Promotion of cannabis: Prohibitions and permissions in the Cannabis Act and Regulations

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This page provides information to anyone planning promotional activities related to cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis in Canada. This includes those who:

  • produce, sell or distribute cannabis;
  • sell or distribute cannabis accessories;
  • provide cannabis-related services; or
  • publish, broadcast or disseminate promotion on behalf of other persons (such as radio and TV broadcasters and print or online publishers)

Foreword and disclaimer

Foreword

The purpose of this page is to provide information and clarity on promotional activities, including permissions and restrictions, under the Cannabis Act and Regulations.

The Cannabis Act generally prohibits the promotion of cannabis, cannabis accessories and services related to cannabis, except in limited circumstances. These prohibitions support the Government's objective to protect public health and safety, including protecting young persons and others from inducements to use cannabis.

The Cannabis Act does permit promotion under specific restrictions to help adult consumers make informed decisions about cannabis. For example, by allowing for informational promotion such as price and availability, as well as brand-preference promotion, but subject to a number of conditions and restrictions including that young persons cannot access the promotion.

It remains the responsibility of those engaging in activities related to cannabis, cannabis accessories and services related to cannabis to understand and comply with all of the requirements of the Cannabis Act and its regulations and any other federal and provincial or territorial legislation that may apply.

Disclaimer

You need to read these pages along with the Cannabis Act and the Cannabis Regulations. If there are differences, the Act and its Regulations are correct.

Definition of promote

As a first step, a regulated party can evaluate if their activities meet the definition of promotion as noted below.

The Cannabis Act provides the following definition of "promote":

Promote, in respect of a thing or service, means to make, for the purpose of selling the thing or service, a representation - other than a representation on a package or label - about the thing or service by any means, whether directly or indirectly, that is likely to influence and shape attitudes, beliefs and behaviours about the thing or service.

This definition includes three key factors that must be present:

  1. For the purpose of selling the thing or service

    In this case, "sell" includes, but is not limited to, offer for sale, expose for sale and have in possession for sale.

  2. A representation about cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis (directly or indirectly)

    All forms of communications, including but not limited to:

    • signage
    • printed publications
    • broadcasts
    • media releases
    • online materials including social media (such as, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook)

    This does not include packaging or labelling as these are captured under other provisions of the Cannabis Act and the Cannabis Regulations.

  3. That is likely to influence and shape attitudes, beliefs and behaviours :

    Influence can include direct influences such as representation resulting in:

    • a decision to visit a retailer or licence holder's website
    • an opinion on a particular brand image, among others

    Influence can also be broader or more indirect, such as those pertaining to perceptions on risk or the normalization and social acceptability of cannabis.

    When assessing whether an activity meets the definition of promote, the intended audience and the purpose, content and context of a communication are all taken into consideration.

Promotion prohibitions under the Cannabis Act

Sections 17 to 24 of the Cannabis Act contain a number of provisions relating to the prohibition on the promotion of cannabis, cannabis accessories and services related to cannabis.

These prohibitions help meet the purpose of the Act in protecting public health and public safety. In particular, it is a priority for Health Canada to help protect young persons and others from inducements to use cannabis, as outlined in subsection 7(b) of the Act.

General prohibitions on the promotion of cannabis

Unless otherwise authorized under the Cannabis Act, it is prohibited to promote cannabis or a cannabis accessory or any service related to cannabis. This includes:

  • communicating information about its price or distribution
  • in a manner that could be appealing to young persons
  • using a testimonial or endorsement, however displayed or communicated
  • using the depiction of a person, character or animal, whether real or fictional
  • presenting it or any of its brand elements in a manner that associates it or the brand element with, or evokes a positive or negative emotion about or image of, a way of life such as one that includes glamour, recreation, excitement, vitality, risk or daring

For more information, refer to subsection 17(1) of the Cannabis Act.

Appeal to young persons

Protecting the health and safety of youth is a top priority for Health Canada. Under the Cannabis Act, the following are prohibited:

  • the promotion of cannabis, a cannabis accessory or any service related to cannabis in a manner that there are reasonable grounds to believe could be appealing to young persons
  • the sale of cannabis or a cannabis accessory in a package or with a label if there are reasonable grounds to believe that the package or label could be appealing to young persons
  • the sale of cannabis or a cannabis accessory that has an appearance, shape, or other sensory attribute or a function that there are reasonable grounds to believe could be appealing to young persons

Refer to subsections 17(1)(b), 26(a), 27(a) and 31 of the Cannabis Act, as well as the "Policy statement on Cannabis Act prohibitions referring to appeal to young persons", for additional information on compliance with prohibitions referring to appeal to young persons.

Celebrity-affiliated promotions

Any association made between a cannabis product or brand and a celebrity may be non-compliant with promotion, packaging and labelling prohibitions. This is because these associations could:

  • be appealing to young persons
  • appear as an endorsement
  • depict real or fictional persons through reference
  • evoke emotions or images of a way of life that could include glamour, recreation, excitement, vitality, risk or daring

All of these are prohibited under the Cannabis Act.

Regulated parties should ensure that they do not have any celebrity associations that can be made with cannabis, cannabis accessories, or services related to cannabis to ensure compliance with these parts.

For more information, refer to subsections 17(1)(c) and 26(b) of the Cannabis Act.

Other prohibitions

False or misleading promotion

You cannot promote cannabis and cannabis accessories in a manner that is false, misleading or deceptive. This includes promotion that is likely to create an erroneous impression about its:

  • characteristics, value, quantity, composition
  • strength, concentration, potency
  • purity, quality, merit, safety
  • health effects, health risks

For more information, refer to subsections 18(1) and (2) of the Cannabis Act.

Promotion using foreign media

You cannot promote, in any way that is prohibited by Part 1 of the Cannabis Act, cannabis, a cannabis accessory, a service related to cannabis or a brand element of any of those things in any communication that originates outside Canada. This includes publications published outside Canada and broadcasts that originate outside Canada.

For more information, refer to Section 20 of the Cannabis Act.

Sponsorship

You cannot display, refer to or otherwise use, directly or indirectly in a promotion that is used in the sponsorship of a person, entity, event, activity or facility, any of the following:

  • a brand element of cannabis, of a cannabis accessory or of a service related to cannabis; and
  • the name of a person that:
    • produces, sells or distributes cannabis
    • sells or distributes a cannabis accessory
    • provides a service related to cannabis

The Cannabis Act does not prohibit sponsorship itself. Some regulated parties may wish to sponsor charity events or activities, but the display, reference or usage of brand elements or the names of persons authorized to conduct cannabis activities are prohibited. In these cases, regulated parties should ensure that any promotions are compliant with this part. Regulated parties are encouraged to inform their sponsoring organization of these prohibitions to ensure compliance.

For more information, refer to Section 21 of the Cannabis Act.

Name of facility

You cannot display any of the following on a facility used for a sports or cultural event or activity:

  • a brand element of cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis; or
  • the name of a person that
    • produces, sells or distributes cannabis
    • sells or distributes a cannabis accessory
    • provides a service related to cannabis

This includes displays as part of the name of the facility or otherwise.

For more information, refer to Section 22 of the Cannabis Act.

Inducements

Unless authorized under the Cannabis Act, it is prohibited for a person that sells cannabis or a cannabis accessory:

  • to provide or offer to provide cannabis or a cannabis accessory if it is provided or offered to be provided without monetary consideration or in consideration of the purchase of any thing or service or the provision of any service
  • to provide or offer to provide any thing that is not cannabis or a cannabis accessory, including a right to participate in a game, draw, lottery or contest, if it is provided or offered to be provided as an inducement for the purchase of cannabis or a cannabis accessory
  • to provide or offer to provide any service if it is provided or offered to be provided as an inducement for the purchase of cannabis or a cannabis accessory

A person that sells cannabis or a cannabis accessory must not provide inducements that might encourage:

  • non-users to begin using cannabis
  • users or non-users to engage in excessive or heavy consumption

Note that it is not necessary to meet the definition of promote under the Cannabis Act to be non-compliant with section 24.

Below are some examples of activities that may be considered inducements, depending on the circumstances:

Free samples of products or accessories

A person that sells cannabis or cannabis accessories cannot provide or offer to provide cannabis or a cannabis accessory without consideration or in consideration of a purchase.

For example, a free accessory for the purchase of cannabis or cannabis as bonus with any purchase. This can include:

  • "Free 1g pre-roll samples"
  • "Free rolling papers with purchase of cannabis Product X"
  • "Buy one and get one free"

A nominal amount of monetary consideration may be considered an inducement and non-compliant with Subsection 24(1)(a) of the Cannabis Act.

Exemption: Intra-industry samples

License holders that provide samples to a person authorised to sell cannabis, such as a provincially or territorially authorized retailer, are exempt from this prohibition. However, the retailer may not provide samples to consumers. Cannabis samples must comply with the other applicable rules in the Cannabis Act and Cannabis Regulations, including those on packaging and labelling, and good production practices.

Each province or territory may have additional legislation that could apply to this type of activity so regulated parties should be familiar with all relevant legislation and consult with provinces and territories as applicable.

For more information, refer to subsection 24(2) of the Cannabis Act or 24(3) as it pertains to cannabis accessories.

Gifts and contests

The right to participate in a game, draw, lottery or contests and eligibility to receive gifts cannot be provided or offered to be provided as an inducement for the purchase of cannabis or a cannabis accessory.

For example:

  • "Win tickets to concert with purchase of cannabis product"
  • "Free T-shirt with purchase of rolling papers"
Discounts, rebates, premiums and bonuses

It is the responsibility of the person that sells cannabis to ensure the price of cannabis or a cannabis accessory is not an inducement, prohibited under the Cannabis Act.

Factors to consider whether an inducement has been provided or offered to be provided include

  • the value of any discount or rebate
  • the location where a discount or rebate is displayed (such as inside or outside the store)
  • the expiry of a discount or rebate (such as "for a limited time")
  • the context and nature of any associated promotion
Loyalty programs

Loyalty programs (such as stamp cards, email sign ups, memberships) are not on their own inducements. However, the benefits obtained through the program could be.

You cannot provide benefits to members of a loyalty program as an inducement for the purchase of cannabis or a cannabis accessory.

For example, the following would likely be considered inducements:

  • free pre-roll for becoming a member
  • a stamp card based on visits or purchases resulting in a free cannabis product
  • a program that allows for the exchange of points for cannabis products and accessories
Delivery service and shipping

A person that sells cannabis or cannabis accessories may offer a delivery service to its customers, subject to provincial or territorial legislation applicable in their respective jurisdictions. The delivery service may not be provided or offer to be provided as an inducement for the purchase of cannabis or a cannabis accessory.

Regulated parties are reminded that under the Cannabis Act, and subject to provincial age-verification requirements, sellers of cannabis, cannabis accessories, and services related to cannabis must take reasonable steps to ascertain an individual's age, such as upon the delivery of cannabis or cannabis accessories.

For more information on inducements, refer to subsection 24(1) of the Cannabis Act.

Display of cannabis or cannabis accessories

The Cannabis Act prohibits the display of cannabis, or its package or label, by a person authorized to sell it (such as, a provincially or territorially authorized retailer) in a manner that may result in it being seen by a young person, such as when walking by a store window. This provision is intended to protect youth and prevent inducements to use cannabis. A similar provision applies for cannabis accessories.

The Cannabis Act and its regulations do not prescribe how this is to be done. For example, a retailer may choose to have full window coverings at its retail location, or modify their store design and product placement to ensure cannabis and cannabis accessories are not visible. Note that the provincial and territorial governments may have additional requirements in place (such as, specific security measures).

For more information, refer to subsections 29 and 30 of the Cannabis Act.

Self-service display or dispensing devices

You cannot sell or distribute cannabis or a cannabis accessory by means of a display that allows for self-service or by means of a dispensing device. Note that this does not apply to replacement parts of a cannabis accessory (such as, pipe screen), only cannabis or cannabis accessories themselves.

For more information, refer to subsections 36 and 37 of the Cannabis Act.

Promotion prohibitions under the Cannabis Regulations

Part 6.1 of the Cannabis Regulations include additional prohibitions that apply to promotions respecting subsections 17(2) to (6) of the Cannabis Act.  Some of these apply to only certain classes of cannabis while others apply to all classes of cannabis.

Health and cosmetic benefits

You cannot promote cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis if it could create the impression that the product or service could have health or cosmetic benefits.

Examples of health claims may include but are not limited to:

  • "pain reduction"
  • "reducing anxiety"
  • "reducing inflammation"
  • "sleep aid"

Examples of cosmetic claims may include but are not limited to:

  • "improves skin elasticity"
  • "soothes dry skin"
  • "reduces signs of aging"
  • "skin brightening"
  • "smooths wrinkles"

The Cannabis Exemption (Food and Drugs Act) Regulations exempt cannabis from the Food and Drugs Act, subject to certain conditions. For example, the Food and Drugs Act does apply if the cannabis is manufactured, sold or represented for use in:

  • the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation or prevention of a disease, disorder or abnormal physical state, or its symptoms
  • restoring or correcting organic functions, in human beings or animals
  • modifying organic functions in human beings or animals

Under the Food and Drugs Act, health products containing cannabis or for use with cannabis are subject to premarket authorization by Health Canada. All health products are reviewed for safety, efficacy and quality prior to receiving a market authorization and are also subject to a number of other requirements such as establishment licensing.

Promotions that include health claims are considered a compliance and enforcement priority for Health Canada. In particular, health claims being made for serious diseases such as depression, addiction, cancer, among others, as referenced in Schedule A.1 of the Food and Drugs Act, are of highest risk and strictly prohibited.

Please refer to the Health products containing cannabis or for use with cannabis: Guidance for the Cannabis Act, the Food and Drugs Act, and related regulations for more information.

For more information, refer to subsection 104.12 of the Cannabis Regulations.

Alcoholic beverages, tobacco and vaping products

You cannot promote cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis if there are reasonable grounds to believe that the promotion could associate it with:

  • an alcoholic beverage
  • a tobacco product, as defined in section 2 of the Tobacco and Vaping Products Act
  • a vaping product to which the Cannabis Act applies

For example, associations with beer, wine, spirits and cocktails are prohibited.

For more information, refer to Sections 104.15 and 104.16 of the Cannabis Regulations.

Flavours (cannabis extracts)

You cannot promote a cannabis extract or a cannabis accessory that contains a cannabis extract in a manner that could cause a person to believe it has flavour other than the flavour of cannabis.

More specifically, this includes flavours of:

  • confectionary (such as candies or gum)
  • dessert (such as ice cream, cookies or chocolate)
  • soft drink (such as Cola, Orange Soda or Root Beer)
  • energy drink

This includes associations either with a product category itself (for example, candy) or a known brand. Abbreviated, truncated or phonetically similar names that could still give an association with any of these prohibited categories may also be non-compliant.

You should be mindful of this prohibition when promoting brand names and/or strain names to ensure they do not give the impression of any of these prohibited flavours. Note that these types of flavours may also be considered appealing to young persons.

For more information, refer to Section 104.11 of the Cannabis Regulations.

Energy value, amount of nutrient and dietary requirements (edible cannabis)

You cannot promote edible cannabis or a cannabis accessory that contains edible cannabis, under subsections 17(2) to (6) of the Cannabis Act, by communicating information about

However, edible cannabis or a cannabis accessory that contains edible cannabis may be promoted by reproducing the nutrition facts table that is required to be included on the label of any container in which edible cannabis is packaged in accordance with these Regulations using smaller, larger or identical dimensions and spacing.

You cannot promote edible cannabis or a cannabis accessory that contains edible cannabis under subsections 17(2) to (6) of the Cannabis Act if there are reasonable grounds to believe that the promotion could create the impression that the edible cannabis or accessory is intended:

  • to meet the particular dietary requirements of an individual
    • who has a physical or physiological condition as a result of a disease, disorder or injury
    • for whom a particular effect, including weight loss, is to be obtained by a controlled intake of food
  • to meet the dietary requirements of young persons

    For more information, refer to:

    • Subsections 104.13(1) and 104.13(2) of the Cannabis Regulations
    • Section 104.14 of the Cannabis Regulations
    • Subsections 17(2) to (6) of the Cannabis Act

Permitted promotions

Persons authorized to promote

The Cannabis Act permits limited promotion by allowing persons authorized to produce, sell or distribute cannabis, and persons promoting cannabis accessories or a service related to cannabis, to promote by means of informational and brand-preference promotion, which are both defined in the Cannabis Act and detailed below.

A person authorized to produce, sell or distribute cannabis is limited to a federal licence holder, a provincial or private retailer authorized under subsection 69(1) of the Cannabis Act, or someone granted a legislative or regulatory exemption.

License holders must include their name, as set out in their license, in all the means by which they identify themselves in relation to cannabis, including in advertising. Advertising is any representation, including promotions found on online platforms such as websites and social media.

License holders are also responsible for any related record keeping and reporting requirements such as the Annual Promotions Reporting requirement under the Cannabis Act or its regulations.

For more information, refer to section 48 of the Cannabis Regulations and 43 of the Cannabis Act.

Informational promotion or brand-preference promotion

Informational promotion means a promotion by which factual information is provided to the consumer about:

  • cannabis or its characteristics
  • a cannabis accessory or its characteristics
  • a service related to cannabis
  • the availability or price of cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis

Brand-preference promotion means promotion of cannabis by means of its brand characteristics, promotion of a cannabis accessory by means of its brand characteristics or promotion of a service related to cannabis by means of the brand characteristics of the service.

Subject to additional requirements further outlined below, this type of informational promotion or brand-preference promotion must be:

  • in a communication that is addressed and sent to an individual who is 18 years of age or older and is identified by name
  • in a place where young persons are not permitted by law
    • In this case, the promotion cannot be audible or visible from outside a place where young persons are not permitted by law [Section 104.17 of the Cannabis Regulations]
  • communicated by means of a telecommunication (such as, online context such as websites, social media), where the person responsible for the content of the promotion has taken reasonable steps to ensure that the promotion cannot be accessed by a young person
    • In this case, steps that may be easily circumvented by youth may require additional steps to ensure youth cannot access promotional content. Hence, if no reasonable steps are taken to restrict access to young persons, all promotion must be removed from online sources including social media pages (such as, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook)

For more information, refer to:

  • Section 104.17 of the Cannabis Regulations
  • Subsections 17(2) and (3) of the Cannabis Act

Point of sale

A person that is authorized to sell cannabis, a cannabis accessory, or a service related to cannabis may promote it at the point of sale if the promotion indicates only its availability, its price or its availability and price.

For more information, refer to subsections 17(4) and (5) of the Cannabis Act.

Brand element on other things

The Cannabis Act allows for the displaying a brand element of cannabis, of a cannabis accessory or of a service related to cannabis on a thing that is not cannabis or a cannabis accessory with some exemptions and restrictions outlined below.

A brand element is defined under the Cannabis Act and includes a brand name, trademark, tradename, distinguishing guise, logo, graphic arrangement, design or slogan that is reasonably associated with, or that evokes cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis or a brand of any cannabis, cannabis accessory or service related to cannabis. 

Examples of "a thing" could include, but are not limited to: signage of any form, merchandise such as hats, apparel, water bottles, mugs, stickers etc..

The Cannabis Act, under subsection 17(6), prohibits a brand element on a thing that:

  • is associated with young persons
  • there are reasonable grounds to believe could be appealing to young persons
  • is associated with a way of life such as one that includes glamour, recreation, excitement, vitality, risk or daring

Other examples of things that could be considered non-compliant include display of brand elements on sports team apparel, skateboards, guitars, colouring books, stuffed animals among others.

The Cannabis Regulations contain a number of additional restrictions related to a brand element on a thing. More specifically, restrictions on:

Number of brand elements

It is prohibited to promote cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis under Subsection 17(6) of the Cannabis Act in a manner that results:

  • In the same brand element being displayed more than once on a thing referred to in that subsection
  • In more than one brand element being displayed on the thing

For more information, refer to Section 104.18 of the Cannabis Regulations.

Public place frequented mainly by young persons

You cannot promote cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis under subsection 17(6) of the Cannabis Act by displaying a brand element of cannabis, of a cannabis accessory or of a service related to cannabis on any thing that is in a school, a public playground, a daycare facility or any other public place frequented mainly by young persons or that is visible from such a place.

For more information, refer to Section 104.19 of the Cannabis Regulations.

Dimensions of brand element

A brand element referred to in subsection 17(6) of the Cannabis Act must meet the following requirements:

  • the surface area must be smaller than or equal to 300 cm2
  • the height of any letter, character or number must be smaller than or equal to 4 cm

This restriction essentially limits the brand element to less than half of a sheet of standard letter paper size. For example, the representation of a brand element on a t-shirt could potentially meet the restriction depending on its size, but a billboard likely would not.

For more information, refer to Section 104.2 of the Cannabis Regulations.

Publishing, broadcasting, billboards and otherwise disseminated

Billboards, radio and newspaper (print or online) advertisements for cannabis licence holders or authorized retailers generally meet the definition of promote. Their primary purpose is typically to influence people to visit the store and/or ultimately purchase product.

In order to achieve its objective, the Cannabis Act also regulates the publication, broadcasting and dissemination of promotional content by third parties. It is prohibited to publish, broadcast or otherwise disseminate, on behalf of another person, with or without consideration, any promotion that is prohibited by any of sections 17 to 22 of the Cannabis Act.

Publishers and broadcasters and other disseminating promotions (for example, advertising space owners) should be familiar with the prohibitions and limited permitted promotions to ensure that they too are in compliance. Of particular note is that in the limited permitted promotions, reasonable steps must be taken to ensure that the promotion cannot be accessed by a young person. Therefore, a publication, signage or a radio broadcast that includes promotions under the Cannabis Act, and that is accessible to the general public, may be non-compliant with the Cannabis Act.

This prohibition does not apply in respect of the distribution for sale of an imported publication, a lawful distribution undertaking in respect of broadcasting as defined under subsection 2(1) of the Broadcasting Act (other than the broadcasting of a promotion that is inserted by the distribution undertaking itself), or to a person that disseminates a promotion if they did not know that it includes a prohibited promotion at the time of the dissemination.

For more information, refer to Section 23 of the Cannabis Act.

When the promotion prohibitions are not applicable

The Cannabis Act includes some situations where the promotion prohibitions do not apply. Section 16 of the Cannabis Act provides that, subject to the regulations, the provisions of sections 17 to 24 do not apply:

  • to a literary, dramatic, musical, cinematographic, scientific, educational or artistic work, production or performance that uses or depicts cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis, or a brand element of any of those things, whatever the mode or form of its expression, if no consideration is given, directly or indirectly, for that use or depiction in the work, production or performance
  • to a report, commentary or opinion in respect of cannabis, a cannabis accessory or a service related to cannabis or a brand element of any of those things, if no consideration is given, directly or indirectly, for the reference to the cannabis, cannabis accessory, service or brand element in that report, commentary or opinion
  • to specific categories of intra-industry promotion, provided that the promotion is not directed, either directly or indirectly, at consumers

These exemptions are aimed at excluding works that use or depict cannabis or a brand element of cannabis for which the relevant cannabis company is not responsible for, or is not actively involved in (such as, a display of a particular product in a film, opinion pieces).

Note that under Section 16 of the Cannabis Act, consideration is not limited to monetary "consideration". For example, it can also include providing something non-monetary in exchange, such as granting of legal rights and benefits.

Other information

Health Canada does not review or pre-approve any communications, materials, and activities before they are published, distributed or launched, nor does Health Canada provide advice on legal matters. It remains the responsibility of those engaging in activities relating to cannabis, cannabis accessories, and services related to cannabis, including promotion or its dissemination, to understand and comply with all of the requirements of the Cannabis Act and its regulations, and any other federal and provincial or territorial legislation that may apply, and to work with their legal counsel to that end if necessary.

For concerns of a suspected non-compliance with the Cannabis Act or its regulations, individuals may report them to Health Canada through the Cannabis Reporting Form. All reports will be reviewed to determine if they fall within Health Canada's mandate. If so, they will be assessed and prioritized for action according to public health and safety risk. High risk reports will receive priority attention. Health Canada will assess compliance with the provisions of the Cannabis Act and its regulations relating to promotion on a case-by-case basis. The particular facts of each circumstance will be examined and considered. The purpose, content and context of a communication or message and the intended audience are examples of factors that may be taken into consideration when assessing whether a promotional activity is prohibited. Actions taken will be consistent with Health Canada's Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Cannabis Act with the objective of achieving compliance using the most appropriate level of intervention.

Contact us

If you have general questions about the Cannabis Act and its regulations, you can reach Health Canada by email cannabis@canada.ca or phone at 1-866-337-7705.

For concerns of a suspected non-compliance with the Cannabis Act or its regulations, individuals may report them to Health Canada through the Cannabis Reporting Form.

Feedback: Help us improve

Health Canada is committed to providing all stakeholders with timely, accurate and reliable information. This includes providing information needed to comply with the Cannabis Act and its regulations. We would appreciate receiving your feedback on whether this guide was useful, and we welcome your suggestions for improvement. Email your feedback to us at cannabis@canada.ca and indicate in the subject line "Promotion of cannabis: Restrictions and permissions in the Cannabis Act and Regulations ".

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