Supplementary Information Tables 2022-23 Departmental Plan: Health Canada

Table of Contents

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Addressing Racism and Discrimination in Canada's Health Systems Program

Start date

January 31, 2022

End date

March 31, 2024

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Addressing Racism and Discrimination in Canada's Health Systems Program aims to address systemic racism and discrimination in Canada's health systems to advance Health Canada's overall mandate to help everyone in Canada maintain and improve their health by striving to ensure high quality health services are efficient and accessible, and by reducing health inequalities.

The objectives of the Program are to address systemic racism and discrimination and advance health equity for racialized and marginalized populations in Canada's health systems. To achieve its objectives, the Program will provide support to eligible organizations through two distinct streams of funding:

  1. Project stream: To improve the safety, accessibility, equity, quality, sustainability, and accountability of Canada's health systems, investments will be made in systems-level projects that address racism and discrimination perpetrated against racialized and/or marginalized populations.
  2. Engagement stream: To maintain strong and effective publicly funded health systems through the development of policies and strategies that address evolving health priorities, investments will be made to build capacity within racialized and/or marginalized communities and organizations that serve racialized and/or marginalized populations to enable them to meaningfully engage on their health priorities to ensure that their priorities and perspectives are adequately considered by health-decision makers.
Expected results

The Program has been designed to support immediate actions to address anti-Indigenous racism through two distinct streams of funding, while the development of a longer-term approach is underway.

Ultimately, it is anticipated that (1) health system partners will be enabled to provide more inclusive and culturally safe services to racialized and marginalized populations, and (2) there will be a reduction in systemic racism and discrimination resulting from a lack of consideration of racialized and marginalized populations' voices. To contribute to these outcomes, the Project Stream will provide funding to eligible organizations to develop, implement, and/or test solutions or awareness products that will address the safety, equity, accessibility, quality, cultural-appropriateness, and accountability of health services, while the Engagement Stream will provide funding to eligible organizations to engage, consult, and collaborate to elevate their voices, perspectives, needs, concerns, priorities and knowledge to health system decision-makers.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not Applicable.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not Applicable.

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

The timing for the evaluation will be determined during the development of a future Departmental Evaluation Plan.

General targeted recipient groups

The following groups of recipients are eligible for funding under the Program:

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with recipients to discuss Program progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipients' compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $3,300,000 $4,300,000 $6,300,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $3,300,000 $4,300,000 $6,300,000 0

Canada Brain Research Fund Program

Start date

April 1, 2011

End date

March 31, 2025

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 13: Brain Research

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

In Budgets 2011, 2016, and 2019, and through a subsequent funding commitment in 2021, the Government of Canada provided a cumulative $200 million, in matched funding with non-federal government donors, for the Canada Brain Research Fund Program "to support the very best Canadian neuroscience" and "to help the medical community better understand the brain and brain health." The Program provides funding for the Brain Canada Foundation (Brain Canada) which fundraises to match the federal contribution with donations from its private and charitable-sector donors and partners and then allocates grants to researchers across Canada. The Program's objectives are to: 1) to serve as a focal point for private investment in brain research by attracting private and charitable donations to match federal funding; and, 2) to support research that advances knowledge of the brain through grants to researchers.

Expected results

Funding for brain research is expected to lead to discoveries that will inform the development of prevention, diagnostic, therapeutic, clinical, technological and health system solutions for brain diseases/disorders. Ultimately, these advances are expected to improve the health and quality of life of Canadians who are at risk of or affected by brain diseases/disorders. To contribute to this outcome, the recipient, in partnership with donors and private organizations, funds merit-based research awards across Canada, to: support interdisciplinary and collaborative research; increase access to equipment, expertise and data across research networks; and develop the next generation of Canadian brain researchers.

In 2022-23, Brain Canada will expand its investment in knowledge mobilization, including through targeted research awards. It will also continue to advance equity, diversity and inclusion throughout its organizational policies and activities, including the research selection processes, as well as by funding research initiatives seeking to improve health outcomes for diverse groups.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2021-22

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

Not application

General targeted recipient groups

The sole target recipient is the national non-profit organization Brain Canada, which acts as a third-party organization that raises and disburses funds for brain research. Brain Canada allocates grants to researchers across Canada targeting research institutes, hospitals and health charities.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with Brain Canada staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $11,616,271 $31,682,739 $26,917,965 $3,608,033
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $11,616,271 $31,682,739 $26,917,965 $3,608,033
Note: The 2021-22 forecast spending was adjusted to exclude $8,383,729, which is being reprofiled to future years. This amount has been included in the planned spending.

Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program

Start date

March 21, 2019

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 14: Thalidomide

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Program objectives are to ensure that, for the remainder of their lives, eligible thalidomide survivors:

Expected results

Expected results are that thalidomide survivors will access care, treatment and/or support which in turn will contribute to their aging with dignity.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2020-21

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2024-25

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian not-for-profit and for-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with the third party administrator of Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program to discuss the Program progress. In addition, Health Canada will provide information about the Program to individual Thalidomide survivors, and individuals who believe they are survivors of Thalidomide, and the general public through direct correspondence and online communication.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $12,503,960 $17,128,148 $12,934,195 $13,218,882
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $12,503,960 $17,128,148 $12,934,195 $13,218,882

Contribution to Canada Health Infoway

Start date

April 1, 2016

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 5: Digital Health

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation that is federally funded to work with jurisdictions and other stakeholders to support the development and adoption of digital health technologies across Canada. Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada invested $2.1 billion in Infoway, through grants or up-front multi-year funding, to focus on electronic health records, and other priorities in digital health. In 2016 Infoway received an additional $50 million over two years via a Contribution Agreement to support short-term digital health activities in e-prescribing and telehomecare. This was followed by an additional Contribution Agreement in 2017 for $300 million over five years to expand e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, support the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, help patients to access their own health records electronically, and better link electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions. Budget 2019 further provided $36.5 million over five years with $5 million per year ongoing, for Infoway and the Canadian Institute for Health Information to support the creation of a pan-Canadian data and performance reporting system for Organ Donation and Transplantation. Finally, in 2020, Infoway was allocated $50 million over two years via a Contribution Agreement to support provinces, territories and others to expand virtual health services to Canadians.

As part of its Driving Access to Care Strategy, Infoway is currently focussing on: driving digital health adoption by collaborating with stakeholders to improve access to care, addressing challenges, and ensuring that virtual care is a viable and effective option for all; and accelerating pan-Canadian interoperability by improving effective data sharing, supporting sharing of resources across jurisdictions, and supporting jurisdictional efforts. Further, Infoway continues to work with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and key stakeholders to support the creation of data management solutions for a pan-Canadian data and reporting system for organ donation and transplantation.

Expected results

Expected results of the Canada Health Infoway Program include: provincial/territorial governments and stakeholders are engaged in expanding digital health technologies; health care providers and patients access digital health technologies and digital health information; and health care providers and patients are equipped with the knowledge and skills to use digital health technologies and digital health information. Over time, this work is expected to lead to: health care providers using digital health technologies to provide more efficient and high quality health care; and patients using digital health technologies to manage and/or improve their health. The Program will ultimately lead to a modern and sustainable health care system where Canadians have access to appropriate and effective health care.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Infoway is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with Infoway staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $91,354,000 $47,580,000 $7,020,000 $5,000,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $91,354,000 $47,580,000 $7,020,000 $5,000,000
Note: The 2021-22 forecast spending was adjusted to exclude $36.7 million, which is being reprofiled to future years. This amount has been included in the planned spending.

Contribution to Improve Health Care Quality and Patient Safety

Start date

March 31, 2021

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2020-21

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

In late 2020, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement and the Canadian Patient Safety Institute amalgamated their organizations, forming Healthcare Excellence Canada (HEC). As such, the Department's annual funding to each organization has been combined and is now dispersed directly to HEC via the Contribution to Improve Health Care Quality and Patient Safety Program.

This Program supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system adaptable to the needs of Canadians. It is designed to: find and promote innovators and innovations, drive rapid adoption and spread of quality and safety innovations, build capacities to enable excellence in healthcare and catalyze policy change.

Expected results

In the short-term, HEC's work will contribute to: spreading promising innovations, sustaining meaningful relationships with those HEC works with and assisting in preparing health leaders to lead improvement efforts. In the medium-term, HEC's work will contribute to: assisting the settings represented by the intermediaries HEC reaches (e.g. long-term care facilities, primary care facilities) in employing evidence-informed practices, implementing policy changes to catalyze health quality and patient safety improvement and developing cultures conducive to improvement. In the long-term, HEC's work will contribute to sustaining, spreading and scaling improvements as well as assisting settings reached by HEC in providing high-quality, safe, patient-orientated and culturally safe care.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Healthcare Excellence Canada is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with HEC staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $30,950,000 $24,600,000 $24,600,000 $24,600,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $30,950,000 $24,600,000 $24,600,000 $24,600,000

Contribution to the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health

Start date

April 1, 2008

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 2: Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) is an independent, not-for-profit agency funded by Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide credible, impartial and evidence-based information about the clinical/cost-effectiveness and optimal use of drugs and other health technologies to Canadian health care decision makers.

The contribution agreement provides financial support for CADTH's core business activities, namely, the Common Drug Review, pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review, Health Technology Assessments and Optimal Use Projects. Through these activities, CADTH is able to create and disseminate evidence-based information about the effectiveness and cost of drugs and non-drug technologies. Provinces and territories use this information to help decide whether or not public health plans should include the particular health products in question.

Expected results

Additional funding announced in Budget 2017 is supporting CADTH's ongoing transition to a health technology management organization in order to deliver results that better meet the needs of the healthcare system.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, an independent, not-for-profit agency is the sole recipient of transfer payment funds.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with CADTH staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $30,278,769 $31,248,352 $34,202,678 $34,202,678
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $30,278,769 $31,248,352 $34,202,678 $34,202,678

Contribution to the Canadian Institute for Health Information

Start date

April 1, 1999

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 6: Health Information

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) is an independent, not-for-profit organization supported by federal, provincial and territorial governments (FPT) that provides essential data and analysis on Canada's health system and the health of Canadians. CIHI was created in 1994 by the FPT Ministers of Health to address significant gaps in health information.

Between 1994 and 2018, the Government of Canada allocated approximately $1,232 million in total to CIHI through a series of contribution agreements. In early 2018, the current contribution agreement was signed, providing close to $365 million over five years (2017-18 to 2021-22). Subsequent amendments valued at an additional $115.9M over six years (2017-18 to 2022-23) are as follows:

Presently, Health Canada funds 81% of CIHI's total budget, while the provincial and territorial governments contribute 17%. The remaining funds are generated largely through product sales.

Expected results

CIHI will continue to address data gaps in priority areas, including home care, long-term care, mental health and addictions, hospital capacity and virtual care in 2022-23. Funding allows CIHI to provide essential information on Canada's health care systems and the health of Canadians. CIHI data is used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across the continuum of care. CIHI's stakeholders use the broad range of the Institute's health system databases, measurements and standards, together with their evidence-based reports and analyses, in their decision-making processes. CIHI protects the privacy of Canadians by ensuring the confidentiality and integrity of the health care information they provide.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

CIHI is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with CIHI staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $101,373,979 $97,324,479 $97,324,479 $92,658,979
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $101,373,979 $97,324,479 $97,324,479 $92,658,979

Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

Start date

April 1, 2007

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2020-21

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 9: Cancer Control

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established to implement the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control. This Strategy was developed in consultation with Canadians, including cancer experts and stakeholders with the following objectives:

CPAC is the sole recipient of the Contribution to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer Program. CPAC received $250 million from the federal government for its first five-year term (2007 to 2012) and $241 million for its second five-year term (2012 to 2017). Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, which is governed by a five-year agreement (2017 to 2022) for $237.5 million. Health Canada is currently reviewing CPAC's funding proposal for fiscal year 2022-23 to 2027-28.

Expected results

While Budget 2016 confirmed ongoing funding for CPAC, it continues to be funded in five-year terms, with its current contribution agreement expiring in March 2022. The next contribution agreement for 2022-23 to 2026-27 is yet to be finalized.

CPAC is expected to continue to enhance cancer control through knowledge management and the coordination of efforts among the provinces and territories, cancer experts, stakeholder groups, and Indigenous organizations to champion change, improve health outcomes related to cancer, and leverage existing investments.

A coordinated, knowledge-centered approach to cancer control is expected to significantly reduce the economic burden of cancer, alleviate current pressures on the health care system, and bring together information for all Canadians, no matter where they live.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Canadian Partnership Against Cancer is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with CPAC staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $52,500,000 $47,500,000 $47,500,000 $47,500,00
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $52,500,000 $47,500,000 $47,500,000 $47,500,000

COVID-19 Safe Restart Agreements Program

Start date

February 4, 2021

End date

March 31, 2023

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2020-21

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy Program

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of the COVID-19 Safe Restart Agreements Program is to enhance Canadian testing, contact tracing and data management/sharing for COVID-19 to manage the pandemic.

The objectives of the Program are to:

Expected results

These investments are intended to support 13 Provinces/Territories (PT) efforts to conduct more testing, perform more contact tracing, and improve the sharing of data to slow the transmission of COVID-19.

The following immediate result shows stakeholders, provinces and territories are engaged in health care improvements in priority areas of testing and screening, contact tracing, and data management. Specifically that all PTs are submitting data on all key variables on 100% of their case reports in the National COVID-19 Case Dataset, all PTs report initiating COVID-19 contact tracing following the identification of a positive case to 24 hours, and all jurisdiction have expanded their testing capacity. Ultimately, these changes will contribute to Canada having modern and sustainable health care systems.

Recipients will work towards reducing the number of national Covid-19 cases, increasing the number of PCR tests performed per day and shortening Covid-19 contact tracing turnaround time between positive case determination and when tracing begins.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable.

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

The timing for the evaluation will be determined during the development of a future Departmental Evaluation Plan.

General targeted recipient groups

The following groups of recipients are eligible for funding under the Program:

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Applicants are engaged by making a request for funding through an exchange of letters between Ministers of Health or by submitting a formal proposal using an online application form.

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and/or knowledge transfer activities) with successful recipients. As well, Health Canada will continue to monitor their compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting requirements.

Financial Information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $180,692,024 $22,500,000 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $180,692,024 $22,500,000 0 0

Health Care Policy and Strategies Program

Start date

September 24, 2002

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Health Care Policy and Strategies Program provides time-limited contribution funding for projects that address specific health care systems priorities, including palliative and end-of-life care, home and community care, mental health, and federal and provincial/territorial and other emerging priorities. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and a variety of stakeholder engagement activities, Health Canada contributes to the development and application of effective approaches to support sustainable improvements to health care systems. The Program also supports the Terry Fox Research Initiative, Ovarian Cancer Canada, the Sexual and Reproductive Health Fund, and Medical Assistance in Dying Policy and Practice.

Expected results

Program funding will support a wide range of projects designed to ultimately contribute to improvements in the accessibility, quality, sustainability and accountability of the health care system. These improvements could ultimately benefit either specific target populations, or all Canadians. For example, projects that produce and transfer knowledge in key areas will help improve Canada's health care systems and advance health policy. Other projects will identify, develop, implement, assess and promote new or modified tools, approaches and best practices that respond to identified health care system priorities and promote people-centred health care. Another range of projects will identify, develop, implement, assess and promote training and skills development, standards, products and technological solutions that will help modernize health care systems delivery.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations, other levels of government and other national organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with staff and senior management of the various recipient groups to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipients' compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $64,342,427 $85,875,248 $95,244,190 $72,553,624
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $64,342,427 $85,875,248 $95,244,190 $72,553,624

Improving Affordable Access to Prescription Drugs Program

Start date

August 11, 2021

End date

March 31, 2025

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-2022

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 2: Access, Affordability, and Appropriate Use of Drugs and Medical Devices

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Government of Canada's purpose in funding the Improving Affordable Access to Prescription Drugs Program is to help willing jurisdictions improve the affordability and accessibility of their public drug plans, as well as provide key learnings to help inform future decisions around national pharmacare. The objectives of the Program are to enhance and improve alignment across public drug plan formularies and, support more affordable access to prescription drugs.

PEI was the first province to sign an agreement with the Government of Canada to accelerate the implementation of national universal pharmacare. Lessons learned from PEI's efforts will inform the Government of Canada's work to advance national universal pharmacare with other willing provinces and territories.

Expected results

Expected immediate results include an increased understanding of public drug coverage differences among provinces and territories, and an increased capacity to implement changes to public drug plans. Intermediate results include identifying prescription drugs that are more affordable for residents, as well as, the residents having access to a list of prescription drugs that better meet their needs, and public drug plans. In the long-term, the Program will result in improved alignment across provincial and territorial public drug plans and increase the knowledge to inform future decisions by all levels of government on the implementation of national pharmacare.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

The timing for the evaluation will be determined during the development of a future Departmental Evaluation Plan.

General targeted recipient groups

Government of Prince Edward Island

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with the responsible PEI staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the letter of intent, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $2,900,000 $10,700,000 $10,700,000 $10,700,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $2,900,000 $10,700,000 $10,700,000 $10,700,000

Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program

Start date

2000 as a Grant, but as of April 1, 2017 it has become a Contribution.

End date

March 31, 2027

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 4: Mental Health

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), an arm's length, not-for-profit organization, was established in March 2007 with a ten-year mandate to improve health and social outcomes for people and their families living with mental illness. Between 2007 and 2017, the Government of Canada invested $130 million in the MHCC through a grant, to develop a mental health strategy for Canada, conduct an anti-stigma campaign and create a knowledge exchange centre. In 2016, the MHCC's mandate was renewed for a 10-year period, from 2017-18 to 2026-27 to advance work on mental health priorities, including linkages to substance use, suicide prevention, support for at-risk populations and engagement. The Government of Canada has made a contribution of $14.25 million per year since 2017-18 for these mandated priority areas.

Expected results

The Mental Health Commission of Canada Contribution Program is expected to contribute to the improved mental health and well-being of Canadians, specifically in the areas of problematic substance use, suicide prevention, and stigma reduction.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups

The Mental Health Commission of Canada is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with MHCC staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $14,250,000 $14,250,000 $14,250,000 $14,250,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $14,250,000 $14,250,000 $14,250,000 $14,250,000

Official Languages Health Program

Start date

June 18, 2003

End date

Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 12: Promoting Minority Official Languages in Health Care Systems

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Official Languages Health Program has a total budget of $191.2 million over five years (2018-2023), and $38.46 million per year ongoing after 2023. The Program supports the federal government's commitment to maintain a strong and effective publicly funded health care system by ensuring that official language minority communities (OLMCs) have access to bilingual health services in the language of their choice. Through the implementation of contribution agreements and micro-grants, Health Canada supports investments that improve the active offer of health services for OLMCs, through training and retention of health care providers, networking activities and innovative projects that increase access to health services for OLMCs.

Expected results

Program funding will support training and retention of health professionals, health networking and innovative projects to improve access to health services for OLMCs. These activities are expected to increase access to bilingual health professionals in OLMCs, and to increase the active offer of health services in the minority language to address the health needs to OLMCs.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017-18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2022-23

General targeted recipient groups

Eligible recipients under the program are individuals, non-profit entities, provincially-accredited postsecondary institutions and provincial and territorial government bodies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with recipients to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipients' compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants $125,000 0 0 0
Total contributions $37,475,000 $37,600,000 $37,400,000 $37,400,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $37,600,000 $37,600,000 $37,400,000 $37,400,000

Organs, Tissues and Blood Program

Start date

April 1, 2000

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 11: Organs, Tissues and Blood

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Organs, Tissues, and Blood Program provides support for safe, effective, accessible and responsive organ, tissue and blood systems that will improve and extend the quality of the lives of Canadians while respecting federal, provincial, and territorial scopes of authority. Canadian Blood Services (CBS) is the sole recipient of the Program funding.

Expected results

With the support of the Organs, Tissues and Blood Program, CBS is expected to generate numerous knowledge products and learning events and to play a role in public education, engagement and awareness. It also plays a significant role in training highly qualified people in important areas such as basic and applied research. CBS develops collaborative arrangements, establishes partnerships and identifies and responds to emerging issues related to organ, tissue and blood systems, in collaboration with the provinces and territories as appropriate.

Various stakeholders, including Health Canada, use the knowledge generated by blood research and development projects and organ donation and transplantation projects to inform changes to practices and standards. This will contribute to greater safety, effectiveness, accessibility and responsiveness of the organ, tissue and blood systems to improve and extend the quality of lives of Canadians.

Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation

This program is expected to continue to support CBS to work with partners and stakeholders to influence and improve system performance through development and implementation of leading practices, professional and public education, engagement and awareness, data and analytics services and system performance reporting. CBS is a member of the Organ Donation and Transplantation Collaborative, and will continue to focus on the priorities identified by the Collaborative that advance transformative, system-level improvements in organ donation and transplantation by 2024.

Blood research and development

In this context, "blood" includes whole blood and blood products, plasma and plasma products and their respective artificial and substitute products.

With support from the Program, CBS helps maintain and increase the safety, supply and efficiency of the Canadian blood system by advancing innovation and maintaining Canadian capacity in transfusion science and medicine. In 2022-23, CBS is expected to continue to foster research, facilitate dissemination and application of knowledge, educate the next generation of scientific and health care experts, and engage with an interdisciplinary network of partners in Canada and beyond.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017-18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation
General targeted recipient groups

Canada Blood Services is the sole recipient.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with Canadian Blood Services' staff and senior management to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $8,780,000 $8,580,000 $8,580,000 $8,580,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $8,780,000 $8,580,000 $8,580,000 $8,580,000

Strengthening Canada's Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services Initiative

Start date

November 9, 2017

End date

March 31, 2027

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18 and amended in 2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Government of Canada is investing $11 billion over ten years (from 2017 to 2027) to support the provinces and territories in improving access to home and community care ($6 billion) and mental health and addictions ($5 billion) services in their jurisdictions, in accordance with the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities which was jointly agreed to by federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) Ministers of Health (with the exception of Quebec) in August 2017.

Governments agreed to common objectives in each of home and community care and mental health and addiction services, and in particular to improving access to mental health and addictions through one or more of the following areas of action:

Similarly, on home and community care, FPT governments agreed to work together to improve access to services through one or more of the following areas of action:

Governments also agreed to develop a focused set of common indicators to measure progress on these priority areas. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) led a collaborative process which culminated in May 2018 when federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Health endorsed a suite of 12 common indicators to be implemented over the coming years. CIHI will continue to work with governments across Canada to report annually on these indicators.

Following agreement on the Common Statement of Principles for Shared Health Priorities in 2017, the federal government negotiated and signed the first of two sequential bilateral agreements with all 13 provinces and territories which set out details of how each jurisdiction is using federal investments to improve access to home and community care and mental health and addiction services. The bilateral agreements with the provinces and territories will be renewed starting in 2021-22 for the remaining five years of the ten-year commitment.

Expected results

It is expected that through these investments Canadians will experience tangible improvements in access to home and community care as well as mental health and addictions services. This will lead to better health outcomes and a more sustainable health care system, as care is shifted from expensive hospital care to more patient-centric settings in the home and in the community. These investments could also have a broader, positive impact on Canada's economy, by making the health care system more sustainable in the long term, and by enhancing workforce productivity and social participation.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2025-26

General targeted recipient groups

Provinces and Territories.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with Provinces and Territories to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipient's compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $2,567,507,731 $1,800,310,000 $1,800,310,000 $1,800,310,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $2,567,507,731 $1,800,310,000 $1,800,310,000 $1,800,310,000
Note: These amounts will be allocated to provinces and territories using funding approaches outlined in bilateral agreements in combination with a per capita basis based on population estimates from Statistics Canada.

Substance Use and Addictions Program

Start date

December 4, 2014

End date

Ongoing (Contribution)

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental results
Link to the department's Program Inventory
Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) provides funding for a wide range of evidence-informed and innovative problematic substance use prevention, harm reduction and treatment initiatives across Canada at the community, regional and national levels. Initiatives target a range of substances, including opioids, stimulants, cannabis, alcohol, tobacco and vaping products.

Projects funded by the SUAP contribute to individual capacity and organizational, system and community level program, policy and practice change by: preventing problematic substance use and reducing harms; facilitating treatment service and related system enhancements; and, improving awareness, knowledge, skills and competencies of targeted stakeholders and Canadians.

Expected results

The SUAP provides contribution funding in support of Health Canada's Canadian Drug and Substance Strategy, as well as the delivery of three of the department's Programs: Cannabis, Tobacco Control and Controlled Substances.

In addition to providing funding to many community, regional and national organizations, SUAP also provides funding to the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addictions to fund research on the impact of cannabis legalization and regulation as well as the Mental Health Commission of Canada to inform and advance research on the impacts of cannabis use on the mental health of Canadians.

It is expected that through these investments Canadians and stakeholders will have access to evidence- based information on substance use and increased availability of harm reduction, safer alternatives and treatment services. This will lead to better data and research evidence on drugs, substance use, and emerging drug trends as well as a reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people with problematic drug, alcohol and substance use. These investments may also have a broader impact on Canadians who use drugs and substances and result in reduced drug-related harms and deaths in the long term.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2017-18

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

Tobacco activities evaluation in 2025-26

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy, and Cannabis Program evaluations in 2022-23

General Targeted Recipient Groups

Community-based, Indigenous, regional and national non-profit organizations, including those in the health and education sectors; and, other levels of government and their agencies.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

SUAP applicants and recipients include not-for-profit organizations, provinces and territories, municipalities, Indigenous organizations, people with lived and living experience of substance use, universities, and many other groups. These groups are engaged through various methods, including stakeholder outreach, solicitation processes, project development discussions, and performance reporting and monitoring tools, processes and activities. Health Canada also supports knowledge translation and exchange opportunities between SUAP projects and other partners and stakeholders.

Health Canada will engage SUAP applicants on funding applications and work closely with successful organizations to shape their initiatives, monitor contribution agreements and obtain required performance measurement and evaluation reports. Of note, the department is also exploring the development of theme-based Communities of Practice (e.g. cannabis, safer supply, chronic pain, etc.) with partners within and external to the federal government.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants $200,000 0 0 0
Total contributions $169,706,718 $170,638,118 $50,683,318 $36,335,774
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $169,906,718 $170,638,118 $50,683,318 $36,335,774

Territorial Health Investment Fund

Start date

April 1, 2014

End date

March 31, 2023

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 15: The Territorial Health Investment Fund

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Building on an initial investment of $70 million in contribution funding (2014-15 to 2017-18), the Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) was renewed as a grant program in 2017-18 with an additional $108 million over four years (2017-18 to 2020-21) and then extended in 2021-22 with an additional $54 million over two years. In 2021-22 and 2022-23, $12.8 million will be allocated to the Yukon, $14.2 million to the Northwest Territories, and $27 million to Nunavut. This funding will enable each territory to continue pursuing innovative activities in support of strong, sustainable health systems and to offset costs associated with medical travel to support Northerners' access to the health care they need.

Expected results

The THIF supports territorial efforts to innovate and transform their health care systems and help offset costs associated with medical travel. The expected results for Northerners are: improved access to health care services; health care needs being met; and improved health status.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2018-19

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24.

General targeted recipient groups

Territories.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with Territories to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipients' compliance with the grant agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants $27,000,000 $27,000,000 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $27,000,000 $27,000,000 0 0

Transfer Payment Programs under $5 Million

Chemicals Management Plan Engagement and Outreach Contribution Program

Start date

April 1, 2022

End date

March 31, 2024

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2021-22

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 24: Health Impacts of Chemicals

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of this Program is to support the capacity of Canadians, with an emphasis on vulnerable populations and Indigenous peoples, to engage in the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP) and environmental health programs, allowing for a broad range of expertise and opinions to be heard and considered. The Program will also support partnerships to increase outreach to Canadians about environmental health issues, using tailored tools and messaging. This will include raising awareness of the impacts of chemicals on human health and how to reduce the risks.

Expected results

The expected results are:

Performance indicators will be published as part of the Call for Proposals, and progress will be monitored through annual reports from recipients.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada will engage applicants and recipients both formally and informally, throughout the life of the Program and solicit input on engagement activities at key points in the process. Engagement and consultation will take place through virtual and/or face-to-face meetings, relevant conferences and workshops, and by email and telephone. Applicant and recipient consultations will be structured to support the design of projects that will maximize reach and impact. Health Canada will also provide expertise and support throughout project delivery and performance measurement of results achieved.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 $418,000 $418,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 $418,000 $418,000 0

Innovative Solutions Canada

Start date

August 23, 2019

End date

March 31, 2023

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20

Link to the departmental results
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care System Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Innovative Solutions Canada is a horizontal Government of Canada initiative, coordinated by Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada, in which participating departments and agencies can issue challenges to Canadian businesses to develop solutions for operational or sector-specific issues and fund the early stage research and development of these innovations. Health Canada's participation will enable innovators and entrepreneurs to generate novel solutions to help Canadians maintain and improve their health.

Expected results

Expected results include the generation of new Canadian Intellectual Property, commercialization of early stage research and development, and increasing the employment of highly skilled workers in the Canadian innovation ecosystem.

Results will be reported under Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's monitoring and evaluation processes which encompass the entirety of the Innovative Solutions Canada Program, including Health Canada's participation therein.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

The timing for the evaluation will be determined during the development of a future Departmental Evaluation Plan.

General targeted recipient groups

Provincial and territorial ministries of health; and established province-wide, regional and local health authorities and public health units.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Health Canada officials will undertake numerous exchanges (meetings, phone calls, e-mails and knowledge transfer activities) with recipient groups to discuss progress. In addition, Health Canada will continue to monitor the recipients' compliance with the contribution agreement, performance and results through the analysis and follow-up of progress, performance and financial reporting.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants $2,000,000 $2,000,000 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $2,000,000 $2,000,000 0 0

Radon Outreach Contribution Program

Start date

April 1, 2018

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018-19

Link to the departmental result(s)
Link to the department's Program Inventory

Program 30: Radiation Protection

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of the Radon Outreach Contribution Program is to protect and improve human health and well-being in Canada from the impacts of indoor radon exposure, by aiding in the education of Canadians about the importance of testing their homes, schools and workplaces for radon and reducing the radon levels where necessary.

Expected results

The expected results are:

These expected results will be measured by the following indicators:

Percentage of Canadians surveyed who are knowledgeable about radon

Target: 65% by March 31, 2023

Percentage of Canadian homeowners surveyed who have tested their homes for radon

Target: 10% by March 31, 2026

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of next planned evaluation

2023-24

General targeted recipient groups
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

The applicants and recipients of the Radon Outreach Contribution Program are engaged and consulted through face-to-face and virtual meetings at relevant conferences and workshops and by email and telephone. Applicant and recipient consultations are structured to support them in designing programs that maximize reach and impact, and provide expertise and support throughout the delivery and evaluation of their programs, with an overarching goal of raising awareness and promoting action to reduce radon-induced lung cancer in Canada.

Financial information
Type of transfer payment 2021-22 Forecast spending 2022-23 Planned spending 2023-24 Planned spending 2024-25 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000

Gender-Based Analysis Plus

Section 1: Institutional GBA Plus Capacity

Health Canada is committed to systematically integrating sex, gender and diversity considerations into all of its activities through the application of quality Sex and Gender-Based Analysis Plus (SGBA PlusFootnote 1). The renewal of both the Health Portfolio SGBA Plus Policy (Policy) and the Health Canada SGBA Plus Action Plan (Action Plan) in 2021-22 supports greater integration of equity, diversity and inclusion into all Health Canada initiatives, departmental culture and operations.

The Policy is endorsed by Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. In 2021-22, Health Canada led a process to renew the Policy on behalf of the Health Portfolio. This included reframing SGBA Plus to emphasize intersectional analyses and equity, diversity and inclusion considerations and to reflect coherence with other federal frameworks and priorities (anti-racism, accessibility, etc.). The Policy was also updated to acknowledge the importance of engaging with diverse partners in all activities and the need for culturally relevant application of SGBA Plus that adheres to principles of respecting the Government of Canada's relationship with Indigenous Peoples. The Policy includes all relevant identity factors as part of SGBA Plus (including, but not limited to, sex, gender, age, race, sexual orientation, etc.).

Health Canada's Action Plan provides a framework that strengthens the systematic integration of sex, gender and other intersectional factors in departmental work and decision-making while also supporting the Government of Canada's priorities on gender equality, diversity and inclusion. It is framed under the following three pillars:

Priority areas under these pillars include:

  1. Increasing governance, accountability and transparency in the integration of SGBA Plus in the Department's decision-making;
  2. Strengthening departmental SGBA Plus knowledge and capacity with enhanced learning opportunities, tools and resources to increase SGBA Plus competency;
  3. Developing strategic partnerships and collaborations to enhance equity lenses and intersectional expertise in SGBA Plus;
  4. Enabling the collection and use of disaggregated data for rigour in intersectional analysis; and
  5. Enhancing communications and guidance with clarity on SGBA Plus and intersectionality.

In 2022-23, Health Canada will continue to strengthen SGBA Plus integration, as part of the Action Plan, through the implementation of initiatives across the Department that are informed and developed through an intersectional lens.

Institutional Leadership and Support for SGBA Plus Integration

Health Canada's Centre of Excellence on SGBA Plus - The SGBA Plus Centre of Excellence (SCOE) provides leadership for the implementation of SGBA Plus at Health Canada. The SCOE advises and collaborates with senior management, branch leads and colleagues to formulate responsive and inclusive health research, policies, regulations, services, programs, and other initiatives to promote greater health equity. In 2022-23, the SCOE will focus on the following:

Departmental SGBA Plus Integration Network - Enhanced governance and accountability will be achieved in 2022-23 with the support of the Health Canada SGBA Plus Integration Network. Consisting of branch head-appointed delegates, the Network was established in late 2021 to support culture change towards the systematic integration of SGBA Plus into all departmental activities.

Key Initiatives in Support of SGBA Plus Integration

SGBA Plus in Health Canada's COVID-19 Response - In response to the pandemic, Health Canada will continue to put forward a number of enhanced post-market surveillance activities for monitoring the safety profile of COVID-19 vaccines that include gender-based analyses. For example, manufacturers of authorised COVID-19 vaccines are required to:

Health Products for Women - In 2022-23, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Health Products for Women will continue to provide timely, patient-centered, scientific, technical and medical advice on current and emerging issues regarding women's health and the regulation of health products for women.

SGBA Plus in Science and Research - The Science and Research Integration Network SGBA Plus Working Group has been established with the objective to enhance integration of sex, gender and diversity analysis into Health Canada's Decision-Making Framework for Identifying, Assessing, and Managing Health Risks. This work is meant to ensure evaluators, researchers and project coordinators support and adopt gender, diversity and intersectionality focused practices in their work so that health policies, programs, legislation and communications result in equitable health outcomes for all people living in Canada.

Drugs and Medical Devices - An SGBA Plus lens will continue to be applied to all regulatory amendment initiatives conducted by the Department. In 2022-2023, these will include the Agile Licensing of Drugs and Medical Devices amendment initiative, which will broaden the scope of terms and conditions that can be imposed onto a medical device licence.

Chemicals Management Plan - Health Canada will launch a new Contribution Program in 2022-23 to support the capacity of Canadians (with an emphasis on vulnerable populations and Indigenous Peoples) to engage on the Chemicals Management Plan and environmental health programs. The Contribution Program will also include support for communicating evidence-based information about chemicals and environmental health to the public. This flexible funding model will bring new voices into the Program, and leverage diverse knowledge and expertise. Canadians and stakeholders will have a greater opportunity to be involved in decision-making processes as a result including the regulatory process.

National Mental Health and Substance Use Service Standards - Health Canada signed an agreement with the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) to develop national mental health and substance use service standards, to fulfil the Budget 2021 commitment. With support from Health Canada, SCC will lead the development of standards and engage a diverse range of key stakeholders to inform the work, including Indigenous partners, people with lived and living experience, and other key stakeholders and populations. In addition to focusing on equity and accessibility, an SGBA Plus lens will be applied to standards development so that diverse perspectives and needs are considered.

Section 2: Highlights of GBA Plus Results Reporting Capacity by Program

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis & Policy

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by sex, gender and diversity (SGBA Plus).

Health Canada integrates SGBA Plus within various stages of the Health Care Policy and Strategies Program performance measurement cycle by:

For instance, all of the output-level indicators measure some aspect of diversity including: the identification of underserved groups to which resources and activities are targeted; determination if a resource is gender-specific; identification of the geographic location of resources, activities, and collaborative arrangements; and indication of the language of products and activities.

Health Canada conducts case studies of projects completed under this program to better understand the impact of funded initiatives. In 2022-23, case studies will focus on projects that target women and Indigenous researchers, as well as cultural and linguistic minorities (such as the Chinese and South Asian communities in British Columbia), and will illustrate some of the ways in which funding provided to projects supports diversity and inclusion in the health care sector. The Department intends to continue conducting annual case studies which will strengthen reporting on program impacts by gender and diversity.

Health Canada also collects additional qualitative data internally on the completed projects, including SGBA Plus best practices and lessons learned. This information will strengthen SGBA Plus data collection for future initiatives.

Program 2: Access, Affordability, & Appropriate Use of Drugs & Medical Devices

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

SGBA Plus is regularly applied, where possible, within policy and program decisions to improve access, affordability and appropriate use of drug and medical devices; however, a number of gaps exist in the collection and reporting of disaggregated pharmaceuticals data. The federal government engages provinces, territories and other health system partners for data to support the effective management of drugs and medical devices. As the data owners are external to the Government of Canada, the data has varying incorporations of SGBA Plus considerations.

While there are a number of data gaps, various health data initiatives are underway that will seek to improve the collection of disaggregated pharmaceuticals data with an emphasis on at-risk populations, where possible (such as by sex, age, etc.). For example, updated disaggregated data on cost-related non-adherence (i.e., not taking medication due to cost), among other pharmaceutical indicators, are expected to be available from Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Survey in 2023. Health Canada is also working to support Statistics Canada in improving disaggregated pharmaceutical and medical device related data collection in future surveys in its implementation of Budget 2021 commitments.

Additionally, Health Canada is working with recipients of federal funding through this Program to build impactful SGBA Plus indicators for performance measurement and reporting.

Program 3: Home, Community & Palliative Care

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada is committed to supporting provinces and territories (P/T) to enhance access to quality home, community and palliative care services for Canadians by spreading and scaling integrated models of care; enhancing access to palliative care; increasing support for caregivers; and enhancing home care infrastructure.

Bilateral agreements with each of the P/Ts include federal funding to support home and community, and palliative care programs over ten years for Shared Health Priorities. The Common Statement of Principles on Shared Health Priorities is a federal, provincial and territorial (F/P/T) health ministers' agreement to a focused set of common indicators to measure pan-Canadian progress, and commitment to report back to Canadians every year on this work. These agreements include an action for the use of this funding, which is available online. P/Ts are also working with the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) on common indicators to show progress in the area of mental health. These initial indicators include some disaggregated data by gender and population and are available online. Please refer to Program 4: Mental Health for more information.

Home & Community Care

Palliative Care

Health Canada will continue to support specific policy and research projects in the area of home care and palliative care, using funding provided through the Health Care Policy and Strategies Program to improve SGBA Plus data collection. Program recipients are required to provide a gender breakdown of their target populations as part of their annual performance reports.

Program 4: Mental Health

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada funds entities such as the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) and P/T governments by way of the Common Statement of Principles on Shared Health Priorities, and the Wellness Together Canada online portal. These various stakeholders collect extensive data to describe unique gender and diversity impacts and continually assess where additional information may better support decision making and program development. It is difficult to specify timelines for future SGBA Plus collection initiatives as the work is ongoing. For example:

Also of importance, self-reported national level data on perceived mental health status have been analyzed and reported by education level, gender and sexual orientation, geographical region, visible minority status, indigeneity, and immigration status to measure the impacts of federal investments on the mental health of diverse populations. The program leverages data available from Statistics Canada and the CIHI, which collects data from the P/Ts, to better understand how mental health is impacting various populations with a gender and diversity lens. However, there is a still a lack of data in this area, and efforts are underway to improve data collection, with an emphasis on SGBA Plus.

Program 5: Digital Health

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The Digital Health Program, supports pan-Canadian collaboration on health innovation to encourage the adoption of new digital health technology to improve access, increase efficiency and improve outcomes for patients. Through Canada Health Infoway (Infoway), the Digital Health Program's funding recipient, progress and performance is measured on an ongoing basis. As part of Infoway's contribution agreement with Health Canada, the organization reports on progress and performance twice yearly. This includes: performance measurement planning; regularly collecting data on output and outcome indicators; analyzing and/or synthesizing the data; and using the data to inform decision-making to continually improve implementation. In carrying out its work, Infoway works with P/Ts and other partners to consider whether and how gender, sex and other identity factors informs their projects. This could include examining sex, gender or other identity factors differences in technology adoption, use and satisfaction levels among health care providers, patients or others. Infoway supports the collection of data by sex, gender and other identity factors to the extent possible, and reports on this data to Health Canada. Further, since 2020, Infoway has developed and used a digital health equity analysis lens to its work, which includes explicit consideration of sex and gender and their intersections with other factors in a broad equity lens. This lens informs Infoway's current initiatives and continues to deepen its understanding and measurement of equity issues.

Program 6: Health Information

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada acknowledges the importance of enhancing health care systems by providing health care information that improves the health of Canadians. The Health Information Program supports the provision of comparable and actionable data and information that are used to accelerate improvements in health care, health system performance and population health across Canada under its present mandate. The lack of sex and gender data and information in the health sector in Canada makes it difficult to measure health inequalities and to identify inequities. To harmonize collection and ensure high-quality data, Health Canada provides funding to the CIHI, which has proposed pan-Canadian standards for sex and gender identity data in health systems in consultation with partners and stakeholders. Health Canada works in close collaboration with pan-Canadian organizations such as CIHI to undertake health care systems analysis and policy development along with providing funding support towards current and future health care systems challenges.

The establishment of common definitions and data standards has been ongoing for several years and has included a detailed review of the literature and engagement with researchers, clinicians, organizations representing stakeholder communities and F/P/T governments. This work has led to notable and ongoing efforts toward making data standards more inclusive for capturing richer data. For instance, CIHI has proposed four sex- at-birth options of male, female, indeterminate, and unknown; and five gender options of female, male, gender diverse, unknown, and not applicable.

The capture of sex and gender data elements at CIHI is described and updated regularly in the Equity Stratifier Inventory.Footnote 2 CIHI is in the process of implementing the broader use of the proposed sex and gender data standards. CIHI developed a toolkit, designed to provide information and resources needed to understand and use the CIHI Reference Data Model, which is a standardized, high-level, corporate-wide reference data model. The toolkit explores the availability of 19 equity stratifiers, as well as residential postal codes, in each of the CIHI (and Statistics Canada) data sources. It can also be used as a template to map available equity stratifiers in various databases. Six of the stratifiers presented in this tool have standard definitions developed by CIHI in collaboration with Statistics Canada and subject-matter experts across the country. These definitions are presented in the report In Pursuit of Health Equity: Defining Stratifiers for Measuring Health Inequalities - A Focus on Age, Sex, Gender, Income, Education and Geographic Location. Efforts are currently under way at CIHI to continue to work in consultation with P/T stakeholders to enhance various submitted data sources to align with these definitions. The CIHI Reference Data Model toolkit can be consulted for further information.

Program 7: Canada Health Act

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The Canada Health Act sets the requirements P/T health insurance plans must meet in order for P/Ts to receive their full federal health transfer. The Act requires P/Ts health insurance plans to provide universal access to medically necessary hospital and physician care for their residents based on medical need, rather than on ability and willingness to pay, or discrimination on any other basis. Medically necessary hospital and medical services are delivered by the P/Ts and are continually changing to meet individual jurisdiction needs. Due to the complexity and ever evolving nature of each jurisdiction's health care plan, Health Canada does not collect a regular set of statistics to assess universal access in accordance with the Act. Instead, Health Canada ensures jurisdictions provide universal access through the monitoring and assessment of media, public grievances or experiences, and general descriptions provided by the P/Ts related to how they meet the criteria of the Act. As such, there are no plans to collect data specific to SGBA Plus on a regular basis.

Program 8: Medical Assistance in Dying

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) monitoring system currently collects and reports on the general profile of those receiving MAID (i.e., age, gender, underlying condition, nature of suffering). Recent changes in the federal legislation on MAID requires Health Canada to expand collection of data to include race, indigeneity and disability, with a view to reporting on the presence of individual or systemic inequality or disadvantage in the context or delivery of MAID.

Amendments to the 2018 Regulations for the Monitoring of Medical Assistance in Dying are required to broaden data collection (as set out in the new legislation). Health Canada will consult with key stakeholders implicated in MAID reporting on how the changes to the reporting regime will be most effective to balance the need for information while respecting the privacy of patients and practitioners and minimizing reporting burden. Questions must also be limited to information that practitioners would be reasonably expected to know. The regulatory regime is expected to begin this new data collection in 2023. To help address data limitations and gaps under the monitoring regime, Health Canada will be using funds committed in Budget 2021 to support other opportunities to gather information about MAID, including research on qualitative aspects of MAID.

Program 9: Cancer Control

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada is supporting Cancer Control through funding to the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC). CPAC's mandate is to reduce the number of cancer cases in Canada, minimize the number of cancer-related deaths, and to improve patient quality of life through the implementation of the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control.

CPAC measures progress and performance on an ongoing basis. This includes performance measurement planning; regularly collecting data on output and outcome indicators; analyzing and/or synthesizing data; and using the data to inform decision-making to continually improve implementation. As a part of CPAC's contribution agreement with Health Canada, the organization reports on progress and performance twice yearly.

Through its progress and performance measurement, CPAC endeavours to maintain its commitment to addressing the diagnostic and treatment needs of men, women, girls, boys, and gender diverse Canadians in its SGBA Plus data collection plans and activities, where appropriate. This includes the application of SGBA Plus and strengthening and promoting the collection of sex and gender disaggregated data.

Program 10: Patient Safety (Healthcare Excellence Canada)

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada provides and synthesizes broad policy advice that helps to advance patient safety in health care systems. Contribution funding to Healthcare Excellence CanadaFootnote 3, the recipient of contribution funding for patient safety work, supports the federal government's interest in achieving an accessible, high quality, sustainable and accountable health system that is adaptable to the needs of Canadians.

Healthcare Excellence Canada is in the process of developing its performance measurement framework for its 2021-2026 Contribution Agreement. As part of this process, it is considering which of its activities and intended short, medium and long-term outcomes can include data collection for gender and diversity. While this process is not complete, Healthcare Excellence Canada is committed to collecting data on the gender and diversity impacts of its funded initiatives.

Program 11: Organs, Tissues and Blood

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The Organs, Tissues, and Blood Program provides funding to Canadian Blood Services (CBS) to support safe, effective, accessible and responsive organ, tissue and blood systems that will improve and extend the quality of life of Canadians while respecting F/P/T scopes of authority. While the organ and tissue donation and transplantation component focuses on improving the effectiveness of the system, the blood research and development activities support protection from health risks associated with the use of biological products through evidence-based practices to ensure the safety and supply of the Canadian blood system.

The collection of SGBA Plus data for the Program falls under P/T jurisdictions which presents limitations in data collection as data comes from multiple sources under different formats that are not easily comparable. By way of contribution funding to CBS, Health Canada aims to improve the access for all Canadian patients to health information and services related to organs, tissues and blood, no matter the geography or income level of individuals and their families.

Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation

Blood Research and Development

CBS is collecting diversity-related data regarding staff (an all-employee survey in this context was recently completed), has an ongoing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion program (an executive-level responsibility), has created a Chief Diversity Officer position, is expanding their recruitment and career development programs to better reflect the needs and foster the potential of diverse team members, and has made a commitment to the federal government's 50-30 Challenge.

A more exhaustive approach will be considered at the renewal of the contribution agreements (starting in 2022). CBS could be encouraged to collect sex, gender, race, indigeneity, and other socio-demographic data elements related to donors and to report these elements in their publicly available annual reports. Health Canada will work with CBS to strengthen the collection of SGBA Plus data as part of its performance measurement framework, as well as to strengthen the inclusion and diversity data.

Program 12: Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada, through its Official Languages Health Program (OLHP), supports organizations in various initiatives including: training new bilingual health professionals; language training for staff already working in the health care system; and retaining bilingual health professionals through internships, bursary programs and support measures.

In addition, Health Canada supports organizations in coordinating network activities to develop and implement new strategies to improve access to health services for members of Official Language Minority Communities (OLMCs), in their official language of choice, and to identify barriers to access to health services and develop strategies and best practices to address them.

Through innovative projects, Health Canada also supports initiatives that are implemented by various stakeholders to foster bilingual health human resource integration; to produce knowledge development and dissemination (including data collection activities and tools, needs assessments, and research); and to facilitate community health improvement (via improved access to health services for OLMCs). This work is conducted through the Promoting Minority Official Languages in the Health Care Systems Program.

In 2022-23, Health Canada will review its current performance measurement tools to expand the capacity to measure and assess the impacts of this Program on gender and diversity in the future. This review will aim to enhance the integration of sex, gender and diversity considerations, improve the monitoring and analysis of progress made by recipients towards achieving targets and ensure adequate implementation of measures that take into account SGBA Plus. The revised tools will also be used by the Program recipients to report (annually or as required) on progress and improvements in order to achieve expected results.

Program 13: Brain Research

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada, in collaboration with the Brain Canada Foundation (Brain Canada), the funding recipient, will continue to refine its strategy to collect SGBA Plus data disaggregated by sex, gender and other diversity factors. In 2021-22 Brain Canada began collecting data on the inclusion of diverse individuals and communities across its funded research and across those who conduct the research. In addition to sex disaggregated data, new data is disaggregated based on disability status, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. While it is still early to understand trends associated with these new indicators, in 2022-23 Brain Canada and Health Canada will begin assessing the data to inform future activities. This new evidence will be utilized by Brain Canada and its partners to develop new initiatives for 2022-23 that will focus on underserved communities. Expansion of work initiated in 2021-22 on the Women's Brain Health Initiative will continue to increase understanding of gender differences in brain health. Health Canada will collaborate with Brain Canada to strengthen its data collection strategy for sex, gender and diversity before the Program sunsets in 2024-25 in order to best capture the results of federal investment over the past decade and maximize the impact of any future funding.

Program 14: Thalidomide

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada will continue to work with the Thalidomide Program Administrator to support the consideration of gender and diversity in the delivery of the Canadian Thalidomide Survivors Support Program and work to ensure the elimination of barriers that may impact a survivor's access to the Program.

In 2022-23, the Program Administrator will explore opportunities to update their website to allow online claim form submissions to improve accessibility and facilitate higher response rates. Through enhancements to data collection techniques and data availability, the Administrator will continue to support analysis of Program impacts on gender and diversity. The Information collected will allow the Administrator to better understand survivor needs, improve their communication strategies, streamline program processes, and where possible, allow for enhancements to the Program based on sex, gender, language, and level of disability.

Program 15: The Territorial Health Investment Fund

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The Territorial Health Investment Fund (THIF) recognizes the particular challenges of health care delivery in the North, with funding provided to enable each territory to continue pursuing innovative activities in support of strong, sustainable health systems, while at the same time offsetting costs associated with medical travel. Budget 2021 renewed the THIF for two years, with new funding for 2021-22 and 2022-23.

Territories, as THIF recipients, are responsible for collecting data under their respective performance measurement frameworks. While SGBA Plus data under the THIF Program is not available, men, women, and children experience health disparities that may lead to increased need for health system innovations that the THIF can help achieve. However, there are currently challenges in capturing gender and diversity disaggregated data at the territorial level. The THIF performance measurement framework includes SGBA Plus indicators that can be disaggregated by sex (e.g., percentage of adults aged 18 and over reporting their health as excellent or very good, rate of potentially avoidable deaths). However, territories are reliant on external organizations, such as Statistics Canada, to make these data available.

As of January 2022, a grant agreement with the Northwest Territories for the renewed 2021-22 and 2022-23 THIF funding is in place, while agreements with Nunavut and the Yukon are not yet in place. As part of collaborative work plan development, Health Canada will continue to encourage the territories to implement sex and gender considerations in the design of their THIF activities, as well as in the development of project-specific indicators (where data is or can be made available). Health Canada will continue to monitor progress on indicators for compliance.

Program 16: Pharmaceutical Drugs

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

In 2022-2023, Health Canada will aim to further develop and implement its SGBA Plus Action Plan as it relates to the Department's Pharmaceutical Drugs Program (Program 16), Biologic and Radiopharmaceutical Drugs Programs (Program 17), and Medical Devices Programs (Program 18) to ensure that Canadians have access to information that supports informed decision-making regarding their treatment options, based on the safety and efficacy profiles of people like them. Specifically, Health Canada will work with relevant national and international stakeholders to:

Data-relevant elements of the branch-specific SGBA Plus Action Plan will include:

Health Canada plans to create guidance documents for industry around developing inclusive trials to encourage greater diversity of trial participants, as well as the inclusion of pregnant and breastfeeding persons in clinical trials, as applicable.

Program 17: Biologic & Radiopharmaceutical Drugs

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

In 2022-2023, Health Canada will further develop and its SGBA Plus Action Plan as it relates to the Department's Pharmaceutical Drugs Program (Program 16), Biologic and Radiopharmaceutical Drugs Programs (Program 17), and Medical Devices Programs (Program 18) to ensure that Canadians have access to information that supports informed decision-making regarding their treatment options, based on the safety and efficacy profiles of people like them. Please refer to Program 16: Pharmaceutical Drugs for more information on the Action Plan.

As part of the performance information profiles review process, Biologic and Radiopharmaceutical Drugs Program will strive to align its long-term indicators to the Government of Canada Quality of Life Framework. Through this alignment, the Program will aim to more clearly demonstrate how its activities impact diverse Canadians across several key categories: Prosperity, Health, Society, and Environment.

Program 18: Medical Devices

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

In 2022-23, Health Canada will continue to review its evidence requirements related to higher-risk medical devices with a view to strengthening the evidence requirements for devices while ensuring alignment with international practices.

At the pre-market stage, Health Canada will continue to employ a case-by-case approach to SGBA Plus when reviewing medical device license applications based on indicated populations and the specifics of the product. Further changes to the review process and templates may be explored in the future to systematically include SGBA Plus considerations.

Health Canada considers any relevant data that is made available through reporting requirements to support SGBA Plus assessments in the post-market environment. The Medical Device Problem Reporting Form for Industry was revised in 2018 and the Medical Device Problem Report Form for Health Care Professionals was revised in 2019. Both now include optional fields for patient sex. In February 2020, Health Canada moved to a new online database for medical device incidents. At that time, a new optional field for patient sex was added. While there was no specific field for this information before 2020, it was possible to include it in the notes section in the database. Post-Market review templates, including the risk detection report and the director's recommendation memo, were updated to capture SGBA Plus content in February 2021.

Health Canada developed a draft Guidance Document on Clinical Evidence Requirements for medical devices that identifies Health Canada's expectations for clinical data, which was posted online for public consultation until February 1st, 2022. This draft guidance includes sections dedicated to SGBA Plus considerations (e.g., clinical data on sex and gender and under-represented populations), and vulnerable populations in clinical trials or investigations (e.g., pediatrics and pregnant persons). Health Canada plans to use this Guidance Document to encourage manufacturers to conduct clinical studies that include adequate representation. Manufacturers will also be encouraged to use clinical data to demonstrate device safety and effectiveness that reflects the population for whom the device is intended to serve and the diversity of the Canadian public.

An SGBA Plus action plan will be developed to guide prioritization of new activities in consideration of factors specific to medical devices, such as broad diversity of the different types of medical devices and current data collection approaches. Please refer to Program 16: Pharmaceutical Drugs for more information on the Action Plan.

Program 19: Natural Health Products

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

In 2022-2023, Health Canada will aim to further develop SGBA Plus data collection as it relates to the Natural Health Products Program. The Department developed and finalized an SGBA Plus toolbox in August 2021 to promote the significance of considering sex, gender, and other identity factors when collecting consumer data. The SGBA Plus toolbox will continue to provide important resources on gender concepts and definitions, key words to use in a literature search, data analysis tools, the description of the methodology of gender analysis, and references to publications that have used SGBA Plus. The SGBA Plus toolbox will act as a resource to guide data collection on sex and gender that will enhance the Department's ability to further integrate SGBA Plus in its decision-making for the Program.

Additionally, Health Canada is improving the integration of SGBA Plus through the departmental Self-Care Framework (see the report on Sex Differences in Consumer Knowledge, Attitude, Behaviours towards Self-Care Products (2019)).

Program 20: Food & Nutrition

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

In 2022-2023, Health Canada will aim to further develop SGBA Plus data collection as it relates to the Food and Nutrition Program. As part of the Department's efforts to monitor the state of food advertising to children, Health Canada is supporting a project that will look at what counts as teen-targeted food promotion, drawing from the perspective of teenagers, to inform Health Canada's monitoring and data collection tools. Through this project, the researcher will ensure that the samples reflect the diversity of the Canadian population and enable analysis of how gender and diversity impact the power of marketing techniques. This project will be completed by March 2023.

In 2022-2023, Health Canada is proposing new regulations that will enable the agri-food industry to conduct clinical trials on innovative foods not yet compliant with the food regulations that have been specially processed or formulated to meet the particular requirements of people with health conditions or for whom it is their sole or primary source of nutrition. Part of a broader Health Canada initiative to modernize the clinical trial regulatory framework, these regulations will also allow more complex and innovative trial designs such as decentralized clinical trials. Decentralized trials allow trial participation and thus early access to these new foods for a special dietary purpose by women with young infants, Inuit, First Nations, Métis and other people living in remote and rural settings with special dietary needs.

In addition, the Department is conducting food toxicology research on flame retardant contaminants in food with a focus on refining the threshold levels that may pose risks to pregnant persons and infants. In 2022-23, Health Canada plans to finalize regulatory maximum levels for inorganic rice in foods commonly consumed by infants and young children.

In 2022-23, Health Canada will continue to strengthen application of SGBA Plus considerations within its chemicals management activities by, for example, implementing tools and training materials to better consider SGBA Plus more systemically in its risk assessment and risk management activities.

Program 21: Air Quality

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada will continue to conduct scientific research and health risk assessments related to air pollution, including examining sex-specific health endpoints; health effects by sex; and differences based on age, underlying health conditions and socio-economic status. For example, several epidemiological studies planned for 2022-23 will evaluate the health risk of air pollution on birth outcomes, pregnancy complications and child diseases by leveraging national birth and infant death databases. Other planned epidemiological studies will assess whether there are differences in the relationship between air pollution and various adverse health outcomes by sex. If the Department identifies notable new differences among subgroups, it may be able to expand its reporting on impacts to SGBA Plus subpopulations.

Program 22: Climate Change

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada conducts public opinion research on the health impacts of climate change every five years. The next set of results are expected to be available in 2022-23, and applicable results related to gender and diversity will be reported as appropriate (e.g., results by sex, age and indigeneity).

Program 23: Water Quality

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada assesses health effects attributable to contaminants in drinking water and recreational water. It works with other federal government departments and agencies, and P/Ts to establish the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality, and provides associated guidance and advice on drinking water quality issues. The provision of safe drinking water in Canada is the responsibility of P/Ts and other federal government departments and agencies (e.g., Correctional Service Canada), as applicable. Indigenous Services Canada administers the Government of Canada's role related to safe drinking water on First Nations reserves. When developing drinking water quality guidelines, Health Canada considers health endpoints related to at-risk populations and sex, when available, and most notably the impacts on pregnant persons and birth outcomes. The Department is also collaborating with other federal health risk assessment programs to identify ways to enhance SGBA Plus considerations in water risk assessments; however, given the mandate of this Program to provide guidance to those responsible for providing safe drinking water in Canada, SGBA Plus data collection would not be an appropriate means of measuring program performance or impact. Therefore, there are no plans to enable future reporting of the Program's impacts by gender or diversity.

Program 24: Health Impacts of Chemicals

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada assesses the extent to which its risk management activities have reduced the potential for exposure to harmful substances. When the Department's risk assessment of a substance identifies a particular risk to a subgroup (e.g., infants or pregnant persons), it puts in place risk management actions to address these risks, and uses performance measurement to examine the extent to which these actions have reduced the potential exposure for this identified subgroup. This practice will continue in 2022-23, which will allow the Department to expand reporting of its effectiveness in protecting these populations, as appropriate.

As part of the risk assessment process, certain subgroups are routinely considered (e.g., infants, children and people of reproductive age) to determine whether biological susceptibility or sex-specific differences might exist. Health Canada also collects information to help identify subgroups who may have higher exposures due to factors such as behaviour (e.g., infants/toddlers mouthing objects) or where they live (e.g., people living near industrial releases). This type of information on susceptibility and exposure is necessary to identify potential vulnerable subgroups. When measuring the performance of risk management actions, the Department considers trends in exposures to toxic substances for subgroups through biomonitoring, market data collection or from other data sources, such as studies.

For example, Health Canada has collected nationally representative biomonitoring data through the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) since 2007. The CHMS reports the levels of environmental chemicals by age group (3-79 years of age) and sex (separately for males and females) for the Canadian population. Starting in 2022-23, future collection cycles of the CHMS will also collect information on the gender identity of respondents and a new vulnerable subpopulation (1-3 years of age). Health Canada's research, monitoring and surveillance activities (including biomonitoring) will continue to collect SGBA Plus data to inform risk assessment, risk management and ultimately performance measurement.

Program 25: Consumer Product Safety

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada identifies risks pertaining to certain subgroups (e.g., infants or children, etc.) when assessing health and safety risks of consumer products and, as applicable, takes risk management and compliance actions to address identified risks. The Department then uses case studies to measure the impact of Program performance on Canadians, and will continue to consider impacts on SGBA Plus subpopulations in upcoming case studies.

Program 26: Workplace Hazardous Products

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The mandate of the Workplace Hazardous Products Program is to ensure that suppliers provide critical health and safety information on hazardous chemicals to workers. Specifically, the Program supports comprehensive and accessible labels and safety data sheets for hazardous products, oversees the process for exempting confidential business information, and coordinates the delivery of a compliance and enforcement program. It does not administer the requirements for occupational health and safety. Health Canada considers SGBA Plus when delivering the Program (e.g., in policy and cost-benefit analysis, and regulatory decision-making); however, given the mandate of this Program requires that industry provide labels and safety data sheets to all workers, SGBA Plus data collection would not be an appropriate means of measuring program performance or impact. Therefore, there are no plans to enable future reporting of the Program's impacts by gender or diversity.

Program 27: Tobacco Control

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

In 2022-23, Health Canada will continue to monitor trends in tobacco and vaping product use based on socio-demographic characteristics and consider targeted measures to address high prevalence rates amongst population groups, as appropriate. Priorities include addressing concerns regarding the rising rates in youth vaping and protecting youth and non-users of tobacco products from nicotine addiction. The Department's SGBA Plus data collection plans include collaborating with Statistics Canada to assess key aspects of tobacco use through population health surveys, such as the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey.

Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS)

Canadian Tobacco and Nicotine Survey (CTNS)

These surveillance tools allow Health Canada to analyze the distribution of smoking and vaping behaviours among the Canadian population, including the identification of subgroups with high prevalence rates. In 2022-23, the Department will also develop and implement supplementary surveillance projects, such as public opinion research, to gather information about Canadians' knowledge and attitudes about tobacco and vaping products, considering the age, sex, gender, language, location and other characteristics of participants. Health Canada will share the SGBA Plus findings with Canadians and stakeholders. This approach will allow the Department to respond to emerging policy issues and to identify key populations and targeted interventions and initiatives for groups, such as young adults who smoke cigarettes as well as youth and young adults who use vaping products.

Data is leveraged from the Performance and Progress Report, with information submitted by recipients funded through the Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP) on a bi-annual basis. Indicator data is disaggregatedFootnote 4 by demographics such as sex, gender, and language, and target populations such as Indigenous, LGBTQ2+ and racialized people and communities.

Program 28: Controlled Substances

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada collects SGBA Plus data and information from a variety of sources including general and targeted population surveys, reports from supervised consumption sites, and recipients of Substance Use and Addictions Program funding. SGBA Plus data on sex, gender, age, and region is collected through the Canadian Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CADS) and the Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CSTADS) (see Cannabis Program (Program 29) for more information on these surveys). The CADS general population survey (2019) had been conducted by Statistics Canada and challenges related to data quality and sample size arose when collecting information on gender and diversity. To mitigate this, Health Canada is strengthening methodologies to ensure meaningful SGBA Plus data is collected. In addition, questions and language regarding sex and gender will be revised to better support data and trend analysis going forward. The next cycle of CADS is scheduled for 2022-23 and results will be available by March 2023.

Health Canada also collects, analyzes and disseminates SGBA Plus data in the Controlled Substances Program's Performance Information Profile (PIP). Where possible, PIP data is disaggregated by various demographics such as geographic location, language, sex, and gender, with consideration of target populations such as Indigenous, LGBTQ2+ and racialized peoples and communities. In 2022-23, the Department will continue to apply SGBA Plus while reviewing and developing policies and initiatives related to controlled substances, including treatment and harm reduction services and initiatives to reduce stigma associated with drug and substance use.

Program 29: Cannabis

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada applies SGBA Plus to its data collection tools and analysis to help inform policy and regulatory decisions and the development of more targeted public education campaigns. SGBA Plus data collection plans include the assessment of key aspects of cannabis use through population health surveys, such as the Canadian Cannabis Survey, Canadian Alcohol and Drugs Survey, and the Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol, and Drugs Survey.

Canadian Cannabis Survey (CCS)

Canadian Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CADS)

Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CSTADS)

Information obtained from these surveillance tools will help further inform the legislative review of the Cannabis Act, regulatory initiatives, and public education and awareness activities.

Program 30: Radiation Protection

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Health Canada conducted public opinion research in 2021-22 to determine Canadians' attitudes and knowledge about the risks from radiation emitting devices. Results will be available in 2022-23, and the Department will report applicable results related to gender and diversity (e.g., results by gender, age and social-economic status).

Program 31: Pesticides

The program collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

Companies applying to register a pesticide must provide Health Canada with substantial data from health and environmental studies in accordance with internationally accepted scientific standards. Health Canada scientists evaluate potential risks to human health and the environment based on the data provided, with particular emphasis on vulnerable populations such as the elderly and pregnant persons. The Department requests additional information from the applicant if necessary.

Health Canada's transparency and engagement strategies may not reach subpopulations affected by its decisions due to factors such as lack of access to the Internet, lack of awareness of the process or its relevance, language or other comprehension barriers, lack of interest or time, or distrust in the government and exposure to misinformation. As a result, Health Canada will continue to conduct public opinion research on public confidence in pesticide regulation every 3 years. This data is disaggregated by gender, age, region, education, area of residence, and income. Future cycles of this research will allow Health Canada to track the impacts of measures to enhance transparency on public confidence across different populations and address gaps between subpopulations.

In addition, Health Canada is preparing to expand its data collection for both pesticide use and environmental monitoring in the near future. Although the Department's pesticide risk mitigation approach is designed to protect all sensitive subpopulations, new or independently generated data may benefit various populations on a case-by-case basis. For example, data identifying unexpectedly unsafe occupational exposures may result in risk mitigation benefitting agricultural workers, such as migrant workers, who may be reproductive-age, male, lower-income, newcomer, English- or French- language learners. Environmental monitoring data identifying higher than expected concentrations of pesticides in a rural area may benefit rural populations through the development of mitigation measures to reduce exposure.

Program 32: Health Canada Specialized Services

This program does not collect sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by SGBA Plus.

The Health Canada Specialized Health Services Program consists of three sub-programs:

Although the EAP collects sufficient data to enable it to monitor and/or report program impacts by gender and diversity, PSOHP is currently unable to collect disaggregated data and data collected for the IPP Program does not enable monitoring or reporting of program impacts by gender and diversity.

Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

Health Canada will continue to collect disaggregated data to support SGBA Plus, which includes data on sex, gender, age, region, language, sexual orientation, and employment equity. Using past research to guide directions, in 2022-23, EAP will focus on broadening reach through:

Public Service Occupational Health Program (PSOHP)

While Health Canada collects sufficient data for monitoring EAP impacts by gender and diversity, it is currently unable to collect disaggregated data on delivery of the PSHOP due to a delay in the implementation of its new National Occupational Health Information System (NOHIS), and limitations with its existing Activity Tracking System. However, NOHIS will capture data on client populations to support the use of SGBA Plus in monitoring and reporting on program impacts, as informed by the SGBA Plus currently underway. It is anticipated this new system will be operational in early 2023. Health Canada will ensure best practices in SGBA Plus data collection plans for its EAP are applied to the new information system.

Internationally Protected Persons (IPP)

The Internationally Protected Persons (IPP) Program's mandate is to coordinate the development of health contingency plans for visiting IPPs to Canada. The data collected by Health Canada does not enable it to monitor and/or report impacts by gender and diversity. Information that could inform SGBA Plus monitoring or analysis is only collected if medically relevant (for example, a healthcare facility or institution specializing in obstetrics and gynecology may be designated as part of a health plan for a female IPP with specific health concerns such as pregnancy). Given the high profile of IPPs and the reasons for which information is collected, there are no actions being taken at this time to enable future monitoring or reporting of the Program's impacts by gender and diversity.

Horizontal Initiatives

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

General Information

Name of Horizontal Initiative

Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Lead Department

Health Canada

Federal Partner Organization(s)

Canada Border Services Agency

Public Health Agency of Canada

Public Safety Canada

Statistics Canada

Note: Other government departments (e.g., Correctional Service Canada) are supporting the federal response to the overdose crisis. However, they are not captured in this Horizontal Initiative table as they have not received funding through the Treasury Board Submission 'Addressing the Opioid Crisis'.

Start Date

April 1, 2018

End Date

March 31, 2023 and ongoing

Description

Illegal drugs and problematic substance use have always presented health and safety challenges in Canada and around the world. Recently, however, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of opioid-related overdoses and deaths, with those most affected in this overdose crisis being young to middle-aged individuals, particularly men. Most deaths are accidental and largely due to the contamination of the illegal drug supply with highly toxic fentanyl and/or fentanyl analogues. Fentanyl continues to be a low-cost way for drug dealers to make street drugs more powerful, with just a few grains contributing to the high rates of overdoses and overdose-related deaths.

The federal government's actions to address the overdose crisis are guided by the Canadian Drugs and Substances StrategyFootnote 5, which takes a comprehensive, collaborative, and compassionate approach to substance use issues using a public health lens. The federal government is deeply concerned about the number of overdoses and deaths and is taking significant actions in areas of federal jurisdiction to address the crisis. Despite substantial efforts to date, the overdose crisis in Canada continues. Data from the Public Health Agency of Canada, indicate that more than 24,626 people lost their lives in Canada between January 2016 and June 2021 to apparent opioid toxicity deaths. In addition, it is estimated that approximately 250,000 Canadians do not have access to treatment when seeking help for problematic substance use. Stigma against people who use drugs continues to be widespread, creating additional barriers for Canadians who seek access to treatment and harm reduction services. Tragically, the COVID-19 pandemic has also exacerbated long-standing challenges regarding substance use and has contributed to the worsening overdose crisis with many communities reporting record high numbers of overdose deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency medical service calls.

While the Government of Canada is taking a number of actions to respond to the overdose crisis, this horizontal initiative is specific to measures announced in Budget 2018 to:

Ultimately, these complementary activities are intended to contribute to a reduction in overdose harms and deaths in Canada.

Governance Structures

The Government of Canada has put in place a robust governance structure to facilitate whole-of-government coordination in implementing a comprehensive federal response to the overdose crisis. Each department/agency is responsible for leading its respective initiatives and providing updates to the interdepartmental Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM)-level Working Group on Opioids chaired by the Associate ADM of Health Canada's Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch. This working group is used as a forum for information and consultation on next steps toward a comprehensive, collaborative federal response to the overdose crisis. Updates and decisions from this working group feed into the federal, interdepartmental Deputy Ministers Task Force on the Opioid Crisis as required. This Task Force, chaired by the Deputy Minister of Health Canada, serves as a time-limited forum to provide leadership and oversight of federal initiatives to respond to the overdose crisis. The Task Force will remain an established committee until such time that the public environment no longer requires it.

The Government is committed to ongoing collaboration and consultation with provincial and territorial partners. Departments and agencies will provide updates to, and consult with, provincial and territorial colleagues as required through the federal/provincial/territorial (FPT) ADM-level Problematic Substance Use and Harms Committee (PSUH), co-chaired by Health Canada and British Columbia and comprised of ADMs responsible for drug policy in their jurisdiction. They will also provide updates to and consult with PT colleagues as required through the FPT Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses (SAC), co-chaired by the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada and New Brunswick's Chief Medical Officer of Health and comprising Chief Medical Officers of Health from each jurisdiction. The PSUH is an established committee intended as a long-term forum for drug policy discussions. The SAC was created specifically as a mechanism for public health collaboration and information sharing between jurisdictions related to the overdose crisis in Canada.

Total Federal Funding Allocated from Start to End Date (dollars)

108,794,405 (includes existing funding)

Total Federal Planned Spending to Date (dollars)

75,784,000Footnote 6

Total Federal Actual Spending to Date (dollars)

64,600,313

Date of Last Renewal of Initiative

Not applicable

Total Federal Funding Allocated at the Last Renewal and Source of Funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional Federal Funding Received after Last Renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total Planned Spending since Last Renewal

Not applicable

Total Actual Spending since Last Renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation

2022-23

Planning Highlights

All federal partners will work collaboratively to address the overdose crisis in a comprehensive, robust, and effective manner. Planning highlights specific to this horizontal initiative in 2022-23 will include:

Contact Information

Jennifer Novak
Executive Director, Opioids Response Team
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
jennifer.novak@hc-sg.gc.ca

Horizontal Initiative framework: Departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Addressing the Opioid Crisis

Shared outcomes:
Name of theme Theme Area 1: Supporting additional prevention and treatment interventions Theme Area 2: Addressing stigma Theme Area 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Targeted stakeholdersTable Footnote 1 use evidence-informed informationTable Footnote 2 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Enhanced quality surveillanceTable Footnote 3 data is available Not applicable
Health Canada

$13,169,264 (Top- up)

$13,000,000 (Existing)

$7,030,966 (Ongoing)

$12,456,900 (Top-up)

$10,234,157 (Existing)

$2,724,238 (Ongoing)

Not applicable Not applicable

$873,836 (Top-up)

$599,273 (Existing)

$253,796 (Ongoing)

Canada Border Services AgencyTable Footnote 4 Not applicable Not applicable

$28,891,653 (Top-up)

$4,716,380 (Ongoing)

Not applicable

$3,993,347 (Top-up)

$664,620 (Ongoing)

Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

$14,928,466 (Top-up)

$1,411,691 (Existing)

$1,779,347 (Ongoing)

$971,534 (Top-up)

$8,165 (Existing)

$116,007 (Ongoing)

Public Safety Canada Not applicable

$801,133 (Top-up)

$1,038,870 (Existing)

$3,204,529 (Top-up)

$115,430 (Existing)

Not applicable

$460,812 (Top-up)

$145,453 (Existing)

Statistics Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

$1,905,286 (Top-up)

$226,195 (Ongoing)

$89,606 (Top-up)

$16,251 (Ongoing)

Planning Information

Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending (dollars) Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Addressing the Opioid Crisis

HC:

50,333,430

CBSA:

33,380,000Table Footnote 1

PHAC:

17,319,856

PS:

5,766,227

StatCan:

1,994,892

HC:

6,909,738

CBSA:

6,596,000

PHAC:

1,890,316

PS:

1,093,563

StatCan:

242,446

Reduced harms and deaths related to opioid use. Number of hospital admissions due to opioid poisoning (including overdoses) per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region) Decrease from baseline population in 2017Table Footnote 2 March 31, 2023
Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population (by gender, age, region)
Table Footnote 1

The total funding for CBSA included a reprofile of $495K from 2022-23 to to 2023-24 and is the result of not implementing the networking of detection equipment. However, the total federal funding allocated remains the same.

Table Return to footnote 1 referrer

Table Footnote 2

Decrease in deaths/harms compared to 2017 baseline year over year. Baseline for hospital admissions: 16.4 per 100,000 population in 2017. Baseline for apparent opioid-related deaths: 10.9 per 100,000 population in 2017.

Table Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme horizontal initiative activities

Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions

HC:

26,169,264

HC:

3,957,624

Targeted stakeholdersTable Footnote 1 use evidence-informed informationTable Footnote 2 on opioid use to change policies, programs, and practice Percentage of funding recipients who met the targets set for targeted stakeholders who intend to use the knowledge/skills related to substance use they have acquired through SUAPTable Footnote 3 funded projects. 60% March 31, 2024
Table Footnote 1

Targeted stakeholders will differ by individual project funded by the SUAP but may include: other levels of government, pan-Canadian health organizations, non-profit organizations, communities or others at the organizational or system level. This target population category relates to initiatives targeting organization, system or policy and practice change.

Table Return to footnote 1 referrer

Table Footnote 2

Evidence-informed information is evidence from research, practice and experience used to inform and improve opioid related policy, programs, practice and behaviour (e.g., curriculum, reports, guidelines, literature, program materials).

Table Return to footnote 2 referrer

Table Footnote 3

This indicator was changed to better reflect the motivation and/or behaviour of the audiences targeted by SUAP funded projects.

Table Return to footnote 3 referrer

Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Substance Use and Addictions Expanded contribution funding 26,169,264 3,957,624 ER 1.1.1 P1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2024
ER 1.1.2
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2: Addressing Stigma

HC:

22,691,057

PS:

1,840,003

HC:

2,724,238

PS:

169,680Table Footnote 1

Increased perception among Canadians of drug use as a public health issue Percentage of Canadians who believe that the opioid crisis in Canada is a public health issue Increase by 5 percentage pointsTable Footnote 2

SUAP:

March 31, 2023

Table Footnote 1

Total funding includes Salary and, O&M. Internal services cost are not included in this amount.

Table Return to footnote 1 referrer

Table Footnote 2

Baseline: 74% in 2017

Table Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme 2 - Horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Public education campaign 22,691,057 2,724,238 ER 2.1.1 PI 2.1.1 T 2.1.1 March 31, 2023
PI 2.1.2 T 2.1.2 March 31, 2023
Public Safety Countering Crime De-stigmatization awareness training for law enforcement 1,840,003 169,680 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 March 31, 2023
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders

PS:

3,319,959

CBSA:

28,891,653

PS:

810,077Table Footnote 1

CBSA:

5,754,062

Enhanced capability to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at ports of entry Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogs Increase by 3.5% (baseline 2.6%) March 31, 2023
Table Footnote 1

Total funding includes Salary, and O&M. Internal services cost are not included in this amount.

Table Return to footnote 1 referrer

Theme 3 - horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Safety Countering Crime Information sharing with law enforcement and international partners 3,319,959 810,077 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 Achieved
Canada Border Security Agency Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Equipping safe examination areas and regional screening facilities 1,709,227 473,858 ER 3.2.1 PI 3.2.1.1

T 3.2.1.1

81

March 31, 2023
Force Generation 2,228,355 477,166
Buildings and Equipment 5,390,485 1,241,343
Field Technology Support 12,811,652 2,222,885 PI 3.2.1.2 T 3.2.1.2 March 31, 2023
PI 3.2.1.3 T 3.2.1.3 March 31, 2023
Targeting Augmenting intelligence and risk assessment capacity 1,495,700 303,417 ER 3.2.2 PI 3.2.2 T 3.2.2 March 31, 2023
Intelligence Collection and Analysis 3,421,203 765,631 ER 3.2.3 PI 3.2.3 T 3.2.3 March 31, 2022
Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Enhancement of Detector Dog Program 1,835,031 269,762 ER 3.2.4 PI 3.2.4.1 T 3.2.4.1 March 31, 2023
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base

PHAC:

16,340,157

StatCan:

1,905,286

PHAC:

1,779,346

StatCan:

226,195

Enhanced quality surveillanceTable Footnote 1 data is available Number of opioid-related evidence productsTable Footnote 2 disseminated publicly 11 March 31, 2020 Achieved
Percentage of data files published on time 100% March 31, 2022
Table Footnote 1

Public health surveillance is the continuous, systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of health-related data needed for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health practice. In the context of opioid-related harms, this involves collecting data on health outcomes/events, including suspected overdoses and deaths, socio-demographic variables and risk factors.

Table Return to footnote 1 referrer

Table Footnote 2

Includes national reports, peer-reviewed (scientific) journal articles, infographics, factsheets, and related analytical products.

Table Return to footnote 2 referrer

Theme 4 - horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Public Health Agency of Canada Evidence for Health Promotion, and Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Expansion of public health surveillance 16,340,157 1,779,346 ER 4.1 P1 4.1 T 4.1 March 31, 2023
Statistics Canada Socio-economic Statistics Re-design and operation of the Canadian Coroner and Medical Examiner Database (CCMED) 1,905,286 226,195 ER 4.2 PI 4.2 T 4.2 March 31, 2023
Total spending, all themes
N/A Total federal funding allocated since the last renewal* (dollars) 2022-23 Total federal planned spending (dollars)
Theme 1 26,169,264 3,957,624
Theme 2 24,531,060 2,893,918
Theme 3 32,211,612 6,564,139
Theme 4 18,245,443 2,005,541
Total, all themes 101,157,379 15,421,222

Horizontal Initiative Activity Codes

Theme 1: Supporting Additional Prevention and Treatment Interventions
Expected Results
Health Canada

ER 1.1.1 Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to opioid use.

ER 1.1.2 Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on opioid use to change policies, programs and practice.

Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 1.1.1 Percentage of funding recipients who met their targets for targeted Stakeholders who intend to use knowledge/skills related to substance use they have acquired through SUAP funded projects.

Targets
Health Canada

T 1.1.1 60%

Theme 2: Addressing Stigma
Expected Results
Health Canada

ER 2.1.1 Increased sympathy among Canadians for people using opioidsFootnote 7

Public Safety Canada

ER 2.2 Increased awareness of the impacts of stigma and support for people who use substances amongst law enforcement community about de-stigmatization of people who use opioids

Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 2.1.1 Percentage of Canadians who have sympathy for people using opioids

PI 2.1.2 Percentage of Canadians who believe that opioid-related substance use disorder is a disease

Public Safety Canada

PI 2.2 Percentage of police service members who completed the online course

Targets
Health Canada

T 2.1.1 Increase by 5 percentage points based on the 2017 baselineFootnote 8

T 2.1.2 Increase by 5 percentage points based on 2017 baselineFootnote 9

Public Safety Canada

T 2.2 25% of eligible police service members

Theme 3: Taking Action at Canada's Borders
Expected Results
Public Safety Canada

ER 3.1 Increased knowledge generation and sharing of information on targeted issues related to reducing the illegal supply of opioids in Canada

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 3.2.1 Increased capacity to identify high-risk goods at ports of entry

ER 3.2.2 Increased ability to risk assess and identify high risk shipments

ER 3.2.3 Increased communications related to threat assessment information and intelligence provided to personnel and partnering agencies

ER 3.2.4 Enhanced capabilityFootnote 10 to interdict illegal cross-border movement of drugs, such as opioids, at postal locationsFootnote 11

Performance Indicators
Public Safety Canada

PI 3.1 Percentage of completed planned engagement activities with law enforcement community, stakeholders and partners to address policy issues related with the illegal supply of opioids

Canada Border Services Agency

PI 3.2.1.1 Number of designated safe examination areas, allowing ports of entry to be equipped to identify, detect, and interdict opioids

PI 3.2.1.2 Percentage of CBSA officers at ports of entry identified for safe examinations training that have completed the required training

PI 3.2.1.3 Number of items per year of suspected opioid-containing packages sampled and identified at safe sampling areas (outside of the laboratory)

PI 3.2.2 Number of streams/risk rules supporting advanced risk assessment

PI 3.2.3 Number of intelligence products produced by the CBSA

PI 3.2.4.1 Percentage of interdictions of drugs, including opioids, using detector dogsFootnote 12

Targets
Public Safety Canada

T 3.1 100%

Canada Border Services Agency

T 3.2.1.1 81

T 3.2.1.2 100%Footnote 13

T 3.2.1.3 1,000Footnote 14

T 3.2.2 Increase by 10%Footnote 15

T 3.2.3 Increase by 10%Footnote 16

T 3.2.4.1 3.5%Footnote 17

Theme 4: Enhancing the Evidence Base
Expected Results
Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 4.1 Enhanced quality surveillance data and research are available

Statistics Canada

ER 4.2 Increased use and relevance of CCMED among stakeholders

Performance Indicators
Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 4.1 Number of opioid-related evidence productsFootnote 18 disseminated publicly

Statistics Canada

PI 4.2 Percentage of clients satisfied with statistical information from CCMED

Targets
Public Health Agency of Canada

T 4.1 11

Statistics Canada

T 4.2 Overall client satisfaction target: 80%

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

General information

Name of horizontal initiative

Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)
  1. Canada Border Services Agency
  2. Canada Revenue Agency
  3. Canadian Institutes of Health Research
  4. Correctional Service Canada
  5. Department of Justice Canada
  6. Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada
  7. Global Affairs Canada
  8. Indigenous Services Canada
  9. Parole Board of Canada
  10. Public Health Agency of Canada
  11. Public Prosecution Service of Canada
  12. Public Safety Canada
  13. Public Services and Procurement Canada
  14. Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Start Date

April 1, 2017

End Date

March 31, 2023 and ongoing

Description

The Government of Canada is committed to a comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate and evidence-based approach to drug policy, which uses a public health lens when considering and addressing the harms of substance use. The Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy (CDSS) is led by the Minister of Health, and the Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health, supported by Health Canada and 14 other federal departments and agencies. The CDSS covers a broad range of legal and illegal substances, including cannabis, alcohol, opioidsFootnote 19 and other controlled substances that can be used problematically. The goal of the strategy is to protect the health and safety of all Canadians by minimizing harms from substance use for individuals, families and communities.

The CDSS has four pillars: prevention, treatment, harm reduction, and enforcement, supported by a strong evidence base. The public health focus of the CDSS has enabled the Government to take a comprehensive and evidence-based approach to the current drug overdose crisis and to work toward reducing the harms related to substance use.

The CDSS recognizes that the national approach to substance use requires coordinated efforts from all levels of government working in their respective areas of jurisdiction. It also recognizes the importance of engaging with stakeholders, including people with lived and living experience. Reducing the stigma experienced by people who use drugs is integral to the CDSS and a priority for the Government of Canada.

Governance structures

The CDSS is led by the Minister of Health, and the Minister of Mental Health and Addictions and Associate Minister of Health. The Strategy is coordinated through a Director-General (DG) level steering committee that reports to Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs).

The DG Steering Committee is designed to reflect and support the CDSS' comprehensive approach to substance use issues. The committee is composed of DGs from federal departments/agencies whose mandates are relevant to drug and substance use (including departments that formally received CDSS funding and those that do not). The Committee meets at least twice a year as well as on an ad hoc basis as needed.

Current federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) engagement is achieved through a number of F/P/T mechanisms, including the F/P/T Committee on Problematic Substance Use and Harms that is co-chaired by Health Canada and the Province of British Columbia. Secretariat support for the CDSS is provided by the Controlled Substances Directorate (CSD) within Health Canada.

Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23Footnote 20 (dollars)

774,387,012Footnote 21

Total federal funding planned spending to March 31, 2021 (dollars)

521,662,953

Total federal actual spending to March 31, 2021 (dollars)

615,907,988

Date of last renewal of initiative

Not applicable

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

Not applicable

Additional federal funding received after last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable

Total planned spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Total actual spending since last renewal

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2022-23

Planning highlights
Contact information
Health Canada

Jennifer Saxe
Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate
Controlled Substances and Cannabis Branch
jennifer.saxe@hc-sc.gc.ca
613-816-1739

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy

Shared outcomes:
Name of theme Theme Area 1: Prevention Theme Area 2: Treatment Theme Area 3: Harm Reduction Theme Area 4: Enforcement Theme Area 5: Evidence Base Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Canadians make better-informed choices around substances use and risks to reduce harms. Treatment and recovery services/systems are easily accessible, comprehensive and appropriately tailored to the needs of individuals Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people who use drugs or substances. Decreased diversion of drugs away from authorized activities and reduced size and profitability of the illegal drug market Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners. Not applicable.
Health CanadaFootnote 4 $161,006,996Footnote 5 Not applicable $20,829,815 $113,759,994 $10,769,489 $6,088,772
Canada Border Services Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $13,800,000 Not applicable $7,800,000
Canada Revenue Agency Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $5,051,070 Not applicable $948,930
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Not applicable $7,849,988 Not applicable Not applicable $12,000,000 Not applicable
Correctional Service Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $11,110,176 Not applicable Not applicable
Department of Justice Canada Not applicable $31,816,702 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $50,850
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $0 Not applicable Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $5,400,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Indigenous Services Canada $17,276,000 $72,429,102 $19,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Parole Board of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $7,955,000 Not applicable $1,738,000
Public Health Agency of Canada Not applicable Not applicable $37,000,000 Not applicable $281,720 $50,293
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $63,836,322 Not applicable $9,363,678
Public Safety Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $3,531,192 Not applicable $90,852
Public Services and Procurement Canada Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable $3,600,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $13,331,136 Not applicable Not applicable $99,184,935 Not applicable $17,436,000
Planning Information
Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending (dollars) Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
CDSSTable footnote 6 -774,387,012 132,942,639 SO 1. Problematic substance use is addressed as a health and social issue by governments, communities, stakeholders and Canadian society. Number of apparent opioid-related deaths per 100,000 population Decrease from baseline population in 2017 (10.9 per 100,000)Table footnote 7 March 31, 2023, and ongoing
SO 2. Rates of problematic substance use in Canada are minimized, especially for youth and those most at risk of harm, including preventing, reducing and/or delaying the use of drugs and other substances. Percentage of Canadians (aged 15+) who engaged in problematic use of legal drugs in the past 12 months. TBDTable footnote 8 March 31, 2023, and ongoing
SO 3. Canadians and their communities are supported with evidence-based tools, programs and services to be safer, healthier and more resilient. Percentage of funding recipients who met their targets set for targeted Stakeholders/Canadians who intend to use knowledge/skills related to substance use they have acquired through SUAP funded projects. 65% March 31, 2023, and ongoing
Theme horizontal initiative activities
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target

Theme Area 1: Prevention

191,614,132 35,623,282 Canadians make better-informed choices around substances use and risks to reduce harms. Percentage of funding recipients who met their targets set for targeted Stakeholders/Canadians who intend to use knowledge/skills related to substance use they have acquired through SUAP funded projects. 65% March 31, 2023 (and on-going)
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Contribution Funding 142,477,028Footnote 9 28,539,458 ER 1.1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
ER 1.1.2
Problematic prescription drug use (PPDU) 18,529,968 1,976,940 ER 1.1.3 PI 1.1.3 T 1.1.3 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness PPDU 17,276,000 2,900,000 Not applicableFootnote 10
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) FP Public Engagement (FPPE) 13,331,136 2,206,884 ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
PI 1.2.2 T 1.2.2
PI 1.2.3 T 1.2.3
PI 1.2.4 T 1.2.4
PI 1.2.5 T 1.2.5
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 2: Treatment 112,095,792 18,384,040 Treatment and recovery services/systems are easily accessible, comprehensive and appropriately tailored to the needs of individuals Number of sites offering opioid agonist therapy (OAT) wraparound services 5 active projects March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Theme 2 - horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Research in Priority Areas Research on Drug Treatment Model 7,849,988 974,998 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Department of Justice Canada Drug Treatment Court Funding Program Drug Treatment Court Funding Program 22,267,552 3,746,000 ER 2.2.1 PI 2.2.1 T 2.2.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Youth Justice Youth Justice Fund 9,549,150 1,591,525 ER 2.2.2 PI 2.2.2 T 2.2.2 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions - Mental Wellness Program 72,429,102 12,071,517 ER 2.3 PI 2.3 T 2.3 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 3: Harm reduction 76,829,815 13,414,634 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among people who use drugs and substances. Percentage decrease in the number of people who use drugs who report sharing drug use equipment. 10% decrease March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Theme 3 - horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from start to end date (dollars) 2022–23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Strengthening the CDSS 20,829,815 2,414,634 ER 3.1 PI 3.1Footnote 11 T 3.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Indigenous Services Canada Mental Wellness Grants and Contributions - First Nations and Inuit health programming 19,000,000 4,000,000 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Public Health Agency of Canada Communicable Diseases and Infections Control Grants and contributions -Transmission of Sexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infections 37,000,000 7,000,000 ER 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 4: Enforcement 327,228,689 53,762,186 Decreased diversion of drugs away from authorized activities and reduced size and profitability of the illegal drug market. Overall percentage of High-Volume Regulatory Authorizations for controlled substances processed within service standards. 90% March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Theme 4 - horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Controlled Substances Directorate Enforcement Activities 37,465,704 6,244,284 ER 4.1.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Regulatory Operations and Enforcement Branch for Compliance and Enforcement Activities 11,704,212 1,950,702 ER 4.1.2 PI 4.1.2 T 4.1.2 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Drug Analysis Services 64,590,078 10,765,013 ER 4.1.3 PI 4.1.3 T 4.1.3 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
ER 4.1.4 PI 4.1.4 T 4.1.4 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Canada Border Services Agency Risk Assessment Targeting Intelligence Security Screening 12,600,000 2,100,000 ER 4.2.1 PI 4.2 T 4.2 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
ER 4.2.2
Criminal Investigations 1,200,000 200,000 ER 4.2.3
Canada Revenue Agency Domestic Compliance Small and Medium Enterprises Directorate 5,051,070 1,243,142 ER 4.3 PI 4.3 T 4.3 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Correctional Service Canada Correctional Interventions Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders 4,123,213 827,663 ER 4.4 PI 4.4.1 T 4.4.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
PI 4.4.2 T 4.4.2
Community Supervision Case Preparation and Supervision of Provincial Offenders 6,986,963 1,024,033 PI 4.4.3 T 4.4.3
Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada Financial Intelligence Program Financial Intelligence Program 0 0 ER 4.5 PI 4.5 T 4.5 Not applicable
Global Affairs Canada Diplomacy, Advocacy and International Agreements Annual Voluntary Contributions to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the American States (OAS) 5,400,000 900,000 ER 4.6 PI 4.6.1 T 4.6.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
PI 4.6.2 T 4.6.2
Parole Board of Canada Conditional Release Decisions Conditional Release Decisions - (Provincial reviews) 5,744,500 187,000 ER 4.7.1 PI 4.7.1 T 4.7.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability Conditional Release Decisions Openness and Accountability (Provincial reviews) 2,210,500 73,000 ER 4.7.2 PI 4.7.2 T 4.7.2
Public Prosecution Service of Canada Prosecutions Program Prosecution and Prosecution-related Services 20,372,580 3,395,430 ER 4.8.1 PI 4.8.1.1 T 4.8 Not applicable
PI 4.8.1.2
Prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable 43,463,742 7,243,957 ER 4.8.2 PI 4.8.2.1
PI 4.8.2.2
Public Safety Canada Law Enforcement National Coordination of Efforts to Improve Intelligence, Knowledge, Management, Research, Evaluation 3,531,192 588,532 ER 4.9 PI 4.9 T 4.9 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Public Services and Procurement Canada Specialized Programs and Services Financial Intelligence Program 3,600,000 600,000 ER 4.10 PI 4.10.1 T 4.10 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
PI 4.10.2
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Federal Policing (FP) Investigations FP Project-Based Investigations 99,184,935 16,419,430 ER 4.11 PI 4.11.1 T 4.11 Not applicable
PI 4.11.2
PI 4.11.3
Theme 5 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Theme Area 5: Evidence base 23,051,209 4,248,713 Data and research evidence on drugs, and emerging drug trends, are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners Percentage of health research publications related to substance use. 90% March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Theme 5 - horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to the department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity from 2017-18 to 2022-23 (dollars) 2022–23 planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2022–23 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
Health Canada Controlled Substances Drug Use Surveillance and Monitoring 10,769,489 2,248,713 ER 5.1 PI 5.1 T 5.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Research in Priority Areas Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM) 12,000,000 2,000,000 ER 5.2 PI 5.2.1 T 5.2.1 March 31, 2023 and ongoing
PI 5.2.2 T 5.2.2
Public Health Agency of Canada Emergency Preparedness and Response Chronic Disease and Injury Surveillance 281,720 0 Not applicableTable footnote 12
Total spending, all themes
Theme Total federal funding allocated from 2017-18 to 2022-23Table footnote * (dollars) 2022–23 Total federal planned spending (dollars)
Theme 1 191,614,132 35,623,282
Theme 2 112,095,792 18,384,040
Theme 3 76,829,815 13,414,634
Theme 4 327,228,689 53,762,186
Theme 5 23,051,209 4,248,713
Total, all themes 730,819,637 125,432,855

Horizontal Initiative Activity Codes

Theme 1: Prevention
Expected Results
Health Canada

ER 1.1.1 Targeted stakeholders and Canadians are equipped with the capacity (knowledge, skills and supports) to inform their decisions and actions related to substance use.

ER 1.1.2 Targeted stakeholders use evidence-informed information on substance use to change policies, programs, and practice.

ER 1.1.3 Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 1.2 The RCMP will increase awareness of drugs and illegal substances among stakeholders by developing education products, supporting outreach and engagement efforts, and building new partnerships.

Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 1.1.1 Percentage of funding recipients who met their targets set for targeted Stakeholders/Canadians who intend to use they have acquired through knowledge/skills related to substance use through SUAP funded projects.Footnote 22

PI 1.1.3 Percentage of pharmacies inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the CDSA and its regulations.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

PI 1.2.1 Number of awareness products.

PI 1.2.2 Number of stakeholders reached.

PI 1.2.3 Percentage of partners and stakeholders who demonstrate an increase in awareness of illegal drugs.

PI 1.2.4 Number of partnerships and collaborations.

PI 1.2.5 Number of new engagement opportunities identified.

Targets
Health Canada

T 1.1.1 65%

T 1.1.3 80%

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

T 1.2.1 5 illegal drug awareness products will be produced and/or updated

T 1.2.2 Approximately 1,000 stakeholders will be reached (stakeholders include Police, Public/Youth, and Industry/other stakeholders).

T 1.2.3 50% of partners and stakeholders agree that Federal Policing contributed to an increased awareness/understanding of illegal drugs.

T 1.2.4 At least 3 partnerships/collaborations.

T 1.2.5 5

Theme 2: treatment
Expected Results
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 2.1 Support for research in priority areas.

Department of Justice Canada

ER 2.2.1 The criminal justice system supports alternative ways of responding to the causes and consequences of offending.

ER 2.2.2 Increased availability of, and access to, drug treatment services and programs for youth involved in the justice system.

Indigenous Services Canada

ER 2.3 Improved access to substance use services.

Performance Indicators
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

PI 2.1 Percentage of funded research projects with a nature and scope that support CDSS' goals.

Department of Justice Canada

PI 2.2.1 Drug Treatment Court participant retention rate.

PI 2.2.2 Percentage of available budget expended to support funded projects under the Youth Justice Fund's Drug Treatment component.

Indigenous Services Canada

PI 2.3 Number of sites offering opioid agonist therapy (OAT) wraparound services.

Targets
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

T 2.1 100%

Department of Justice Canada

T 2.2.1 50% of participants are retained for six months in federally funded Drug Treatment Court programs.

T 2.2.2 5 100% of the budget allocation is committed to support treatment programming for youth involved in the justice system.

Indigenous Services Canada

T 2.3 75 sites

Theme 3: harm reduction
Expected Results
Health Canada

ER 3.1 Increased availability of harm reduction services.

Indigenous Services Canada

ER 3.2 Increased availability of harm reduction services

Public Health Agency of Canada

ER 3.3 Reduction in risk-taking behaviour among drug or substances users.

Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 3.1 Percentage of applications for an exemption to operate a Supervised Consumption Site that received a decision within the service standard from the time the review is complete.Footnote 23

Indigenous Services Canada

PI 3.2 Number of sites offering opioid agonist therapy (OAT) wraparound services.

Public Health Agency of Canada

PI 3.3 Percentage decrease in the number of people who use drugs who report sharing drug use equipment.

Targets
Health Canada

T 3.1 not applicable

Indigenous Services Canada

T 3.2 75 sites

Public Health Agency of Canada

T 3.3 10% decrease

Theme 4: enforcement
Expected Results
Health Canada

ER 4.1.1 Authorizations to perform legitimate activities with controlled substances and precursor chemicals are processed in a timely manner.

ER 4.1.2 Increased compliance and reduced risk of diversion of controlled substances, prescription drugs and precursor chemicals.

ER 4.1.3 Increased effectiveness in drug analysis.

ER 4.1.4 Data and research evidence on drugs and emerging drug trends are used by members of the federal Health Portfolio and their partners.

Canada Border Services Agency

ER 4.2.1 Increase awareness and capacity to gather information and intelligence to maximize interdiction of illegal drugs (as defined in the CDSA) at the border.

ER 4.2.2 Continue to inform enforcement activities by providing intelligence and analytical support to the regions.

ER 4.2.3 Continue to work with CDSS partner agencies to identify opportunities for cooperation, share information, and conduct laboratory analysis related to illegal drugs and other goods (e.g. precursor chemicals) governed by the CDSA.

Canada Revenue Agency

ER 4.3 30 audits. Re- assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Service Canada

ER 4.4 Timely case preparation and supervision of provincial offenders with a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II).

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

ER 4.5 Given the importance of the CDSS initiative, FINTRAC will continue to work with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ensure they receive financial intelligence related to drug production and distribution that is useful for further actions.

Global Affairs Canada

ER 4.6 In 2020-21, GAC will increase capacity of port officials in selected countries in the Americas to intercept and seize illegal drugs smuggled via legal maritime containerized cargo. GAC will also work with UNODC to build the capacity of law enforcement, forensic laboratories and border control agencies officers to predict, prevent and protect against the challenges posed by synthetic opioids.

Parole Board of Canada

ER 4.7.1 Conditional release decisions contribute to keeping communities safe.

ER 4.7.2 The timely exchange of relevant information with victims, offenders, observers, other components of the criminal justice system, and the general public.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

ER 4.8.1 Provision of legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of drug offences in all provinces /territories regardless of which police agency investigates the offences, except Quebec and New Brunswick. In these provinces, the PPSC prosecutes only drug offences investigated by the RCMP.

ER 4.8.2 Provision of pre-charge legal advice and litigation support, as well as the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.Footnote 24

Public Safety Canada

ER 4.9 Coordinated enforcement action to address illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

ER 4.10 Assist law enforcement agencies and prosecutors by providing forensic accounting services and expertise. These services assist in determining whether the assets identified were derived from criminal activities, thereby allowing the Crown to seize the assets and remove the financial incentives from the crime.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

ER 4.11 The RCMP will focus its efforts to undertake investigations and initiatives focussing on the highest threats related to organized crime networks including those involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs, including illegal opioids.

Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 4.1.1 Overall percentage of High-Volume Regulatory Authorizations for controlled substances processed within service standards.

PI 4.1.2 Percentage of licensed dealers inspected that are deemed to be compliant with the CDSA and its regulations.

PI 4.1.3 Percentage of samples analyzed within service standards or by negotiated date.

PI 4.1.4 Number of drug notifications issued to clients and to provincial and territorial health authorities on newly identified potent illegal drugs in communities.

Canada Border Services Agency

PI 4.2 Ratio of the average dollar value of drugs and their precursors seized attributed to Intelligence vs. the average dollar value drugs and their precursors seized not attributed to intelligence.

Canada Revenue Agency

PI 4.3 80% or more of audits resulting in a (re) assessment.

Correctional Service Canada

PI 4.4.1 Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II) supervised by CSC on a monthly basis during the year.

PI 4.4.2 Total number of provincial offenders convicted of a drug offence (CDSA Schedule II) with a residency requirement on a monthly basis during the year.

PI 4.4.3 Total number of case preparation reports (pre- and post-release) completed for all provincial offenders during the year.

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

PI 4.5 Total number of FINTRAC disclosures of actionable financial intelligence made to regime partners, and the number of unique disclosures of actionable financial intelligence that relate to at least one drug-related offence.

Global Affairs Canada

PI 4.6.1 Number of illegal drug seizures made by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.

PI 4.6.2 Volume of illegal drug seized by GAC-financed/UNODC trained Port Control Units in beneficiary countries.

Parole Board of Canada

PI 4.7.1 Number and proportion of provincial offenders convicted of drug offences who successfully complete parole.

PI 4.7.2 Percentage of individuals (i.e., general public and victims) who are satisfied with the quality of the service.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

PI 4.8.1.1 Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year.

PI 4.8.1.2 Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel.

PI 4.8.2.1 Number of litigation files related to the prosecution of serious drug offences under the CDSA referred to the PPSC during the fiscal year to which mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.Footnote 24

PI 4.8.2.2 Number of files for which legal advice was provided by PPSC counsel where mandatory minimum penalties are applicable.Footnote 24

Public Safety Canada

PI 4.9 Timely sharing of evidence-based knowledge and intelligence to support law enforcement actions against illegal drugs and substances.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

PI 4.10.1 Number of active CDSS files where the services of a forensic accountant were required.

PI 4.10.2 Number of Forensic Accounting Reports produced during the fiscal year.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

PI 4.11.1 Number and percentage of Federal Serious and Organized Crime (FSOC) investigations with a transnational nexus.

PI 4.11.2 Number of drug-related charges laid by FSOC units.

PI 4.11.3 Number of drug seizures made by FSOC units, including amount of drugs seized.

Targets
Health Canada

T 4.1.1 90%

T 4.1.2 A target for this indicator will be established once a full year of risk-based planned inspections data is available by March 31, 2023. For 2022-23, the program will shift to a risk-based approach for compliance and enforcement activities, including virtual/remote and onsite inspections and compliance promotion.Footnote 25

T 4.1.3 95%Footnote 26

T 4.1.4 Demand driven

Canada Border Services Agency

T 4.2 9:1 ratio

Canada Revenue Agency

T 4.3 30 audits. Re-assessments of $2.0 million of federal taxes.

Correctional Service Canada

T 4.4.1 19 (approximately)

T 4.4.2 10 (approximately)

T 4.4.3 392 (approximately)

Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada

T 4.5 FINTRAC seeks to closely align its financial intelligence products with the needs and priorities of its investigative partners. As such, the Centre does not set specific targets for the number or types of drug-related case disclosures it produces in any fiscal year.

Global Affairs Canada

T 4.6.1 Illegal drug seizures are made in all beneficiary countries benefiting from GAC-financed/UNODC trained port control units.

T 4.6.2 At least 20 tons

Parole Board of Canada

T 4.7.1 99.8% of provincial offenders serving sentences for drug offences who are on parole are not convicted of a violent offence during their supervision period.

T 4.7.2 89% of individuals are satisfied with the quality of service. PBC questionnaire was conducted in 2016-17, and the next questionnaire is planned for 2022-23

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

T 4.8 Targets are not applicable owing to the nature of the PPSC's workload and mandate.

Public Safety Canada

T 4.9 100% completion of planned coordination activities based on an integrated law enforcement work plan.

Public Services and Procurement Canada

T 4.10 The files are dependent on the projects law enforcement assign to PSPC-FAMG and are based on the resource capacity of the three senior forensic accounts dedicated to work on CDSS files.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

T 4.11 Targets are not applicable as these will vary by province/territory and is based on need.

Theme 5: evidence base
Expected Results
Health Canada

ER 5.1 Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

ER 5.2 Increased availability of data and research evidence on drugs and substances.

Performance Indicators
Health Canada

PI 5.1 Percentage of United Nations Office on Drug and Crime Annual Report Questionnaire completed with Canadian data.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

PI 5.2.1 Percentage of grant recipients producing policy-relevant knowledge products, such as research publications, policy briefs, guidelines for policies or practice, presentations to policy audiences, and media mentions.

PI 5.2.2 Percentage of health research publications related to substance use.

Targets
Health Canada

T 5.1 60.5%Footnote 27

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

T 5.2.1 75%

T 5.2.2 90%

Chemicals Management Plan

General information
Name of horizontal initiative

Chemicals Management Plan

Lead department

Health Canada

Federal partner organization(s)

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Public Health Agency of Canada

Start Date

2007-08

End Date

2023-24

Description

The objective of the Chemicals Management Plan (CMP or "the Program") is to protect human health and the environment by addressing substances of concern in Canada. It was launched in 2006, and is jointly managed by Health Canada (HC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC). The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) also contributes to this Program.

The core functions of the Program are: 1) chemicals risk assessment; 2) chemicals risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; 3) research; monitoring and surveillance; and 4) collaboration, outreach and engagement.

The CMP addresses both substances currently in commerce ("existing substances") and substances entering the Canadian market ("new substances"). It also takes into consideration various routes of exposure (e.g., from water, air, food, consumer products, cosmetics, pesticides, etc.), and both chronic and acute risks. When identifying and/or managing risks, actions are guided by the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), the Food and Drugs Act (F&DA), the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA) and others, as appropriate.

For more information, see the Government of Canada's Chemical Substances Portal.

Governance structures

HC and ECCC share the overall responsibility for delivering the CMP. The Departments fulfill their responsibilities through established internal departmental governance structures, as well as a joint CMP governance structure to address shared responsibilities.

Within the joint structure, there is a CMP Horizontal Initiative Oversight Committee comprised of implicated Assistant Deputy Ministers (ADMs) from the three partner organizations. Meetings of the CMP Horizontal Initiative Oversight Committee are co-chaired by the ADM of the Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, HC, the ADM of the Environmental Protection Branch, ECCC, and the ADM of the Science and Technology Branch, ECCC. This Committee provides strategic direction and management oversight for the integrated delivery and management of the CMP. This Committee will also resolve any disputes within the Horizontal Initiative. This Committee reports to the Deputy Ministers of HC and of ECCC and is responsible for the overall management of the CMP. It meets approximately four times a year.

The CMP Horizontal Initiative Oversight Committee is supported by the CMP Steering Committee, which consists of all implicated Directors General (DGs) within HC and ECCC. The CMP Steering Committee also meets four times a year, although some DG sub-groups meet monthly. The CMP Steering Committee provides a regular open exchange of information and decisions on a broad range of operational and policy issues for the implementation of CMP.

The CMP Steering Committee is supported by a CMP Working Group, a Director-level Committee that meets every two weeks to provide oversight of the CMP's implementation and coordination, and seeks to resolve issues that may arise, while developing options and making recommendations to DGs as needed. Overall, this joint CMP governance structure supports integration, co-ordination, decision-making and clear accountabilities within the Horizontal Initiative.

Total federal funding allocated from start to end date (dollars)

$1,785,865,593

Total federal funding planned spending to date (dollars)

$1,308,179,400

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$1,266,704,760

Date of last renewal of initiative

June 2021

Total federal funding allocated at the last renewal and source of funding (dollars)

$477,686,193. Budget 2020.

Additional federal funding received after last renewal (dollars)

Not applicable.

Total planned spending since last renewal

$0Footnote 28

Total actual spending since last renewal

$0Footnote 28

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2023-24

Planning highlights

In 2022-23, the Program will:

Contact information

Health Canada
Kathleen Buset
Director
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch
kathleen.buset@hc-sc.gc.ca
613-415-9402

Environment and Climate Change Canada

Thomas Kruidenier
A/Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement
Science and Technology Branch
thomas.kruidenier@ec.gc.ca
613-697-4854

Christina Paradiso
Executive Director, Chemicals Management Division
Environmental Protection Branch
christina.paradiso@ec.gc.ca
613-797-3612

Horizontal initiative framework: departmental funding by theme (dollars)

Horizontal initiative: Chemicals Management Plan

Shared outcomes: Risks from harmful chemicals to the environment and to the health of Canadians are reduced

Name of theme Theme 1 Chemical Risk Assessments Theme 2 Chemical Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement Theme 3 Science-Based Decision-Making Theme 4 Collaboration, Outreach and Engagement Internal Services
Theme outcome(s) Harmful chemicals are identified through risk assessments of established priority chemicals Potential human or environmental exposure to harmful chemicals is reduced CMP research and monitoring and surveillance projects provide data to inform CMP decisions Canadians use information to minimize the health and environmental risks of harmful chemicals Not applicable
Health Canada $68,194,221 (Top-up) $21,477,054 (Existing) $31,979,616 (Top-up) $17,726,922 (Existing) $62,934,767 (Top-up) $26,848,854 (Existing) $23,366,798 (Top-up) $4,327,170 (Existing) $11,447,915 (Top-up)
Environment and Climate Change Canada $8,918,649 (Top-up) $28,983,039 (Existing) $49,782,999 (Top-up) $56,244,369 (Existing) $22,995,255 (Top-up) $17,220,642 (Existing) $0 $6,803,097 (Top-up) $8,555,904 (Existing)
Public Health Agency of Canada $0 $9,548,552 (Top-up) $330,369 (Existing) $0 $0 $0
Planning Information
Horizontal initiative overview
Name of horizontal initiative Total federal funding allocated since last renewal (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending (dollars) Horizontal initiative shared outcome(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Date to achieve target
Chemicals Management Plan 477,686,193 159,228,731 Risks from harmful chemicals to the environment and to the health of Canadians are reduced Health: Levels of exposure to a selectedTable Footnote 1 group of harmful chemicals where risk management actions have been put in place Stable or downward trend (confirmed through periodic, comparative analysis of selected substances undertaken since 2010) March 2026
Environment: Levels of exposure within the environment of a selected group of harmful chemicals where risk management actions have been put in place Stable or downward trend (confirmed through periodic, comparative analysis of selected substances undertaken since 2010) March 2026
Table Footnote 1

The Program intends to use case studies on specific substances that will examine the levels of exposure to describe the extent to which the Program has reduced risks to human health.

Table Return to footnote 1 referrer

Theme horizontal initiative activities
Theme 1 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Chemical Risk Assessments 127,572,963 42,529,108 Harmful chemicals are identified through risk assessments of established priority chemicals % of the 4,363 existing chemicals that were prioritized under the Chemicals Management Plan that have been addressed 100% March 2024
Theme 1 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
HC
  • Heath Impacts of Chemicals
  • Consumer Product Safety
  • Food & Nutrition
  • Natural Health Products
  • Pesticides
Risk Assessment 89,671,275 29,895,212 ER 1.1 PI 1.1.1 T 1.1.1 March 2023
PI 1.1.2 T 1.1.2 March 2023
ER 1.2 PI 1.2.1 T 1.2.1 March 2023
PI 1.2.2 T 1.2.2 March 2023
ECCC Substances and Waste Management Risk Assessment 37,901,688 12,633,896 ER 1.3 PI 1.3.1 T 1.3.1 March 2023
PI 1.3.2 T 1.3.2 March 2023
Theme 2 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Chemical Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 165,612,827 55,204,276 Potential human or environmental exposure to harmful chemicals is reduced Exposure or prevalence of a selected group of chemicals where risk management actions have been put in place Varies by chemical (stable or downward trend) March 2023
% of actions taken in a timely manner to protect the health of Canadians from substances found to be a risk to human health 100% March 2023
% of actions taken in a timely manner to protect Canada's environment from chemicals found to be a risk to the environment 100% March 2023
Theme 2 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
HC
  • Heath Impacts of Chemicals
  • Consumer Product Safety
  • Food & Nutrition
  • Natural Health Products
  • Pesticides
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 49,706,538 16,568,846 ER 2.1 PI 2.1 T 2.1 March 2023
ECCC
  • Substances and Waste Management
  • Compliance Promotion and Enforcement - Pollution
Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 106,027,368 35,342,456 ER 2.2 PI 2.2 T 2.2 March 2023
ER 2.3 PI 2.3.1 T 2.3.1 March 2023
PI 2.3.2 T 2.3.2 March 2023
PHAC Border and Travel Health Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement 9,878,921 3,292,974 ER 2.4 PI 2.4 T 2.4 March 2023
Theme 3 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Science-Based Decision-Making 129,999,518 43,339,588 CMP research and monitoring and surveillance projects provide data to inform CMP decisions % of research projects that inform program science-based decision-making (including priorities for risk assessment; risk management; research, monitoring and surveillance; and/or international activities related to the impacts of chemicals) 100% March 2023
% of monitoring and surveillance activities that inform program science-based decision-making (including priorities for risk assessment; risk management; research, monitoring and surveillance; and/or international activities related to the impacts of chemicals) 100% March 2023
Theme 3 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
HC
  • Heath Impacts of Chemicals
  • Food & Nutrition
Research 48,750,852 16,250,284 ER 3.1 PI 3.1 T 3.1 March 2023
  • Heath Impacts of Chemicals
  • Food & Nutrition
Monitoring and Surveillance 41,032,769 13,684,005 ER 3.2 PI 3.2 T 3.2 March 2023
ECCC Substances and Waste Management Research 22,607,403 7,535,801 ER 3.3 PI 3.3 T 3.3 March 2023
Monitoring and Surveillance 17,608,494 5,869,498 ER 3.4 PI 3.4 T 3.4 March 2023
Theme 4 details
Name of theme Total federal theme funding allocated since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Federal theme planned spending (dollars) Theme outcome(s) Theme performance indicator(s) Theme target(s) Date to achieve theme target
Collaboration, Outreach and Engagement 27,693,968 9,224,189 Canadians use information to minimize the health and environmental risks of harmful chemicals % of Canadians who took recommended actions to minimize the health and environmental risks of harmful chemicals (overall; as well as disaggregated for Indigenous people and vulnerable populations, such as women and visible minorities, when relevant/possible) TBD by March 2022 March 2023
Theme 4 horizontal initiative activities
Departments Link to department's Program Inventory Horizontal initiative activity (activities) Total federal funding allocated to each horizontal initiative activity since last renewal[*] (dollars) 2022-23 Planned spending for each horizontal initiative activity (dollars) 2022-23 Horizontal initiative activity expected result(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity performance indicator(s) 2021-22 Horizontal initiative activity target(s) Date to achieve horizontal initiative activity target
HC Health Impacts of Chemicals Outreach and Engagement 5,043,213 1,683,186 ER 4.1 PI 4.1.1 T 4.1.1 March 2023
PI 4.1.2 T 4.1.2 March 2023
PI 4.1.3 T 4.1.3 March 2023
PI 4.1.4 T 4.1.4 March 2023
ER 4.2 PI 4.2 T 4.2 March 2023
Program Management 22,650,755 7,541,003 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total spending, all themes
Theme Total federal funding allocated since last renewal (dollars) 2022-23 total federal planned spending (dollars)
Theme 1 127,572,963 42,529,108
Theme 2 165,612,827 55,204,276
Theme 3 129,999,518 43,339,588
Theme 4 27,693,968 9,224,189
Total, all themes 450,879,276 150,297,161

Horizontal Initiative Activity Codes

Expected Results
Health Canada
ER 1.1 Risk assessments are conducted in a timely manner to inform risk management decisions
ER 1.2 Regulated pesticides are deemed to meet current scientific standards with respect to health and the environment
Environment and Climate Change Canada
ER 1.3 Harmful chemicals are identified through timely risk assessments
Theme 1: Chemical Risk Assessments
Performance Indicators
Health Canada
PI 1.1.1 % of existing chemicals addressed within targeted timelines
PI 1.1.2 % of new substances (chemicals, polymers, and animate products of biotechnology) assessed within prescribed timelines
PI 1.2.1 % of pesticide re-evaluations that are completed within specified timelines
PI 1.2.2 % of pesticide special reviews that are completed within specified timelines
Environment and Climate Change Canada
PI 1.3.1 % of new substances (chemicals, polymers, and animate products of biotechnology) assessed within prescribed timelines
PI 1.3.2 % of existing chemicals addressed within targeted timelines
Targets
Health Canada
T 1.1.1 100%
T 1.1.2 100%
T 1.2.1 90%
T 1.2.2 90%
Environment and Climate Change Canada
T 1.3.1 100%
T 1.3.2 100%
Theme 2: Chemical Risk Management, Compliance Promotion and Enforcement
Expected Results
Health Canada
ER 2.1 Regulatees are informed of and comply with legislative and regulatory requirements related to the applicable HC Acts
Environment and Climate Change Canada
ER 2.2 Regulatees are informed of requirements of regulatory and non-regulatory instruments
ER 2.3 Non-compliant regulatees become compliant with established risk management obligations
Public Health Agency of Canada
ER 2.4 Public health risks associated with travel are reduced
Performance Indicators
Health Canada
PI 2.1 % of planned CMP compliance verifications completed
Environment and Climate Change Canada
PI 2.2 % of regulatees subject to regulatory and non-regulatory CMP instruments that are contacted through compliance promotion activities
PI 2.3.1 % of non-compliance addressed by enforcement action
PI 2.3.2 % of verified compliance for ongoing environmental violations during follow-up inspections
Public Health Agency of Canada
PI 2.4 % of inspected passenger transportation operators that meet public health requirements
Targets
Health Canada
T 2.1 100%
Environment and Climate Change Canada
T 2.2 100%
T 2.3.1 70%
T 2.3.2 60%
Public Health Agency of Canada
T 2.4 95%
Theme 3: Science-Based Decision-Making
Expected Results
Health Canada
ER 3.1 Research data is available to inform CMP decisions
ER 3.2 Monitoring and surveillance data is available to inform CMP decisions
Environment and Climate Change Canada
ER 3.3 Research data is available to inform CMP decisions
ER 3.4 Monitoring and surveillance data is available to inform CMP decisions
Performance Indicators
Health Canada
PI 3.1 % of planned knowledge transfer activities completed related to research on chemicals of concern
PI 3.2 % of planned knowledge transfer activities completed related to monitoring and surveillance on chemicals of concern
Environment and Climate Change Canada
PI 3.3 % % of research projects that supports priorities for risk assessment and risk management
PI 3.4 % of monitoring and surveillance projects that supports risk assessment and risk management decisions
Targets
Health Canada
T 3.1 100%
T 3.2 100%
Environment and Climate Change Canada
T 3.3 100%
T 3.4 100%
Theme 4: Collaboration, Outreach and Engagement
Expected Results
Health Canada
ER 4.1 Canadians and intermediaries have access to information to minimize environmental health risks
ER 4.2 The Government better understands the interests and concerns of vulnerable populations and Indigenous people regarding the management of chemicals and environmental health risks
Performance Indicators
Health Canada
PI 4.1.1 % of Canadians who engaged in social media in order to actively learn more about minimizing the health risks of harmful chemicals
PI 4.1.2 % of outreach participants who report an increase in knowledge about environmental health risks
PI 4.1.3 % of outreach participants who intend to take recommended actions to minimize the environmental health risks of harmful chemicals
PI 4.1.4 % of contribution funds committed to selected recipients to communicate evidence-based information about chemicals and health to Canadians
PI 4.2 % of planned engagement opportunities completed with the participation of vulnerable populations, including Indigenous peoples
Targets
Health Canada
T 4.1.1 1%
T 4.1.2 80%
T 4.1.3 70%
T 4.1.4 100%
T 4.2 100%

United Nations 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals

Supplementary Information Table

Health Canada

The following provides examples of how Health Canada programming supports the SDGs and supplements the information outlined in detail in Health Canada's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.

UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Planned initiatives Associated domestic targets or "ambitions" and/or global targets

SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Through Bilateral Agreements for Home and Community Care and Mental Health and Addiction Services with provincial and territorial governments, Health Canada is expanding access to care at home and in the community, to support Canadians who need care to remain at home as they age, and reducing reliance on more expensive facility-based infrastructure. These agreements also provide funding for provinces and territories to expand access to community-based mental health and substance use services, with a focus on integrating services with primary care, expanding services for children and youth and for individuals with complex cases.

This contributes to Canadian Indicator Framework Ambitions:

Canada prevents causes of premature death.

Canadians have healthy and satisfying lives.

Despite decades of aggressive action by governments of all levels and civil society, tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of premature death and disease in Canada.

Canada's Tobacco Strategy seeks to reduce smoking prevalence through efforts to prevent the uptake of tobacco use by youth and people who do not smoke, and to help people who currently smoke to quit.

This will be achieved through scientific research, surveillance, policy and regulatory development, compliance and enforcement activities, public education and outreach.

This contributes to Canadian Indicator Framework Ambition:

Canada prevents causes of premature death.

Chemicals Management Plan (CMP)

The CMP aims to protect human health and the environment by reducing risks related to chemicals in air, water, soil, and consumer and industrial products and processes. Key activities include: chemicals risk assessment; chemicals risk management, compliance promotion and enforcement; research, monitoring and surveillance; and collaboration, outreach and engagement.

This contributes to Canadian Indicator Framework Ambition:

Canada prevents causes of premature death.

SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Air Quality Program

The Air Quality Program supports actions to improve air quality and health for all Canadians by: conducting research on the exposure of Canadians to air pollution and on the health impacts of air pollution; assessing the health risks from air pollutants and pollutant sources; and analyzing the health benefits from actions to improve air quality. This work enables the Program to also contribute to the updates to the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards, which drive the continuous improvement of air quality across the country.

This contributes to Canadian Indicator Framework Ambition:

Canadians live in healthy, accessible, and sustainable cities and communities.

SDG 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Climate Change Program

The Climate Change Program aims to increase knowledge, capacity and tools on the human health impacts and adaptation approaches to climate change available to healthcare and public health professionals, emergency preparedness officials and provincial and local decision-makers across Canada. The Program also aims to increase the level of awareness among Canadians, including vulnerable populations, of extreme heat health risks.

This contributes to Canadian Indicator Framework Ambition:

Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change.

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Healthcare Excellence Canada

General information

Recipient information

Healthcare Excellence Canada, an amalgamation of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement.

Start date

1996-97

End date

In perpetuity

Link to departmental result(s)
Link to department's Program Inventory

Program 1: Health Care Systems Analysis and Policy

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Canadian Health Services Research Foundation was established as an independent organization in 1996-97. To reflect the evolution of its work, the organization was renamed the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement in 2012 and subsequently amalgamated with the Canadian Patient Safety Institute in 2020-21 to form Healthcare Excellence Canada (HEC).

In 2022-23 and going forward, HEC will work to find and promote innovators and innovations, drive rapid adoption and spread of quality and safety innovations, and build capacities to enable excellence in healthcare and catalyze policy change. HEC will focus its efforts on three areas: re-imagining care with - and for - older adults with health and social needs; care closer to home and community with safe transitions; and, pandemic recovery and health system resilience.

Up-front multi-year funding to HEC includes the original $66.5 million endowment to establish the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation along with the following grants:

Total funding approved (dollars)

151,500,000

Total funding received (dollars)
Planned funding in 2022−23 (dollars)

0

Planned funding in 2023−24 (dollars)

0

Planned funding in 2024−25 (dollars)

0

Note: HEC is also reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Summary of recipient's annual plans

HEC will continue to work with patients, families and caregivers; health and social service providers; governments and other public and private sector organizations to accelerate the identification, spread and scale of proven healthcare innovations.

As amalgamation costs are finalized, the new organization may rely on its remaining up-front multi-year funding to address amalgamation costs or unfunded liabilities it is bringing into the new organization (e.g., pension liabilities). These funds are being held in reserve to address implications associated with any negative revisions to future funding.

Canada Health Infoway

General information

Recipient information

Canada Health Infoway (Infoway)

Start date

March 31, 2001Footnote 29

End date

March 31, 2015Footnote 30

Link to departmental result(s)
Link to department's Program Inventory

Program 6: Digital Health

Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

Canada Health Infoway Inc. is an independent, not-for-profit corporation established in 2001 to accelerate the development of electronic health technologies such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telehealth on a pan-Canadian basis.

Between 2001 and 2010, the Government of Canada committed $2.1 billion to Infoway in the form of grants and up-front multi-year funding consisting of: $500 million in 2001 to strengthen a Canada-wide health infostructure, with the EHR as a priority; $600 million in 2003 to accelerate implementation of the EHR and Telehealth; $100 million in 2004 to support the development of a pan-Canadian health surveillance system; $400 million in 2007 to support continued work on EHRs and wait time reductions (fully expended); and $500 million in 2010 to support continued implementation of EHRs, implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs) in physicians' offices, and integration of points of service with the EHR system (fully expended). Infoway invests in electronic health projects in collaboration with a range of partners, in particular provincial and territorial governments, typically on a cost-shared basis. Project payments are made based on the completion of pre-determined milestones.

It is anticipated that Infoway's approach, where federal, provincial and territorial governments participate toward a goal of modernizing electronic health information systems, will reduce costs and improve the quality of health care and patient safety in Canada through coordination of effort, avoidance of duplication and errors, and improved access to patient data.

Total funding approved (dollars)

2,100,000,000

Total funding received (dollars)

2,093,398,112Footnote 31

Planned funding in 2022−23 (dollars)

0

Planned funding in 2023−24 (dollars)

0

Planned funding in 2024−25 (dollars)

0

Note: The contribution funding to Infoway is reported under the Details on Transfer Payment Programs section of the Supplementary Information Tables.

Summary of recipient's annual plans

The following is a summary of plans related to up-front multi-year funding.Footnote 32

Since its inception in 2001, Infoway received $2.1 billion in up-front multi-year funding from the federal government. This funding was invested in 12 programs (e.g., EMR and EHR) by the Board. Each program was broken down by jurisdictions into smaller projects. As of March 31, 2021, Infoway has spent $2.05 billion of the original $2.1 billion. An estimated $16 million will be spent in 2021-22. Infoway's plans for the expenditure of its remaining up-front multi-year funding will abide by the terms and conditions for use of the funds, to advance digital health in Canada.

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