2012-2013 Departmental Performance Report

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Parole Board of Canada


The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness


Chairperson's Message

For more than a half-century, as part of the criminal justice system, the Parole Board of Canada has contributed to the protection of society by facilitating, as appropriate, the safe reintegration of offenders into the community.

This report demonstrates the Board's commitment to delivering on its established plans and priorities while being responsive to a changing environment. The Board was able to deliver quality programs while supporting the implementation of new legislation and regulations.

Over the past fiscal year, the Board continued to make progress in key areas that contribute to public safety through conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes. In this reporting period, the Board also offered comprehensive training on the Safe Streets and Communities Act (C-10) and the Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations, and enhanced Board member training.

Considerable progress was achieved in modifying the Board's processes as a result of Budget 2012 measures. Measures included holding more reviews by video-conference, undertaking more office reviews and reducing quorum for certain types of reviews.

In 2012-13, the Board completed almost 19,000 conditional release reviews (federal and provincial offenders). Multi-year data continues to demonstrate that parole contributes to public safety: over 94% of all releases do not result in a new offence and over 99% do not result in a new violent offence while on parole.

In addition, the Board received 19,526 record suspension applications. The Board also had more than 22,000 contacts with victims, more than 3,500 observers at its hearings, and released more than 6,600 decisions from its decision registry.

The Board's accomplishments serve to showcase the dedication and commitment of our Board members and public service employees and reflect the Board's ability to respond to a changing environment as we strive to continue to foster safe and secure communities for Canadians.

_________________________________
Harvey Cenaiko
Chairperson, Parole Board of Canada

Section I - PBC Overview

Raison d'être and Responsibilities

The Parole Board of Canada (PBC or "the Board") is an agency within the Public Safety Portfolio.

The Board is an independent administrative tribunal that has exclusive jurisdiction and absolute discretion under the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA) to grant, cancel, terminate or revoke day parole and full parole. The PBC may also order (on referral by Correctional Service of Canada (CSC)) that certain offenders be held in custody until the end of their sentence. This is called detention during the period of statutory release. Further, the Board has the authority to terminate or revoke a period of statutory release. In addition, the Board makes conditional release decisions for offenders in provinces and territories that do not have their own parole boards. Only the provinces of Ontario and Quebec currently have their own parole boards, which make parole decisions for offenders serving sentences of less than two years.

The Board has legislated responsibilities related to openness and accountability, which are the provision of information and assistance to victims of crime, observers at hearings, access to the PBC's decision registry, and delivery of a program of public information.

The Board has exclusive jurisdiction and absolute discretion to order, refuse to order or revoke a record suspension under the Criminal Records Act (CRA). In addition, the PBC is authorized to investigate Royal Prerogative of Mercy (RPM) requests under Section 110 of the CCRA. The Board makes clemency recommendations to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

The PBC is headed by a Chairperson who reports to Parliament through the Minister of Public Safety Emergency Preparedness. The Minister, however, does not have statutory authority to give direction to the Chairperson or other members of the PBC in the exercise of their decision-making powers. This structure helps to ensure the impartiality and integrity of the Board's decision-making process.

Outcomes of the PBC's work can be found in its annual Performance Monitoring Report (PMR). The PMR provides performance and statistical information for the past five years for the PBC's two legislative based programs - conditional release, and clemency and record suspensions.

Our Mission

The Parole Board of Canada, as part of the criminal justice system, makes independent, quality conditional release and record suspension decisions and clemency recommendations. The Board contributes to the protection of society by facilitating, as appropriate, the timely integration of offenders as law-abiding citizens.

As part of the criminal justice system, the Board contributes to the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society. The word "contribute" is used in the Board's Mission Statement to reflect the fact that it does not work in isolation in the pursuit of this goal.

The Board works with key Portfolio colleagues, provincial parole boards, criminal justice partners, and many other organizations and individuals in the community. The legal authority under which the PBC operates includes the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Criminal Code, the CCRA and its Regulations, the CRA and other legislation.

In making quality conditional release and record suspension decisions, as well as clemency recommendations, the Board's primary objective is the long-term protection of society. During the course of rendering its decisions, the Board is autonomous and independent. However, its decisions are open and transparent to the public by virtue of its legislation and policies.

The protection of society is the paramount consideration for all decisions taken by the Board. Decisions are limited to only what is necessary and proportionate to the purpose of conditional release.

The Mission of the PBC establishes four core values:

  • Contributing to the attainment of a just, peaceful and safe society;
  • Respect for the inherent potential and dignity of all individuals and the equal rights of all members of society;
  • Belief that the contribution of qualified and motivated Board members and staff is essential to promoting the achievement of the Board's Mission; and,
  • Commitment to openness, integrity and accountability in the execution of our mandate.

As an agency within the Public Safety Portfolio, the PBC constantly strives to contribute to the Government's outcome of a safe and secure Canada. The Board contributes to this outcome by making quality conditional release and record suspension decisions that result in the safe reintegration of offenders in the community.

The Board carries out its responsibilities through a national office in Ottawa, as well as six offices in five regions across the country (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario, Prairies, and Pacific).

PBC Locations

Pacific Regional Office - Abbotsford, British Columbia
Prairies Regional Office - Edmonton, Alberta and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Ontario/Nunavut Regional Office - Kingston, Ontario
National Office - Ottawa, Ontario
Québec Regional Office - Montreal, Québec
Atlantic Regional Office - Moncton, New Brunswick

The Board's regional offices deliver the conditional release program. Conditional release decisions are made by Board members, who are supported in their decision-making by public service staff. Staff schedule hearings, provide information for decision-making, ensure that information for decision-making is shared with offenders, and communicate conditional release decisions to offenders, CSC representatives and others as required. Regional staff also provide information to victims, make arrangements for observers at hearings, and manage requests for access to the Board's decision registry. In addition, regional Board members make record suspension decisions and clemency recommendations.

While the data collection, investigation and assessment work for record suspensions and clemency are conducted at the national office, Board members from all five regions make decisions related to record suspensions and clemency recommendations. In addition, Board members in the Appeal Division at the national office review conditional release decisions and determine if the law and processes were respected. Public service employees at the national office deliver the record suspension and clemency program, develop national policies and procedures related to all program areas, coordinate Board member appointments and training, deliver a program of public information and respond to ATIP requests. Other work performed at the national office includes strategic and operational planning, resource management, program monitoring, case reviews and investigations and an array of internal services.

Consistent with the provisions of the Acts that govern the PBC, Board members are independent in their decision-making responsibilities, and free from outside interference of any kind. As independent decision-makers, Board members are bound by legislation, guided by policy, and are responsible for:

  • Reviewing all information for consideration in conditional release, record suspension and clemency cases;
  • Conducting an in-depth analysis of each case, and requesting additional information, as necessary, to support quality decision-making;
  • Assessing the risk and other factors related to cases, voting independently on the disposition of each case, and providing sound, well-documented, written reasons for decisions; and,
  • Ensuring that hearings are conducted in accordance with the duty to act fairly, with respect for all procedural safeguards.

The Chairperson of the PBC is a full-time member of the Board and its chief executive officer. The Chairperson directs PBC's program delivery in keeping with the Government of Canada's overall plans and priorities. The Chairperson reports to Parliament through the Minister of Public Safety on the fulfillment of the Board's mandate, and is accountable for the effectiveness and efficiency of PBC's policies and operations. The Chairperson is assisted in these responsibilities by the Executive Vice-Chairperson, the Vice-Chairperson of the Appeal Division, and the Board's five regional Vice-Chairpersons. The Executive Director General of the Board is its senior staff member and chief operating officer. The Executive Director General, in support of the Chairperson, provides leadership for strategic and operational planning, resource management, program monitoring and administration, as well as the operation of the national office and the regions.

The following organizational chart provides additional details.

Organizational chart
  • PBC Chairperson
  • Director Communications & ATIP
  • Legal Counsel
  • Chief Financial Officer
  • Executive Director General
  • Regional Directors General
  • Director General Policy & Operations
  • Director Corporate Services
  • Director Planning, Performance and Program Monitoring
  • Director Record Suspension and Clemency
  • Regional Vice-Chairpersons (5)/ Vice- Chairperson Appeal Division
  • Executive Vice-Chairperson
  • Director Board Member Secretariat

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

The Parole Board of Canada's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) reflect the key aspects of its legislated responsibilities for conditional release, record suspensions and clemency, and represents the areas of accountability and performance in which the public and Parliamentarians most frequently express interest. In this context, the Board's strategic outcome is the cornerstone of its public accountability. The PAA includes a single outcome and four programs.

The following chart illustrates the PBC's PAA, which contribute to the Board's single strategic outcome:

Strategic Outcome

Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Program Alignment Architecture:

  • P1.1- Conditional Release Decisions
  • P1.2- Conditional Release Openness and Accountability
  • P1.3- Record Suspensions Decisions/ Clemency Recommendations
  • P1.4- Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

The following identifies the key priorities for the PBC during 2012-13, links them to the Board's strategic outcome and programs, and explains how these priorities contributed to the strategic outcome. All organizational priorities support the Board's sole strategic outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities.

Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities related to quality conditional release decision-making Ongoing

Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Program(s):
  • Conditional release decisions
Summary of Progress

The PBC continually strives to strengthen its capacity for quality conditional release decision-making in response to significant program delivery challenges. These include: increased complexity in conditional release decision-making; diversity in the federal offender population; and an over-representation of Aboriginal offenders.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:
  • Ensures public safety by providing quality decisions on the timing and conditions of release of offenders into the community.
  • Important that the Board ensure credible decisions which withstand appeal and court challenges while respecting individual rights enshrined in law.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Enhance selection and professional standard processes to ensure professional integrity, competency and ability.
  • Reviewed qualification process and will implement new exam and correction grid in November 2013.
  • Developed competencies profile for the Vice-Chairpersons and a new performance evaluation process for Board members.
  • Continue updating and providing regular training to Board members, rooted in evidence-based practices, pertinent to Board member activities, and consistent with adult learning principles.
  • Conducted needs analyses to ensure that training and learning opportunities were in line with Board member evaluations and competencies profile, and emerging criminal justice trends.
  • Developed and distributed tools and reference material, such as the Board Member Handbook, legislative binder, communiqués, and reference manuals.
  • Conduct research on developments in relevant fields such as risk assessment, conditional release, and decision-making processes, among others, to ensure that Board members and staff are aware of and working with the latest information from the field in accordance with law and policy.
  • Conducted research on training items for Board members and worked closely with subject matter experts to develop high caliber training modules.
  • Ensure national consistency in decision-making processes.
  • Developed national procedures to support staff as part of case preparation activities to support the coming into force of the Safe Streets and Communities Act. The Board created similar procedures for changes related to the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act and regulatory changes. The development of national procedures in these areas ensured a consistent approach during the national implementation of legislative and regulatory changes.
  • Develop a process to streamline liaisons with correctional and parole systems internationally in order to compare processes and determine best practices in an efficient and timely manner.
  • Continued liaison with other tribunals, stakeholders, and international partners. International exchanges occurred (e.g., Annual Training on Risk Assessment (ATRA) with the United Kingdom's Parole Board), regularly through e-mail requests to the Association for Paroling Authorities International (APAI), etc.).
  • Implement improvements to case files that will enhance efficiencies.
  • Revised a number of forms, and templates relating to withdrawal of parole applications, postponements, victims, and elder-assisted hearing (EAH) requests in support of enhancing case file efficiencies.
  • Enhance information management and the sharing of information with CSC through the modernization of the Board's Offender Management System (OMS) to support PBC's conditional release responsibilities.
  • Continued the modernization of the Board's OMS legacy application as part of a multi-year project involving CSC which is the Board's information technology (IT) service provider.
  • Develop policies that reflect legislative and regulatory requirements and which support quality decision making.
  • Refine operational practices to support consistency and ensure an effective use of resources.
  • Implemented policy and procedural changes and a number of legislative and regulatory changes. This included developing a series of national procedures for staff related to case preparation timelines, reviews, postponements, and withdrawals to support the Safe Streets and Communities Act. The Board created similar procedures for changes related to the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act and regulatory changes.
  • Conduct compliance reviews to ensure that regardless of case outcomes, the law, policy and duty to act fairly are respected. The results of these reviews will also enhance quality decision-making.
  • Due to competing priorities, no compliance reviews were conducted in 2012-13. However, random case reviews were conducted which provided valuable information to support policy and Board member training.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities related to open and accountable conditional release processes Ongoing

Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Program(s):
  • Conditional release openness and accountability
Summary of Progress

The Board has extensive legislated responsibilities related to openness and accountability. The PBC must remain open and accountable to the public and to victims of crime in the delivery of its mandate. During the year, the Board had more than 22,000 contacts with victims, more than 3,500 observers at hearings, and released more than 6,600 decisions from its decision registry.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:
  • Ensures the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the provisions of the CCRA.
  • It is important for the PBC to remain open and accountable to the public and to victims of crime.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Refine policies and guidelines as it pertains to victims and the public to enhance the effectiveness of service delivery.
  • Provide victims with options that will better meet their needs including enabling their attendance at hearings by way of video conferencing when they are unable to attend in person.
  • The Safe Streets and Communities Act entrenches victims' rights to present a statement at a PBC hearing.
  • The Board's policy outlines that victims can present a statement to Board members in person at a hearing, as well as by audio or video recording if they are unable to attend.
  • The Board also provided victims the opportunity to observe and present their statements at a hearing by video conference.
  • The Board will continue to assess its procedures in this area as the use of this technology continues to evolve.
  • Continue to reach out to our provincial, territorial, international criminal justice partners, to victims, and to community partners.
  • As a co-chair with CSC, enhanced the coordination of the information provided to victims through a National Joint Steering Committee (internal forum), as well as several regional Victim Advisory Committees (external forum).
  • Delivered numerous presentations to local, national and international audiences, reaching thousands of victims, victim advocates, Aboriginal people, criminal justice partners (police and corrections) and international paroling body representatives.
  • Communicate information to offenders about decision processes that impact them.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities related to the processing of record suspension applications and clemency requests Ongoing

Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Program(s):
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations
Summary of Progress

Record suspensions are not only beneficial to the individuals who earn them, but to society in general. Record suspensions demonstrate a commitment to a law-abiding lifestyle, to reconciliation with society, all of which help people secure jobs, reduce reliance on social programs, and consequently give back to society by generating revenue and contributing to social and economic growth.

The RPM or clemency is applied only in exceptional circumstances, where there are no other lawful remedy, and where without such remedy there would be undue hardship that is disproportionate to the nature of the offence or offences, and that is more severe for the applicant than for other individuals in similar situations. Legislative changes to the CRA and the increase in user fee will increase the number of clemency requests.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:

  • Supports rehabilitation and community reintegration by providing quality record suspension decisions and clemency recommendations.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Establish a sound training regime for both staff and Board members.
  • Developed a comprehensive training module that was delivered during four sessions to 35 Board members.
  • Standing Memorandum of Understanding established with a service provider for staff training.
  • Continue efforts to achieve program efficiencies through policy refinement, process streamlining, and effective use of technology.
  • Continued improvements were made to data management to adhere to legislative amendments and improve service. Regular IT releases addressed change requirements.
  • Continuously improve and monitor service standards and program delivery for record suspension application processing and notification.
  • Centralized decision notifications were put in place with two regions. Work was also done to pursue streamlining with other regions.
  • Streamline the process for the collection and presentation of data in support of RPM.
  • Reduction in the number of Board members providing a recommendation on a single file contributed to streamlining the process.
  • Ensure that the Ministerial Directive on RPM is reviewed, updated and recommended to the Minister.
  • Partially reviewed and updated the Ministerial Directive.
  • Enhance the Pardon and Record Suspension System (PARSS).
  • Streamline the investigative process for clemency requests.
  • Implemented changes to investigative techniques. As a result, subject interviews are now conducted directly by the PBC.
  • Modify the clemency application and consent to better reflect current requirements.
  • Completed the modification of the clemency application.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization New

Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Program(s):
  • Conditional release decisions
  • Conditional release openness and accountability
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations
  • Internal services
Summary of Progress

A strong and strategically focused governance structure ensures an integrated corporate system of decision-making, and enables effective allocation of resources to priorities, alignment of activities to outcomes, and management of accountabilities.

Twenty years after the coming into force of the CCRA, the Board must review its decision processes and support structures to ensure they reflect the realities of today, and that the PBC continues to be at the forefront of decision-making innovation.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:
  • Supports the delivery of quality decisions on the timing and conditions of release of offenders into the community.
  • A strong, robust and strategically focused governance structure ensures an integrated corporate system of decision-making which enables effective allocation of resources to priorities, alignment of activities to outcomes and management of accountabilities.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Assess current practices, explore innovative and more efficient ways of achieving the PBC's core mandate and mission as it relates to its decision-making models and the operational structures required to support them.
  • In December 2011, the Chairperson launched a corporate-wide renewal initiative. The purpose of this exercise is to examine the Board's processes and operations. This initiative continued throughout 2012-13. Considerable time was spent analyzing information and conducting research projects on some of the Board's key functions and processes.
  • Continue work towards integrating the Board's vision elements with the PBC's operational planning and governance framework (e.g., enhance Board member training, quality of information for parole and record suspension decision-making, and responses to diversity within the offender population, and strengthen partnerships with criminal justice agencies and key stakeholders to support the timely reintegration of offenders in the community).
  • The Board's vision has been shaping and stimulating continuous improvement in PBC policy, training and operations, and links planning and performance reporting. Through the vision, the Board has developed a solid foundation for enhancing its contribution to public safety, quality program delivery, and effective resource management.
  • Modernized orientation, offered continuous learning and development opportunities and updated tools to support decision making.
  • Coordinated regional orientation sessions to ensure consistency across the Board. Also incorporated e-learning into training programs to increase efficiencies and innovation in the training delivery model.
  • Assess implications of government proposals for reform of corrections and criminal justice, including a review of related policy issues, anticipated workload pressures, resource needs, and training requirements for Board members and staff.
  • Responded to proposed changes to legislation (e.g., Safe Streets and Communities Act, Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act) over the last year.
  • Comprehensive discussions occurred to assess the impact of the changes, both at a national level and with managers and directors in the regions. Impact on workload was assessed and operational instructions and training tools were developed in consultation with the regions to address changes in policy and legislation.
  • Integrate corporate risk management into governance structures and decision-making processes. This will include communicating and enhancing corporate strategy management practices to better inform decision-makers at all levels of the Board.
  • Continued development of the Board's Corporate Risk Profile
  • Enhanced operational planning processes to strengthen the use of risks to better inform priority setting and resource allocations.
  • Commenced development of business models; once finalized they will be used to plan and communicate key activities throughout the Board.
  • Improve program monitoring techniques to identify best practices, ensure national consistency, and continuously strengthen program delivery.
  • Continued to identify best practices, investigate ways to strengthen program delivery, and ensure national consistency through a renewal initiative.
  • Performed random case reviews which provided valuable information to support policy and Board member training.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Ensuring fair and transparent people management New

Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Program(s):
  • Conditional release decisions
  • Conditional release openness and accountability
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations
  • Internal services
Summary of Progress

The PBC will treat its Board members and employees in an open and equitable manner to help them respond to new ways of doing business and to meet future challenges. Board member training is a priority as Board decisions must be credible and withstand court challenges while respecting individuals' rights.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:
  • Supports the delivery of quality decisions on the timing and conditions of release of offenders into the community.
  • Public service renewal remains a top priority for the federal public service. Not only must PBC focus on attracting new recruits to replace employees leaving on retirement, but we must also develop and renew the competencies of those continuing their careers so that they can respond to new ways of doing business and meet future challenges.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Encourage Board member and staff input with regard to possible future changes and regularly communicate updates throughout the Board.
  • A renewal initiative began in 2011 and continued throughout 2012-13, collecting detailed information about PBC's business lines, and building on Board-wide consultation efforts.
  • Board members and staff were encouraged to participate and regular updates were communicated.
  • Work to ensure a sufficient number of qualified individuals are identified for consideration as Board member appointees.
  • Reviewed the qualification process for efficiency and streamlined exam/interview/reference aspects.
  • Coordinated two qualification processes to ensure that a sufficient number of candidates are available to the Minister for appointment consideration.
  • Ongoing work on a number of initiatives towards improved knowledge management, training/learning and development systems and tools, and to address organizational needs in a more timely and effective manner. These include:
  • Continue in-depth orientation training for new Board members to provide them with the information and resources required to be prepared to assess risk and make quality conditional release decisions.
  • Provided orientation sessions for new roles and assignments such as record suspension, appeals, and the Vice-Chairperson.
  • Updated and offered modules for new Board member orientation three times throughout the year. As a result, six separate orientation sessions were delivered.
  • Provide ongoing training to existing Board members to ensure that need areas are addressed, and that Board members are provided with current and relevant information and resources to continuously improve their decision-making skills.
  • Monthly Board member meetings ensured members were kept apprised of changes in law, policy, and practices. These meetings were also used as training opportunities (topics covered during the year included fraud offenses, child exploitation, appeals and programming for women offenders).
  • Develop succession plans for key positions, including possibilities for internal secondments.
  • The integration of succession planning into operational planning processes helped identify human resource shortfalls, implications, and strategies to better inform human and financial resource allocation decision-making.
  • Examine ways to capture knowledge of retiring staff (i.e., knowledge transfer).
  • Enhancements of the Board's succession planning processes strengthened knowledge transfer practices.
  • Seek efficiencies through measures such as collective staffing actions, which include standardized competencies and assessment tools.
  • For similar positions across the organization, managers launched collective staffing processes with the same statement of merit criteria.
  • Address issues related to diversity, language and gender in Board member and staff recruitment.
  • Integrated diversity, language and gender requirements in all staffing actions. Human resource advisors proposed strategies if there were any gaps.
  • Ensure value and ethics are integrated into management practices, which include the new organizational code of conduct.
  • Introduced an internal code of conduct.
  • Integrated values and ethics with performance appraisals for all levels in the organization.
  • Provide specialized training for staff as required.
  • Provided leadership training to managers and executives.
  • In addition, employees were encouraged through the development of individual learning plans to identify specific training needs. Training needs were assessed and provided where required and available.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Effectively providing services to victims and the public New Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities
Program(s):
  • Conditional release openness and accountability
Summary of Progress

The Board has extensive legislated responsibilities related to openness and accountability. As part of the government's initiative to provide victims with greater access to the justice system, and the Board's commitment to openness and accountability, it is important to ensure access to information for victims of crime who contact the PBC.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:
  • Ensures the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the provisions of the CCRA.
  • As part of the government's initiative to provide victims with greater access to the justice system, and the Board's commitment to openness and accountability, it is important to ensure access to information for victims of crime who contact the PBC.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Provide specialized training for frontline staff who work with victims.
  • Conducted annual national training for regional communications officers (RCOs) who work directly with victims. This training enhances the skills and competencies to ensure effective services for victims.
  • Maintain quality information services to victims and the public.
  • Revised the guidelines for RCOs to better assist victims who make a presentation to the Board (whether in person or by recording).
  • Developed a checklist to assist victims in preparing victim statements, as well as a number of fact sheets were revised.
  • Provided ongoing support, supervision and management services to RCOs and regional communication assistants (RCAs) in the delivery of information services to victims and the public.
  • Responded to numerous media enquiries regarding conditional release decisions made in the regions.
  • Work in partnership with CSC to enhance PBC's effectiveness in areas of shared responsibilities regarding the provision of information to victims.
  • Co-led with CSC, a National Victims Steering Committee composed of senior executives from both organizations.
  • PBC and CSC co-led a number of Regional Victims Advisory Committees. These committees ensure enhanced cooperation and engagement relating to our legislated roles and responsibilities in the area of victims.
  • The Board and CSC implemented joint registration letters to better streamline the information being provided to victims from the organizations.
  • PBC held an annual meeting of regional and national managers involved with victim information services.
  • Conduct community outreach to increase awareness and discuss issues so that victims, victim organizations and the public are aware of the information services provided by the Board.
  • Delivered numerous outreach presentations to victims, victim advocates and other target audiences, (i.e., National Victim Awareness Week) successfully improving their understanding and knowledge of the conditional release decision-making process and the Board's role in the protection of society.
  • In collaboration with CSC, participate in the development and support of Regional Victims Advisory Committees.
  • Work ongoing to support for Victims Advisory Committees (VAC) in the regions.
  • VAC meetings took place and planning for the annual forum progressed.
  • Implement legislative amendments pertaining to victims that fall under the Board's authority.
  • There were a number of legislative amendments associated with the Safe Streets and Communities Act which were related to victims. As such, modifications were required to the Board's policies and procedures specific to victims. These changes were implemented in June and December 2012 to coincide with the coming into force dates.
  • Ensured staff were trained in all legislative changes relating to victims and decision making so accurate explanations could be provided to victims and the public when responding to enquiries.
  • Update public information products for victims on the conditional release decision-making process.
  • Developed fact sheets to provide information to victims on the changes to the CCRA and the services and options available through the PBC.
  • Coordinated a national mail-out of 42,000 products to victims, and groups that provide support to victims.
  • PBC regional offices undertook several joint outreach presentations on victim services.
  • PBC took part in the National Victims of Crime Awareness Week in Ottawa.
  • Developed a video entitled "Parole Board of Canada: Victim Services" to help victims of crime better understand the conditional release process and their role in it.
  • Developed communication products (i.e., fact sheets etc) to inform Aboriginal victims of EAH.
Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) and/or Program(s)
Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders New

Strategic Outcome: Conditional release and record suspension decisions and decision processes that safeguard Canadian communities

Program(s):
  • Conditional release decisions
  • Conditional release openness and accountability
  • Record suspension decisions/Clemency recommendations
Summary of Progress

Effective information sharing and accurate recording of offender information are essential to the Board's ability to make informed quality decisions. The Board must continue to foster, maintain and explore partnerships with organizations to promote its mandate and leverage opportunities for efficiencies toward fulfilling its strategic objective and ultimately contributing to public safety. Sections 25(1) and 101(b) of the CCRA guide CSC and the Board with respect to the provision and consideration of relevant information related to the supervision of offenders and conditional release decision-making. CSC provides information for PBC decision-making, supervises offenders in the community following PBC decisions to release, and informs the PBC when an offender's level of risk in the community changes.

How this priority contributes to the Board's strategic outcome:
  • Ensures the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the provisions of the CCRA.
  • The Board continued to foster, maintain and explore partnerships with organizations within and outside the public sector to broaden its scope and leverage opportunities for efficiencies toward fulfilling its strategic objective and contributing to public safety.
  • Effective information sharing and accurate recording of offender information are essential for the Board to be able to make informed decisions.
Planned Activities to Meet Priority Status
  • Ongoing work towards efficiently managing partnerships:
  • At the national level (e.g., CSC, Public Safety Canada, Department of Justice, RCMP, National Victim Advisory Committee, Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime, etc.).
  • Engaged in regional and national Interlinkage meetings with CSC to strengthen the partnerships between our organizations. Meetings pertaining to legislative proposals and other initiatives were held with TBS and PS. The Board was also involved in various Federal/Provincial/Territorial committees in the area of mental health, women offenders, victims, Aboriginal victims and multiculturalism.
  • At the regional level (e.g., regional Interlinkages meetings with CSC, Victim Service Units, Advisory Committees, and provincial/territorial/municipal government departments, non-governmental organizations, etc.).
  • Attended Interlinkage meetings and addressed victim issues.
  • Work with criminal justice participants in PBC's assessment of record suspension applications and with Non Government Organizations (NGOs) in assisting record suspension applicants.
  • Work continued with applicants, criminal justice partners and NGOs. Video tutorial, information brochures and posters along with an improved guide and application form have been shared. The PBC's web site was also updated.
  • Meet with the Aboriginal Circle to examine ways to improve access to services for Aboriginal offenders and victims.
  • Held an Aboriginal Circle meeting in September 2012. The committee made a number of recommendations in the areas of policy, operational procedures, and training for PBC's consideration.
  • Continue to enhance an integrated sharing of information approach with CSC.
  • Consulted with CSC regarding various operational and/or policy issues in common to enhance information sharing activities and clarity of legislated responsibilities. As an example, the passing of the Safe Streets and Communities Act and Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act required PBC and CSC to meet regularly to discuss the policy and operational issues that impact both of our organizations.

Risk Analysis

Risk Footnote 1 Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture Link to Organizational Priorities
Due to numerous priorities there is a risk that the Board will not be able to comply with government-wide policies and requirements. Mitigate
  • The OPIs/OCIs Footnote 2 will report on non-compliance risks to Senior Management Committee.
  • Develop and implement formalized monitoring function for corporate services.
  • 1.1 Conditional release decisions
  • 1.2 Conditional release openness and accountability
  • 1.3 Record suspensions decisions/clemency recommendations
  • 1.4 Internal services
  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities
  • Effectively providing services to victims and the public

The Board rigorously pursues innovation and improvements to successfully meet emerging challenges and ongoing workload pressures. Public safety remains the Board's primary consideration in all aspects of decision-making policy, training, and operations.

The Board delivers two programs grounded in legislation: conditional release; and record suspensions and clemency. The PBC also manages a range of internal services that support program delivery. The conditional release program is the largest and accounts for 88% of annual program expenditures. Program delivery is labour-intensive, with salary costs accounting for approximately 84% of yearly program expenditures. Most of the remaining expenditures cover essential operating costs, such as travel to parole hearings.

Conditional Release

The PBC's workloads are influenced by many factors, some of which are beyond its control. Legislation governing the Board (i.e., the CCRA) is prescriptive, specifying when and how the Board conducts its business (e.g., when a review is required by law; and when to use hearings). In addition, workloads are driven by the actions of offenders, victims and the community. In concrete terms, this means that the PBC must deal with high workload volumes, involving issues critical to public safety, under tight timeframes, amid intense public scrutiny.

The Board made efforts to manage the workload and cost implications of recent legislative and regulatory amendments (i.e., Bill C-10, the Safe Streets and Communities Act and Bill C-38,the Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act).

Workloads Footnote 3 in the Conditional Release Openness and Accountability program have grown exponentially since the introduction of the CCRA in 1992. In 2012-13 for example, the Board had more than 22,000 contacts with victims, over 3,500 observers at hearings, and released more than 6,600 decisions from the decision registry. As with conditional release decision-making, the need for quality program delivery in this area is critical, given its implications for public confidence in corrections and conditional release. Ongoing public scrutiny and media interest in this area make program effectiveness crucial.

Record Suspensions and Clemency

The PBC's record suspension workload is also shaped by factors beyond its control. The CRA is prescriptive, specifying precisely how the Board conducts its business (e.g., admissibility and measuring merit). In addition, workloads are also driven by fluctuating volumes of requests for record suspensions. In concrete terms, this means that the PBC must deal with high workload volumes, involving issues critical to public safety, under legislatively established timeframes (i.e., User Fees Act (UFA)), amid intense public scrutiny. In 2012-13, the PBC accepted 11,534 record suspension applications and rendered 5,784 decisions.

To assist in managing workloads, the Board has provided comprehensive training to Board members to ensure that additional members are available to address increases in requests for record suspensions. In 2012-13, the Board delivered three training sessions on record suspensions to more than twenty Board members.

The Board is now managing an increase in the user fee collected for record suspensions. Since February 23, 2012, applicants for a record suspension must pay a processing fee of $631. Consequently, the Board must adhere to established service standards prescribed by requirements of the UFA. In 2012-13, the Board continued to focus on ways to streamline program processes and find operational efficiencies.

The backlog of 22,500 pardon applications is being addressed by the PBC using the savings incurred through the Deficit Reduction Action Plan and the reallocation of these resources.

Several staffing process were launched during that year to fill determinate positions. Those efforts culminated in the hiring of 21 determinate staff in November 2012. Training and equipping staff was completed in December 2012. Work began in January 2013, and by the end of the fiscal year the backlog was 21,274 applications.

Since 2010, the Clemency Unit has seen steady growth in clemency requests. In order to manage this increase, human resource strategies are being adopted, streamlining processes are being developed and better investigation strategies are being used. The Board received over 52 clemency requests in 2012-13.

Strategic Resource Management

The PBC is committed to ensuring a strong, diverse and dynamic workforce that excels in delivering the Board's mandate, today and in the years to come. The Board continued to address the need for strategic management of human, financial, and information and technology resources to support quality program delivery.

During 2012-13, the Board strengthened its integrated business and human resource planning (e.g., operational, staffing and succession) processes in relation to both its public service staff and its Board members.

It was necessary for the Board to maintain a sufficient number of Board members, who are Governor in Council term appointments. The CCRA specifies that the Board will be comprised of no more than 60 full-time Board members, and provides for the appointment of part-time members to help manage fluctuating conditional release decision-making workloads. As appointments are term, the Board continued to ensure that it identifies sufficient numbers of qualified candidates for appointment consideration by the Minister of Public Safety as Board members are appointed for a determined period of time.

In addition, PBC also provided training and mentoring to ensure that Board members have the knowledge they need to adhere to legislation and regulations, and assess risk in their decision-making.

Timely access to relevant information provides the foundation for quality conditional release, and record suspension decision-making and clemency recommendations. The Board must deal with legislated responsibilities for sharing appropriate information with victims of crime, offenders, other criminal justice partners, and the public. In this environment, strategic information management is crucial, requiring the Board to have the automated systems necessary to support effective collection, storage and sharing of information. Additionally, the Board must have in place policies and procedures necessary to ensure effective information management. Throughout the fiscal year, the Board was assisted in efforts to continuously improve in these areas by CSC, which is the Board's information technology service provider.

For the foreseeable future, the Board will face complex and growing workload pressures in areas of legislated responsibility. For this reason, strong strategic management of resources (both financial and human) is essential in order to closely monitor impacts and identify opportunities to reallocate and re-invest in the Board's programs in line with emerging priorities (both internal and government wide).

Summary of Performance

Financial Resources ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2012–13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending)
51,489 51,489 55,175 46,512 4,977

Human Resources (full-time equivalent - FTEs)

Planned 2012-13 Actual 2012-13 Difference 2012-13
497 468 29

Performance Summary Tables for Strategic Outcome (s) and Program (s) ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome: The custody, correctional interventions and supervision of offenders, in communities and institutions, contribute to public safety

Programs Total Budgetary Expenditures(Main Estimates 2012–13) Planned Spending Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
Conditional Release Decisions 39,357 39,357 36,960 37,603 42,228 35,654 38,244 33,780
Conditional Release Openness and Accountability 6,852 6,852 6,936 7,080 7,269 5,562 7,087 5,693
Record Suspension / Clemency Recommendations - - - - 83 275 1,154 2,095
Strategic Outcome Sub-Total 46,209 46,209 43,836 44,683 49,850 41,491 46,485 41,568

The PBC's three programs align to the Government of Canada's "Safe and Secure Canada" outcome.

Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ thousands)

Total Performance Summary Table ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome and Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–13) Planned Spending Total Authorities
(available for use) 2012–13
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
Strategic Outcome 46,209 46,209 43,896 44,683 49,580 41,491 46,485 41,568
Internal Services 5,280 5,280 5,331 5,420 5,595 5,021 5,703 4,427
Total 51,489 51,489 49,227 50,103 55,175 46,512 52,188 45,995

For an explanation of the variances for the total Department spending, please refer to the Expenditure Profile section of this report.

  • Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) figures are as reported in the 2012-13 Main Estimates.
  • Planned Spending figures are as reported in the 2012-13 RPP. Planned Spending reflects funds already brought into the Department's reference levels as well as amounts to be authorized through the Estimates process as presented in the Annual Reference Level Update.
  • Total Authorities reflect 2012-13 Main Estimates plus a net total increase of $3.7 M comprised of Supplementary Estimates and allotment transfers received during the 2012-13 fiscal year, as well as adjustments to statutory amounts to equal actual spending, as reported in the 2012-13 Public Accounts.
  • Actual Spending figures represent the actual expenditures incurred during the 2012-13 fiscal year, as reported in the 2012-13 Public Accounts.

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend

In 2012-13, the Board's total authorities, consisting of Main Estimates, subsequent to Supplementary Estimates funding, were $55.1M. This consisted of $48.8M of operating resources and $6.3M for the Employee Benefit Plan (EBP).

Actual expenditures were $46.5M and resulted in a reported Public Accounts lapse of $8.6M. This lapse included $2.8M re-profiling of funds to the next two fiscal years related to the Board's Medium to Long Term Accommodation Plan for Program Delivery, $2.2M can be carried forward to 2013-14 and $1.4M related to Budget 2012 Strategic and Operating Review. Various Budget 2012 measures were initiated or implemented ahead of schedule, contributing to a surplus of $2.2M or 4%.

The Board applied its resources to the four following program areas: Conditional Release Decisions, Conditional Release Openness and Accountability, Record Suspension Decisions/Clemency Recommendations and Internal Services.

Departmental Spending Trend chart

Actual Spending:

  • 2009-10 $47,310 (including temporary funding)
  • $47,310 (excluding temporary funding)
  • 2010-11 $45,995 (including temporary funding)
  • $45,995 (excluding temporary funding)
  • 2011-12 $52,188 (including temporary funding)
  • $48,054 (excluding temporary funding)

Spending:

  • 2012-13 $46,512 (including temporary funding)
  • $46,512 (excluding temporary funding)

Planned Spending:

  • 2013-14 $52, 027 (including temporary funding)
  • $50,640 (excluding temporary funding)
  • 2014-15 $47, 523 (including temporary funding)
  • $46, 136 (excluding temporary funding)
  • 2015-16 $46, 137 (including temporary funding)
  • = $46, 137 (including temporary funding)

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Parole Board of Canada's organizational Votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada's website.

Strategic Environmental Assessment

In 2012-13, the PBC considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy Plan and Program Proposals. The Board uses Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) procurement instruments to the extent possible, as these incorporate environmental performance considerations. In addition, PBC contracts include reference to the Policy on Green Procurement, and encourage contractors to follow environmental practices, such as use of electronic means for transmission of reports, and recycling unused unclassified material. The Board continues to promote environmental considerations in its daily workplaces.

Section II - Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

The Parole Board of Canada (PBC) has a single strategic outcome:

Strategic Outcome

The following tables report back on the indicators and targets from the 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) to provide information on whether progress on the Board's strategic outcome was achieved as planned.

Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The percentage of parole releases that did not result in a new conviction 90% of parole releases are completed successfully Footnote 5 Over 97% of parole releases in the 2012-13 did not result in a new conviction
The percentage of record suspension recipients whose record suspensions have not ceased to exist or who have not had their record suspensions revoked for a new offence 95% of record suspensions remain in force Over 95% of record suspensions remain in effect

Programs

PBC programs and priorities are designed to support continuous progress in achieving the strategic outcome. To support this outcome, PBC has four programs:

Programs
  • P1.1- Conditional Release Decisions
  • P1.2- Conditional Release Openness and Accountability
  • P1.3- Record Suspensions Decisions/ Clemency Recommendations
  • P1.4- Internal Services

The following section describes the PBC's programs and identifies the expected results, performance indicators and targets for each of them. This section also explains how the PBC plans on meeting the expected results and presents the financial and non-financial resources that will be dedicated to each program.

Program 1.1: Conditional Release Decisions

Financial Resources – For Program Level ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2012–13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
39,357 39,357 42,228 35,654 3,703

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents— FTEs)– For Program Level

Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
333 311 22

Performance Results – For Program Level

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results

Quality conditional release decisions that contribute to public safety

The percentage of offenders on parole that incur a new violent offence prior to the end of the supervision period

98% of offenders are not convicted of a violent offence prior to the end of their supervision periods

Over the last ten years, over 94% of parole supervision periods were completed without the offender being convicted of a new offence

Over a ten year period, over 99% of releases on parole did not result in a conviction for a new violent offence prior to warrant expiry

Quality conditional release decisions that contribute to public safety

The percentage of offenders who completed their sentence on full parole and who are re-admitted after release because of a new violent conviction (five years post-warrant expiry)

98% of offenders who completed their sentences on full parole have not been readmitted after release because of a new violent offence five years after warrant expiry

Over 98% of offenders who completed their sentences on full parole within the last five years have not re-offended and returned to a federal penitentiary

Quality conditional release decisions that contribute to public safety

The percentage of decisions that are modified by the Appeal Division

95% affirmation rate for conditional release decisions

89% affirmation rate for conditional release decisions in 2012-13

Program Description and Benefits to Canadians: Conditional release is based on the principle that gradual release to the community, in conjunction with effective programs and treatment, quality assessments of the risk of re-offending and effective community supervision enhances community safety. This program supports public safety by providing quality decisions on the timing and conditions of release of offenders into the community. Through this program, PBC staff provides timely, and accurate information for Board member decision-making, and develops and delivers effective training and policies that are essential tools for quality risk assessment and decision-making. Effectiveness is assessed through monitoring of the outcomes of release on parole. This program is directly supported by the following priorities identified for 2012-13:

  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities related to quality conditional release decision-making;
  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization; and,
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management.

Performance Analysis

Information on performance demonstrates that the Board achieved the priorities and commitments identified in its 2012-13 RPP. In 2012-13, the Board completed over 18,900 conditional release reviews for federal and provincial offenders.

Multi-year data continues to confirm that parole contributes to public safety. Over 94% of all parole releases do not result in a new offence, and over 99% do not result in a new violent offence while on parole.

Information on re-offending after completion of sentence illustrates that 9 of 10 offenders who reach the end of their sentences on full parole do not return to a federal penitentiary.

For more information, please access the Board's Performance Monitoring Reports.

Program 1.2: Conditional Release Openness and Accountability

Financial Resources – For Program Level ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2013-13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
6,852 6,852 7,269 5,562 1,290

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents— FTEs)– For Program Level

Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
60 56 4

Performance Results – For Program Level

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Conditional release processes that ensure that the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the CCRA Percentage of victims who are satisfied with the quality and timeliness of information provided by PBC 80% satisfaction rating Footnote 6 Eighty-nine percent (89%) of respondents were satisfied with the services they received
Conditional release processes that ensure that the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the CCRA Percentage of those who access PBC services who are satisfied with the quality and timeliness of information provided by PBC 80% satisfaction rating Footnote 7 The results of past surveys of those who observe hearings and who request access to the decision registry indicated that PBC response times are within acceptable ranges. The PBC did not have the resources to conduct a survey in 2012-13, however there is no indication from correspondence received that there has been any change in satisfaction rates

Program Description and Benefits to Canadians: This program ensures that the PBC operates in an open and accountable manner, consistent with the provisions of the CCRA. This program consists of the provision of information for victims of crime; assistance for observers at hearings and those who seek access to the Board's registry of decisions; encouragement of citizen engagement; and performance monitoring and reporting on the release process. Results for this program are assessed by monitoring the timeliness of information shared and by selected surveys of those who receive information and assistance from the PBC. Work in this area recognizes that the PBC operates in a challenging environment in which timely sharing of accurate information is fundamental for effective partnerships and public trust. This program is supported directly by PBC's priorities for:

  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities related to open and accountable conditional release processes;
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management;
  • Effectively providing services to victims and the public; and,
  • Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders.

Performance Analysis

The openness and accountability provisions of the CCRA continue to present important challenges for the Board with respect to: sharing information with victims of crime; provision of information and assistance for those who wish to observe PBC hearings or gain access to the Board's registry of decisions; and delivery of a program of public information. Workloads in these areas have grown exponentially since the introduction of the CCRA in 1992.

In 2012-13, for example, the Board had more than 22,000 contacts with victims, reflecting a 5% increase from 2011-12. As with conditional release decision-making, the need for quality program delivery in this area is critical, given its implications for public confidence in corrections and conditional release. Intense public scrutiny and extensive media interest in this area make program effectiveness crucial. Most of the over 22,000 contacts were with victims of violence, such as sexual assault or with the families of murder victims.

The Board had over 3,500 observers at its hearings in 2012-13, reflecting an 85% increase over the last five years and in 2012-13 victims made 254 presentations at 140 hearings. Most of the presentations were made in person (90%), while the rest were made on either audio or video tape, or via video conference.

The CCRA permits access to specific decisions and to decisions for research purposes through the Board's registry of decisions.

In 2012-13, the Board released over 6,600 decisions from its registry of decisions. Victims were the most frequent requestors of decisions (approximately 55%), followed by the media (approximately 32%).

For more information, please access the Board's Performance Monitoring Reports.

Program 1.3: Record Suspension Decisions/Clemency Recommendations

Financial Resources – For Program Level ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2013-13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
Expenses 2,436 2,436 5,728 5,686 (3,250)
Revenue (2,436) (2,436) (5,645) (5,411) 2,975
Total - - 83 275 (275)

Note: Effective February 23, 2012, the fee increased from $150 to $631, resulting in the authority increase to re-spend revenue by $3.2M from $2.4M to $5.6M.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents— FTEs)– For Program Level

Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
50 58 (8)

Performance Results – For Program Level

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Quality record suspension decisions that support rehabilitation and community reintegration The percentage of record suspension recipients whose record suspensions cease to exist or whose record suspensions are revoked Cumulative cessation/ revocation rate not to exceed 5% The cumulative record suspension cessation/revocation rate was 4.5% in 2012-13

Program Description and Benefits to Canadians: A record suspension is designed to recognize the successful reintegration of an individual into society. It is a formal attempt to remove the stigma of a criminal record for people found guilty of a federal offence and who, after satisfying their sentence and a specified waiting period, have shown themselves to be responsible, law-abiding citizens. Through this program, the PBC screens applications for eligibility and completeness, collects and analyses information for decision-making, and develops policy to guide decision processes. The results of this program are assessed through ongoing review of the average time required to process record suspension applications, and the rates of revocation of record suspensions granted. This program is supported by the following priorities:

  • Effectively fulfilling legislative responsibilities related to the processing of record suspension applications and clemency requests;
  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization;
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management; and,
  • Efficiently managing partnerships with stakeholders.

This program is designed to support rehabilitation and community reintegration by providing quality record suspension decisions. The benefits of the program include:

  • Providing greater opportunity for record suspension recipients to contribute to their communities as law-abiding citizens;
  • Ensuring those who receive a record suspension have increased opportunities for employment, housing, insurance, and travel, allowing them to generate revenue and capital contributing to economic growth; and,
  • Ensuring that most individuals (over 95%) who receive a record suspension remain crime free, demonstrating the value of a pardon as a long-term measure of community reintegration.

The RPM or clemency is a largely unfettered, discretionary power vested in the Office of the Governor General, by virtue of the Letters Patent and the Governor in Council, under sections 748, 748.1 of the Criminal Code of Canada, who may apply exceptional remedies under exceptional circumstances to deserving cases. Under section 110 of the CCRA the PBC is mandated to conduct investigations on behalf of the Minister.

The benefit of the program addresses instances of substantial injustice and instances of undue hardship.

Performance Analysis

During the reporting period, the Record Suspension/Clemency Division received a total of 19,526 record suspension applications and accepted 11,291 for processing.

In 2012-13, the Clemency program received 52 requests for the RPM and had 79 active files. The increase in requests is largely attributable to the changes made to the CRA. Most requests are discontinued either because the applicant does not provide sufficient information or proof of excessive hardship to proceed with the request, or the Minister determines that the clemency request does not warrant investigation as the criteria have not been met. Nonetheless, unlike the CRA, the RPM is not based on timelines set in statute but rather on various remedies sought for very exceptional cases. Consequently, an exhaustive assessment of each request is essential in order to provide the Minister with a recommendation. The Clemency program has seen its volumes increase substantially with a corresponding increase in resource demand.

The Board delivered three comprehensive training sessions on record suspensions decision making to over twenty Board members during the reporting period.

For more information, see the Board's Performance Monitoring Reports.

Program 1.4: Internal Services

Financial Resources – For Program Level ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2013-13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
5,280 5,280 5,595 5,021 259

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents— FTEs)– For Program Level

Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
54 43 11

Performance Results – For Program Level

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Efficient and effective internal services that support quality program delivery Services provided meet standards set under Government-wide policies as well as Management Accountability Framework (MAF) expectations To meet or surpass government standards related to management capacity and practices as outlined and assessed through the MAF The Board continued to adhere to MAF expectations. Mechanisms are in place and work continued to integrate and enhance MAF elements

Program Description and Benefits to Canadians: This program includes the provision of financial, human resource, administration, security and modern management services. The program provides operational services that enable the Board to function while ensuring compliance with new and existing central agency policies. This program is supported by the following priorities:

  • Strengthening PBC governance, decision-making practices and supports, ensuring the Board remains a flexible organization; and,
  • Ensuring fair and transparent people management.

Internal Services enable the Board to deliver its programs, and strive to:

  • Ensure that the Board's governance structure facilitates the most effective and flexible decision making possible;
  • Communicate information about the PBC to target audiences in an effective manner;
  • Provide the appropriate human and financial resources to advance the Board's key and ongoing priorities;
  • Generate the most effective, results-based planning to ensure reason and cohesion in all PBC programs;
  • Conduct reviews, monitoring and investigations to ensure that operations are transparent and accountable;
  • Ensure that the technological tools that are essential to the Board's operations are in place; and,
  • Maintain a culture of continuous innovation and improvement.

Reporting internal services through a common government-wide approach to planning, designing, budgeting, and reporting allows Canadians to see the full cost and proportion of resources spent at the Board and across the federal government for support activities.

Performance Analysis

Highlights of performance during the year include the following:

  • The Office of the Comptroller General conducted a Core Control Audit of the Board in 2012-13. The objective of the audit was to ensure that core controls over financial management result in compliance with key requirements contained in corresponding legislation, policies and directives. While the Board was found to be compliant in certain areas, the audit pointed out areas where improvement was required. The Audit Report and the Board's Management Action Plan can be found on the PBC website. The Action Plan is expected to be fully implemented by June 2013;
  • Implemented a code of conduct for PBC employees;
  • During the year, PBC's Department Security Plan was approved;
  • Human resource and security monitoring was completed to ensure compliance with government policies and legislation;
  • PBC commenced a workplace refit in the national office to meet the new government standards (i.e., workplace 2.0); and,
  • PBC developed and implemented a process to remove information resources of business value' (term used by Library and Archives to describe operationally-based files and documents) from Library and Archives' Regional Services Centres.

For more information, please access the Board's Performance Monitoring Reports.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

The Board's condensed financial statements are shown below. Expenditures for the Board decreased in 2012-13 compared to the prior year, and were also considerably less than planned expenditures. One of the main factors contributing to this was the implementation of Budget 2012 measures, which changed the way in which certain conditional release decisions are made, including the following:

  • Performing certain types of reviews by video-conference;
  • A change for certain types of reviews from hearings (i.e., in-person) to office reviews; and,
  • A reduction in quorum for certain types of reviews.

As a result of these measures, travel expenditures were approximately 30% less than the prior year.

Salary expenses were also lower in 2012-13 despite the fact that employee salaries increased. This is because significant amounts were paid in 2011-12 as severance benefits earned following changes to collective agreements and conditions of employment.

Expenses decreased in all of the Board's programs with the exception of the Record Suspension and Clemency program, where expenditures increased by approximately 75%. Revenue for this program also increased as the higher user fee for Record Suspension applications was in place for the entire year, and resources were in place to allow required service standards to be met. In addition, the Board began work on an internally-funded initiative to reduce the pardons backlog.

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Parole Board of Canada Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited) For the Year Ended March 31, 2013 ($ thousands)

2012–13 Planned Results 2012–13 Actual 2011–12 Actual $ Change (2012–13 Planned vs. Actual) $ Change (2012–13 Actual vs. 2011-12 Actual)
Total expenses 65,628 57,087 58,130 8,541 (1,043)
Total revenues 7,578 5,407 2,349 2,171 3,058
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 58,050 51,680 55,781 6,370 (4,101)
Departmental net financial position - (950) (2,187) N/A N/A

Condensed Statement of Financial Position

Parole Board of Canada Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited) As at March 31, 2013 ($ thousands)
2012-13 2011-12 $ Change
Total net liabilities 5,929 6,645 (716)
Total net financial assets 2,427 2,043 384
Departmental net debt 3,502 4,602 (1,100)
Total non-financial assets 2,552 2,415 137
Departmental net financial position (950) (2,187) 1,237
Financial Highlights Chart
Expenses less Revenues- Where Funds Go (pie chart)

Conditional Release Decisions- 76%
Conditional Release Openness and Accountability- 12%
Record Suspension and Clemency Recommendation (net revenue)- 2%
Internal Services- 10%

Total Expenses net of Revenues for the PBC were $51.7M in 2012–13.

Total expenses for 2012-13 were $8.5M less than planned results. Of this amount, $2.8M relates to the Board's Medium to Long Term Accommodation Plan for program delivery and was re-profiled to the next two fiscal years, and $2.2M will be carried forward to 2013-14. Various Budget 2012 measures were initiated or implemented ahead of schedule, contributing to significant savings. The Board collects a fee for processing record suspension applications. Effective February 23, 2012, the fee increased from $150 to $631, resulting in a significant increase in the revenue collected of $3.1M compared to 2011-12.

Assets by Type

Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund- 48%
Accounts receivable and advances- 1%
Prepaid Expenses- 5%
Tangible Capital Assets- 46%

Total Assets equaled $4.9M at the end of 2012–13, an increase of $0.5M from the prior year. This increase is largely related to the implementation of the Board's Medium to Long Term Accommodation Plan at the national office which began in 2012-13 and will continue for the next two fiscal years.

Liabilities by Type (pie chart)

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities- 40%
Vacation pay and compensatory leave- 27%
Employee future benefits- 33%

Total Liabilities were $5.9M at the end of 2012–13, a decrease of $0.7M from last fiscal year. This is mostly explained by the various collective agreement negotiations with certain employee groups, and changes to conditions of employment for executives and certain non-represented employees, the accumulation of severance benefits under the employee severance pay program ceased for these employees commencing in 2012. Employees subject to these changes have been given the option to be immediately paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits on termination from the public service. These changes have been reflected in the calculation of the outstanding severance benefit obligation.

Financial Statements

The Board's 2012-13 Financial Statements can be found on the PBC website.

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables found in the 2012–13 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the PBC website.

  • Horizontal Initiatives;
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations;
  • Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue; and,
  • User Fees Reporting.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Regular mail: Parole Board of Canada
410 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0R1

Additional Information

Endnotes

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