Supplementary Information Tables 2021-22 Departmental Plan: Health Canada

Table of Contents

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Canada Brain Research Fund Program

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

March 31, 2022

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 13: Brain Research

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Through Budgets 2011, 2016, and 2019, the Government of Canada committed up to $160 million, in matched funding with non-federal government donors, for the Canada Brain Research Fund Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience" and "to help the medical community better understand the brain and brain health." The Program provides funding for the Brain Canada Foundation (Brain Canada) which fundraises to match the federal contribution with donations from its private and charitable-sector donors and partners. The Government of Canada's objectives in funding the Canada Brain Research Fund are: 1) to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding; and, 2) to support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers.

Expected results

The Canada Brain Research Fund's support for brain research is expected to lead to discoveries that will inform the development of prevention, diagnostic, therapeutic, clinical, technological and health system solutions for brain diseases/disorders. Ultimately, these advances are expected to improve the health and quality of life of Canadians who are at risk of or affected by brain diseases/disorders. To contribute to this outcome, the Recipient, in partnership with various donors and private organizations, funds merit-based research awards across Canada, including for the purpose of developing the next generation of Canadian brain researchers.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2021-22

General targeted recipient groups

The sole target recipient is the national non-profit organization Brain Canada, which acts as a third-party organization that raises and disburses funds for brain research. Through the Canada Brain Research Fund, delivered by Brain Canada, the Program allocates grants to researchers across Canada targeting research institutes, hospitals and health charities.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Recipient is continuously engaged through regular monitoring activities such as reporting, performance measurement, meetings and ongoing communication in support of program design and delivery.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spendingFootnote *
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 24,676,683 20,000,000 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 24,676,683 20,000,000 0 0
Footnote *

Includes $4.7 million in funding which has been was carried over and is included in the 2020-21 forecast spending from the previous fiscal year.

Return to footnote * referrer

Contribution to the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

In late 2020, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute amalgamated their organizations. The Department's annual funding to each organization has been combined and is flowing to the new amalgamated organization. For detailed information, please refer to the "Contribution to improve health care quality and patient safety".

Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program

Start date

March 21, 2019

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 14: Thalidomide

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:

Expected results

Expected results are that thalidomide survivors will access care, treatment and/or support which in turn will contribute to their aging with dignity.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2020-21

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not Applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2024-25

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian not-for-profit and for-profit organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The recipient is engaged through regular meetings and ongoing communication. Confirmed thalidomide survivors are engaged by the recipient through monthly updates and annual surveys. This supports simple, pro-active, accessible program delivery to meet the changing needs of thalidomide survivors as they age. Health Canada engages key stakeholders on a routine and ad hoc basis to discuss issues arising and opportunities to improve program design and delivery.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 14,546,067 12,503,960 12,655,092 12,934,195
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,546,067 12,503,960 12,655,092 12,934,195

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 5: Digital Health

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada invested $2.1 billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records and other priorities in digital health. Budget 2016 allocated $50 million over two years to Infoway to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare, with the funds flowing as a Contribution Agreement. Budget 2017 allocated $300 million over five years to Infoway to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, support the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, help patients to access their own health records electronically, and better link electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions. In addition, Budget 2019 provided $36.5 million over five years with $5 million per year ongoing, for Infoway and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) to support the creation of a pan-Canadian data and performance reporting system for Organ Donation and Transplantation. These funds flow as a contribution agreement.

Infoway is currently undertaking its Driving Access to Care Strategy which is comprised of two programs: PrescribeIT and ACCESS Health. To date, 12 jurisdictions have formally agreed to participate in the PrescribeIT program (all except for British Columbia). Infoway has also secured partnerships with several distributers. Infoway also continues to develop its ACCESS Health program. It is currently reviewing the lessons learned from the Access Atlantic pilot project to determine how to best design and scale its Access Atlantic and Access Gateway. As a part of the ACCESS Health program, Infoway is developing a national trust framework to help protect the privacy and manage the consent of patients.

Expected results

The program's expected results include: provincial/territorial governments and stakeholders engaged in expanding digital health technologies; health care providers and patients access digital health technologies and digital health information; and health care providers and patients are equipped with the knowledge and skills to use digital health technologies and digital health information. Over time, this work is expected to lead to: health care providers using digital health technologies to provide more efficient and high quality health care; and patients using digital health technologies to manage and/or improve their health. The program will ultimately lead to a modern and sustainable health care system where Canadians have access to appropriate and effective health care.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Infoway is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with Infoway to establish activities to be carried out under the Contribution Agreement, and maintains regular contact with Infoway to monitor progress and compliance under the Contribution Agreement.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 127,000,000 85,554,000 10,880,000 7,020,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 127,000,000 85,554,000 10,880,000 7,020,000
Note: Canada Health Infoway is also reported under the "Up-Front Multi-Year Funding" section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 2: Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

Expected results

The purpose of the contribution agreement is to provide financial support for CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Through these activities, CADTH achieves results through: the creation and dissemination of evidence-based information that provide guidance and evidence-based information enabling health system partners to make informed decisions on the adoption and appropriate utilization of drugs and non-drug technologies, in terms of both effectiveness and cost. In particular, CADTH's formulary listing recommendations have been embedded within the decision-processes of public drug plans as a means of increasing transparency across jurisdictions and providing consistency to pharmaceutical reimbursement decisions. Additional funding announced in Budget 2017 is supporting CADTH's ongoing transition to a health technology management organization in order to deliver results that better meet the needs of the healthcare system.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

CADTH, an independent, not-for-profit agency is the sole recipient of transfer payment funds.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CADTH to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with CADTH to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 26,058,769 29,058,769 26,058,769 26,058,769
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 26,058,769 29,058,769 26,058,769 26,058,769

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

Start date

April 1, 1999

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 6: Health Information

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (FPT) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the FPT Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Between 1994 and 2018, the Government of Canada allocated approximately $1,232 million in total to CIHI through a series of contribution agreements. Under the current agreement signed in early 2018, over $365 million will be provided to CIHI over 5 years (2017-18 to 2021-22). A first amendment was signed in February 2019 to provide an additional $140,000 to CIHI to undertake an environmental scan of data gaps for addiction treatment services. A second amendment was signed in December 2019 to provide $500,000 for initiating a collaborative pan-Canadian project to enhance organ donation and transplantation data and reporting across the country. Presently, Health Canada funds 79% of CIHI's total budget, while the provincial and territorial governments contribute 19%. The remaining funds are generated largely through product sales.

Expected results

This funding allows CIHI to provide essential information on Canada's health care systems and the health of Canadians in partnership with Canada Health Infoway. CIHI provides comparable and actionable data and information that are used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across the continuum of care. CIHI's stakeholders use the broad range of the Institute's health system databases, measurements and standards, together with their evidence-based reports and analyses, in their decision-making processes. CIHI protects the privacy of Canadians by ensuring the confidentiality and integrity of the health care information they provide.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

CIHI is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CIHI to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with CIHI to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 96,158,979 101,373,979 97,324,479 97,324,479
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 96,158,979 101,373,979 97,324,479 97,324,479

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 9: Cancer Control

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). The CSCC was developed in consultation with Canadians, including cancer experts and stakeholders, with the following objectives:

Health Canada is responsible for managing the funding to the corporation. CPAC received $250 million from the federal government for its first five-year term (2007 to 2012) and $241 million for its second five-year term (2012 to 2017). Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, which is governed by a five-year agreement (2017 to 2022) for $237.5 million.

Expected results

Enhance cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Indigenous organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments.

A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

CPAC is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with CPAC to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement, and maintains regular contact with CPAC to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 51,000,000 52,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 51,000,000 52,500,000 47,500,000 47,500,000

Contribution to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

In late 2020, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement amalgamated their organizations. The Department's annual funding to each organization has been combined and is flowing to the new amalgamated organization. For detailed information, please refer to the "Contribution to improve health care quality and patient safety".

Contribution to Improve Health Care Quality and Patient Safety

Start date

TBD

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2020-21

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

In late 2020, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute amalgamated their organizations, currently operating under the name of CFHI until a new name is announced. The Department's annual funding to each organization has been combined and is flowing to the program to improve health care quality and patient safety.

The program supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to: undertake safety improvement projects that evaluate and implement scalable, evidence-based practices; find and promote health care innovators and innovations; use the patient voice in patient safety reporting and campaigns to raise awareness; drive rapid adoption of proven innovations; enable improvement-oriented systems; target policy, standards and regulations to influence Canada's health care system towards safer care; and, shape the future of healthcare.

Expected results

The program's expected results include: project participants who demonstrate better safety practices and make improvements in patient safety outcomes; stakeholders are better informed and more engaged in patient safety issues and solutions; policy, standards and regulatory bodies utilize best evidence on patient safety; health care leaders are knowledgeable and skilled in carrying out health care improvements; patients, residents, family members, communities and others with lived experience are engaged in health care improvement and co-design; and improvements to the cultures of participating organizations. Over time, this work is expected to lead to: improvements to patient, resident and family experience of care, the health of patients and residents reached, efficiency of care, and work life of healthcare providers; stakeholders adopting and replicating proven, sustainable patient safety practices; and, stakeholders adopting and applying healthcare policies, standards and regulations that incorporate evidence-informed patient safety requirements. Ultimately, the program will work to: sustain, spread and/or scale proven innovative policies and practices within and across organizations, regions and provinces/territories; and, sustain improvements in patient safety outcomes in the Canadian healthcare system.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

The Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (or its successor) is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada works with the recipient to establish activities to be carried out under the contribution agreement and maintains regular contact with the recipient to monitor progress and compliance under the contribution agreement.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 29,250,000 26,300,000 24,600,000 24,600,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 29,250,000 26,300,000 24,600,000 24,600,000

Health Care Policy and Strategies Program

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2020-21

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Health Care Policy and Strategies Program (HCPSP), previously known as the Health Care Policy Contribution Program, provides up to $26.9 million per fiscal year in time-limited contribution funding to support investments in emerging and demonstrated innovations in areas of priority for health care systems, including mental health, home and community care, palliative and end-of-life care, and other federal, provincial-territorial and emerging priorities. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to health care systems.

Expected results

Program funding will support a wide range of projects designed to ultimately contribute to improvements in the accessibility, quality, sustainability and accountability of the health care system. These improvements could ultimately benefit either specific target populations, or all Canadians. For example, projects that produce and transfer knowledge in key areas will help improve Canada's health care systems and advance health policy. Other projects will identify, develop, implement, assess and promote new or modified tools, approaches and best practices that respond to identified health care system priorities and promote people-centred health care. Another range of projects will identify, develop, implement, assess and promote training and skills development, standards, products and technological solutions that will help modernize health care systems delivery.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations, other levels of government and other national organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Program engages applicants and recipients through discussions on reporting to facilitate the collection of data/information to inform program delivery and results. Recipients are consulted on performance measurement, knowledge translation, and sex and gender based analysis with a view to understanding their needs and the tools they require to meet Program reporting requirements, as well as to provide guidance and feedback on performance measurement plans and reports. Site visits by project officers offer an opportunity to engage recipients in all Program aspects.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 40,443,945 46,987,703 59,196,686 73,898,042
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 40,443,945 46,987,703 59,196,686 73,898,042

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program

Start date

2000 as a Grant, but as of April 1, 2017 it has become a Contribution.

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 4: Mental Health

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), an arm's length, not-for-profit organization, was established in March 2007 with a ten-year mandate to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness. Between 2007 and 2017, the Government of Canada invested $130 million in the MHCC through a grant, to develop a mental health strategy for Canada, conduct an anti-stigma campaign and create a knowledge exchange centre. In 2016, the MHCC's mandate was renewed for a two-year period, from 2017-18 to 2018-19, with a contribution of $14.25 million per year to advance work on mental health priorities, including problematic substance use, suicide prevention, support for at-risk populations and engagement. This contribution was extended until March 31, 2021, and Health Canada intends to renew the terms and conditions until the end of the term (FY 2026-27).

Expected results

This initiative is expected to contribute to the improved mental health and well-being of Canadians, specifically in the areas of problematic substance use, suicide prevention, and stigma reduction.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

The MHCC is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Regular meetings with the Recipient; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.

Planning information (dollars)Footnote *
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 14,250,000 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 14,250,000 0 0 0
Footnote *

This contribution of $14.2 million was extended until March 31, 2021, and Health Canada intends to renew the terms and conditions until the end of the term (FY 2026-27). It is currently in the renewal process and expects to receive $14.2 million.

Return to footnote * referrer

Official Languages Health Program

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

March 31, 2022 (Grant)
Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Grant and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 12: Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Official Languages Health Program (OLHP) has a total budget of $191.2 million over five years (2018-2023), and $38.46 million per year ongoing after 2023. The Program supports the federal government's commitment to maintain a strong and effective publicly funded health care system by ensuring that official language minority communities (OLMCs) have access to bilingual health services in the language of their choice. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and micro-grants, Health Canada supports investments that improve access to health care services for OLMCs, in the language of their choice through training and retention bilingual health care providers, networking activities and innovative projects in priority areas, such as home care, mental health, palliative and end-of-life care.

Expected results

Program funding will support training and retention of health professionals, health networking and innovative projects to improve access to health services for OLMCs. These activities are expected to increase access to bilingual health professionals in OLMCs, and to increase the offer of health services to OLMCs.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2021-22

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients under the program are individuals, non-profit entities, provincially-accredited postsecondary institutions and provincial and territorial government bodies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The Program engages recipients, potential recipients and the public in various ways, for example through solicited proposals, through open calls for proposals and through consultation with funding recipients and program stakeholders. Program recipients are also engaged through regular meetings; analysis and follow-up of progress and financial reporting; and monitoring of performance and results.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 125,000 125,000 0 0
Total contributions 37,255,000 37,475,000 37,600,000 37,400,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 37,380,000 37,600,000 37,600,000 37,400,000

Organs, Tissues and Blood Program

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 11: Organs, Tissues and Blood

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Organs, Tissues, and Blood Program ("the Program") provides support for safe, effective, accessible and responsive organ, tissue and blood systems that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting federal, provincial, and territorial scopes of authority. In 2020-21, it was combined to replace two existing separate programs: the Canadian Blood Services (CBS) – Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation (OTDT) Program and the CBS – Blood Research and Development (R&D) Program.

Expected results

The Program generates numerous knowledge products and learning events. It plays a role in public education, engagement and awareness. The Program also plays a significant role in training highly qualified people in important areas such as basic and applied research. The Program develops collaborative arrangements, establishes partnerships and identifies areas of emergent interests as well as responds to emerging issues and needs relating to organ, tissue and blood systems, in collaboration with the provinces and territories as appropriate.

In addition, various stakeholders, including Health Canada, use the knowledge generated by blood research and development projects and organ donation and transplantation projects to inform changes to practices and standards. This will contribute to greater safety, effectiveness, accessibility and responsiveness of the organ, tissue and blood systems to improve and extend the quality of lives of Canadians.

Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation

The Program is expected to continue to support CBS to work with partners and stakeholders to influence and improve system performance through development and implementation of leading practices, professional and public education, engagement and awareness, data and analytics services and system performance reporting.

Blood Research and Development

In this context, "blood" includes whole blood and blood products, plasma and plasma products and their respective artificial and substitute products Under its blood research and development component, the program is expected to continue its research to inform the deferral period for gay men and men who have sex with men (MSM) on blood and plasma donations.

Budget 2019 provided $2.4 million over three years, starting in 2019-20, for additional MSM research specific to reducing barriers to the donation of blood plasma. With these investments, CBS, in collaboration with Héma-Québec, began to assess knowledge gaps, set up a research program, and started an international peer review process to select projects for funding. Data gathered from the funded MSM plasma projects, which are set to end in March 2022, will build evidence on relevant stakeholder attitudes and MSM screening and testing that could in turn inform further evolution of eligibility criteria for blood donation.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017-18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2022-23

General targeted recipient groups

CBS is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with CBS Program staff and senior management to discuss Program progress. In addition, Health Canada continues to monitor the Recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 10,080,000 8,780,000 8,580,000 8,580,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 10,080,000 8,780,000 8,580,000 8,580,000

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative

Start date

November 9, 2017

End date

March 31, 2027

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Government of Canada is investing $11 billion over ten years (from 2017 to 2027) to support provinces and territories (PTs) to improve access to home and community care ($6 billion) and mental health and addictions ($5 billion) services in their jurisdictions, in accordance with the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities (CSoP), which was jointly agreed to by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) Ministers of Health (with the exception of Quebec) in August 2017.

On mental health and addictions, PTs have agreed to focus on:

On home and community care, PTs have agreed to focus on:

By endorsing the CSoP, PTs fulfilled the conditions set out in the Budget Implementation Act, 2017 to receive funding for fiscal year 2017-18 through a statutory appropriation ($300 million). The remaining nine years of funding ($10.7 billion) will be provided through bilateral funding agreements. Following the 2017 federal, provincial and territorial agreement on the Common Statement of Principles, the federal government negotiated and signed bilateral agreements with each province and territory in which each jurisdiction outlines how it will invest the federal funding for the first five years of the ten year commitment, based on the priority areas of action agreed to by FPT Ministers of Health in August 2017. In 2021-22, these agreements will be renewed for the remaining five years (2022-23 – 2026-27) of the 10-year commitment. As part of the CSoP, all governments also agreed to develop a focused set of common indicators to measure progress on these priority areas. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) led a collaborative process which culminated in May 2018 when federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Health endorsed a suite of 12 common indicators to be implemented over the coming years.

Expected results

It is expected that through these investments Canadians will experience tangible improvements in access to home and community care as well as mental health and addictions services. This will lead to better health outcomes and a more sustainable health care system, as care is shifted from expensive hospital care to more patient-centric settings in the home and in the community. These investments could also have a broader, positive impact on Canada's economy, by making the health care system more sustainable in the long term, and by enhancing workforce productivity and social participation.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2022-23

General targeted recipient groups

Provinces and territories.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

With respect to mental health and addictions, the Government of Canada has engaged with provinces and territories, national Indigenous organizations, mental health stakeholders, provincial and territorial medical associations and treatment centres, and experts.

With respect to the home and community care, the Government of Canada has engaged with a range of home care stakeholders including representatives from national organizations working on home, community and palliative care, provincial home care providers, patient and family advocates, and national health professional associations (e.g., the Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Nurses Association and the College of Family Physicians of Canada), as well as experts.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 1,900,000,000 2,000,000,000 1,200,000,000 1,200,000,000
Total program 1,900,000,000 2,000,000,000 1,200,000,000 1,200,000,000
Note: These amounts will be allocated to provinces and territories on an equal per capita basis based on population estimates from Statistics Canada.

Substance Use and Addictions Program

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

March 31, 2022 (Grant)
Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Grants and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) provides funding for a wide range of evidence-informed and innovative problematic substance use prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives across Canada at the community, regional and national levels. Initiatives target a range of psychoactive substances, including opioids, cannabis, alcohol, nicotine, and tobacco. Projects funded by the SUAP contribute to individual capacity and organizational, system and community level program, policy and practice change by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment service and system enhancements; and, improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Expected results

Projects funded by the SUAP are expected to contribute to individual capacity and organizational, system and community level program, policy and practice change by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment and related system enhancements; and, improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017-18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2022-23

General targeted recipient groups

Community-based, Indigenous, regional and national non-profit organizations, including those in the health and education sectors; and, other levels of government and their agencies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Applicants and recipients are engaged through: stakeholder outreach; solicitation processes; project development discussion; and performance reporting and monitoring tools, processes and activities. The Program also supports knowledge translation and exchange opportunities between projects, Health Canada and other partners and stakeholders.

Planning information (dollars)Footnote 1
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 200,000 200,000 0 0
Total contributions 99,787,883 115,226,457 58,365,169 50,983,318
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 99,987,883 115,426,457 58,365,169 50,983,318

Transfer Payment Programs under $5 Million

Climate Change and Health Adaptation Capacity Building Contribution Program

Start date

April 1, 2018

End date

March 31, 2022

Type of transfer payment

Grants and Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 22: Climate Change

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of the program is to protect and improve the health of Canadians in a changing climate through better understanding of risks and effective adaptation measures, and by building needed capacity to implement them.

Expected results

The expected result is:

This expected result will be measured by the following indicator:

Percentage of funded health system actors that have taken evidence-based adaptation measures to reduce the health effects of climate change

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2025-26

General targeted recipient groups

Provincial and territorial ministries of health; and established province-wide, regional and local health authorities and public health units.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada shared information regarding the launch of the call for proposal with eligible applicants, and regularly communicates with funding recipients regarding the progress of their projects. These engagement activities support the design and delivery of the most effective and efficient evidence-based adaptation measures, and ensures meaningful evaluations in support of future efforts.

The program also supports the engagement of recipients and non-recipients through the provision of scientific help, training and information exchange that allows for further collaboration opportunities in support of their projects and initiatives.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 78,000 0 N/A N/A
Total contributions 1,522,000 1,200,000 N/A N/A
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 N/A N/A
Total program 1,600,000 1,200,000 N/A N/A

Innovative Solutions Canada

Start date

August 23, 2019

End date

March 31, 2023

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the departmental results

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care System Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Innovative Solutions Canada is a horizontal Government of Canada initiative, coordinated by Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada, in which participating departments and agencies can issue challenges to Canadian businesses to develop solutions for operational or sector-specific issues and fund the early stage research and development of these innovations. Health Canada's participation will enable innovators and entrepreneurs to generate novel solutions to help Canadians maintain and improve their health.

Expected results

Expected results include the generation of new Canadian Intellectual Property, commercialization of early stage research and development, and increasing the employment of highly skilled workers in the Canadian innovation ecosystem.

Results will be reported under Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's monitoring and evaluation processes which encompass the entirety of the Innovative Solutions Canada program, including Health Canada's participation therein.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

For-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable. As a horizontal initiative, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada will lead engagement with applicants and recipients of funding under Innovative Solutions Canada.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 1,400,000 1,400,000 1,400,000
Total contributions 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0
Total program 1,400,000 1,400,000 1,400,000

Radon Outreach Contribution Program

Start date

April 1, 2018

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)

Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 30: Radiation Protection

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of this program is to protect and improve human health and well-being in Canada from the impacts of indoor radon exposure, by aiding in the education of Canadians about the importance of testing their homes, schools and workplaces for radon and reducing radon levels where necessary.

Expected results

The expected results are:

These expected results will be measured by the following indicators:

Percentage of Canadians surveyed who are knowledgeable about radon

Percentage of Canadian homeowners surveyed who have tested their homes for radon

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Regional and local governments, including local health authorities; not-for-profit organizations (including voluntary organizations); professional associations; national Indigenous organizations; and educational institutions.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The applicants and recipients of the Radon Outreach Contribution Program are engaged and consulted through face-to-face and virtual meetings at relevant conferences and workshops and by email and telephone. Applicant and recipient consultations are structured to support them in designing programs that maximize reach and impact, and provide expertise and support throughout the delivery and evaluation of their programs, with an overarching goal of raising awareness and promoting action to reduce radon-induced lung cancer in Canada.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2020–21 Forecast
spending
2021–22 Planned
spending
2022–23 Planned
spending
2023–24 Planned
spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 250,000 250,000 250,000 250,000

Gender-based analysis plus

General information

Institutional GBA+ Capacity

In 2021-22, Health Canada will continue to strengthen the implementation of Gender-Based Analysis PlusFootnote 2 (GBA+) through the renewed Sex and Gender Action Plan (2020-2023). The Action Plan provides a framework that strengthens the integration of sex, gender and other intersectional factors (such as age, race, indigeneity, education and income level) in externally and internally facing work of the Department. The Department's Action Plan aims to:

The renewed Sex and Gender Action Plan will continue to advance equality and improve our approaches to diversity and inclusion. It will build on lessons learned between 2017 and 2020, including through the COVID-19 pandemic as well as be guided by recommendations from the evaluation of the original Action Plan (2017-2020). Under the renewal, sex, gender diversity and inclusion related priorities for 2021-22 will include:

The Department will continue to identify signature initiatives where it will deepen the integration of sex, gender and other intersectional factors.

The Gender and Health Unit will:

Highlights of GBA+ Results Reporting Capacity by Program

Internal Services

External Services

Cannabis

Consumer Product Safety

Food and Nutrition

Health Impacts of Chemicals

Mental Health

Medical Devices and Drugs

Pesticides

Horizontal Initiatives

Addressing the Opioids Crisis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Canada Border Services Agency
Public Health Agency of Canada
Public Safety Canada
Statistics Canada

Note: Other government departments (e.g., Correctional Service Canada) are supporting the federal response to the overdose crisis. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission "Addressing the Opioid Crisis."

Start date

April 1, 2018

End date

March 31, 2023 and ongoing

Description

Illegal drugs and problematic substance use have always presented health and safety challenges in Canada and around the world. Recently, however, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of opioid-related overdoses and deaths. The people most affected in this overdose crisis continue to be young to middle-aged individuals and men, whose deaths are mostly accidental and largely due to the contamination of the illegal drug supply with highly toxic fentanyl and/or fentanyl analogues. The scale of this crisis is so severe that life expectancy in Canada has stopped increasing for the first time in over 40 years. Fentanyl is a cheap way for drug dealers to make street drugs more powerful and it is causing high rates of overdoses and overdose deaths. A few grains can be enough to cause a fatal overdose.

The federal government's actions to address the overdose crisis are guided by the Canadian Drugs and Substances StrategyFootnote 1, which takes a comprehensive, collaborative, and compassionate approach to substance use issues using a public health lens. The federal government is deeply concerned about the number of overdoses and deaths, and is taking significant actions in areas of federal jurisdiction to address the crisis. However, despite significant efforts to date, the overdose crisis in Canada continues. According to data from the Public Health Agency of Canada, more than 17,602 people lost their lives in Canada between January 2016 and June 2020 to apparent opioid-related overdoses. In addition, it is estimated that approximately 250,000 Canadians do not have access to treatment when seeking help for problematic substance use. Since people who use drugs have traditionally been stigmatized, Canadians struggling with substance use disorder often encounter barriers when accessing health, medical and social services. Tragically, the COVID-19 pandemic is also exacerbating long-standing challenges regarding substance use and has contributed to the worsening overdose crisis, with some communities now reporting record high numbers of overdose deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency medical service calls.

While the Government of Canada is taking a number of actions to respond to the overdose crisis, this horizontal initiative is specific to measures announced in Budget 2018 to:

Ultimately, these complementary activities are intended to contribute to a reduction in overdose harms and deaths in Canada.

Governance structure

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing a comprehensive federal response to the overdose crisis. Each department/agency will be responsible for leading its respective initiatives and providing updates to the interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) level Working Group on Opioids chaired by the Associate-ADM of Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch. This working group is used as a forum for information and consultation on next steps toward a comprehensive, collaborative federal response to the overdose crisis. Updates and decisions from this working group feed into the federal, interdepartmental Deputy Ministers Task Force on the Opioid Crisis as required. This Task Force, chaired by the Deputy Minister of Health Canada, serves as a time-limited forum to provide leadership and oversight of federal initiatives to respond to the overdose crisis. The Task Force will remain an established committee until such time that the public environment no longer requires it.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. Departments and agencies will provide updates to, and consult with, provincial and territorial colleagues as required through the federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) ADM-level Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee (PSUH), co-chaired by Health Canada and British Columbia and comprised of ADMs responsible for drug policy in their jurisdiction. They will also provide updates to and consult with provincial/territorial colleagues as required through the FPT Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health with representation from each jurisdiction. The PSUH reports to the FPT Conference of Deputy Ministers of Health and the FPT Conference of Ministers of Health.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$108,794,405 (includes existing funding)

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$47,957,952

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$41,247,844

Date of last renewal of initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Planning highlights

All federal partners will work collaboratively to address the overdose crisis in a comprehensive, robust, and effective manner. Planning highlights specific to this horizontal initiative in 2021-22 will include:

Contact information

Health Canada

Sheri Todd
Director General
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Sheri.Todd@canada.ca
613-797-2719

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Shared outcomes: Reducing harms and deaths related to opioid use

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)
Name of theme Theme Area 1:
Supporting additional prevention and treatment interventions
Theme Area 2:
Addressing stigma
Theme Area 3:
Taking Action at Canada's Borders
Theme Area 4:
Enhancing the Evidence Base
Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 2 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 3 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Enhanced quality surveillanceFootnote 4 data is available Not applicable
Health Canada
  • $13,169,264 (Top- up)
  • $13,000,000 (Existing)
  • $7,030,966 (Ongoing)
  • $12,456,900 (Top-up)
  • $10,234,157 (Existing)
  • $2,724,238 (Ongoing)
Not applicable Not applicable
  • $873,836 (Top-up)
  • $599,273 (Existing)
  • $253,796 (Ongoing)
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable
  • $30,254,740
  • $4,716,380 (Ongoing)
Not applicable
  • $3,125,260
  • $664,620 (Ongoing)
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Enhancing surveillance
  • $14,928,466 (Top-up)
  • $1,411,691 (Existing)
  • $1,779,347 (Ongoing)
  • $971,534
  • $8,165 (Existing)
  • $116,007 (Ongoing)
Public Safety Canada Not applicable
  • $801,133 (Top-up)
  • $1,038,870 (Existing)
  • $3,204,529 (Top-up)
  • $115,430 (Existing)

Not applicable

  • $460,812 (Top-up)
  • $145,453 (Existing)
Statistics Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
  • $1,905,286
  • $226,195 (Ongoing)
  • $89,606
  • $16,251 (Ongoing)

Planning information

Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Addressing the Opioid Crisis
  • HC:
    $50,333,430
  • CBSA:
    $33,380,000
  • PHAC:
    $17,319,856
  • PS:
    $5,766,227
  • StatCan:
    $1,994,892
  • HC:
    $7,909,000
  • CBSA:
    $5,514,000
  • PHAC:
    $2,809,330
  • PS:
    $1,018,563
  • StatCan:
    $242,446
Reduced harms and deaths related to opioid use. Number of hospital admissions due to opioid poisoning (including overdoses) per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)

Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)
% reductionFootnote 5 March 31, 2021
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions HC:
$26,169,264
HC:
$4,949,046
Targeted stakeholdersFootnote 6 use evidence-informed informationFootnote 7 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Percentage of targeted Stakeholders who reported that they intend to use/used knowledge/skills related to substance use provided by projects funded through SUAPFootnote 8 65% March 31, 2024
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity
(activities)
Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Expanded contribution funding $26,169,264 $4,949,046 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2024
ER 1.1.2
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2: Addressing Stigma
  • HC:
    $22,691,057
  • PS:
    $1,840,003
Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Percentage of Canadians who believe that the opioid crisis in Canada is a public health issue Increase by 5 percentage pointsFootnote 10 March 31, 2021
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity
(activities)
Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Public education campaign $22,691,057 $2,723,499 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2020 Achieved
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2021
Public Safety Countering Crime De-stigmatization awareness training for law enforcement $1,840,003 $169,680 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 March 31, 2020 Achieved
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders
  • PS:
    $3,319,959
  • CBSA:
    $30,254,740
Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs (compared to random resultant rate) A target will be established in 2021-22, once a baseline has been established. The objective will be to maintain or exceed previous years' results March 31, 2021
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity
(activities)
Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Safety Countering Crime Information sharing with law enforcement and international partners $3,319,959 $735,077 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 31, 2020 Achieved
Canada Border Services Agency Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Equipping safe examination areas and regional screening facilities $1,638,673 $216,769 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 March 31, 2022
Force Generation $2,153,613 $414,895
Buildings and Equipment $11,353,992 $533,047
Field Technology Support $7,951,329 $2,187,575 PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2023
PI 3.2.1.3 T 3.2.1.3 March 31, 2022
Targeting Augmenting intelligence and risk assessment capacity $2,041,704 $299,542 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2 T 3.2.2 March 31, 2022
Intelligence Collection and Analysis $3,284,279 $730,474 ER 3.2.3 PI 3.2.3 T 3.2.3 March 31, 2022
Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Enhancement of Detector Dog Program $1,831,150 $286,300 ER 3.2.4 PI 3.2.4.1
PI 3.2.4.2
T 3.2.4.1
T 3.2.4.2
March 31, 2022
March 31, 2021
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal[*]
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base
  • PHAC:
    $16,340,157
  • StatCan:
    $1,905,286
  • PHAC:
    $2,689,347
  • StatCan:
    $226,195
Enhanced quality surveillanceFootnote 12 data is available Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 13 disseminated publicly 11 March 31, 2020 Achieved
Percentage of data files published on time 100% March 31, 2022
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity
(activities)
Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion, and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Expansion of public health surveillance $16,340,157 $2,689,347 ER 4.1 PI 4.1 T 4.1 March 31, 2020 Achieved
Statistics Canada Socio-economic Statistics Re-design and operation of the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED) $1,905,286 $226,195 ER 4.2 PI 4.2 T 4.2 March 31, 2022
Total spending, all themes
Theme Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 total federal planned spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 $26,169,264 $4,949,046
Theme 2 $24,531,060 $2,893,179
Theme 3 $33,574,699 $5,403,679
Theme 4 $18,245,443 $2,915,542
Total, all themes $102,520,466 $16,161,446

Theme 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions

Expected results

Health Canada

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Theme 2: Addressing Stigma

Expected results

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Public Safety Canada

Theme 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders

Expected results

Public Safety Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Performance indicators

Public Safety Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Targets

Public Safety Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Theme 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base

Expected results

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Performance indicators

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Targets

Public Health Agency of Canada

Statistics Canada

Footnotes

Footnote 1

The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) covers a broad range of legal and illegal substances, including cannabis, alcohol, opioids and other kinds of substances that can be used problematically.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, and program materials).

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Decrease in baseline year over year to 2021. Baseline for hospital admissions: 16.4 per 100,000 population in 2017. Baseline for apparent opioid-related deaths: 10.9 per 100,000 population in 2017.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, program materials).

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

This indicator was changed to better reflect the motivation and/or behaviour of the audiences targeted by SUAP funded projects.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Total funding includes Salary, O&M, G&C and centrally held funds used to support this theme. Internal services cost are not included in this amount.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Baseline: 74% in 2017

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Total funding includes Salary, O&M, G&Cs and centrally held funds used to support this theme. Internal services cost are not included in this amount.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

This indicator was changed to better reflect the motivation and/or behaviour of the audiences targeted by SUAP funded projects, and measures both ER 1.1.1 and ER 1.1.2

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Baseline: 21% in 2017

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Baseline: 61% in 2017

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Enhanced capability is reference to six additional dog teams and the introduction of the fentanyl scent (through training) to existing teams

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Baseline is 100% as these are new facilities not yet established and no officers have been trained.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Baseline: 1,000 from September 2017 to February 2018

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

Baseline: 5% (2017-18)

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

March 31, 2022 and ongoing

Description

The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) is the Government of Canada's comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, which uses a public health lens when considering and addressing problematic substance use. The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health, supported by Health Canada and 14 other federal departments and agencies. The CDSS covers a broad range of legal and illegal substances, including cannabisCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 1, alcohol, opioidsCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 2 and other substances that may result in harms when used problematically. The goal of the strategy is to protect the health and safety of all Canadians by minimizing harms from substance use for individuals, families and communities.

The CDSS takes a four-pillar approach to substance use issues (prevention, treatment, harm reduction, and enforcement), supported by a strong evidence base. The public health focus of the CDSS, along with the inclusion of harm reduction as a core pillar of the strategy, will better enable the Government to address the current overdose crisis, which has been made worse by the impacts of COVID-19, while at the same time working to prevent the emergence of new challenges.

The CDSS recognizes that the national approach to substance use requires strong collaboration and coordination amongst all levels of government working in their respective areas of jurisdiction. It also recognizes the critical importance of working closely with a wide range of stakeholders on an ongoing basis, including people with lived and living experience with substance use. Reducing the stigma experienced by people who use drugs is also integral to the CDSS, and an ongoing priority for the Government of Canada.

Governance structure

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health. The Strategy is coordinated through a Director-General (DG) level steering committee that reports to Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs).

The DG Steering Committee is designed to reflect and support the CDSS's comprehensive approach to substance use issues. The committee is composed of DGs from federal departments/agencies whose mandates are relevant to drug and substance use across the four pillars of prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement/drug regulation. The Committee, which meets at least twice a year and also on an ad hoc basis, is supported by three working groups: the Demand and Harm Reduction Working Group; the Supply Reduction Working Group; and the Evaluation and Reporting Working Group. Secretariat support for the CDSS is provided by the Controlled Substances Directorate (CSD) within Health Canada.

Current federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) engagement is achieved through a number of F/P/T mechanisms, including the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms that is co-chaired by Health Canada and a provincial Co-Chair.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$641,823,968

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$388,219,158

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$460,295,090

Date of last renewal of initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Planning highlights

Contact information

Health Canada

Jennifer Saxe
Director General
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
Jennifer.saxe@canada.ca
613-816-1739

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Shared outcomes:

Name of theme Theme Area 1:
Prevention
Theme Area 2:
Treatment
Theme Area 3:
Harm Reduction
Theme Area 4:
Enforcement
Theme Area 5:
Evidence Base
Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Preventing problematic substance use.
(Note Health Canada is continuing to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the prevention theme outcomes during Winter/Spring 2020-21.)
Supporting access to treatment services.
(Note Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the treatment theme outcomes during Winter/Spring2020-21.)
Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people who use drugs or substances. Law enforcement and drug regulation activities.
(Note Health Canada will work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the enforcement theme outcomes during Winter/Spring 2020-21.)
Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners. Not applicable
Health CanadaCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 3 $130,490,598Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 4 Not applicable $18,415,181 $94,799,995 $8,520,776 $5,117,712
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $11,500,000 Not applicable $6,500,000
Canada Revenue Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $4,209,225 Not applicable $790,775
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Not applicable $6,874,990 Not applicable Not applicable $10,000,000 Not applicable
Correctional Service Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $9,258,480 Not applicable Not applicable
Department of Justice Canada Not applicable $26,479,177 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $42,375
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $0 Not applicable Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $4,500,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Indigenous Services Canada $14,376,000 $60,357,585 $15,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Parole Board of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $7,695,000 Not applicable $1,710,000
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable $30,000,000 Not applicable $281,720 $45,647
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $53,196,935 Not applicable $7,803,065
Public Safety Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $2,942,660 Not applicable $75,710
Public Services and Procurement Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $3,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $11,124,252 Not applicable Not applicable $82,765,505 Not applicable $13,950,605

Planning information

Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since last renewal (dollars) 2021–22 planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS)Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 5 $641,823,968 $129,283,572 Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to update the shared outcome(s) Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s) TBDCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 6 TBD
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 1:
Prevention
$155,990,850 $33,389,830 Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBDCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 7 TBD
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) Grants and Contributions Funding $113,937,570Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 8 $26,312,389Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 9 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1  March 31, 2022
ER 1.1.2
Controlled Substances Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) $16,553,028 $1,976,940 ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2022
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness PPDU $14,376,000 $2,900,000 Not applicableCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 10
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) FP Public Engagement (FPPE) $11,124,252 $2,200,501 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2022
PI 1.2.2 T 1.2.2
PI 1.2.3 T 1.2.3
PI 1.2.4 T 1.2.4
PI 1.2.5 T 1.2.5
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2:
Treatment
$93,711,752 $18,384,040 Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBDCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 11 TBD
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity  from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Research in Priority Areas Research on Drug Treatment Model $6,874,990 $974,998 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 31, 2022
Department of Justice Canada Drug Treatment Court Funding Program Drug Treatment Court Funding Program $18,521,552 $3,746,000 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2022
Youth Justice Youth Justice Fund $7,957,625 $1,591,525 ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2022
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions - Mental Wellness Program $60,357,585 $12,071,517 Not applicableCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 12
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated  from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3:
Harm Reduction
$63,415,181 $13,414,634 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people who use drugs and substances. Percentage decrease in the number of people who use drugs who report sharing drug use equipment. 10% decrease March 31, 2022
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity  from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Strengthening the Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy  $18,415,181  $2,414,634 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 31, 2022
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions -First Nations and Inuit health programming $15,000,000 $4,000,000 Not applicableCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 13
Public Health Agency of Canada Communicable Diseases and Infections Control Grants and contributions - Transmission of Sexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infections $30,000,000 $7,000,000 ER 3.3 PI 3.3Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 14 T 3.3 March 31, 2022
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated  from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4:
Enforcement
$273,867,800 $53,656,985 Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme TBDCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 15 TBD
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity  from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Controlled Substances Directorate Enforcement Activities $31,221,420 $6,244,284 ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 31, 2022
Regulatory Operations and Enforcement Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities $9,753,510 $1,950,702 ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2 T 4.1.2 TBD
Drug Analysis Services $53,825,065 $10,765,013 ER 4.1.3 PI 4.1.3 T 4.1.3 March 31, 2022
ER 4.1.4 PI 4.1.4 T 4.1.4 March 31, 2022
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment Targeting Intelligence Security Screening $10,500,000 $2,100,000 ER 4.2.1 PI 4.2 T 4.2 March 31, 2022
ER 4.2.2
Criminal Investigations $1,000,000 $200,000 ER 4.2.3
Canada Revenue Agency Domestic Compliance Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate $4,209,225 $1,163,433 ER 4.3 PI 4.3 T 4.3 March 31, 2022
Correctional Service Canada Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $3,295,550 $873,726 ER 4.4 PI 4.4.1 T 4.4.1 March 31, 2022
PI 4.4.2 T 4.4.2
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders $5,962,930 $977,970 PI 4.4.3 T 4.4.3
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program $0 $0 ER 4.5 PI 4.5 T 4.5 Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission of the American States $4,500,000 $900,000 ER 4.6 PI 4.6.1 T 4.6.1 March 31, 2022
PI 4.6.2 T 4.6.2
Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions - (Provincial reviews) $5,557,500 $189,000 ER 4.7.1 PI 4.7.1 T 4.7.1 March 31, 2022
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Provincial reviews) $2,137,500 $93,000 ER 4.7.2 PI 4.7.2 T 4.7.2
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Drug, National Security and Northern Prosecutions Program Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable $36,219,785 $7,243,957 ER 4.8.1 PI 4.8.1.1 T 4.8 Not applicable
PI 4.8.1.2
Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services $16,977,150 $3,395,430 ER 4.8.2 PI 4.8.1.1
PI 4.8.1.2
Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation $2,942,660 $588,532 ER 4.9 PI 4.9 T 4.9 March 31, 2022
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services Financial Intelligence Program $3,000,000 $600,000 ER 4.10 PI 4.10.1 T 4.10 March 31, 2022
PI 4.10.2
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) Investigations FP Project-Based Investigations $82,765,505 $16,371,938 ER 4.11 PI 4.11.1 T 4.11 Not applicable
PI 4.11.2
PI 4.11.3
Theme 5 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated  from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 5:
Evidence Base
$18,802,496 $4,249,449 Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to update the theme outcome(s) Health Canada continues to work with the other federal CDSS partners to review and update the performance indicator(s) for this theme  TBDCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 16  TBD
Theme 5 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2021-22
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Drug Use Surveillance and Monitoring $8,520,776 $2,249,449 ER 5.1 PI 5.1 T 5.1 March 31, 2022
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Horizontal Health Research Initiative Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) $10,000,000 $2,000,000 ER 5.2 PI 5.2.1 T 5.2.1 March 31, 2022
PI 5.2.2 T 5.2.2
Public Health Agency of Canada Emergency Preparedness and Response Chronic Disease and Injury Surveillance $281,720 $0 Not applicable
Total spending, all themes
ThemeCanadian Drugs and Substances Strategy table footnote a Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 total federal planned spending
(dollars)
Theme 1: Prevention $155,990,850 $33,389,830
Theme 2: Treatment $93,711,752 $18,384,040
Theme 3: Harm Reduction $63,415,181 $13,414,634
Theme 4: Enforcement $273,867,800 $53,656,985
Theme 5: Evidence Base $18,802,496 $4,249,449
Total, all themes $605,788,079 $123,094,938
Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy table footnote a

Funding does not include internal services and lead role.

Return to Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy table footnote a referrer

Theme 1: Prevention

Expected Results

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 1.2 The RCMP will increase awareness of drugs and illegal substances among stakeholders by developing education products, supporting outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

Performance Indicators

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 2: Treatment

Expected Results

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 2.1 Support for research in priority areas.

Department of Justice Canada

Performance indicators

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

PI 2.1 Percentage of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals.

Department of Justice Canada

Targets

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

T 2.1 100%

Department of Justice Canada

Theme 3: Harm reduction

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 3.1 Increased availability of harm reduction services.

Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 3.3 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 3.1 Percentage of applications for an exemption to operate a Supervised Consumption Site that received a decision within the service standard from the time the review is complete.

Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 3.3 Percentage decrease in the number of people who use drugs who report sharing drug use equipment.Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 18

Targets

Health Canada

T 3.1 90%

Public Health Agency of Canada

T 3.3 10% decrease

Theme 4: Enforcement

Expected results

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 4.3 30 audits. Re- assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Service Canada

ER 4.4 Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II).

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada.

ER 4.5 Given the importance of the CDSS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 4.6 In 2020-21, GAC will increase capacity of port officials in selected countries in the Americas to intercept and seize illegal drugs smuggled via legal maritime containerized cargo. GAC will also work to build the capacity law enforcement of OAS member states to share and disseminate information and early warning alerts on New Psychoactive Substances (NPS), opioids, and other emerging drug threats.

Parole Board of Canada

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Public Safety Canada

ER 4.9 Coordinated enforcement action to address illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 4.10 Assist law enforcement agencies and prosecutors by providing forensic accounting services and expertise. These services assist in determining whether the assets identified were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Crown to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives from the crime.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 4.11 The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on the highest threats related to organized crime networks including those involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs, including illegal opioids.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

PI 4.2 Ratio of the average dollar value of drugs and their precursors seized attributed to Intelligence vs. the average dollar value drugs and their precursors seized not attributed to intelligence.

Canada Revenue Agency

PI 4.3 80% or more of audits resulting in a (re) assessment.

Correctional Service Canada

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

Global Affairs Canada

Parole Board of Canada

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

Public Safety Canada

PI 4.9 Timely sharing of evidence-based knowledge and intelligence to support law enforcement actions against illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Health Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

T 4.2 9:1 ratio

Canada Revenue Agency

T 4.3 30 audits.  Re-assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Service Canada

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

T 4.5 FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

Global Affairs Canada

Parole Board of Canada

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

T 4.8 Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC's workload and mandate.

Public Safety Canada

T 4.9 100% completion of planned coordination activities based on an integrated law enforcement work plan.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

T 4.10 The files are dependent on the projects law enforcement assign to PSPC-FAMG and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts dedicated to work on CDSS files.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

T 4.11 Targets are not applicable as these will vary by province/territory and is based on need.

Theme 5: Evidence base

Expected results

Health Canada

ER 5.1 Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 5.2 Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Performance indicators

Health Canada

PI 5.1 Percentage of United Nations Annual Report Questionnaire completed with Canadian data.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Targets

Health Canada

T 5.1 60.5%Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy Footnote 20

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Footnotes

Footnote 1

While cannabis is encompassed by the CDSS, federal activities, performance measures and funding amounts are reported on through a separate horizontal initiative (Implementing a Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis).

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Additional federal activities to address the opioid crisis are reported through a separate horizontal initiative (Addressing the Opioid Crisis).

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Health Canada Internal Services include $2,436,740 for the Lead Role.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) consolidated funding is reported under the Prevention theme and continues to contribute to both the Prevention and Treatment themes.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Funding includes internal services and lead role.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Health Canada will review and update the Horizontal Initiatives for shared outcomes performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target. The changes will be reflected in 2022-23 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative, due to planning and reporting timelines.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Health Canada will review and update the Theme 1 performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target. The changes will be reflected in 2022-23 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative, due to planning and reporting timelines.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

This amount represents the global SUAP CDSS budget. The SUAP does not allocate or track funding by CDSS pillar/theme.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

SUAP Planned spending for 2021-22 has increased to $26,312,389 due to the re-profile from 2018-19 lapses totalling $3,524,875.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

The indicator has been retired. ISC is continuing to work with other CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s).

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Health Canada will review and update the Theme 2 performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target. The changes will be reflected in 2022-23 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative, due to planning and reporting timelines.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

The indicator has been retired. ISC is continuing to work with other CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s).

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

The indicator has been retired. ISC is continuing to work with other CDSS partners to review and update the shared performance indicator(s).

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

This performance indicator is currently being reviewed and will be replaced in the 2022-23 CDSS HI Departmental Plan.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Health Canada will review and update the Theme 4 performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target. The changes will be reflected in 2022-23 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative, due to planning and reporting timelines.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Health Canada will review and update the Theme 5 performance indicator(s), target(s) and date(s) to achieve target. The changes will be reflected in 2022-23 Departmental Plan CDSS Horizontal Initiative, due to planning and reporting timelines

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

This indicator was changed to better reflect the motivation and/or behaviour of the audiences targeted by SUAP funded projects, and measures both ER 1.1.1 and ER 1.1.2.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

This performance indicator is currently being reviewed and will be replaced in the 2021-22 CDSS HI Departmental Results Report.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

PBC questionnaire was conducted in 2016-17, and the next questionnaire is planned for 2022-23.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

The United Nations Annual Report Questionnaire was revised, increasing the total number of questions asked, and therefore the target has been changed to 60.5% (instead of 90%).

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Canada Border Services Agency
Public Health Agency of Canada
Public Safety Canada
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Note: Other government departments (e.g., the Department of Justice) are supporting the federal cannabis framework. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table, as they have not received targeted funding to support this initiative, "Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis".

Start date

April 1, 2017

End date

March 31, 2022

Description

The objective of this horizontal initiative is to implement and administer the federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. The Cannabis Act received Royal Assent on June 21, 2018, and came into force on October 17, 2018. This initiative aims to prevent young persons from accessing cannabis, to protect public health and public safety by establishing strict product safety and product quality requirements and to deter criminal activity by imposing serious criminal penalties for those operating outside the legal framework.

Federal partner organizations implement the regulatory framework including licensing; compliance and enforcement; surveillance; research; national public education and awareness activities; and framework support.

The initiative also supports law enforcement capacity to collect and assess intelligence on the evolution of organized crime involvement in the illicit cannabis market and other related criminal markets.

Activities are organized by five high-level themes:

  1. Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework;
  2. Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms;
  3. Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety;
  4. Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities; and
  5. Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travelers and goods.

Governance structure

The Government of Canada continues to support a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing and administering the federal framework to legalize and strictly regulate cannabis. At the federal level, this governance structure includes: an Assistant Deputy Minister Committee that serves as a forum for government-wide coordination of policy and implementation activities; a Directors General Committee that is responsible for coordinating policy, regulatory development, and implementation activities across federal departments and agencies; and, a Federal Partners Cannabis Data Working Group to promote horizontal collaboration and support evidence-based policy and program development.

Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch assumes a central coordinating role in tracking key project milestones and in reporting to federal Ministers.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. In May 2016, the Federal/Provincial/Territorial (F/P/T) Senior Officials Working Group on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation was established to enable F/P/T governments to exchange information on important issues about the legalization and regulation of cannabis throughout the consultation, design and implementation of the legislation, regulations, and non-regulatory activities. Other F/P/T working groups and committees also facilitate ongoing engagement in key priority areas, including public education and awareness, data development and information sharing, national inventory tracking and implementation. In addition, existing F/P/T bodies are also considering the implications of cannabis legalization and regulation, including F/P/T Deputy Ministers responsible for Justice, Public Safety and Finance, and F/P/T Ministers responsible for Health, Justice and Labour.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$546,807,456

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

$424,998,364

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$258,201,556

Date of last renewal of initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Planning highlights

The federal government will continue to focus on the ongoing implementation of the cannabis legislative and regulatory framework, which includes initiating the mandated legislative review of the administration and operation of the Cannabis Act. To meet its objectives, the Department will continue collaborating with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities, the regulated industry, public health organizations, academics, federal partners, international partners, and law enforcement.

For 2021-22, the federal government will also continue to: issue licences for cannabis, hemp, research and analytical testing and cannabis drug licences; monitor and report on service standards for applications and permits issued; and provide standards for products, packaging and labelling, and prohibitions on promotions designed to protect the health and safety of Canadians. Provinces and territories remain responsible for determining how cannabis is distributed and sold in their jurisdictions.

More specifically, participating federal departments and agencies have identified the following key priorities for 2021-22.

Health Canada

In 2021-22, Health Canada will:

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)

In 2021-22, the CBSA will continue to advance initiatives that support the identification and interception of high-risk people, goods and conveyances that pose a threat to the security of Canadians with respect to the illegitimate cross-border movement of cannabis. Planning highlights include:

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)

In 2021-22, the PHAC will continue to support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer by undertaking the following:

Public Safety Canada (PS)

In 2021-22, PS will continue to support the implementation of the Cannabis Act, with a particular focus on policy goals relating to the prevention of public safety harms. PS will work in close partnership with federal, provincial, and territorial (F/P/T) partners as well as law enforcement and other key stakeholders on policies and strategies to combat the illegal market. Planning highlights for 2021-22 will include developing and implementing disruption practices and strategies; strengthening data collection and evidence-based policy through research and monitoring of illicit cannabis markets; and delivering public education and awareness activities to support Canadians in making informed and lawful decisions around cannabis with a particular focus on the following:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

In 2021-22, the RCMP will work collaboratively to develop appropriate responses, including targeted awareness products, through ongoing interactions with stakeholders. The RCMP will identify trends related to organized crime infiltration and money-making schemes in relation to both the legitimate and the illegal markets. Through in-person engagement and the use of technology, the RCMP will continue to focus on increasing awareness and education of cannabis legalization and regulation, with an emphasis on possession, production, and distribution of cannabis for Indigenous and youth populations by undertaking the following select initiatives:

The RCMP will play a key coordinating role in stakeholder engagement, establishing networks and in the development and distribution of national awareness products to ensure consistency and support for stakeholder outreach. In 2021-22, Federal Policing Prevention and Engagement work will focus on:

In 2021-22, the RCMP will continue its efforts to support training and capacity development by engaging in the following activities:

The RCMP will continue to work with partners on various cannabis policy-related initiatives, such as the approach to law enforcement in Indigenous communities, online illegal dispensaries, and regulations related to cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals. Furthermore, in 2021-22, the RCMP will leverage existing forums such as the Canadian Association Chiefs of Police to discuss and advance current or emerging policy initiatives.

The RCMP will continue to develop criminal intelligence products to identify, target, and disrupt criminal involvement in the Canadian cannabis market, and share intelligence with law enforcement agencies, domestic government partners, and international law enforcement partners. In 2021-22, the RCMP will continue to:

The RCMP will continue to support the Minister of Health's decisions on security clearances required as part of the licensing regime for cannabis cultivators and processors, which includes identifying criminality or associations to criminal organizations and verifying this information with the law enforcement organizations of jurisdiction.

Contact information

Health Canada
John Clare
Director General
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
John.Clare@canada.ca
613-941-2045

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis

Shared outcomes:

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)
Name of theme Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new legislative framework Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods Internal Services
Theme outcome(s)
  • A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established [HC];
  • The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements [HC];
  • The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC]; and,
  • Law Enforcement Records Checks are conducted in support of Health Canada's security clearance decisions [RCMP].
  • Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use [HC];
  • Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis [HC];
  • Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information [PHAC];
  • Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them [PHAC];
  • Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation [PS]; and,
  • Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions [PS].
  • Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation [PS];
  • Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues [PS];
  • Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented [PS];
  • Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement [PS];
  • RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities [RCMP]; and,
  • Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime [RCMP].
  • Information and intelligence products/advice related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime [RCMP];
  • Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP];
  • RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime [RCMP]; and,
  • RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP].
  • Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada [CBSA];
  • Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites [CBSA];
  • CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws [CBSA];
  • Prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis is detected [CBSA];
  • Border-related regulations, accompanying policies and procedures, agreements, studies, and monitoring framework are developed and implemented [CBSA]; and,
  • Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner [CBSA].
Not applicable
Health Canada $370,394,429 $16,121,003 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $44,485,622
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $34,600,853 $5,095,567
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable $2,586,174 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $206,951
Public Safety Canada Not applicable $1,173,345 $3,810,640 Not applicable Not applicable $500,353
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $17,972,092 Not applicable $14,003,082 $26,798,704 Not applicable $9,058,641

Planning information

Horizontal initiative overviewFootnote 3
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending
(dollars)
Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Implementing a New Federal Framework for the Legalization and Strict Regulation of Cannabis $546,807,456
  • HC:
    $118,014,935
  • RCMP:
    $15,989,327
  • CBSA:
    $$9,799,373
  • PS:
    $1,097,374
  • PHAC:
    $623,471
SO 1. Cannabis is kept out of the hands of Canadian children and youth [HC] Percentage of Canadians (aged 15-17 and 18-24) who used cannabis in the last 12 months [HC] 29% or lower for Canadians aged 15-24 (14% for Canadians aged 15-17 and 33% for Canadians aged 18-24Footnote 4) March 31, 2025
SO 2. Criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market is reduced [CBSA and RCMP] Qualitative assessment on trends related to criminal involvement in the illicit cannabis market [RCMP] 1 March 31, 2022
Number of cannabis import interdictions at the border [CBSA] 10% reduction (+/- 5%) to baseline of 20,933 March 31, 2022
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative
  • HC:
    $370,394,429
  • RCMP:
    $17,972,092
  • HC:
    $101,853,410
  • RCMP:
    $$5,878,922
A federally licensed and regulated (non-medical) industry is established [HC] Number of licence applications (decisions) per year [HC] 2,200Footnote 5 March 31, 2022
Percentage of licence applications reviewed within internal service standards [HC] 75% March 31, 2022
The federally licensed industry understands the legislation and regulatory requirements [HC] % of federal licence holders who indicate they have access to information to help them understand the regulatory requirements [HC] 80% March 31, 2022
The federally licensed industry is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC] Percentage of federally licensed industry that is found to be compliant with regulatory requirements [HC] 80%Footnote 6 March 31, 2022
Law Enforcement Records Checks (LERCs) are conducted in support of HC's security clearance decisions [RCMP] Percentage of LERCs completed within negotiated service standards [RCMP] 75%Footnote 7 March 31, 2022
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Cannabis Program License federal producers and other legal market participants; provide client registration and other client services $ 216,418,075 $51,447,026 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1.1 T 1.1.1.1 March 31, 2022
PI 1.1.1.2 T 1.1.1.2 March 31, 2022
Compliance and enforcement: Design and promote compliance and enforcement; robust inspection program, involving pre- and post-licence inspections $153,976,354 $50,406,384 ER 1.1.2 PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 31, 2022
ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2022
Royal Canadian Mounted Police RCMP Departmental Security Build capacity to provide security screening reports (i.e., LERCs) to Health Canada to complete applications for the production of cannabis for non-medical purposes $17,972,092 $5,878,922 ER 1.2 PI 1.2 T 1.2 March 31, 2022
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 Federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms
  • HC:
    $16,121,003
  • PHAC:
    $2,586,174
  • PS:
    $1,173,345
  • HC:
    $931,035
  • PHAC:
    $577,483
  • PS:
    $214,669
Canadian youth understand the potential health and safety risks associated with cannabis use [HC] Percentage of youth (grades 7-12) who perceive that there is "no risk" in smoking cannabis on a regular basis [HC] 7% March 31, 2024
Canadians use information to make informed decisions about the potential health and safety risks associated with the use of cannabis [HC] Percentage of Canadians who strongly agree or somewhat agree that they have access to enough trustworthy information about the health risks of cannabis to make informed decisions [HC]Footnote 8 74% March 31, 2022
Health care and social service professionals and public health officials have access to high-quality public health information [PHAC] Number of health care and social service professionals and public health officials accessing high-quality public health information and data products developed [PHAC] 200,000Footnote 9 March 31, 2022
Health care and social service professionals and public health officials use information, knowledge and data products related to the public health impacts of cannabis and interventions to address them [PHAC] Percentage of Chief Public Health Officer's Health Professionals Forum member organizations using information, knowledge and data products to make informed decisions [PHAC] 75% March 31, 2022
Canadians are aware of the legal implications associated with cannabis use, and understand the laws associated with the new legislation [PS] Percentage of Canadians who indicate that they are aware of the new legislation, and the consequences related to making certain decisions involving cannabis [PS]Footnote 10 22% March 31, 2022
Canadians use information provided by the program to make informed, lawful decisions [PS] Percentage of Canadians who have indicated that they have made informed, lawful decisions around cannabis that protected themselves, and the safety of others [PS]Footnote 11 51%Footnote 12 March 31, 2022
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Cannabis Program Public education and outreach: Provide Canadians with information about health and safety risks associated cannabis use $16,121,003 $931,035 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2024
ER 2.1.2 PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2022
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Program Develop public health advice to support the role of Canada's Chief Public Health Officer (CPHO) through knowledge translation and horizontal analysis $2,586,174 $577,483 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2022
ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2022
Public Safety Crime Prevention Public education and awareness $1,173,345 $214,669 ER 2.3.1 PI 2.3.1 T 2.3.1 March 31, 2022
ER 2.3.2 PI 2.3.2 T 2.3.2 March 31, 2022
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety
  • PS:
    $3,810,640
  • RCMP:
    $14,003,082
  • PS:
    $800,547
  • RCMP:
    $3,188,586
Law enforcement is well-informed to apply the new legislation [PS] Percentage of law enforcement knowledgeable about the changes to the new regime, and able to use the legislative framework as a result of the training materials [PS] 33% of frontline police officers access materials 75% of officers with access to materials find the materials helpful Achieved March 31, 2020Footnote 13
Evidence-based decision-making on organized crime and policing issues [PS] Percentage of stakeholders who indicate that the materials informed decision making [PS] 75% March 31, 2022
Number of working meetings and consultations with stakeholders held [PS] 15 March 31, 2022
Number of new initiatives considered for implementation [PS] 2 March 31, 2022
Research projects related to cannabis and performance measurement implemented [PS] Percentage of research projects related to performance measurement completed and disseminated [PS] 100% March 31, 2022
Policy development and decision-making is informed by evidence and performance measurement [PS] Percentage of stakeholders indicating that policy development and decision making was based on performance measurement results and lessons learned [PS] 50% March 31, 2022
RCMP prevention and engagement activities support enhanced understanding among targeted partners and stakeholders, including youth and Indigenous communities [RCMP] Percentage of targeted federal partners and stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement "RCMP Federal Policing contributes to increased understanding specific to the new cannabis regime, organized crime, and the illicit cannabis market" [RCMP] 45% March 31, 2022
Number of information inquiries responded to by the Centre for Youth Crime Prevention [RCMP] 150 March 31, 2022
Enhanced capacity of target populations, including partners and stakeholders, youth and Indigenous communities, to respond to the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of targeted partners/stakeholders who strongly agree or agree with the statement "RCMP Federal Policing contributes to an increased skills/ability to respond to the new cannabis regime" [RCMP] 30% March 31, 2022
Percentage of youth resource officers who positively assessed the impact of training [RCMP] 80% March 31, 2022
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Safety Serious and Organized Crime Training for law enforcement $3,810,640 $800,547 ER 3.1.1 PI 3.1.1 T 3.1.1 Achieved March 31, 2020
ER 3.1.2 PI 3.1.2.1 T 3.1.2.1 March 31, 2022
PI 3.1.2.2 T 3.1.2.2 March 31, 2022
PI 3.1.2.3 T 3.1.2.3 March 31, 2022
Develop policies to inform operational law enforcement efforts See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime See first amount for Serious and Organized Crime ER 3.1.3 PI 3.1.3 T 3.1.3 March 31, 2022
ER 3.1.4 PI 3.1.4 T 3.1.4 March 31, 2022
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.5 Public Engagement Enhance RCMP's capacity to develop and deliver prevention and outreach activities on the new cannabis regime from a law enforcement perspective. $5,507,991 $1,540,782 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1 T 3.2.1.1 March 31, 2022
PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2022
Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.3.5 Operational Readiness and Response $8,495,091 $1,647,804 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2.1 T 3.2.2.1 March 31, 2022
PI 3.2.2.2 T 3.2.2.2 March 31, 2022
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities RCMP:
$26,798,704
RCMP:
$4,680,924
Information and intelligence products related to illicit substances (including cannabis) are shared with Canadian law enforcement agencies and available to be used to target organized crime [RCMP] Percentage or number of RCMP information / intelligence products / advice that indicate organized crime groups' activities in the Canadian cannabis market shared with RCMP senior management, divisions, domestic partners (including Canadian law enforcement) or international partners [RCMP] 10 March 31, 2022
Canadian law enforcement agencies have intelligence information to nationally coordinate activities to target organized crime groups involved in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP] Number of organized crime groups involved in the illicit cannabis market for which there are intelligence gaps is reduced which will result in efficient and accurate targeting by the law enforcement community [RCMP] TBD by December 31, 2022Footnote 14 TBD by December 31, 2022
Number or percentage of information and intelligence products that are used to guide enforcement against organized crime groups in the Canadian cannabis market [RCMP] 3 March 31, 2022
RCMP staff have access to required training in regards to enforcement of the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of target audience who have received the appropriate cannabis related training[RCMP] 80% October 31, 2022
RCMP employees have an increased ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP] Percentage of training participants who reported an increased level of knowledge and ability to enforce the new cannabis regime [RCMP] 90% October 31, 2022
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Criminal Intelligence Enhance RCMP's ability to collect, assess and disseminate information and intelligence related to the evolution of organized crime's involvement in the illicit substances market $4,402,524 $1,004,765 ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 31, 2022
Federal Policing General Investigations $14,219,253 $3,152,986 ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2.1 T 4.1.2.1 TBD by December 31, 2022
PI 4.1.2.2 T 4.1.2.2 March 31, 2022
Criminal Intelligence Service Canada $1,704,611 $325,986
Human Resources Management Services Ensure that the RCMP is able to develop and deliver extensive training to its officers across Canada to support national implementation and ensure appropriate and standardized criminal enforcement of the new regime $2,898,054

$3,574,262
$55,701

$141,486
ER 4.1.3 PI 4.1.3 T 4.1.3 October 31, 2022
Information Technology Services ER 4.1.4 PI 4.1.4 T 4.1.4 October 31, 2022
Theme 5 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 federal theme planned spending
(dollars)
Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods CBSA:
$34,600,853
CBSA:
$8,409,563
Travellers understand the requirements to declare cannabis and cannabis-related products when entering Canada [CBSA] Percentage of ports of entry with displayed signage on cannabis [CBSA] 75% of major ports and 100% of other priority ports Achieved March 31, 2019
CBSA awareness tools are in place to inform travelling public on prohibition of cross-border movement of cannabis [CBSA] 100% of the digital strategy launched Achieved March 31, 2019
Travellers are provided a clear opportunity to declare cannabis in their possession at all primary inspection sites [CBSA] Percentage of relevant primary inspection kiosks, systems, training materials, operational guidelines and forms in all modes updated [CBSA] 100% Achieved March 31, 2019
CBSA has enhanced capacity to promote compliance and to enforce import-related laws [CBSA] Number of cannabis import interdictions at ports of entry [CBSA] 10% reduction (+/- 5% variance) to baseline of 20,933 March 31, 2022
Prohibited cross border movement of cannabis detected Percentage of referred cannabis samples analyzed within 30 days [CBSA] 90% March 31, 2022
Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner [CBSA] Percentage of appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 calendar days [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2022
Percentage of Enforcement and Trusted Traveller appeals received that are decided within 180 calendar days [CBSA] 70% March 31, 2022
Percentage of Trade related appeals – Tariff Classification – that are decided within 365 calendars days (for cases never held in abeyance) [CBSA] 70% March 31, 2022
Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which the CBSA contact the complainant within 14 calendar days after a written complaint is received [CBSA] 85% March 31, 2022
Percentage of cannabis-related complaints for which the CBSA provides a final written response to the complainant within 40 calendar days after a written complaint is received [CBSA] 90% March 31, 2022
Theme 5 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity
(dollars)
2021–22 horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021–22 horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Canadian Border Services Agency Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Program Traveller awareness $1,008,014 0 ER 5.1.1 PI 5.1.1.1 T 5.1.1.1 Achieved March 31, 2019
PI 5.1.1.2 T 5.1.1.2 Achieved March 31, 2019
Port of entry processing $20,952,092 $5,267,530 ER 5.1.2 PI 5.1.2 T 5.1.2 Achieved March 31, 2019
Regulatory compliance and enforcement $4,074,333 $1,118,241 ER 5.1.3 PI 5.1.3 T 5.1.3 March 31, 2022
Policy, Monitoring and Reporting $4,766,720 $895,837 Completed in 2018-19 Completed in 2018-19 Completed in 2018-19 Completed in 2018-19
Field Technology Laboratory Services $1,011,397 $250,739 ER 5.1.4 PI 5.1.4 T 5.1.4 March 31, 2022
Recourse Regulatory compliance and enforcement $2,788,297 $877,216 ER 5.1.5 PI 5.1.5.1 T 5.1.5.1 March 31, 2022
PI 5.1.5.2 T 5.1.5.2 March 31, 2022
PI 5.1.5.3 T 5.1.5.3 March 31, 2022
PI 5.1.5.4 T 5.1.5.4 March 31, 2022
PI 5.1.5.5 T 5.1.5.5 March 31, 2022
Total spending, all themesFootnote *
Theme Total federal funding allocated since last renewal
(dollars)
2021–22 total federal planned spending
(dollars)
Theme 1 $388,366,521 $107,732,332
Theme 2 $19,880,522 $1,723,187
Theme 3 $17,813,722 $3,989,133
Theme 4 $26,798,704 $4,680,924
Theme 5 $34,600,853 $8,409,563
Total, all themes $487,460,322 $126,535,139
Footnote *

Total spending, all themes table does not include Internal Services

Return to footnote * referrer

Theme 1: Establish, implement and enforce the new horizontal initiative

Expected results

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 2: Provide Canadians with information needed to make informed decisions and minimize health and safety harms

Expected results

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Performance indicators

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Targets

Health Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Theme 3: Build law enforcement knowledge and engage partners and stakeholders on public safety

Expected results

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicators

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Public Safety Canada

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 4: Provide criminal intelligence, enforcement and related training activities

Expected results

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Performance indicators

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Targets

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Theme 5: Prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods

Expected results

Canada Border Services Agency

Performance indicators

Canada Border Services Agency

Targets

Canada Border Services Agency

Footnotes

Footnote 1

The Cannabis Regulations establish different classes of licences to conduct activities with cannabis, including micro-cultivation and micro-processing licences. For micro-cultivation, the plant surface area to cultivate, propagate and harvest cannabis cannot exceed 200 m2 (includes multiple surfaces such as surfaces vertically arranged). For micro-processing, the licence holder can only possess a maximum of the equivalent of 600 kg of dried cannabis that has been sold or distributed to them in a calendar year. A micro-class applicant is an individual or corporation who has applied for a micro-cultivation and/or micro-processing cannabis licence.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Cryptomarkets are anonymous online marketplaces that facilitate transactions of illegal products and services among many sellers and buyers, leveraging sophisticated technologies, like the Tor network and cryptocurrencies, to ensure anonymity among all participants.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The Horizontal Initiative Overview Table includes internal services cost.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

The target is based on data from CTADS 2013-2017. Past trends are not linear. It is anticipated that past 12-month prevalence among adults (i.e., 18-24) will increase post-legalization based on increasing pattern since 2013, and the fact that other jurisdictions who legalized cannabis for non-medical purposes observed an increase in prevalence rate among adults following legalization. As for past 12-month prevalence among youth aged 15 to 17, it is expected to remain stable or decrease based on a decreasing pattern since 2013 and data from other jurisdictions who legalized cannabis for non-medical purposes. It is anticipated that in the long-term the prevalence rate among youth will decrease and reach a plateau.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

The target has been revised based on latest data available.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

The target has been reduced to 80% from 95% to reflect changes in the licensed industry (recent introduction of licence holders who are less familiar with operating in a highly regulated environment), and to reflect increasing use of a targeted, risk-based enforcement approach that identifies licence holders at higher risk of non-compliance.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

The RCMP has applied an internal service level objective of 75% of all files with no adverse information completed within 15 business days.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

As mentioned in the 2019-20 Cannabis Horizontal Initiative Annex, the survey measuring the percentage of parents who discuss cannabis with their youth has been discontinued. As a result, the following new indicator has been identified to measure the intended outcome "% of Canadians who strongly agree or somewhat agree that they have access to enough trustworthy information about the health risks of cannabis to make informed decisions."

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

The target has been increased from the initial 150,000 as it was surpassed in 2019-20 with an actual result of 175,318.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Removal of youth target age range to align with current direction of work related to illegal sales, with first public opinion research undertaken in 2019-20.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Removal of youth target age range to align with current direction of work related to illegal sales, with first public opinion research undertaken in 2019-20.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Refers to Canadians who have used cannabis in the past 12 months indicating they usually purchase cannabis from a legal storefront or legal online source.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Public Safety Canada developed information packages and training materials for law enforcement on cannabis legislation in 2018-19 and 2019-20. This indicator has been achieved and is deemed complete.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

A target and target date cannot be established at this time as the information available on organized crime groups in relation to cannabis is insufficient due to the reallocation of enforcement resources to other criminal threats. A target and a target date will be established by December 31, 2022, once a new data collection process is implemented.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

General information

Recipient information

Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement

Start date

1996-97

End date

Not applicable

Link to departmental result(s)

Link to department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) was established as an independent organization in 1996-97 and renamed the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) in 2012. In late 2020, CFHI and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute amalgamated their organizations. The amalgamated organization's goal is to: find and promote health care innovators and innovations; drive rapid adoption of proven innovations; enable improvement-oriented systems; and, shape the future of healthcare.

Up-front multi-year funding included:

Additional federal grants were provided for the following purposes:

Total funding approved (dollars)

151,500,000

Total funding received (dollars)

1996 – 66,500,000
1999 – 60,000,000
2003 – 25,000,000

Planned funding in 2021−22 (dollars)

0

Planned funding in 2022−23 (dollars)

0

Planned funding in 2023−24 (dollars)

0

Note: CFHI is also reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Summary of recipient's annual plans

The newly amalgamated organization will continue to work with patients, families and caregivers; health and social service providers; governments and other public and private sector organizations to accelerate the identification, spread and scale of proven healthcare innovations.

As amalgamation costs are finalized, the new organization may rely on its remaining up-front multi-year funding to cover amalgamation costs or unfunded liabilities it is bringing into the new organization (e.g., pension liabilities). These funds are being held in reserve to address implications associated with any negative revisions to future funding

Canada Health Infoway

General information

Recipient information

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start date

March 31, 2001Footnote 3

End date

March 31, 2015Footnote 4

Link to departmental result(s)

Link to department's Program Inventory

Program 6: Digital Health

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1 billion to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding consisting of: $500 million in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority; $600 million in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100 million in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400 million in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait time reductions; and $500 million in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system. Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Total funding approved (dollars)

2,100,000,000

Total funding received (dollars)

2,093,398,112Footnote *

Footnote *

This amount only represents funds disbursed to Infoway since its creation in 2001 up to November 2019, including the immediate lump sum disbursements in 2001, 2003 and 2004 totaling $1.2 billion as well as funds disbursed through cash flow requests under the 2007 and 2010 funding agreements.

Return to footnote * referrer

Planned funding in 2021−22 (dollars)

To be determinedFootnote i

Planned funding in 2022−23 (dollars)

To be determinedFootnote i

Planned funding in 2023−24 (dollars)

To be determinedFootnote i

Footnote i

As per both the 2007 and 2010 contribution agreements, funds are to be disbursed according to the annual cash flow requirements identified by Infoway. These requirements are to be submitted to Health Canada no later than March 30, in advance of the upcoming fiscal year to which that cash flow statement applies. Also, Infoway can submit additional cash flow requests within a fiscal year, should the need for additional funding arise.

Return to footnote i referrer

Note: Budget 2017 contribution funding to Infoway is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Summary of recipient's annual plans

The following is a summary of plans related to up-front multi-year funding.Footnote 5

At its inception in 2010, Infoway received $2.1 billion in up-front multi-year funding from the federal government. This funding was invested in 12 programs (e.g., EMR and EHR) by the Board. Each program was broken down by jurisdictions into smaller projects. As of March 31, 2020, Infoway has spent $2.030 billion of the original $2.1 billion and has made commitments for the remaining $70 million. An estimated $40 million of the $70 million will be spent in 2020-21.

Infoway is currently undertaking its Driving Access to Care Strategy which is comprised of two programs: PrescribeIT and ACCESS Health. To date, 12 jurisdictions have formally agreed to participate in the PrescibeIT program (all except for British Columbia). Infoway has also secured partnerships with several distributers. Infoway also continues to develop its ACCESS Health program. It is currently designing two facets of the program: Access Atlantic and Access Gateway. As a part of the ACCESS Health Program, Infoway is developing a national trust framework to help protect the privacy and manage the consent of patients.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Annual contribution amounts vary from year to year based on the funding profile of various budget commitments (e.g. Budget 2017, 2018, 2019, etc.)

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

The terms Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) and Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) refer to the same concept. Health Canada has chosen to use SGBA+ to emphasize the fact that differences between women, men and gender-diverse individuals can be biological (sex related) and/or socio-cultural (gender related).

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The original allocation (2001) was governed by a Memorandum of Understanding. Presently, Infoway is accountable for the provisions of three active funding agreements, signed in: March 2003 (encompasses 2001 and 2003 allocations), March 2004, and March 2010.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Funds from the 2007 funding agreement were expended in 2018-19.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Note that this section focuses on Infoway legacy activities remaining from historical up-front multi-year funding agreements. The bulk of Infoway's current activities relate to Budget 2017 contribution funding to Infoway, which is reported under the section "Details on Transfer Payment Programs."

Return to footnote 5 referrer

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