Citizenship grants: Citizenship knowledge testing

This section contains policy, procedures and guidance used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada staff. It is posted on the Department’s website as a courtesy to stakeholders.

Note: With amendments to the Citizenship Act on October 11, 2017, the age range to meet language and knowledge requirements was amended from 14-64 to 18-54. This provision is retroactive, therefore, applicants who have not yet been assessed, or are in the process of being assessed and were 14-17 or 55-64 years of age on the date they signed their application will no longer be required to meet language and knowledge requirements.

On this page

Before the knowledge test

File requirements for tests

All applicants who are 18 to 54 years of age on the date they signed their application are required to write the citizenship knowledge test.

Note the following scenarios:

  • If an applicant turns 18 (minor application form submitted, they are not required to write the citizenship knowledge test.
  • For applications received before June 11, 2015, applicants 55 years of age or older are automatically waived from meeting language and knowledge requirements. If an applicant turns 55 years of age during processing and before a citizenship officer renders a decision, the citizenship officer must apply the automatic waiver under subsection 5(3) and remove the applicant from any knowledge testing (and/or language assessment) events. No refusals on knowledge or language can be made.

The following forms must be initiated in the Global Case Management System (GCMS) and signed by the officer or the clerk at the test:

For applications received at the CPC-S before June 11, 2015: The Citizenship Application Record of Decision (CARD) form [CIT 0065] and the File Requirements Checklist [CIT 0470]

For applications received at the CPC-S on or after June 11, 2015: The Citizenship Application Record of Decision – Subsection 5(1) (Adult CARD) form [CIT 0065CIF2], and the File Requirements Checklist [CIT 0551]

Regardless of the date of receipt of an application, if a Residence Questionnaire is on file for the applicant, the information needs to be reviewed by the officer before the citizenship knowledge test to ensure that all questions can be addressed at the initial program integrity interview.

Notifying applicants

Applicants scheduled for a written citizenship knowledge test are sent a Notice to Appear - To Write a Citizenship Test and for Verification of Identity Documents [CIT 0023] (for applications received before June 11, 2015 and CIT 0023CIF2 (for applications received on or after June 11, 2015) by regular mail (or method to be determined by IRCC) to the latest known address. Applicants should be notified about the test at least seven days before the test date. Therefore, notices should be sent 14 days before the test date.

The following information is included in the notice to appear:

  • the date and time of the citizenship knowledge test;
  • the location of the test;
  • that the test will be a written test; and
  • the identification and supporting documents the applicant must bring to the test.

Security of knowledge test

  • The integrity of the citizenship testing process is compromised when the tests are released in the public domain. While the knowledge tests themselves (and related testing materials) are classified as Protected B, they should be treated as secret and, as such, handled with the utmost care and security. Therefore, the print and electronic copies of the knowledge tests and answer keys must be securely stored. For more information, consult the Security Policy and Procedures manual.
  • Additionally, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)’s local offices are encouraged to continue to stress the importance of the non-disclosure of test information to applicants at test sessions and oral knowledge hearings. All testing materials are provided to local offices as encrypted documents and are sent via Entrust to assigned individuals.
  • IRCC receives many requests from the media, elected officials and members of the public for copies of the knowledge tests. Under no circumstances should tests be released.
  • Should a problem or situation that could potentially compromise the citizenship knowledge test—written or oral versions—be identified, local offices must notify the Citizenship Program Delivery Division as soon as they become aware of the incident so that the National Headquarters (NHQ) can immediately take the appropriate action.

At the knowledge test

Procedures: administering the written knowledge test

Steps

  • Verify each applicant’s identity. If an applicant’s identity cannot be verified, the applicant cannot take the test.
  • Make sure there are at least two monitors for each group of 50 applicants.
  • Complete the Citizenship Application Record of Decision form.
  • Screen for language using the Citizenship Language Screening Tool (CLST) form [CIT 0505] when necessary.
  • Compare declared absences against all passports and travel documents in the applicant’s possession.
  • Check the documents provided with the application against the originals brought in by the applicant.
  • Ensure that
    • only those taking the knowledge test are in the test room;
    • couples, family members and friends are not seated together;
    • tests are pre-sorted, so people sitting next to each other receive different versions (there are different versions of the test, and there should be a random, even distribution of the test versions); and
    • all personal belongings (e.g., purses, bags, study materials) are placed underneath applicants’ chairs.
  • Deliver the test preamble and answer all questions from the applicants before starting the test.
  • During the test, do not interrupt or talk to applicants unless absolutely necessary.
  • Alert applicants five minutes before the test ends.
  • When the test period ends, make sure that all copies of the test booklets/versions are collected and verify that all pages are still in the booklets/versions. Also verify that none of the original test booklets/versions have any handwritten notes or answers marked. If an officer notices something is missing, they should report the incident immediately to their supervisor and NHQ.

Knowledge testing for applicants with special needs

With the introduction of retesting in June 2013, applicants now have two opportunities to pass the written knowledge test. If they fail the test a second time, they are then scheduled for a hearing with a citizenship officer, where the oral version of the test is administered.

IRCC provides applicants clients with special needs accommodation such as

  • wheelchair access;
  • sign language interpretation (e.g., deaf individuals may have a sign language interpreter to assist with the assessment of the listening and speaking ability);
  • personal assistance (e.g., being accompanied by a care attendant, an interpreter, a seeing eye dog, a sighted guide); and
  • assistance due to visual impairment (e.g., the study guide is available in large print, audio version or Braille).

Generally, applicants with a disability who are prevented from being able to write the knowledge test are referred directly for a hearing with a citizenship officer, where the oral test is administered (i.e., they have no opportunity to attempt the written test). For example, the following instances are normally referred directly for a hearing with a citizenship officer:

  • someone who is blind or partially sighted but is not able to read Braille or large print;
  • someone who is physically unable to write the test;
  • someone who is illiterate (e.g., can learn and understand the study material by listening to the audio version of the guide).

To ensure procedural fairness, all applicants should have the same number of opportunities to pass the knowledge test. Therefore, applicants with special needs have the option of attempting the written test (and if required, a retest) with assistance from an IRCC official (level 1 or level 2). Assistance can take one or both of the following forms:

  • reading questions aloud to applicants (and repeating the question as necessary);
  • noting applicant responses on the answer sheet.

Where applicants have indicated either on their application form or via subsequent interactions with IRCC that they have special needs that require accommodation, IRCC will ensure that applicants are aware of their option to attempt the written test (and if necessary, retest) with the assistance of an IRCC official. This option can be presented to the applicant in any written or telephone communication with the applicant, or at test check-in. Applicants with significant medical conditions which would impede the administration of the test (e.g., an applicant who does not have the cognitive capacity to comprehend questions, indicate responses or indicate consent) should continue to be referred for a hearing with a citizenship officer.

Should an applicant wish to pursue the option of attempting the written test, the responsible office will ensure that appropriate resources (e.g., facilities, available IRCC officials) are available for the applicant to attempt the test with assistance. Normal testing and retesting procedures apply.

Should an applicant not wish to pursue this option, they will be advised that they will be placed in the hearing inventory. Applicants will also be advised that they cannot change their decision at a later time. A declaration form will be signed by the applicant indicating that they understand that by not opting to be assisted by an IRCC official in taking the written test, they will be provided with only one opportunity to demonstrate that they meet the knowledge requirement, which will be assessed at the time of the hearing with the citizenship officer. The declaration form will be placed on file and a note made in GCMS.

If an applicant indicates that they require accommodations for the first time when they present themselves for the written test, local offices will accommodate their special needs to the best of their operational capacity at that time (e.g., if no staff is available to assist the applicant at that time, the applicant may have to be rescheduled to come back at another time. In this case, the applicant will not be considered a no-show).

Administering the test to applicants with special needs

The administration of the citizenship knowledge test to applicants with special needs should be done in a manner that provides the applicant with an appropriate environment to take the exam.

  • The test should be administered in a private area or room separate from other test candidates. The area or room should allow for the applicant to clearly hear the official reading the questions and for the official to hear the responses of the applicant.
  • To allow for additional time that will be required to administer the test and verify responses, applicants with special needs will have up to 75 minutes to complete the test.
  • The IRCC official will only be able read the questions and related choices as written and, if necessary, record responses. Rewording, reformulating or attempting to explain what the written questions or choices mean is not permitted. Should an applicant be having difficulty, an offer can be made to return to the question later, if time permits.
  • Before commencing the administration of the test, applicants are to be advised that they will be required to sign a declaration indicating that they have agreed to the administration of the written test with assistance of an IRCC official, that they have heard and understood the questions and choices as read to them and that, where applicable, they have had the chance to review the answers selected and confirm that these are the answers they provided. Upon completion of the administration of the test, the applicant will be asked to complete and sign the declaration, which will be placed on the applicant’s file.
  • The result of the test should be provided only after the applicant has completed and signed the declaration. From this point on, normal testing and retesting procedures apply. The applicant should be reminded that, as per the declaration, in the event retesting is necessary, the same conditions of accommodation apply.

Applicants who require sign language interpretation

For applicants who wish to pursue this option and also require sign language interpretation, the sign language interpreter will be allowed to be present for the administration of the written test with assistance of the IRCC official. The role of the sign language interpreter will be to interpret to the applicant questions and related choices as read by the IRCC officer and to provide the applicant’s answer to the IRCC official. Only the IRCC official or applicant may record the applicant’s answer on the answer sheet. The Accompanying person declaration and interpreter’s oath form [CIT 0117] must be completed whenever a sign language interpreter is used.

Other forms of interpretation

Where applicants with special needs require non-official language interpretation, they should be referred to a hearing with a citizenship officer. Use of non-official language interpreters (with the exception of sign language interpretation) is not permitted where IRCC officers are providing assistance to applicants with special needs taking the written knowledge test. The Accompanying person declaration and interpreter’s oath form [CIT 0117] must be completed whenever an interpreter is used.

After the knowledge test

The Citizenship Application Record of Decision (CARD) form [CIT 0065] or CIT0065CIF2, as applicable, (available internally only) must be completed and signed by the officer or the clerk.

Records

Written knowledge test

If the applicant has failed, all citizenship knowledge tests (first tests, retests and oral) must be kept on file at the local office. Failed tests for refused applicants are retained on file, so that the actual test questions that an applicant was not able to answer can be provided as evidence if judicial review is launched. However, the knowledge tests themselves are to be kept exempt from the certified tribunal record. See the instructions on judicial review.

Oral knowledge test

If the applicant has failed, the local office must forward the oral knowledge assessment tool to the CPC-S for retirement. The front page of the oral knowledge test is micro-filmed at the Case Processing Centre in Sydney (CPC-S).

Cheating

If a citizenship official suspects that an applicant is cheating at the knowledge test session, the test must be taken away. An applicant caught cheating forfeits their opportunity for a retest. The officer should make detailed notes in GCMS and on file as to what transpired during the test session to ensure there is a record for reference. The officer should schedule the applicant for a hearing with a citizenship officer. Cheating on a written knowledge test or during a hearing constitutes misrepresentation, as the results are not a true measure of the knowledge or abilities of the applicant. If an officer believes there is misrepresentation associated with an application, the officer must summarize their findings for their local officer supervisor.

Communicating results of the knowledge test and next steps to applicants

Following all knowledge test sessions, citizenship officials (any level) will communicate to the applicant the results of their test. Officials must provide the applicant with the actual test score (no discussion regarding outcome per question). Providing test results allows the applicant to gauge their performance and prepare for the second attempt at the written test. Officials are also to explain that applicants can waive their right to a retest and be scheduled for a knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer. Offices are to maintain a supply of the study guide, Discover Canada, and ensure applicants have a copy of the latest version of the guide to study in preparation for the retest.

If officials encounter applicants with literacy issues, the applicants should be advised that Discover Canada is available via the IRCC website in e-book and audio versions. Local offices are encouraged to have a supply of CDs on hand.

It is strongly recommended that local offices administer the written knowledge test as the first step in the testing session and conduct the usual integrity interview process, including language screening, afterwards. This reduces the number of times that officials are required to interact with applicants. Communicating the knowledge test results during the standard interview allows for all communication with the applicant to occur in one interaction and also reduces stress of applicants waiting to write the test.

Results

If the applicant passes the knowledge test:

  • Inform the applicant that, pending a positive decision by the citizenship officer, they should proceed to the citizenship ceremony.
  • Provide the applicant with the timelines for the ceremony. Local offices may wish to consider providing applicants with their ceremony Notice to appear – to take the Oath of Citizenship [CIT 0024] or CIT0024 CIF2, as applicable, (available internally only) immediately after the knowledge test session if this is operationally feasible. Officials must emphasize that receiving the notice on the spot should not be considered as final approval of the application. If this is not feasible, a notice should be mailed to the applicant as per normal procedure. This measure will decrease the number of no-shows at ceremonies, decrease enquiries to the Call Centre and improve client service. Furthermore, when offices are planning special enhanced ceremonies, applicants can be offered the choice to participate in the event or remain part of a standard ceremony. Offices that choose to implement this process will need to do the necessary input in GCMS after the test event.

If the applicant fails the written knowledge test (first time)

  • Provide the applicant with their knowledge test score and a copy of the information sheet [Notice – Results of Your Citizenship Test and Next Steps] indicating first time fail.
  • Inform the applicant of the opportunity to waive the retest and proceed directly to a knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer. If the applicant chooses this option, have the applicant complete the Waiver of retest form, and input a note in GCMS. If the applicant continues with regular processing, advise them that they will be scheduled to rewrite the citizenship test in approximately 4 to 8 weeks. The retest can be scheduled on the spot, or a notice can be provided to the applicant as per normal procedure.
  • If applicable, hand the applicant a paper copy of Discover Canada.

    Note: Local offices may wish to consider providing applicants with the date of their citizenship knowledge retest immediately after the test session if this is operationally feasible. Offices that choose to implement this process will need to do the necessary GCMS input after the test (see the GCMS updates section).

  • Inform the applicant that they will have only one opportunity to rewrite the knowledge test. If they do not appear for that appointment and IRCC does not receive an acceptable reason from them for not attending within 30 days from the date of the scheduled retest appointment, their file will be treated as abandoned, and only the right of citizenship fee will be refunded. They will need to submit a new application and any applicable fees in order to become a Canadian citizen.
  • Advise the applicant that if they fail the test a second time, they will be scheduled for an oral knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer. Encourage the applicant to study to increase their chances of passing the retest while informing them that wait times are very long for a hearing with an officer.
  • If one or more applicants are part of the file, inform applicants who have passed their test and have not had any issues identified with their language screening that, since their case is now ready for a decision, IRCC will split the file to allow these family members to proceed through the rest of the process once the results of retesting are known rather than wait for the hearing with an officer of other family member(s) to be completed. IRCC will do this automatically if and when the affected applicant is unsuccessful at the retest, unless the family requests to remain together as a family unit during processing. Do not split the file until the results of the retesting are known. Local offices must ensure there are no security concerns before initiating a file split, and files must not be split where residency issues exist for any applicant on a particular file.

Applicants who fail the written knowledge test the first-time and those who are in the hearing inventory queue after having failed only the knowledge requirement as well as knowledge combined with any other criteria have the opportunity to have a second attempt at passing the written knowledge test.

Retesting sessions must be scheduled and held as separate events from first-time testers to allow for more accurate reporting and ease of test distribution. Test versions strictly reserved for retesting sessions are provided to all local offices. Offices are reminded to follow instructions on distribution of tests as per normal testing procedures.

First-time knowledge testing and retesting

Exceptions to testing and retesting

Before scheduling a hearing in the situations below, citizenship officers should consider Administering the knowledge test to applicants with special needs.

Applicants in the following two scenarios should not be scheduled for a written knowledge test or a retest:

  • The applicant has requested a hearing at the time of application or in subsequent communication with IRCC because they do not read English or French. Applicants with literacy issues should not be invited to write a knowledge test or a retest if IRCC is aware of the issue from information on file. If IRCC staff become aware of the literacy issue only at a test or interview, they must advise the applicant that Discover Canada is available via the IRCC website in e-book and audio versions. These applicants should instead be scheduled for a knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer for a formal knowledge assessment. Citizenship officials must place a note on file and in GCMS to record that testing or retesting was bypassed due to literacy concerns. It should be noted that literacy is not a requirement.
  • The applicant has requested a hearing due to a medical condition. Where it is clear from information on file ((e.g., a completed medical opinion form or a letter from a legal guardian) that the applicant has a mental disability or condition that is cognitive, psychiatric or psychological in nature that prevents them from writing a test, the applicant should be scheduled for a knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer for a formal knowledge assessment. If citizenship officials become aware of a medical condition only at the time of testing check-in, the applicant must be given the medical opinion form to complete. Citizenship officials must place a note on file and in GCMS to record that a test or retest was put on hold due to medical concerns. If a request of a waiver under subsection 5(3) of the Citizenship Act is made by the applicant at any point up to completion of the hearing, the citizenship officer will render a decision on any waiver requests for language or knowledge requirements. For any other waiver requests, the citizenship officer will forward the file to the Case Management Branch (CMB) for waiver consideration and decision.

Scheduling knowledge testing for retesters

A period of four to eight weeks should elapse before retesting those applicants who failed the first written test, which will allow adequate time for preparation for the second attempt of the written knowledge test. At the retest session, the officer must ensure the test version given to the applicant is different from the test version they received the first time.

Local offices have the option of scheduling applicants for a knowledge retest without valid clearances. However, clearances must be valid before a file is referred to an officer for a formal knowledge assessment. Field Operations Support System (FOSS) and GCMS checks must be conducted before retest as per normal procedure. Local offices must send the Notice to Appear – To Re-write a Citizenship Test [CIT 0516] and CIT 0516CIF2, as applicable, and follow the usual procedures for administering a test.

If the applicant fails the retest, the officer should provide the applicant with their retest score and a copy of the information sheet, Notice – Results of Your Citizenship Test and Next Steps, indicating that they failed the test for the second time.

The officer should advise the applicant that they will be scheduled for an oral knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer and that wait times for an oral hearing may be long.

For procedures on no-shows, see abandonment procedures.

Itinerant services

The following instructions apply only to applicants who are served through itinerant service. Local offices have the flexibility to offer applicants options that are operationally feasible.

Knowledge test sessions only

Offices that deliver testing sessions during an itinerant service trip may present the following retest options to applicants:

  1. Wait until the itinerant service returns to that location and retest.
  2. Request to be scheduled for a retest at any IRCC office if they do not wish to wait for the next planned itinerant service offering. If an applicant indicates that they prefer to travel to a different IRCC office than the one performing itinerant services in that area and
    • is aware that they will be travelling to a location where there is a test at an IRCC office in six weeks or more, the official should facilitate the temporary transfer of the file to accommodate the applicant; or
    • is unsure if they will travel to another IRCC office, the official should instruct the applicant to contact the Call Centre if they choose to travel. A minimum of six weeks’ notice is required before a retest appointment can be scheduled. The Call Centre will send the referral to the appropriate office for action.

The office receiving the referral will arrange for the file transfer. Once the retest is completed, the file can be transferred back to the responsible office to be finalized. Receiving offices (whether the Centralized Processing Region or IRCC office) will input case notes into GCMS documenting the applicant’s choice.

Note: Applicants must not be allowed to do a retest on the same day.

One-pass sessions

Offices that are scheduling a combination of knowledge tests, hearings and ceremonies during an itinerant service trip may present the following options to applicants:

  1. Wait until the itinerant service returns to that location and retest. If the applicant passes the retest, offices may consider scheduling the ceremony the same day (via one-pass).
  2. See option 2 above.
  3. If possible, waive the retest and proceed directly to a knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer. If this option is chosen, have the applicant complete the Waiver of retest for adult grant form.

Note: The officer must adjust the timelines accordingly for a retest session in the preamble script.

Alternate knowledge test formats: Braille or large print

To assist visually impaired applicants, both the Discover Canada study guide and the citizenship knowledge test are available in Braille format and large print. Braille versions of Discover Canada are available upon request.

Large print versions of the knowledge test are provided to local offices each time new versions of the test are issued.

Where an applicant specifies the need for the citizenship test to be administered in Braille format on the application, the local office must make a request to NHQ by sending a request to the Citizenship Program Delivery Division before scheduling the applicant for the test.

The applicant can be scheduled for a knowledge test event once the Braille test has been received at the local office.

Allow a minimum of four weeks to receive the Braille integral version.

Administering the written test: large print

The citizenship official should ensure that

  • they validate with the applicant, using the instruction page, whether or not they can clearly read the large print test. If the applicant still cannot read the large characters, they can be offered to take the test with the assistance of a citizenship officer or will need to be referred to a citizenship officer for an oral knowledge hearing (should this be the case, the applicant should be advised of the situation);
  • the applicant is seated apart from other writers because the size of the large print can easily be viewed by others;
  • the applicant is taken aside and explained why they are seated apart from the group (large characters);
  • the duration of the test is the same as for any other written tests—30 minutes;
  • the large print answer sheet is provided with the large print test; and
  • local offices using the Scantron sheet provide the applicant with an enlarged page.

Hearing with a citizenship officer: visually impaired applicants

Visually impaired applicants who are unable to take the conventional written or large print format or Braille test on their own can be offered to take the knowledge test with the assistance of a citizenship officer. See Administering the knowledge test to applicants with special needs. If the applicant declines, they must be referred for an oral knowledge hearing with a citizenship officer.

The applicant must be notified by telephone of the date, time and location of the knowledge hearing. The official must give the list of documents that the applicant must bring. The official should inform the applicant that a regular written notice confirming the appointment will be sent by mail.

Administering the written knowledge test: Braille

The applicant must be notified by telephone of the date, time and location of the written knowledge test. The officer must give the list of documents that the applicants must bring. The officer should inform the applicant that a regular written notice confirming the appointment will be sent by mail.

The citizenship Braille integral test should be administered in a private location. At this knowledge session, citizenship officers can circle the applicant’s responses to the questions directly on the answer sheet.

The procedure for administering the knowledge test in Braille consists of the following steps:

  • ensure that a citizenship officer will be available throughout the test;
  • reserve a separate room to administer the test;
  • verify the applicant’s identity;
  • verify original documents against those submitted with the application;
  • compare declared absences against all passports and travel documents in the applicant’s possession;
  • accompany and guide the applicant to the test room as required; and
  • give the applicant the instructions orally.

When inviting applicants to take the test, officers should advise applicants that they can bring their own Braille typewriter to type their answers. If they do not have access to a Braille typewriter, they can still take the test in Braille.

If the applicant brings their own Braille typewriter

  • The office must supply the applicant with a desk large enough to hold both the Braille test and the typewriter with both items within easy reach.
  • The applicant takes the test in Braille and answers using their own typewriter; they can indicate only the question number and the answer (a, b, c, d, etc.). That way, they can review their answers and make corrections, if necessary.
  • Once the test has been completed, the applicant orally translates their written Braille answers to the officer. The officer will verify the answers with the applicant and note the answers with a lead pencil on the answer Sheet, which will then be corrected.
  • Copies of the Braille test, the answer sheet typed in Braille by the applicant and the answer sheet transcribed by the officer must be kept on record.

If the applicant does not bring their own Braille typewriter

  • The applicant uses the Braille version of the test to read the questions and to refer to, and then gives their answers orally to the officer.
  • As soon as the applicant gives their answers, the citizenship officer writes them down on the answer sheet using a lead pencil. In that manner, the applicant can verify, confirm and, most importantly, correct their answers, when necessary, with the officer’s help.

Length of knowledge test in Braille

Reading a text in Braille generally takes twice as long as reading the same text in traditional formats. The citizenship officer must extend the testing period by up to 45 minutes to allow people who are visually impaired the time necessary to complete the test. The total test time must not exceed 75 minutes.

Presence of a guide dog

The presence of a guide dog is permitted at all times. The guide dog is considered a working tool for the applicant who is visually impaired. The dog should not be disturbed at any time unless the applicant who is visually impaired instructs otherwise.

Passing the knowledge test in Braille

As with any other applicant writing a citizenship test, a person taking the test in Braille must correctly answer a minimum of 15 out of 20 questions.

Applicants who pass the test in Braille

If the applicant passes the test the first time, normal testing procedures apply. See If the applicant passes the knowledge test.

Applicants who fail the first written test in Braille

If the applicant fails the Braille test, normal retesting procedures apply. See If the applicant fails the written knowledge test (first time).

Knowledge test for deaf

Administration of written knowledge test

In some cases, when an applicant is deaf, depending on the applicant’s ability to read and understand English or French, the written test can still be administered.

A sign language interpreter may be allowed to interpret the instructions given to the applicant at a written test. The instructions can also be given to the applicant in writing if they have difficulty understanding oral instructions. However, once the instructions have been given, the sign language interpreter must leave the testing room because the use of a sign language interpreter during the test is generally prohibited. If the applicant is unable to take the test without the help of the interpreter, the citizenship officer should consider Administering the knowledge test to applicants with special needs. The local office must contact the applicant before the scheduled appointment to give the applicant the choice of bringing a sign language interpreter or using an interpreter supplied by IRCC. If the applicant wishes IRCC to arrange for an interpreter, IRCC will make arrangements for a sign language interpreter through Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC). The local office will contact the PWGSC Translation Bureau for visual interpretation services. See the procedures for sign language interpreters.

Note: Citizenship officers are not interpreters and should not act as interpreters. It is the applicant’s responsibility to provide their own interpreter or request that IRCC arrange an interpreter for them.

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