutrition:
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications
848,425 169,685 ER 1.6 PI 1.6 T 1.6 March 31, 2020
Env. Risks to Health:
Stakeholder Engagement and Risk Communications
14,076,085 2,815,217        
Env. Risks to Health:
Policy and Program Management
11,041,590 2,208,318 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Pesticides Pesticides:
Risk Assessment
22,817,180 4,563,436 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.5 T 1.1.5 March 31, 2020
Pesticides:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
4,232,080 846,416 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.2 T 1.2.2 March 31, 2020
Pesticides:
Research
- - N/A N/A N/A N/A
Internal Services – Health Canada 34,979,720 6,995,943 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Public Health Agency of Canada Border Health Security Border Health:
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
15,914,255 3,182,851 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 31, 2020
Environment and Climate Change Canada Substances and Waste Management Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Assessment
19,367,335 3,873,467 ER 3.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 31, 2020
PI 3.1.2 T 3.1.2
Substances and Waste Management:
Risk Management
67,624,765 13,524,953 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 31, 2020
Substances and Waste Management:
Research
9,420,790 1,884,158 E.R 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 31, 2020
Substances and Waste Management:
Monitoring and Surveillance
24,399,675 4,879,935 ER 3.4 PI 3.4 T 3.4 March 31, 2020
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution:
Compliance Promotion
4,272,045 854,409 ER 3.5 PI 3.5 T 3.5 March 31, 2020
Compliance Promotion and Enforcement – Pollution:
Enforcement
11,075,675 2,215,135 ER 3.6 PI 3.6 T 3.6 March 31, 2020
Internal Services – ECCC 11,339,715 2,267,943        
Total for all federal organizations 493,286,450 98,657,290        

Expected Results:

Health Canada:

  • ER 1.1 Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • ER 1.2 Risk management measures under CEPA, PCPA, CCPSA and F&DA.
  • ER 1.3 Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality are available to be used by provinces / territories.
  • ER 1.4 Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans.
  • ER 1.5 Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food and consumer products.
  • ER 1.6 Engagement, consultation and communication products to inform the public and stakeholders.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • ER 2.1 Mitigation of human health risks associated with contamination of water, food and sanitation on board passenger conveyances.

Environment and Climate Change Canada

  • ER 3.1 Information on risks of substances to inform risk management, monitoring and surveillance and research activities.
  • ER 3.2 Risk management measures under CEPA and/or Fisheries Act.
  • ER 3.3 Science-based information on the risks posed by substances, in accordance with annual research plans.
  • ER 3.4 Data generated on the use, release, exposure and presence of substances of concern in humans, the environment, food, consumer products and waste.
  • ER 3.5 Information on obligations to conform or comply with risk management control measures.
  • ER 3.6 Inspections, investigations and enforcement actions.

Performance Indicators:

Health Canada

  • PI 1.1.1 Timely response to chemical-related risks to health.
  • PI 1.1.2 Percentage of food ingredients, food additives, food contaminants and food packaging material chemicals re-evaluated for which Chemicals Management Plan assessments and new scientific knowledge identify potential risk.  
  • PI 1.1.3 Percentage of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (Existing Substances).
  • PI 1.1.4 Percentage of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (New Substances).
  • PI 1.1.5 Percentage of the annual target of proposed re-evaluations decisions (PRVDs) as set out in the published re-evaluation and special review work plan.
  • PI 1.2.1 Percentage of actions taken in a timely manner to protect the health of Canadians from substances found to be a risk to human health.
  • PI 1.2.2 Percentage of the annual target for re-evaluations decisions (final RVDs) met as set out in the published re-evaluation and special review work plan.
  • PI 1.3 Percentage of planned final water quality guidelines / guidance documents published in Canada Gazette, Part I and online.
  • PI 1.4 Percentage of CMP research projects conducted that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the health impacts of chemicals.
  • PI 1.5 Percentage of monitoring and surveillance projects funded by CMP that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the health impacts of chemicals.
  • PI 1.6 Percentage of knowledge transfer activities completed as planned related to substances of concern.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • PI 2.1 Percentage of inspected passenger transportation operators that meet public health requirements.

Environment and Climate Change Canada

  • PI 3.1.1 Percentage of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (Existing Substances).
  • PI 3.1.2 Percentage of substances assessed within prescribed timelines (New Substances).
  • PI 3.2 Percentage of risk management controls of substances assessed as posing a risk to the environment under CEPA are implemented within 42 months of being deemed harmful to the environment.
  • PI 3.3 Percentage of CMP research projects conducted that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the environmental impacts of chemicals.
  • PI 3.4 Percentage of monitoring and surveillance projects funded by CMP that support priorities for risk assessment, risk management, research, monitoring and surveillance, and international activities related to the environmental impacts of chemicals.
  • PI 3.5 The number of targeted regulatees under the Chemicals Management Plan contacted by the Compliance Promotion Program.
  • PI 3.6 Percentage of non- compliance addressed by an enforcement action.

Targets:

Health Canada

  • T 1.1.1  100%
  • T 1.1.2  100%
  • T 1.1.3  100%
  • T 1.1.4  100%
  • T 1.1.5  80%
  • T 1.2.1  100%
  • T 1.2.2  80%
  • T 1.3  100%
  • T 1.4  100%
  • T 1.5  100%
  • T 1.6  100%

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • T 2.1  95%

Environment and Climate Change Canada

  • T 3.1.1  100%
  • T 3.1.2  100%
  • T 3.2  100%
  • T 3.3  100%
  • T 3.4  100%
  • T 3.5  All regulatees identified in the Compliance Promotion Program database subject to priority instruments.
  • T 3.6  85%

New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative
Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis
Lead department
Health Canada
Federal partner organization(s)
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)
Public Safety Canada (PS)
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Note: Other government departments (e.g., the Department of Justice) are supporting the new federal cannabis framework. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received targeted funding to support this initiative, "Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis".

Start date of the horizontal initiative
April 1, 2017
End date of the horizontal initiative
March 31, 2022
Description of the horizontal initiative
The objective of this horizontal initiative is to implement and administer a new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. The Cannabis Act received Royal Assent on June 21, 2018, and came into force on October 17, 2018. The initiative is designed to follow through on the Government's key objectives of protecting public health, safety, and security. More specifically, the initiative aims to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework.

Federal partner organizations implement ongoing delivery of the regulatory framework including licensing; compliance and enforcement; surveillance; research; national public education and awareness activities; and framework support.

The initiative also supports law enforcement capacity to collect and assess intelligence on the evolution of organized crime involvement in the illicit cannabis market and other related criminal markets.

Activities are organized by five high-level themes:

  1. Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework;
  2. Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms;
  3. Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety;
  4. Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities; and
  5. Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travelers and goods.
Governance structures
The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing and administering the new federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. At the federal level, this governance structure includes: regular engagement among Deputy Ministers of Health, Justice and Public Safety to provide strategic direction and oversight on implementation activities; an Assistant Deputy Minister's Committee that serves as a forum for government-wide coordination of policy and implementation activities; a Directors-General Committee that is responsible for coordinating policy, regulatory development, and implementation activities across federal departments and agencies; an Interdepartmental Communications Working Group to lead cannabis communications, public awareness and education efforts; and a Federal Partners Cannabis Data Working Group to promote horizontal collaboration and support evidence-based policy and program development.

Health Canada’s Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch assumes a central coordinating role in tracking key project milestones and in reporting to federal Ministers.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. In May 2016, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) Senior Officials Working Group on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation was struck, to enable F/P/T governments to exchange information on important issues about the legalization and regulation of cannabis throughout the consultation, design and implementation of the legislation, regulations, and non-regulatory activities. Supporting F/P/T working groups and committees have also been established to facilitate ongoing engagement in key priority areas, including public education and awareness, data development and information sharing, national inventory tracking, ticketing and drug-impaired driving. In addition, existing F/P/T bodies are also considering the implications of cannabis legalization, including F/P/T Deputy Ministers Responsible for Justice, Public Safety and Finance, and F/P/T Ministers Responsible for Labour.
Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)
$546,807,456
Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)
$61,398,179
Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)
$51,450,043
Date of last renewal of the horizontal initiative
Not applicable
Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)
Not applicable
Additional federal funding received after the last renewal (dollars)
Not applicable
Total planned spending since the last renewal
Not applicable
Total actual spending since the last renewal
Not applicable
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
2023-24
Planning highlights
With the Cannabis Act and Cannabis Regulations now in effect, federal, provincial and territorial governments share responsibility for overseeing the implementation of the regulation of cannabis in Canada. For 2019-20, the federal government will continue to oversee the regulations for producers who grow and process cannabis as well as standards for products, packaging and labelling, and the prohibitions on promotion, that are designed to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians across the country. Provinces and territories are responsible for determining how cannabis is distributed and sold in their jurisdictions. The Government of Canada has also committed to developing regulations to support production and the sale of edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals within one year following the coming into force of the Cannabis Act.

More specifically, participating federal departments and agencies have identified the following key priorities for 2019-20.

Health Canada

In 2019-20, Health Canada will:

  • Continue public education and awareness activities, targeting youth and young adults in particular, to provide Canadians with the information they need to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms associated with cannabis use;
  • Continue to work with Indigenous governments, organizations and communities to support public education about cannabis use and to facilitate Indigenous participation in the legal cannabis industry;
  • Support public education initiatives that are community-based and targeted to specific segments of the population including health professionals, pregnant and breastfeeding women, and individuals predisposed to mental illness;
  • Continue to administer the licensing of cannabis and hemp producers, researchers and laboratories, and the national Cannabis Tracking System, which monitors the high-level movement of cannabis throughout the supply chain;
  • Continue to monitor and verify that federally licensed producers are compliant with legislative and regulatory requirements that aim to help ensure the quality-controlled production of cannabis and prevent the diversion of cannabis into, and out of, the legal market;
  • Maintain a distinct medical access framework to provide Canadians who have the authorization of their health care practitioner with legal and reasonable access to cannabis for medical purposes;
  • Identify and respond to non-compliant promotional, packaging and labelling activities;
  • Amend the Cannabis Regulations to enable the legal production and sale of edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals;
  • Implement a cost recovery regime for cannabis regulation; and,
  • Strengthen data collection and surveillance activities to evaluate the cannabis legal and regulatory framework and inform evidence-based decision making, policies and programs.

Canada Border Services Agency

In 2019-20, CBSA will continue to advance initiatives that support the identification and interception of high-risk people, goods and conveyances that pose a threat to the security of Canadians, including with respect to the illegitimate cross-border movement of cannabis. With the implementation of the Cannabis Act, the CBSA will continue to develop border-related compliance strategies to assist in preventing prohibited cannabis and cannabis-related products from crossing our borders.

The CBSA will continue to implement a cannabis monitoring and reporting framework in 2019-20 that will enable reporting on the Agency’s capacity to prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis, while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods.

Other planning highlights for 2019-20 include:

  • Enhance capacity to promote compliance and enforce import-related laws while providing travellers and the import/export community with access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner;
  • Develop policies and procedures related to the new cannabis Administrative Monetary Penalty regime; and,
  • Improve interdepartmental coordination and the Government of Canada’s enforcement response for criminal activity.

Public Health Agency of Canada

In 2019-20, PHAC will support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer by undertaking the following:

  • Work with partners and stakeholders to conduct knowledge synthesis and translation in priority areas to inform public education needs (e.g., cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals);
  • Leverage existing programs, networks, initiatives and collaborations to effectively reach priority populations (e.g., health care professionals, pregnant and breastfeeding women) with tailored public education messaging on cannabis; and,
  • Develop and promote messages and resources to help build resilience and prevent/reduce problematic cannabis and other substance use for youth with educators and public health professionals.

Public Safety Canada

In 2019-20, PS will continue to:

  • Work on the implementation of the new cannabis framework in 2019-20 and beyond;
  • Build law enforcement capacity to enforce the new cannabis legislation and efforts aimed at displacing organized crime. In particular, PS will undertake national engagement using a variety of fora to identify and address emerging issues aimed at keeping profits out of the hands of organized crime;
  • Support the development of the data framework needed to monitor trends and to evaluate the new cannabis legal and regulatory framework;
  • Address data gaps and strengthen data collection through collaboration with Statistics Canada and Health Canada, which includes continuing to:
    • develop new indicators and collect baseline data on organized crime; and
    • invest in innovative methodology and research to inform evidence-based decision making, policies and programs.

Research will also be undertaken to gauge Canadians’ awareness of the new laws and legal implications associated with cannabis use, and awareness products will be disseminated through work with provinces, territories, and established partners like the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

In 2019-20, Federal Policing will align activities with other RCMP cannabis resources both at National Headquarters and across the country to identify trends related to organized crime infiltration and money-making schemes in relation to both the legitimate and the illegal markets. Federal Policing will also work collaboratively to develop appropriate responses, including targeted awareness products, through ongoing interactions with stakeholders.

Through in-person engagement and the use of technology, the RCMP will continue to focus on increasing awareness and education of cannabis legalization, with an emphasis on possession, production, and distribution of cannabis for Indigenous and youth populations by undertaking the following select initiatives:

  • Develop evidence-based learning materials for youth audiences, including lesson plans, fact sheets, presentations, posters, brochures and online campaigns (such as Operation Think of Me) for use by RCMP School Resource Officers, Community Program Officers, school administrators and persons who work with youth on cannabis legalization and regulation;
  • Engage youth nationally by hosting Facebook LIVE interactive panel discussions with our National Youth Advisory Committee;
  • Deliver 'RCMPTalks' videoconferencing sessions, which connect Canadian youth for open and real-time conversations, and allow the RCMP to learn directly from youth on the impacts of cannabis, trends related to attaining and using cannabis, and provide the RCMP with an opportunity to work with youth to be leaders in the prevention of use.

The RCMP will play a key coordinating role in partnership engagement, and in the development and sharing of national awareness and education products to ensure consistency and support for stakeholder outreach.

In 2019-20, the RCMP will:

  • Design and develop online training to support the upcoming regulations related to new classes of cannabis (i.e., cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals) and the recent changes to the Excise Act 2001 following the introduction of the Cannabis Act;
  • Re-design the Federal Policing Advanced Excise Course to reflect the new legislation;
  • Review and amend existing Federal Policing operational training courses in all of the respective program areas to reflect the new legislation; and,
  • Co-ordinate and deliver National Cannabis Awareness Sessions through Federal Policing Training Services for Federal Policing employees.

The RCMP will continue to work with partners on various cannabis policy related initiatives, such as the approach to law enforcement in Indigenous communities, online illegal dispensaries, and regulations related to cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals. Furthermore, in 2019-20, the RCMP will leverage existing forums such as the Canadian Association Chiefs of Police to discuss and advance current or emerging policy initiatives.

The RCMP will continue to develop criminal intelligence products to identify, target, and disrupt criminal involvement in the Canadian cannabis market, and share intelligence with law enforcement agencies, domestic government partners, and international law enforcement partners.

In 2019-20, the RCMP will continue to:

  • Coordinate criminal intelligence across divisions and law enforcement/regulatory partners to effectively plan enforcement action against organized criminal activity in the Canadian cannabis market; and,
  • Work with divisional partners, provincial and federal law enforcement agencies, and regulatory partners to identify intelligence gaps and requirements for effective intelligence collection.

The RCMP will continue to support the Minister of Health’s decisions on security clearances required as part of the licensing regime for cannabis cultivators and processors, which includes identifying criminality or associations to criminal organizations and verifying this information with the law enforcement organizations of jurisdiction.

Contact information

Health Canada

John Clare
A/Director General
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
John.Clare@canada.ca
613-941-8371

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

Shared outcomes:

  • SO 1. Cannabis is kept out of the hands of Canadian children and youth
  • SO 2. Criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market is reduced
Name of theme Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods Internal Services
Note: Theme area 1 includes 2017-18 Supplementary Estimates C transfer from HC to RCMP in the amount of $342,227.
Theme outcome(s)
  • A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established [HC];
  • The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements [HC];
  • The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC]; and,
  • Law Enforcement Records Checks are conducted in support of Health Canada’s security clearance decisions [RCMP].
  • Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use [HC];
  • Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis [HC];
  • Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information [PHAC];
  • Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them [PHAC];
  • Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation [PS]; and,
  • Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions [PS].
  • Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation [PS];
  • Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues [PS];
  • Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented [PS];
  • Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement [PS];
  • RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities [RCMP]; and,
  • Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime [RCMP].
  • Information and intelligence products/advice related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime [RCMP];
  • Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP];
  • RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime [RCMP]; and,
  • RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP].
  • Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada [CBSA];
  • Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites [CBSA];
  • CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws [CBSA];
  • Prohibited cross border movement of cannabis is detected [CBSA];
  • Border-related regulations, accompanying policies and procedures, agreements, studies, and monitoring framework are developed and implemented [CBSA]; and,
  • Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner [CBSA].
Not applicable
Health Canada $370,052,202 $16,121,003 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $44,485,622
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $34,600,853 $5,095,567
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable $2,586,174 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $206,951
Public Safety Canada Not applicable $1,173,345 $3,810,640 Not applicable Not applicable $500,353
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $16,388,514 Not applicable $12,626,787 $18,304,524 Not applicable $20,854,921
Planning information
Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019-20
Planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target

Note: RCMP 2019-20 planned spending includes reprofiled funding from 2017-18.

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis $546,807,456

HC:
$89,396,257

RCMP: $15,285,429

CBSA:
$9,898,974

PS:
$1,094,784

PHAC:
$623,472

SO 1. Cannabis is kept out of the hands of Canadian children and youth [HC] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-17 and 18-24) who used cannabis in the last 12 months [HC] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
SO 2. Criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market is reduced [CBSA and RCMP] Qualitative assessment on trends related to criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market [RCMP] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Number of cannabis import interdictions at the border [CBSA] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target

Total federal theme area 1 funding includes 2017-18 Supplementary Estimates C transfer from HC to RCMP in the amount of $342,227.

Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative

HC:
$370,052,202

RCMP:
$16,388,514

HC:
$79,197,394

RCMP:
$4,430,842

A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established [HC] Number of licence applications (decisions) per year [HC] 1,050 March 31, 2020
Percentage of licence applications reviewed within internal service standards [HC] 75% March 31, 2020
The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements [HC] Percentage of federally licensed industry that indicates that they understand the regulatory requirements [HC] 80% March 31, 2020
The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC] Percentage of federally licensed industry that is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC] 95% March 31, 2022
Law Enforcement Records Checks (LERCs) are conducted in support of HC’s security clearance decisions [RCMP] Percentage of LERCs completed within negotiated service standards [RCMP] 75%Footnote 2 March 31, 2020
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Cannabis Program License federal producers and other legal market participants; provide client registration and other client services $216,075,849 $48,267,659 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1.1 T 1.1.1.1 March 31, 2020
PI 1.1.1.2 T 1.1.1.2 March 31, 2020
Compliance and enforcement: Design and promote compliance and enforcement; robust inspection program, involving pre- and post-licence inspections $153,976,353 $30,929,735 ER 1.1.2 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 31, 2020
ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2022
RCMP RCMP Departmental Security Build capacity to provide security screening reports (i.e., LERCs) to Health Canada to complete applications for the production of cannabis for non-medical purposes $16,388,514 $4,430,842 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 31, 2020
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms

HC:
$16,121,003

PHAC:
$2,586,174

PS:
$1,173,345

HC:
$905,366Footnote 3

PHAC:
$577,483

PS:
$214,669

Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use [HC] Percentage of youth (grades 7-12) who perceive that there is “no risk” in using cannabis [HC] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis [HC] Percentage of parents who discuss cannabis with their teens [HC] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information [PHAC] Number of health care and social service professionals and public health officials accessing high-quality public health information and data products developed [PHAC] TBD by March 31, 2019 March 31, 2020
Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them [PHAC] Percentage of Public Health Network members using information, knowledge and data products to make informed decisions [PHAC] 75% March 31, 2020
Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation [PS] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-24) who indicate that they are aware of the new legislation, and the consequences related to making certain decisions involving cannabis [PS] TBD in 2019-20Footnote 1 TBD in 2019-20
Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions [PS] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-24) who have indicated that they have made informed, lawful decisions around cannabis that protected themselves, and the safety of others [PS] TBD in 2019-20 TBD in 2019-20
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Cannabis Program Public education and outreach: Provide Canadians with information about health and safety risks associated cannabis use $16,121,003 $905,366 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 TBD in 2020
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 TBD in 2020
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Program Develop public health advice to support the role of Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) through knowledge translation and horizontal analysis $2,586,174 $577,483 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2020
ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2020
Public Safety Crime Prevention Public education and awareness $1,173,345 $214,669 ER 2.3.1 PI 2.3.1 T 2.3.1 TBD in 2019-20
ER 2.3.2 PI 2.3.2 T 2.3.2 TBD in 2019-20
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety

PS:
$3,810,640

RCMP:
$12,626,787

PS:
$779,053

RCMP:
$2,879,802

Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation [PS] Percentage of law enforcement knowledgeable about the changes to the new regime, and able to use the legislative framework as a result of the training materials [PS] 33% of frontline police officers access materials 75% of officers with access to materials find the materials helpful March 31, 2020
Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues [PS] Percentage of stakeholders who indicate that the materials informed decision making [PS] 75% March 31, 2020
Number of working meetings and consultations with stakeholders held [PS] 15 March 31, 2020
Number of new initiatives considered for implementation [PS] TBD in 2019-20 TBD in 2019-20
Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented [PS] Percentage of research projects related to performance measurement completed and disseminated [PS] 100% March 31, 2020
Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement [PS] Percentage of stakeholders indicating that policy development and decision making was based on performance measurement results and lessons learned [PS] 50% March 31, 2020
RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities [RCMP] Percentage of targeted federal partners and stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement “RCMP Federal Policing contributes to increased understanding specific to the new cannabis regime, organized crime, and the illicit cannabis market” [RCMP] TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19 TBD in 2019-20
Number of information inquiries responded to by the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention [RCMP] 150 March 31, 2020
Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of targeted partners/stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement “RCMP Federal Policing contributes to an increased skills/ability to respond to the new cannabis regime” [RCMP] 30% March 31, 2020
Percentage of youth resource officers who positively assessed the impact of training [RCMP] 80% March 31, 2020

Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Safety Serious and Organized Crime Training for law enforcement $3,810,640 $779,053 ER 3.1.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 March 31, 2020
ER 3.1.2 PI 3.1.2.1 T 3.1.2.1 March 31, 2020
PI 3.1.2.2 T 3.1.2.2 By March 31, 2020
PI 3.1.2.3 T 3.1.2.3 TBD in 2019-20
Develop policies to inform operational law enforcement efforts See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime ER 3.1.3 PI 3.1.3 T 3.1.3 March 31, 2020
ER 3.1.4 PI 3.1.4 T3.1.4 March 31, 2020
RCMP Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.5 Public Engagement

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.3.5 Operational Readiness and Response
Enhance RCMP’s capacity to develop and deliver prevention and outreach activities on the new cannabis regime from a law enforcement perspective. $4,919,245 $1,096,594 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 TBD in 2019-20
PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2020
$7,707,542 $1,783,208 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2.1 T 3.2.2.1 March 31, 2020
PI 3.2.2.2 T 3.2.2.2 March 31, 2020
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities RCMP:
$18,304,524
RCMP:
$4,202,416
Information and intelligence products related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime [RCMP] Percentage or number of RCMP information / intelligence products / advice that indicate organized crime groups’ activities in the Canadian cannabis market shared with RCMP senior management, divisions, domestic partners (including Canadian law enforcement) or international partners [RCMP] TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19
Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP] Number of organized crime groups involved in the illicit cannabis market for which there are intelligence gaps is reduced which will result in efficient and accurate targeting by the law enforcement community [RCMP] TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19
Number or percentage of information and intelligence products that are used to guide enforcement against organized crime groups in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP] TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19
RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of target audience who have received the appropriate cannabis related training [RCMP]

Federal Policing (FP) training: 100%

Learning and Development: 80%

FP training:
March 31, 2020

Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020

RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of training participants who reported an increased level of knowledge and ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP]

FP training: 90%

Learning and Development: 100%

FP training:
March 31, 2020

Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020

Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
RCMP

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.3 Criminal Intelligence

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2 Federal Policing Project-Based Investigations

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.1 Federal Policing General Investigations

Sub-sub-program 1.2.1.5 Criminal Intelligence Service Canada

Enhance RCMP’s ability to collect, assess and disseminate information and intelligence related to the evolution of organized crime’s involvement in the illicit substances market

$3,929,767

$8,543,907

$4,301,250

$1,529,600

$941,885

$1,957,861

$996,750

$305,920

ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19
ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2.1 T 4.1.2.1 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19
PI 4.1.2.2 T 4.1.2.2 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19

Sub-Program 4.1.4 Human Resources Management Services

Sub-Program 4.1.7 Information Technology Services

Ensure that the RCMP is able to develop and deliver extensive training to its officers across Canada to support national implementation and ensure appropriate and standardized criminal enforcement of the new regime N/A N/A ER 4.1.3 PI 4.1.3 T 4.1.3

FP training:
March 31, 2020

Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020

ER 4.1.4 PI 4.1.4 T 4.1.4

FP training:
March 31, 2020

Learning and Development:
October 31, 2020

Theme 5 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Federal theme planned  spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods CBSA:
$34,600,853
CBSA:
$8,644,689
Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada [CBSA] Percentage of ports of entry with displayed signage on cannabis [CBSA] 75% of major ports and 100% of other priority ports March 31, 2020
CBSA awareness tools are in place to inform travelling public on prohibition of cross-border movement of cannabis [CBSA] 100% of the digital strategy launched March 31, 2020
Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites [CBSA] Percentage of relevant primary inspection kiosks, systems, training materials, operational guidelines and forms in all modes updated [CBSA] 100% March 31, 2020
CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws [CBSA] Number of cannabis import interdictions at ports of entry [CBSA] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Prohibited cross border movement of cannabis detected Percentage of referred cannabis samples analyzed within 30 days 90% March 31, 2020
Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner [CBSA] Number of cannabis seizures appealed [CBSA] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Number of Trusted Travelers appeals due to cannabis-related enforcement action [CBSA] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Number of Trade related appeals due to classification disputes of cannabis [CBSA] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Percentage of appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 calendar days [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2020
Percentage of Enforcement and Trusted Traveller appeals received that are decided within 180 calendar days [CBSA] 80% March 31, 2020
Percentage of Trade related appeals – Tariff Classification – that are decided within 365 calendars days (for cases never held in abeyance) [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2020
Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which the CBSA contact the complainant within 14 calendar days after a written complaint is received [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2020
Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which the CBSA provides a final written response to the complainant within 40 calendar days after a written complaint is received [CBSA] 90% March 31, 2020
Number/Percentage of appeal decisions further appealed at the Courts or Tribunals and defended by Recourse [CBSA] TBD in 2020 TBD in 2020
Theme 5 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department’s Program Inventory Horizontal initiative  activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20  Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2019–20 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
CBSA Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program Traveller awareness $1,008,014 N/A ER 5.1.1 PI 5.1.1.1 T 5.1.1.1 By March 31, 2020
PI 5.1.1.2 T 5.1.1.2 March 31, 2020
Port of entry processing $20,952,092 $5,967,239 ER 5.1.2 PI 5.1.2 T 5.1.2 March 31, 2020
Regulatory compliance and enforcement $4,074,333 $959,435 ER 5.1.3 PI 5.1.3 T 5.1.3 TBD in 2020
ER 5.1.4 PI 5.1.4 T 5.1.4 March 31, 2020
Laboratory Services $1,011,397 $204,979 ER 5.1.4 PI 5.1.4 T 5.1.4 March 31, 2020
Policy, Monitoring and Reporting $4,766,720 $1,011,058 Completed in 2018-19 Completed in 2018-19 Completed in 2018-19 Completed in 2018-19
Recourse Regulatory compliance and enforcement $2,788,297 $501,978 ER 5.1.5 PI 5.1.5.1 T 5.1.5.1 TBD in 2020
PI 5.1.5.2 T 5.1.5.2 TBD in 2020
PI 5.1.5.3 T 5.1.5.3 TBD in 2020
PI 5.1.5.4 T 5.1.5.4 March 31, 2020
PI 5.1.5.5 T 5.1.5.5 March 31, 2020
PI 5.1.5.6 T 5.1.5.6 March 31, 2020
PI 5.1.5.7 T 5.1.5.7 March 31, 2020
PI 5.1.5.8 T 5.1.5.8 March 31, 2020
Total spending, all themesFootnote *
  Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal
(dollars)
2019–20 Total federal planned spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 $386,440,716 $83,628,236
Theme 2 $19,880,522 $1,697,518
Theme 3 $16,437,427 $3,658,855
Theme 4 $18,304,524 $4,202,416
Theme 5 $34,600,853 $8,644,689
Total, all themes $475,664,042 $101,831,714
Footnote *

Total spending, all themes table does not include Internal Services

Return to footnote * referrer

Theme 1:  Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 1.1.1  A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established.
  • ER 1.1.2  The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements.
  • ER 1.1.3  The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • ER 1.2 Law Enforcement Records Checks (LERCs) are conducted in support of HC’s security clearance decisions.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 1.1.1.1 Number of licence applications decisions per year.
  • PI 1.1.1.2 Percentage of licensed applications reviewed within internal service standards.
  • PI 1.1.2 Percentage of federally licensed industry that indicates that they understand the regulatory requirements.
  • PI 1.1.3 Percentage of federally licensed industry that is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • PI 1.2  Percentage of LERCs completed within negotiated service standards.

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 1.1.1.1  1,050
  • T 1.1.1.2  75%
  • T 1.1.2  80%
  • T 1.1.3  95%

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • T 1.2 75%

Theme 2:  Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms

Expected results

Health Canada

  • ER 2.1.1  Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use.
  • ER 2.1.2  Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • ER 2.2.1 Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information.
  • ER 2.2.2  Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them.

Public Safety Canada

  • ER 2.3.1 Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation.
  • ER 2.3.2  Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

  • PI 2.1.1 Percentage of youth (grades 7-12) who perceive that there is “no risk” in using cannabis.
  • PI 2.1.2 Percentage of parents who discuss cannabis with their teens.

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • PI 2.2.1 Number of health care and social service professionals and public health officials accessing high-quality public health information and data products developed.
  • PI 2.2.2 Percentage of Public Health Network members using information, knowledge and data products to make informed decisions.

Public Safety Canada

  • PI 2.3.1 Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-24) who indicate that they are aware of the new legislation, and the consequences related to making certain decisions involving cannabis.
  • PI 2.3.2 Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-24) who have indicated that they have made informed, lawful decisions around cannabis that protected themselves, and the safety of others.

Targets

Health Canada

  • T 2.1.1 TBD in 2020
  • T 2.1.2 TBD in 2020

Public Health Agency of Canada

  • T 2.2.1 TBD by March 31, 2019
  • T 2.2.2 75% (baseline TBD by March 31, 2019)

Public Safety Canada

  • T 2.3.1 TBD in 2019-20
  • T 2.3.2 TBD in 2019-20

Theme 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety

Expected results

Public Safety Canada

  • ER 3.1.1 Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation.
  • ER 3.1.2  Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues.
  • ER 3.1.3  Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented.
  • ER 3.1.4  Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • ER 3.2.1 RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities.
  • ER 3.2.2  Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime.

Performance indicators

Public Safety Canada
  • PI 3.1.1 Percentage of law enforcement knowledgeable about the changes to the new regime, and able to use the legislative framework as a result of the training materials.
  • PI 3.1.2.1 Percentage of stakeholders who indicate that the materials informed decision making.
  • PI 3.1.2.2 Number of working meetings and consultations with stakeholders held.
  • PI 3.1.2.3 Number of new initiatives considered for implementation.
  • PI 3.1.3 Percentage of research projects related to performance measurement completed and disseminated.
  • PI 3.1.4 Percentage of stakeholders indicating that policy development and decision making was based on performance measurement results and lessons learned.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • PI 3.2.1.1 Percentage of targeted federal partners and stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement “RCMP Federal Policing contributes to increased understanding specific to the new cannabis regime, organized crime, and the illicit cannabis market”.
  • PI 3.2.1.2 Number of information inquiries responded to by the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention.
  • PI 3.2.2.1 Percentage of targeted partners/stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement “RCMP Federal Policing contributes to an increased skills/ability to respond to the new cannabis regime”.
  • PI 3.2.2.2 Percentage of youth resource officers who positively assessed the impact of training.

Targets

Public Safety Canada

  • T 3.1.1  33% of frontline police officers access materials
    75% of officers with access to materials find the materials helpful.
  • T 3.1.2.1  75%
  • T 3.1.2.2  15
  • T 3.1.2.3  TBD in 2019-20Footnote 2
  • T 3.1.3 100%
  • T 3.1.4 50%

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • T 3.2.1.1  TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19.
  • T 3.2.1.2 150
  • T 3.2.2.1  30%
  • T 3.2.2.2  80%

Theme 4:  Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities

Expected results

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • ER 4.1.1  Information and intelligence products/advice related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime.
  • ER 4.1.2  Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market.
  • ER 4.1.3  RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime.
  • ER 4.1.4  RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime.

Performance indicators

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • PI 4.1.1 Percentage or number of RCMP information / intelligence products / advice incorporating organized crime groups’ activities in the Canadian cannabis market shared with RCMP senior management, divisions, domestic partners (including Canadian law enforcement) or international partners.
  • PI 4.1.2.1 Number of organized crime groups involved in the illicit cannabis market for which there are intelligence gaps is reduced which will result in efficient and accurate targeting by the law enforcement community.
  • PI 4.1.2.2 Number or percentage of information and intelligence products that are used to guide enforcement against organized crime groups in the Canadian cannabis market.
  • PI 4.1.3 Percentage of target audience who have received the appropriate cannabis related training.
  • PI 4.1.4 Percentage of training participants who reported an increased level of knowledge and ability to enforce the new cannabis regime.

Targets

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

  • T 4.1.1 TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19.
  • T 4.1.2.1  TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19.
  • T 4.1.2.2  TBD based on baseline data generated in 2018-19.
  • T 4.1.3 FP training: 100%
    Learning and Development: 80%.
  • T 4.1.4 FP training: 90%
    Learning and Development: 100%.

Theme 5:  Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods

Expected results

Canada Border Services Agency

  • ER 5.1.1  Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada.
  • ER 5.1.2  Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites.
  • ER 5.1.3  CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws.
  • ER 5.1.4  Prohibited cross border movement of cannabis is detected.
  • ER 5.1.5  Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner.

Performance indicators

Canada Border Services Agency

  • PI 5.1.1.1 Percentage of ports of entry with displayed signage on cannabis.
  • PI 5.1.1.2 CBSA awareness tools are in place to inform travelling public on prohibition of cross-border movement of cannabis.
  • PI 5.1.2  Percentage of relevant primary inspection kiosks, systems, training materials, operational guidelines and forms in all modes updated.
  • PI 5.1.3 Number of cannabis import interdictions at ports of entry.
  • PI 5.1.4 Percentage of referred cannabis samples analyzed within 30 days.
  • PI 5.1.5.1 Number of cannabis seizures appealed.
  • PI 5.1.5.2 Number of Trusted Travelers appeals due to cannabis-related enforcement action.
  • PI 5.1.5.3 Number of Trade related appeals due to classification disputes of cannabis.
  • PI 5.1.5.4 Percentage of appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 calendar days.
  • PI 5.1.5.5 Percentage of Enforcement and Trusted Traveller appeals received that are decided within 180 calendar days.
  • PI 5.1.5.6 Percentage of Trade related appeals – Tariff Classification – that are decided within 365 calendars days (for cases never held in abeyance).
  • PI 5.1.5.7 Number/Percentage of appeal decisions further appealed at the Courts or Tribunals and defended by Recourse.
  • PI 5.1.5.8 Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which CBSA provides a final written response to the complainant within 40 calendar days after a written complaint is received.

Targets

Canada Border Services Agency

  • T 5.1.1.1 75% of major ports and 100% of other priority ports.
  • T 5.1.1.2 100% of the digital strategy launched.
  • T 5.1.2 100%
  • T 5.1.3 TBD in 2020
  • T 5.1.4 90%
  • T 5.1.5.1 TBD in 2020
  • T 5.1.5.2 TBD in 2020
  • T 5.1.5.3 TBD in 2020
  • T 5.1.5.4 85%
  • T 5.1.5.5 80%
  • T 5.1.5.6 85%
  • T 5.1.5.7 85%
  • T 5.1.5.8 90%

Gender-based analysis plus

Health Canada has continued to build on the Sex and Gender Action Plan (Action Plan) launched in 2017. The federal government’s prioritization of gender equality, diversity and inclusion with strengthened accountability mechanisms has enhanced our progress on the Action Plan’s goal of systematically integrating sex, gender and diversity into our decision making processes. It has provided levers to aid in the implementation of the Action Plan while at the same time significantly increasing the demand from across the department for Sex and Gender-Based Analysis (SGBA) advice and assistance. This is a result of new processes and requirements, such as the inclusion of SGBA into budget proposals, regulations, audits and evaluations, grants and contributions, the Department Results Framework, Performance Information Profiles as well as Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board Submissions.

The Action Plan is supported by governance structures such as:

  • a Coordinating Committee of Branch officials and researchers that help to implement sex and gender related initiatives and report on progress;
  • a performance measurement framework and indicators through which progress is monitored and reported;
  • a SGBA Responsibility Unit (4 FTEs) which provides advice, tools and templates, training and other support.

As well, sex and gender has been incorporated into other departmental governance bodies such as the Results and Delivery Group.

In keeping with the Department’s commitment to transparency, plans and progress reports on the Sex and Gender Action Plan are posted on the Departmental website.

Major initiatives expected to impact departmental decision-making:

  • Five sex and gender related policy-research collaborations established in 2018 will continue to increase departmental SGBA capacity in the areas of:
    • Cannabis risk perception and awareness;
    • Workplace wellness;
    • Consumer perceptions and behaviours in response to health product labelling;
    • Risk communications for health products;
    • Digital technology to support informal caregivers.

This will be done through training and the sharing of results which will contribute to the Department’s decision-making processes;

  • In 2018 a successful, inaugural Sex and Gender Symposium, titled ‘Bridging Science, Policy and Practice with Sex and Gender’, organized in collaboration with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, brought together experts from across Canada to discuss emerging issues and trends in sex, gender and health. The 2019 Sex and Gender Symposium will focus on the work of the policy-research collaborations.
  • Results of an SGBA Employee survey, conducted in December 2018, to assess employee awareness, knowledge and use of SGBA, will be used to strengthen the departmental sex and gender integration strategies.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI)

General information

Name of recipient
Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), formerly the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF)
Start date
1996-97
End date
Not applicable
Link to department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy
Description
When CHSRF was established as an independent organization, its priorities were to bring researchers and decision-makers together to identify gaps in applied health services research, fund the researchers who could investigate those gaps, and promote best practices of health services delivery and their outcomes. To reflect the evolution of its work, CHSRF was renamed the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) in 2012. CFHI aims to identify proven innovations and accelerate their spread across Canada by supporting healthcare organizations to adapt, implement and measure improvements in patient care, population health and value-for-money. 

Up-front multi-year funding to CFHI included:

  • 1996-97: A $66.5 million endowment established the CHSRF.

Additional federal grants were provided to CHSRF for the following purposes:

  • 1999: $25 million to support a ten-year program to develop capacity for research on nursing recruitment, retention, management, leadership and the issues emerging from health system restructuring (Nursing Research Fund).
  • 1999: $35 million to support its participation in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
  • 2003: $25 million to develop a program to equip health system managers and their organizations with the skills to find, assess, interpret and use research to better manage the Canadian health care system (Executive Training for Research Application or EXTRA).
Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)
Total Funding Approved Total Funding Received Planned Funding 2019-20 Planned Funding 2020-21 Planned Funding 2021-22

Note: CFHI is also reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

151,500,000 1996 – 66,500,000
1999 – 60,000,000
2003 – 25,000,000
N/A N/A N/A

Summary of annual plans of recipient:

CFHI facilitates ongoing interaction, collaboration, and exchange of ideas and information between governments, policy-makers, health system leaders and providers. It does so by converting evidence and innovative practices into actionable health care improvement policies, programs, tools and leadership development programs.

With the announcement of ongoing funding in Budget 2017, CFHI is now considering how to best use its remaining up-front multi-year funding that had previously been held in reserve for potential costs related to its organizational wind-down (e.g., legal obligations related to its pension plan and contracts) had it been needed. CFHI is awaiting the outcomes from the External Review of the Federally Funded Pan-Canadian Health Organizations before making final decisions on the use of its remaining up-front multi-year funding.

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

General information

Name of recipient
Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)
Start date
March 31, 2001(a)
(a) The original allocation (2001) was governed by a Memorandum of Understanding. Presently, Infoway is accountable for the provisions of three active funding agreements, signed in: March 2003 (encompasses 2001 and 2003 allocations), March 2004, and March 2010. 
End date
March 31, 2015(b)
(b) As per the 2010 funding agreement, the duration of the agreement is until the later of: the date upon which all Up-Front Multi-Year Funding provided has been expended; or March 31, 2015. Funds from the 2007 funding agreement (which was signed in March 2007) were expended in 2018-19.
Link to department's Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: Health Care Systems
Program 6: Digital Health
Description
Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1 billion to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding consisting of: $500 million in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority; $600 million in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100 million in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400 million in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait time reductions; and $500 million in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.
Up-Front Multi-Year Funding (in dollars)
Total Funding Approved Total Funding Received Planned Funding 2019-20 Planned Funding 2020-21 Planned Funding 2021-22

Note: Budget 2016 and 2017 contribution funding to Infoway is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Footnote 1

This amount only represents funds disbursed to Infoway since its creation in 2001 up to November 2018, including the immediate lump sum disbursements in 2001, 2003 and 2004 totaling $1.2 billion as well as funds disbursed through cash flow requests under the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements.

Return to footnote (c) referrer

Footnote 2

As per both the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements, funds are to be disbursed according to the annual cash flow requirements identified by Infoway. These requirements are to be submitted to Health Canada no later than March 30, in advance of the upcoming fiscal year to which that cash flow statement applies. Also, Infoway can submit additional cash flow requests within a fiscal year, should the need for additional funding arise.

Return to footnote (d) referrer

2,100,000,000 2,074,943,679Footnote (c) To be determinedFootnote (d) To be determinedFootnote (d) To be determinedFootnote (d)

Summary of annual plans of recipient

The following is a summary of plans related to all existing funding agreements.

Last year, Infoway launched its Driving Access to Care strategy and has made significant progress. In the 2019-20 Infoway is accelerating its efforts with ACCESS 2022, a movement to promote a future where all Canadians have access to their health information through the availability and use of digital health tools and services. Infoway will continue to build momentum by engaging with all health system stakeholders — clinicians, government bodies, technology and industry partners, and patients and caregivers.

Infoway will continue to unlock value through its Driving Access to Care strategy, which comprises two strategic initiatives: PrescribeIT™ and ACCESS Health. Infoway is focusing on these initiatives that are national in scope, difficult for any single jurisdiction to achieve alone, and are expected to have a positive impact for Canadians.  

PrescribeIT™ is Canada’s e-prescribing service that provides safe and effective medication management and patient convenience by enabling prescribers to electronically transmit a prescription to a patient’s pharmacy of choice. PrescribeIT™ has successfully launched in select communities in Ontario, Alberta and New Brunswick, and is now readying for larger scale roll-out. Infoway has secured agreements with nine jurisdictions and is positioned to reach the remaining jurisdictions over the next few years. 

Infoway will continue to work closely with Health Canada, the provinces and territories, and private sector health IT providers to enable prescribers and retail pharmacies to participate, regardless of the electronic medical record (EMR) system or pharmacy system they use. PrescribeIT™ ensures prescribing and dispensing environments are free from commercial influence and safeguards patient health information from commercial misuse.

Infoway’s ACCESS Health program is focused on providing more Canadians with access to their personal health information and to digitally-enabled health services. For Canadians, this means more informed decision-making, strong privacy and security protection, and access to information and health providers anytime, anywhere. For clinicians, this means models of care that encourage physician adoption and the use of patient-centric technologies which will lead to better patient outcomes, modernized and streamlined communication with clinical partners, and less duplication of effort. For the Government of Canada, this means greater value for Canadians and Canadian industry through the effective scaling of successful solutions. Infoway is also helping to close the circle of care for First Nations by improving the sharing of information for citizens and their care teams.

Infoway is working toward its ACCESS Health goals by launching:

  • ACCESS Gateway as a shared digital service that will enable products and services to more easily connect Canadians with their health data and electronic health services. Starting with a few provinces and initiatives designed to enhance e-mental health services, ACCESS Gateway will scale over the next few years into an important national resource to improve the interoperability of health information.
  • ACCESS Alliance as the program of choice for public and private sector participants seeking to collaborate and achieve meaningful change in the health sector by enabling access to digital health solutions for all Canadians.

Infoway has established the following performance expectations for 2019-20:

  • Lead the ACCESS 2022 movement to build awareness and action on digital health in Canada;
  • Continue to scale PrescribeIT™ in Alberta, New Brunswick and Ontario, including integrating with additional jurisdictional assets and point-of-service vendors as they are ready;
  • Launch PrescribeIT™ in two additional jurisdictions;
  • Expand PrescribeIT™ to additional prescribers and/or clinical settings (e.g., hospitals, dentists);
  • Advocate for and advance mandatory e-prescribing of narcotics through PrescribeIT™;
  • Build and support a limited production release of the ACCESS Gateway with e-services that support the national priorities, including mental health;
  • Accelerate deployment of e-services in multiple jurisdictions in priority areas: mental health and addiction; patient access to their personal health information; and other virtually delivered care solutions.
  • Actively engage industry to co-create solutions and address high priority technology and business barriers through the launch of the ACCESS Alliance program;
  • Support the scaling of access to personal health information in multiple jurisdictions; and
  • Collaborate with clinicians and patients in the development and delivery of Infoway’s strategic initiatives.

For additional information, please see Infoway's 2019-20 Summary Corporate Plan.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Additional federal activities to address the opioid crisis are reported through a separate horizontal initiative (Addressing the Opioid Crisis).

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Will be determined following stakeholder consultation.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Baseline: 21% in 2017

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Baseline: 61% in 2017

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Enhanced capability is reference to six additional dog teams and the introduction of the fentanyl scent (through training) to existing teams

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Baseline is 0 as these are new facilities not yet established and no officers have been trained.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Target may be adjusted in future years once DSEAs are fully operational

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

While cannabis is encompassed by the CDSS, federal activities, performance measures and funding amounts are reported on through a separate horizontal initiative (Implementing a Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis).

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

This target has been revised given the implementation of new risk-based methodologies behind assigning compliance ratings. As a result of the new approach, compliance rates are expected to decrease, and therefore the target has been revised accordingly.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

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