Guidance Document - Topical Anaesthetic/Analgesic/Antipruritic Labelling Standard

Date Adopted: 2015/07/09
Effective Date: 2015/07/31

Foreword

Guidance documents are meant to provide assistance to industry and health care professionals on how to comply with governing statutes and regulations. Guidance documents also provide assistance to staff on how Health Canada mandates and objectives should be implemented in a manner that is fair, consistent and effective.

Guidance documents are administrative instruments not having force of law and, as such, allow for flexibility in approach. Alternate approaches to the principles and practices described in this document may be acceptable provided they are supported by adequate justification. Such approaches should be discussed in advance with the relevant program area to avoid the possible finding that applicable statutory or regulatory requirements have not been met.

As a corollary to the above, it is equally important to note that Health Canada reserves the right to request information or material, or define conditions not specifically described in this document, in order to allow the Department to adequately assess the safety, efficacy or quality of a therapeutic product. Health Canada is committed to ensuring that such requests are justifiable and that decisions are clearly documented.

This document should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notice and the relevant sections of other applicable guidance documents.

Table of contents

1. Introduction

This labelling standard describes the requirements necessary to receive marketing authorization (a Drug Identification Number (DIN) or a Natural Product Number (NPN)) for topical anaesthetic, analgesic, and antipruritic products for the temporary relief of pain and itching. This standard does not apply to products to be used on mucous membranes or surrounding areas (i.e. gums, throat, lips, nostrils, eyelids, ears, genitals, or anus).

2. Medicinal Ingredients

Topical anaesthetic, analgesic, and antipruritic products are classified as natural health products (NHPs) if they contain medicinal ingredients from Table 1 or in combination with ingredients from Table 3 only. Applicants applying for a NPN should use the appropriate forms, templates, and guidance.

Topical anaesthetic, analgesic, and antipruritic products are classified as drugs if they contain at least one medicinal ingredient from Table 2 or in combination with ingredients from Table 4. Applicants applying for a DIN should use the appropriate forms, templates, and guidance.

Table 1: NHP topical anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic medicinal ingredients and associated doses

(A) Amine and "caine"-type
Proper name(s)Table 1a footnote 1 Common name(s)Table 1a footnote 2 Source material(s)Table 1a footnote 1 Quantity

Table 1a footnotes

Table 1a footnote 1

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Merck 2014

Return to table 1a footnote 1 referrer

Table 1a footnote 2

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Gottschalck and McEwen 2004

Return to table 1a footnote 2 referrer

4-Aminobenzoic acid, ethyl ester Benzocaine Benzocaine para-Aminobenzoic acid 5-20%
(B) Alcohols and ketones
Proper name(s)Table 1b footnote 1 Common name(s)Table 1b footnote 2 Source material(s)Table 1b footnote 3 Quantity

Table 1b footnotes

Table 1b footnote 1

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Merck 2014; Gottschalck and McEwen 2004; Ph.Eur. 2011; BP 2012; NIH 2014; ChEBI 2013; Rowe et al. 2013

Return to table 1b footnote 1 referrer

Table 2 footnote 2

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Merck 2014; Gottschalck and McEwen 2004; Ph.Eur. 2011; BP 2012; NIH 2014

Return to table 1b footnote 2 referrer

Table 1b footnote 3

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Merck 2014; Gottschalck and McEwen 2004; NIH 2014; McGuffin et al. 2000

Return to table 1b footnote 3 referrer

alpha-Hydroxytoluene

Benzyl alcohol

Benzyl alcohol

10-33%

(1R, 4R)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo [2.2.1]heptan-2-one

d-Camphor

(+)-Camphor

d-Camphor

Camphor

Natural camphor

(+)-Camphor

d-Camphor

0.1-3%

(1RS, 4RS)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one

dl-Camphor

(+-)-Camphor

dl-Camphor

Racemic camphor

(+-)-Camphor

dl-Camphor

Juniperus oxycedrus

Juniper tar

Twig wood of Juniperus oxycedrus L.

1-5%

l-Menthol

(1R,2S,5R)-5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-cyclohexanol

(1R,2S,5R)-5-methyl-2-(propan-2-yl)cyclohexan-1-ol

(-)-Menthol

l-Menthol

Menthol

(-)-Menthol

l-Menthol

0.1-1%

dl-Menthol

(1R,2S,5R)-rel-5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-cyclohexanol

(1RS,2RS,5RS)-(±)-5-Methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)cyclohexanol

(+-)-Menthol

dl-Menthol
Racemic menthol

(+-)-Menthol

dl-Menthol

Phenol

Phenol

Phenol

0.5-1.5%

Phenolate sodium

Phenolate sodium

Phenolate sodium

0.5-1.5%

1,3-benzenediol

m-dihydroxybenzene

Resorcinol

Resorcinol

0.5-3%

Table 2: Drug topical anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic medicinal ingredients and associated doses

(A) Amine and "caine"-type
Medicinal ingredient
preferred name
Quantity
Butamben picrate 1%
Dibucaine/Dibucaine hydrochloride 0.25-1%
Dimethisoquin hydrochloride 0.3-0.5%
Dyclonine hydrochloride 0.5-1%
Lidocaine/Lidocaine hydrochloride 0.5-5%
Pramoxine hydrochloride 0.5-1%
Tetracaine/Tetracaine hydrochloride 1-2%
(B) Alcohols and ketones
Medicinal ingredient
preferred name
Quantity
Camphorated metacresol:
Camphor 3-10.8%
Metacresol 1-3.6%
(C) Antihistamines
Medicinal ingredient
preferred name
Quantity
Diphenhydramine hydrochloride 1-2%
Tripelennamine hydrochloride 0.5-2%
Table 3: NHP skin protectant ingredients and associated doses
Proper name(s)Table 3 footnote 1 Common name(s)Table 3 footnote 2 Source material(s)Table 3 footnote 3 QuantityTable 3 footnote 4

Table 3 footnotes

Table 3 footnote 1

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Merck 2014; Gottschalck and McEwen 2004; Ph.Eur. 2011; NIH 2014; McGuffin et al. 2000

Return to table 3 footnote 1 referrer

Table 3 footnote 2

At least one of the following references was consulted: USP 34; Merck 2014; Gottschalck and McEwen 2004; Ph.Eur. 2011; BP 2012

Return to table 3 footnote 2 referrer

Table 3 footnote 3

USP 34

Return to table 3 footnote 3 referrer

Table 3 footnote 4

At least one of the following references was consulted: Berardi et al. 2002; US FDA 2003; US FDA 1990

Return to table 3 footnote 4 referrer

Table 3 footnote 5

Products being manufactured using USP Grade Zinc Oxide Ointment or Zinc Oxide Paste should ensure that the final quantity of zinc oxide does not exceed 25%. Manufacturers must list all non-medicinal ingredients on product licence application form and label.

Return to table 3 footnote 5 referrer

(2,5-Dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl)urea

Allantoin

N-(2,5-Dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl) urea

5-Ureidohydantoin

Glyoxyldiureide

Allantoin

0.5-2%

Aluminum hydroxide

Aluminum hydroxide

Aluminum hydrate

Aluminum hydroxide

0.15-5%

Iron oxide (Fe2O3), mixture with zinc oxide

Calamine

Calamine

1-25%

Theobroma cacao

Cocoa butter

Cacao butter

Theobroma oil

Seed of Theobroma cacao L.

≥ 50%

1,2,3-propanetriol

Glycerin

Glycerine

Glycerol

Glycerol

20-45%

Kaolin

Kaolin

Argilla

Bolus alba
 
China clay

Hydrated aluminum silicate

Porcelain clay

White bole

 

Kaolin

4-20%

Shark Liver Oil (Gottschalck and McEwen 2004; Merck 2014)

Shark Liver Oil

Liver from sharks (organisms in the orders Carcharhiniformes, Heterodontiformes, Hexanchiformes, Lamniformes, Orectolobiformes, Pristiophoriformes, Squaliformes, and Squatiniformes) (Gottschalck and McEwen 2004)

3%

Acetic acid; zinc salt

Zinc acetate

Acetic acid, zinc salt

Zinc acetate

Acetic acid, zinc salt, dihydrate

0.1-2%

Carbonic acid, zinc salt (1:1)

Zinc carbonate

Zinc carbonate

0.2-2%

Zinc oxideTable 3 footnote5

Zinc oxide

Zinc oxide

1-25%

Table 4: Drug skin protectant ingredients and associated doses
Medicinal ingredient
preferred name
Quantity
Dimethicone 1-30%
Petrolatum ≥ 30%
White petrolatum ≥ 30%

2.1 Permitted combinations

Combinations of anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic medicinal ingredients:

  • Any single ingredient in Table 1 (A) or Table 2 (A) with any single ingredient in Table 1 (B) or Table 2 (B).
  • Any single ingredient in Table 1 (B) or Table 2 (B) with any single ingredient in Table 2 (C).
  • Any one of: Benzyl alcohol, Juniper tar, Phenol, Phenolate sodium, or Resorcinol (as per Table 1 (B)) combined with Camphor and Menthol (as per Table 1 (B)).
  • Camphor (3-10.8%) and Phenol (4.7 %) in a light mineral oil USP vehicle.

Combinations of anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic medicinal ingredients and skin protectant ingredients:

  • Any single ingredient in Tables 1 or 2 or any permitted combination outlined above may be combined with a skin protectant ingredient (as listed in Tables 3 and 4) or combination of skin protectant ingredients.

Note: The declaration of a skin protectant ingredient as a medicinal ingredient is optional. However, if it is declared as medicinal, then the concentration of the ingredient must meet the required level as per Tables 3 and 4.

3. Route of administration

Topical

4. Dosage forms

Acceptable dosage forms: Lotion, solution, cream, gel, liquid, ointment, spray [including non-pressurized sprays, continuous (bag-on-valve) sprays, and aerosol {non-chlorofluorocarbons (CFC)} based sprays], and powder. Wipes are an acceptable dosage form for NHPs.

5. Uses or purposes

Statement(s) to the effect of:

For products containing a topical anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic ingredient (Tables 1 and 2):

  • For temporary relief of pain and/or itching associated with minor burns, sunburn, minor cuts, scrapes, insect bites or minor skin irritations.

For products containing a topical anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic ingredient (Tables 1 and 2) in combination with a skin protectant ingredient (Tables 3 and 4): Footnote 1

  • For temporary relief of pain and/or itching associated with minor burns, sunburn, minor cuts, scrapes, insect bites or minor skin irritations and for temporary protection of minor skin irritations.

6. Directions for use

Statement(s) to the effect of:

Adults and children two (2) years of age and older: Apply (Spray) to affected area not more than 3 to 4 times daily.

7. Risk information

Statement(s) to the effect of:

7.1 Cautions and warnings

For all products:

  • For external use only.Footnote 2
  • Keep out of reach of children.
  • For children (2 - 12 years): Application should be supervised by an adult.
  • Avoid contact with eyes; if this happens, rinse thoroughly with water.Footnote 2
  • If condition worsens or if symptoms persist for more than seven (7) days or clear up and occur again within a few days, discontinue use and consult a health care practitioner.Footnote 2Footnote 3
  • If overdose or accidental ingestion occurs, call a Poison Control Centre immediately.Footnote 4

For butamben picrate:

  • This product stains skin and clothing yellow.Footnote 2

For glycerin, aluminum hydroxide:

  • Consult a health care practitioner prior to use on children less than six (6) months of age.Footnote 5

For zinc acetate:

Consult a health care practitioner prior to use on children less than two (2) years of age.Footnote 5

7.2 Contraindications

For all drug products:

  • Do not use if you are allergic to any of the ingredients.

For butamben picrate, resorcinol:

  • Do not apply over large areas of the body.Footnote 2

For dibucaine, dibucaine hydrochloride:

  • Do not use in large quantities, particularly over raw surfaces or blistered areas.Footnote 2

For benzocaine, lidocaine, lidocaine hydrochloride, tetracaine, tetracaine hydrochloride:

  • Do not use under a bandage.Footnote 6Footnote 7
  • Do not use in large quantities or over large areas of the body.Footnote 6Footnote 8
  • Stop use and consult a health care practitioner if the following symptoms appear: weakness, confusion, headache, difficulty breathing and/or pale, grey or blue coloured skin as these may be signs of methemoglobinemia, a rare disorder, which may appear up to two (2) hours after use.Footnote 8Footnote 9
  • Do not use over raw surfaces or blistered areas.Footnote 2Footnote 10Footnote 11

For camphorated metacresol, phenol, phenolate sodium:

  • Do not apply over large areas of the body or under a bandage.Footnote 2

For diphenhydramine hydrochloride:

  • Do not use on large areas of the body or with any other product containing diphenhydramine, even one taken by mouth.Footnote 12

7.3 Known adverse reaction(s)

For benzocaine:

8. Non-medicinal ingredients

Non-medicinal ingredients must be chosen from the current Natural Health Products Ingredients Database and must meet the limitations outlined in that database.

Non-medicinal ingredients must be restricted to those substances, necessary for the formulation of the dosage form. Their concentration must not exceed the minimum required to provide their intended effect. They must be harmless in the amounts used, their presence must not affect the therapeutic efficacy or safety of the medicinal ingredients and they must not interfere with assays and tests for the medicinal ingredients and, if present, antimicrobial preservatives. Sponsors should be aware that ingredients of botanical origin added as non-medicinal ingredients must comply with the Health Canada Policy Herbs Used as Non-Medicinal Ingredients in Nonprescription Drugs for Human Use (1995).

9. Specifications

For all products:

This labelling standard describes those requirements that are specific to this class of drugs and to natural health products (NHPs). Any change to the manufacturing process that impacts the safety and efficacy of the ingredients, such as the use of novel technology (e.g. nanotechnology), requires supporting data and will be reviewed outside the labelling standard.

Guidance Document Labelling of Pharmaceutical Drugs for Human Use: This guidance document should be consulted for applicable labelling requirements.

For products containing ingredients from Table 1 NHP medicinal ingredients:

Products must comply with the minimum specifications in the current Natural and Non-prescription Health Products Directorate (NNHPD) Compendium of Monographs.

The finished product must comply with the minimum specifications outlined in the NNHPD Quality of Natural Health Products Guide (Health Canada 2013).

For products containing ingredients from Table 2 drug medicinal ingredients:

Products must comply with the requirements in the Food and Drugs Act and associated Regulations. It is also noted that all products are subject to Part C, Division 2 of the Food and Drug Regulations.

When applicable, the medicinal ingredient(s) should comply with the specifications outlined in the associated monograph from the standards listed on Schedule B to the Food and Drugs Act.

Where no Schedule B monograph exists for the finished product’s dosage form, specifications should be similar to those of a comparable compendial dosage form demonstrating the product’s identity, potency, purity and quality.

Products that contain medicinal ingredients not included in Table 2 may be considered New Drugs as per section C.08.001of the Food and Drug Regulations.

10. References cited

  • Berardi RR, DeSimone EM, Newton GD, Oszko MA, Popovich NG, Rollins CJ, Shimp LA, Tietze KJ, editors. Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care, 13th edition. Washington (DC): American Pharmaceutical Association; 2002.
  • BP 2012: British Pharmacopoeia 2012. Volume I. London (GB): The Stationary Office on behalf of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA); 2012.
  • ChEBI 2013: Chemical entities of biological interest: (-)-menthol (CHEBI:15409). Last modified 2013 November 19. [Internet]. Hinxton (GB): ChEBI is a database of the European Bioinformatics Institute. [Accessed 2014 April 28]. Available from: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi
  • CPhA 2002: Repchinsky C, editor-in-chief. Patient Self-Care: Helping Patients Make Therapeutic Choices. 1st edition. Ottawa (ON): Canadian Pharmacists Association; 2002.
  • CPS 2014: Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties, online version (e-CPS). Ottawa (ON): Canadian Pharmacists Association; c2014. Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.e-therapeutics.ca/cps.showMonograph.action
  • Gottschalck TE and McEwen GN, editors. International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook – 10th edition. Washington, D.C.: Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association; 2004.
  • Health Canada 1995: Herbs Used as Non-Medicinal Ingredients in Nonprescription Drugs for Human Use. Health Canada, September 1995. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/applic-demande/pol/herbnonmed_pol-eng.php
  • Health Canada 2011: Health Canada. Health Canada reminds Canadians of health risks associated with topical benzocaine products. Information update, Canada Vigilance Program, Marketed Health Products Directorate: April 19, 2011. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/recall-alert-rappel-avis/hc-sc/2011/13598a-eng.php
  • Health Canada 2012: Health Canada. Benzocaine health products: new risk statements to be added to product labels. Information update, Health Canada: April 5, 2012. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/recall-alert-rappel-avis/hc-sc/2012/13671a-eng.php
  • Health Canada 2013: Quality of Natural Health Products Guide. Health Canada, May 2013. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodnatur/legislation/docs/eq-paq-eng.php
  • Health Canada 2014: Guidance Document Labelling of Pharmaceutical Drugs for Human Use. Health Canada, January 10, 2014. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/applic-demande/guide-ld/label_guide_ld-eng.php
  • Martindale 2014: Brayfield A, editor. Martindale: The Complete Drug Reference. [Internet]. London (GB): Pharmaceutical Press; Copyright 1933-2013. [Local Anaesthetics, latest update 2014 January 13]; [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.medicinescomplete.com
  • McGuffin M, Kartesz JT, Leung AY, Tucker AO. Herbs of Commerce. 2nd ed. USA: The American Herbal Products Association; 2000.
  • Merck 2014: The Merck Index Online. [Internet]. Whitehouse Station (NJ): Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: https://www.rsc.org/Merck-Index
  • NIH 2014: National Institutes of Health. ChemIDplus advanced [online]. 2014. Bethesda (MD): Specialized Information Services, United States National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health & Human Services. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://chem.sis.nlm.nih.gov/chemidplus/chemidheavy.jsp
  • Rowe RC, Sheskey PJ, Quinn ME, editors. Handbook of Pharmaceutical Excipients. Content updated to coincide with 7th print edition. [Internet]. London (GB): Pharmaceutical Press. [Menthol: last modified 2013 April 9; Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.medicinescomplete.com
  • Ph.Eur. 2011: European Pharmacopoeia. 7th edition, volume 2. Strasbourg (FR): Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and HealthCare of the Council of Europe (EDQM); 2011.
  • US FDA 1983: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Part 348. External Analgesic Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: Tentative Final Monograph: [Internet]. Federal Register, Volume 48, Number 27, February 8, 1983. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTCDrugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/UCM077928.pdf
  • US FDA 1990: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Part 347. Skin Protectant Drug Products for Over-the Counter Human Use; Proposed Rulemaking for Diaper Rash Drug Products: Federal Register, Volume 55, Number 119, June 20, 1990. [Accessed 2014 May 14]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTCDrugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/ucm091669.pdf
  • US FDA 2002: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Parts 336, 338, and 341. Labeling of Diphenhydramine-Containing Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: Final rule: [Internet]. Federal Register, Volume 67, Number 235, December 6, 2002. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTCDrugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/ucm081024.pdf
  • US FDA 2003: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Part 347. Skin Protectant Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use; Final Monograph: [Internet]. Federal Register, Volume 68, Number 107, June 4, 2003. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTCDrugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/ucm091520.pdf
  • US FDA 2009: United States Food and Drug Administration. Public Health Advisory: Potential Hazards of Skin Products Containing Numbing Ingredients for Relieving Pain from Mammography and Other Medical Tests and Conditions: [Internet]. January 16, 2009. [Accessed 2014 October 3]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/PostmarketDrugSafetyInformationforPatientsandProviders/ucm110625.htm
  • USP 34: United States Pharmacopeial Convention. 2011. United States Pharmacopeia and the National Formulary (USP 34 - NF 29). Rockville (MD): The United States Pharmacopeial Convention.

11. References reviewed

  • AHFS 2014: American Hospital Formulary Service®. McEvoy GK (ed). AHFS Drug Information 2014®. [Internet]. Published by Authority of the Board of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists®, Bethesda, Maryland. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from http://online.statref.com
  • Boulinguez S, Sparsa A, Bouyssou-Gauthier ML, Bedane C, Bonnetblanc JM. Adverse effects associated with EMLA cream used as topical anesthetic for the mechanical debridement of leg ulcers. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2000; 42(1 Pt 1):146-8.
  • Brosh-Nissimov T, Ingbir M, Weintal I, Fried M, Porat R. Central nervous system toxicity following topical skin application of lidocaine. European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2004; 60(9):683-4. Epub 2004 Oct 2.
  • Couper RT. Methaemoglobinaemia secondary to topical lignocaine/ prilocaine in a circumcised neonate. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2000; 36(4):406-7.
  • Eldadah M, Fitzgerald M. Methemoglobinemia due to skin application of benzocaine. Clinical Pediatrics. 1993; 32(11):687-8.
  • Elsaie ML. Cardiovascular collapse developing after topical anesthesia. Dermatology. 2007; 214(2):194.
  • Hahn IH, Hoffman RS, Nelson LS. EMLA-induced methemoglobinemia and systemic topical anesthetic toxicity. The Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2004; 26(1):85-8.
  • Health Canada 2004: Guidance for Industry: Product Monograph. Health Canada, October, 2004. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/applic-demande/guide-ld/monograph/pm_mp_2010-eng.php
  • Health Canada 2005: Draft Guidance for Industry - Impurities in Existing Drug Substances and Products. Health Canada, September 2005. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/prodpharma/applic-demande/guide-ld/chem/impur_exist_dru_med-eng.php
  • Marra DE, Yip D, Fincher EF, Moy RL. Systemic toxicity from topically applied lidocaine in conjunction with fractional photothermolysis. Archives of Dermatology. 2006; 142(8):1024-6.
  • Parker JF, Vats A, Bauer G. EMLA toxicity after application for allergy skin testing. Pediatrics. 2004; 113(2):410-1.
  • Raso SM, Fernandez JB, Beobide EA, Landaluce AF. Methemoglobinemia and CNS toxicity after topical application of EMLA to a 4-year-old girl with molluscum contagiosum. Pediatric Dermatology. 2006; 23(6):592-3.
  • Rincon E, Baker RL, Iglesias AJ, Duarte AM. CNS toxicity after topical application of EMLA cream on a toddler with molluscum contagiosum. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2000; 16(4):252-4.
  • Sinisterra S, Miravet E, Alfonso I, Soliz A, Papazian O. Methemoglobinemia in an infant receiving nitric oxide after the use of eutectic mixture of local anesthetic. The Journal of Pediatrics. 2002; 141(2):285-6.
  • Touma S, Jackson JB. Lidocaine and prilocaine toxicity in a patient receiving treatment for mollusca contagiosa. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2001; 44(2 Suppl):399-400.
  • US FDA 1983: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Part 347. Skin Protectant Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: Tentative Final Monograph: [Internet]. Federal Register, Volume 48, Number 32, February 15, 1983. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTCDrugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/ucm091500.pdf
  • US FDA 1997: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Part 348. Labeling of Diphenhydramine Containing Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: Notice of proposed rulemaking: [Internet]. Federal Register, Volume 62, Number 168, August 29, 1997. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/Over-the-CounterOTCDrugs/StatusofOTCRulemakings/UCM078099.pdf
  • US FDA 2003: United States Food and Drug Administration. 21 CFR Part 348.  External Analgesic Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: Amendment of Tentative Final Monograph: [Internet]. Federal Register, Volume 68, Number 137, July 17, 2003. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2003-07-17/pdf/03-17934.pdf
  • US FDA 2007: United States Food and Drug Administration. Life-Threatening Side Effects with the Use of Skin Products Containing Numbing Ingredients for Cosmetic Procedures: Public Health Advisory: [Internet]. February 6, 2007. [Accessed 2014 October 3]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/PostmarketDrugSafetyInformationforPatientsandProviders/ucm054718.htm
  • US FDA 2008: United States Food and Drug Administration. Consumer Health Information: Use Caution with Over-the-Counter Creams, Ointments: [Internet]. April 2008. [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm096417.pdf
  • US FDA 2011a: United States Food and Drug Administration. FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA continues to receive reports of a rare, but serious and potentially fatal adverse effect with the use of benzocaine sprays for medical procedures: [Internet]. April 7, 2011 [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm250040.htm
  • US FDA 2011b: United States Food and Drug Administration. MedWatch Alert: Benzocaine Topical Products: Sprays, Gels and Liquids - Risk of Methemoglobinemia: [Internet]. April 7, 2011 [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch/safetyinformation/safetyalertsforhumanmedicalproducts/ucm250264.htm
  • US FDA 2012: United States Food and Drug Administration. Consumer Update: Benzocaine and Babies: Not a Good Mix: [Internet]. May 31, 2012 [Accessed 2014 May 15]. Available from: http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm306062.htm

Appendix 1: Dosage forms that fall outside the scope of this labelling standard

The following dosage forms for topical anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic products are associated with indications of use that fall outside the scope of this labelling standard:

  • Patch
  • Wipe (for drug products)

These, as well as all other dosage forms not identified as acceptable in the ‘Dosage form(s)’ section of this document, require assessment outside of the labelling standard stream.

Appendix 2: Uses or purposes that fall outside the scope of this labelling standard

The following indications for topical anaesthetic/analgesic/antipruritic products would require a review outside of the labelling standard and applicants/sponsors may request a pre-submission meeting to discuss appropriate supporting data. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Male genital desensitizer
  • Numbing of skin prior to cosmetic procedures (e.g. laser hair removal)
  • Numbing of skin prior to medical procedures (e.g. mammograms; vaccinations; minor skin surgery)
  • Any indication suggesting an oral, buccal, otic, rectal, nasal, or oromucosal route of administration
  • Use on poison ivy, eczema, or rashes
  • Treatment of moles, cold sores, or warts
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