Tables and Figures - Articles on Canadians' Nutrient Intakes from Food

Table of Contents

Figures: Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement

Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) in Canadian adolescents 9-18 years (2004)

A bar graph showing the prevalence of inadequacy for 14 nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adolescents 9-18 years in 2004.

The letter E denotes data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6 per cent to 33.3 per cent; interpret with caution.

The letter F denotes data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3 per cent with a 95 per cent confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3 per cent; data is suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.

Less than 3 per cent denotes data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3 per cent with a 95 per cent confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3 per cent; interpret with caution.

A "*" denotes that vitamin D dietary intake data cannot stand alone and consideration must be given to serum 25 OHD levels.

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A
    • Boys 9-13 years: 11.6 per cent (E)
    • Boys 14-18 years: 38.3 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: 23.1 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 42.2 per cent
  • Vitamin C
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 7.1 per cent (E)
    • Girls 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 6.0 per cent (E)
  • Folate
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 5.2 per cent (E)
    • Girls 9-13 years: (F)
    • Girls 14-18 years: 20.1 per cent
  • Vitamin B6
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: (F)
    • Girls 14-18 years: 11.1 per cent
  • Vitamin B12
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 1.7 per cent (E)
    • Girls 9-13 years: (F)
    • Girls 14-18 years: 15.8 per cent (E)
  • Thiamin
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 4.1 per cent (E)
  • Riboflavin
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 2.4 per cent (E)
  • Niacin
    • Boys 9-13 years: 0 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 0 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: 0 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: less than 3 per cent
  • Vitamin D *
    • Boys 9-13 years: 84.5 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 74.7 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: 93.1 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 93.5 per cent

Minerals

  • Magnesium
    • Boys 9-13 years: 4.7 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 41.5 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: 18.3 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 66.3 per cent
  • Zinc
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 5.6 per cent (E)
    • Girls 9-13 years: 14.6 per cent (E)
    • Girls 14-18 years: 19.6 per cent
  • Iron
    • Boys 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 11.9 per cent
  • Phosphorous
    • Boys 9-13 years: 8.9 per cent (E)
    • Boys 14-18 years: 4.9 per cent (E)
    • Girls 9-13 years: 30.2 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 35.2 per cent
  • Calcium
    • Boys 9-13 years: 43.9 per cent
    • Boys 14-18 years: 33.4 per cent
    • Girls 9-13 years: 66.9 per cent
    • Girls 14-18 years: 70.0 per cent
Figure 1. Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) in Canadian adolescents 9-18 years (2004)

E Data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6% to 33.3%; interpret with caution.
F Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3%; suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.
<3 Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3%; interpret with caution.
* Vitamin D dietary intake data cannot stand alone and consideration must be given to serum 25OHD levels.

Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adult males 19+ years (2004)

A bar graph showing the prevalence of inadequacy for 14 nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adult males 19 and older in 2004.

The letter E denotes data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6 per cent to 33.3 per cent; interpret with caution.

The letter F denotes data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3 per cent with a 95 per cent confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3 per cent; data is suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.

Less than 3 per cent denotes data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3 per cent with a 95 per cent confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3 per cent; interpret with caution.

A "*" denotes that vitamin D dietary intake data cannot stand alone and consideration must be given to serum 25 OHD levels.

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A
    • Men 19-30 years: 47.4 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: 42.7 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 42.5 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 49.0 per cent
  • Vitamin C
    • Men 19-30 years: 13.7 per cent (E)
    • Men 31-50 years: 24.4 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 24.0 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 31.5 per cent
  • Folate
    • Men 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: (F)
    • Men 51-70 years: 11.5 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 23.1 per cent
  • Vitamin B6
    • Men 19-30 years: (F)
    • Men 31-50 years: (F)
    • Men 51-70 years: 10.9 per cent (E)
    • Men 71 years and older: 23.1 per cent
  • Vitamin B12
    • Men 19-30 years: (F)
    • Men 31-50 years: (F)
    • Men 51-70 years: (F)
    • Men 71 years and older: (F)
  • Thiamin
    • Men 19-30 years: (F)
    • Men 31-50 years: (F)
    • Men 51-70 years: 3.1 per cent (E)
    • Men 71 years and older: 5.9 per cent (E)
  • Riboflavin
    • Men 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: 1.7 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 3.6 per cent (E)
    • Men 71 years and older: 5.9 per cent (E)
  • Niacin
    • Men 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: 0 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 0 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: less than 3 per cent
  • Vitamin D *
    • Men 19-30 years: 91.1 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: 90.5 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 79.6 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 87.1 per cent

Minerals

  • Magnesium
    • Men 19-30 years: 34.8 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: 45.7 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 53.6 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 65.3 per cent
  • Zinc
    • Men 19-30 years: (F)
    • Men 31-50 years: 13.3 per cent (E)
    • Men 51-70 years: 24.6 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 25.2 per cent
  • Iron
    • Men 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 1.9 percent (E)
  • Phosphorous
    • Men 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: (F)
  • Calcium
    • Men 19-30 years: 26.5 per cent
    • Men 31-50 years: 39.0 per cent
    • Men 51-70 years: 53.0 per cent
    • Men 71 years and older: 80.1 percent
Figure 1. Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adult males 19+ years (2004)

E Data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6% to 33.3%; interpret with caution.
F Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3%; suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.
<3 Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3%; interpret with caution.
* Vitamin D dietary intake data cannot stand alone and consideration must be given to serum 25OHD levels.

Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adult females 19+ years (2004)

A bar graph showing the prevalence of inadequacy for 14 nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adult females 19 and older in 2004.

The letter E denotes Data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6 per cent to 33.3 per cent; interpret with caution.

The letter F denotes data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3 per cent with a 95 per cent confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3 per cent; data is suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.

Less than 3 per cent denotes data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3 per cent with a 95 per cent confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3 per cent; interpret with caution.

A "*" denotes that vitamin D dietary intake data cannot stand alone and consideration must be given to serum 25 OHD levels.

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A
    • Women 19-30 years: 43.4 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: 34.1 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: 33.8 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 40.2 per cent
  • Vitamin C
    • Women 19-30 years: 10.8 per cent (E)
    • Women 31-50 years: 19.9 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: 14.2 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 20.8 per cent
  • Folate
    • Women 19-30 years: 18.8 per cent (E)
    • Women 31-50 years: 19.6 per cent (E)
    • Women 51-70 years: 25.0 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 47.0 per cent
  • Vitamin B6
    • Women 19-30 years: 9.6 per cent (E)
    • Women 31-50 years: 15.9 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: 19.4 per cent (E)
    • Women 71 years and older: 32.5 per cent
  • Vitamin B12
    • Women 19-30 years: (F)
    • Women 31-50 years: 13.7 per cent (E)
    • Women 51-70 years: (F)
    • Women 71 years and older: 15.3 per cent (E)
  • Thiamin
    • Women 19-30 years: (F)
    • Women 31-50 years: 7.9 per cent (E)
    • Women 51-70 years: 5.6 per cent (E)
    • Women 71 years and older: 11.4 per cent (E)
  • Riboflavin
    • Women 19-30 years: (F)
    • Women 31-50 years: 2.8 per cent (E)
    • Women 51-70 years: less than 3 per cent (E)
    • Women 71 years and older: 4.4 per cent (E)
  • Niacin
    • Women 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: less than 3 per cent
  • Vitamin D *
    • Women 19-30 years: 96.4 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: 91.1 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: 90.7 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 91.8 per cent

Minerals

  • Magnesium
    • Women 19-30 years: 36.6 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: 36.4 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: 37.5 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 51.5 per cent
  • Zinc
    • Women 19-30 years: 14.7 per cent (E)
    • Women 31-50 years: 14.2 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: (F)
    • Women 71 years and older: 25.2 per cent
  • Iron
    • Women 19-30 years: 16.8 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: 18.3 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 2.0 per cent (E)
  • Phosphorous
    • Women 19-30 years: less than 3 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: 1.8 per cent (E)
    • Women 51-70 years: 1.8 per cent (E)
    • Women 71 years and older: 3.3 per cent (E)
  • Calcium
    • Women 19-30 years: 47.5 per cent
    • Women 31-50 years: 51.9 per cent
    • Women 51-70 years: 82.4 per cent
    • Women 71 years and older: 86.9 per cent
Figure 2. Prevalence of inadequacy for nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement in Canadian adult females 19+ years (2004)

E Data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6% to 33.3%; interpret with caution.
F Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3%; suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.
<3 Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3%; interpret with caution.
* Vitamin D dietary intake data cannot stand alone and consideration must be given to serum 25OHD levels.

Tables: Summary of inadequacy or excess for nutrient with an Adequate Intake

Assessment of adequacy for nutrients with an Adequate Intake ( AI) in Canadian children 1-8 years (2004)
Age Potassium Sodium
1-8 years Median intake <AI; no assessment can be made regarding the prevalence of inadequacy of this nutrient High prevalence of excessive intakes; Increased risk of adverse health effects
Assessment of adequacy for nutrients with an Adequate Intake (AI) in Canadian adolescents 9-18 years (2004)
Age Potassium Sodium

<AI - Median intake <AI; no assessment can be made regarding the prevalence of inadequacy of this nutrient in this age group.

Boys 9-13 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
14-18 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
Girls 9-13 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
14-18 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
Assessment of adequacy for nutrients with an Adequate Intake ( AI) in Canadian adults 19+ (2004)
Age Potassium Sodium

<AI - Median intake < AI; no assessment can be made regarding the prevalence of inadequacy of this nutrient in this age group.

* - The AI for this nutrient was not based on intakes of apparently healthy populations.  While this age groups' median intake was at or above the AI, indicating a low prevalence of inadequate intakes, there is less confidence in this assessment.

Males 19-30 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
31-50 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
51-70 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
70+ <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
Females 19-30 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
31-50 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
51-70 <AI High prevalence of excessive intakes; increased risk of adverse health effects
70+ <AI Low prevalence of inadequate intake*

Tables: Proportion of Canadians with macronutrient intakes below, within or above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range

Proportion of Canadian children 1-8 years with macronutrient intakes below, within or above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges ( AMDR) (2004)
Macronutrients % children below AMDR % children within AMDR % children above AMDR Dietary Reference Intake
AMDR (% of total energy intake)

<3 - Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3%; interpret with caution.

F - Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3%with a 95% confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3%; suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.

Total fat
1-3 years 47.0 51.7 <3 30-40%
4-8 years 5.5 87.7 6.8 25-35%
Protein
1-3 years 0 96.4 F 5-20%
4-8 years <3 99.2 0 10-30%
Carbohydrates
1-3 years F 95.4 F 45-65%
4-8 years <3 98.5 <3 45-65%
Proportion of Canadian adolescents 9-18 years with macronutrient intakes below, within or above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges ( AMDR) (2004)
Macronutrients % adolescents below AMDR % adolescents within AMDR % adolescents above AMDR Dietary Reference Intake
AMDR
(% of total energy intake)
Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls
Total fat

E - Data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6% to 33.3%; interpret with caution.

<3 - Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3%; interpret with caution.

F - Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3%with a 95% confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3%; suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.

9-13 years F 6.5E 86.3 81.4 10.8E 12.1E 25-35%
14-18 years F F 84.4 82.6 13.4E 12.9E 25-35%
Protein
9-13 years <3 F 99.1 97.8 0.0 0.0 10-30%
14-18 years <3 3.9E 98.8 96.1 <3 0.0 10-30%
Carbohydrates
9-13 years <3 <3 99.0 96.4 <3 F 45-65%
14-18 years F F 95.5 97.1 <3 <3 45-65%
Proportion of Canadian adults 19 years and older with macronutrient intakes below, within or above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges ( AMDR) (2004)
Macronutrients adults below AMDR % adults within AMDR % adults above AMDR Dietary Reference Intake
AMDR (% of total energy intake)
Men Women Men Women Men Women
Total fat

E - Data with a coefficient of variation from 16.6% to 33.3%; interpret with caution.

<3 - Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3% with a 95% confidence interval entirely between 0 and 3%; interpret with caution.

F - Data with a coefficient of variation greater than 33.3%with a 95% confidence interval not entirely between 0 and 3%; suppressed due to extreme sampling variability.

19-30 years <3 <3 81.7 88.4 18.0E F 25-35%
31-50 years <3 <3 71.2 71.7 27.5 28.0 25-35%
51-70 years <3 <3 76.2 75.8 23.0 23.3 25-35%
71+ years 3.1E <3 74.6 82.3 22.3 16.6 25-35%
19+ 1.2E 0.6E 73.9 76.5 24.8 22.8 25-35%
Protein
19-30 years <3 <3 99.1 99.2 0.0 <3 10-30%
31-50 years <3 <3 98.8 99.3 0.0 0.0 10-30%
51-70 years <3 <3 100.0 100.0 0.0 0.0 10-30%
71+ years <3 <3 100.0 99.8 0.0 0.0 10-30%
19+ <3 <3 99.8 99.6 0.0 0.0 10-30%
Carbohydrates
19-30 years 22.8 8.5 76.4 90.9 <3 <3 45-65%
31-50 years 35.0 29.2 64.6 70.3 <3 <3 45-65%
51-70 years 35.9 22.0 63.8 77.5 <3 <3 45-65%
71+ years 21.7 11.3E 76.9 80.1 <3 <3 45-65%
19+ 31.8 21.5 67.6 77.9 0.6E 0.6E 45-65%

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