Prairies Economic Development Canada 2022–2023 Departmental Plan

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From the Minister

The Honourable Daniel Vandal
The Honourable Daniel Vandal

Minister of Northern Affairs, Minister responsible for Prairies Economic Development Canada and Minister responsible for the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

As Minister of Northern Affairs, Minister responsible for Prairies Economic Development Canada, and Minister responsible for the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, I am pleased to present Prairies Economic Development Canada’s Departmental Plan for the 2022-23 fiscal year.

As the first Minister responsible for PrairiesCan, my objective is to improve the lives of families, grow and diversify the Prairie economy, and advance Prairie interests in Ottawa. Our plan is designed to advance the success of our economy, the resilience of our communities, and a fair and inclusive recovery. That is the core of our government’s commitment to build back better.

This is the first departmental plan for PrairiesCan. It outlines a strengthened approach to economic development in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. In the last decade alone, WD has touched over 940 communities, 5,700 for-profits, 1,600 not-for-profits, and supported 86,000 jobs. From that foundation, PrairiesCan will continue investing in the coming year. We will also grow as an advisor, convenor and pathfinder working with Prairie businesses and communities.

Across the Prairies, small and medium-sized businesses are the lifeblood of communities and the backbone of the economy. The COVID-19 pandemic created uncertainty and anxiety for entrepreneurs and their employees. This was compounded by severe weather events that further disrupted supply chains and vital exports. Our government has been there for them. We will continue to be there throughout the coming year.

PrairiesCan will expand its on-the-ground footprint in the coming year, bringing expertise and service access to new locations in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. They will assist businesses, communities, and tourist destinations, big and small across the Prairies. We must continue diversification in the expanding knowledge and technology fields, and position promising sectors such as precision healthcare, value-added agriculture, and clean technology to lead the new economy.

Our plan for growth includes everyone. Underrepresented groups that face additional barriers to business success will continue to find support and expertise from PrairiesCan.

In these pages, you will find more insight about the priorities of PrairiesCan, and our commitment to deliver on them in partnership with the people of the Prairies.

From the President

Dylan Jones
Dylan Jones

Interim President, Prairies Economic Development Canada

This first departmental plan from Prairies Economic Development Canada lands in a time of significant change but exceptional opportunity for the Prairie economy.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the fragility of global supply chains. It challenged how and where we work. It upended the labour market. New technologies continue to disrupt established industries, rewarding those who adapt. Severe weather events threaten export industries from farm field to family table – at home and abroad. Canada, like the rest of world, is pushing harder to a green energy future.

Westerners are facing these challenges with their characteristic resilience. We can do no less at Prairies Economic Development Canada. We plan to be more present and a better partner than ever before.

Laying out a fixed path toward the future is hard. The most reliable guidepost on a shifting path may be our fundamental principle of adding value in how we serve westerners. Adding value in the world has always been a core value for westerners.

PrairiesCan is building on the foundation that anchored Western Economic Diversification Canada in serving the evolving economic needs of Prairie residents for more than 30 years. To improve our service, PrairiesCan will increase our presence in the region with new service locations to provide supports to businesses and communities.

In a time of significant change, PrairiesCan is guided by an enduring truth: a strong Prairie region is critical for a strong nation and the post-pandemic economy. Our strategic plan for 2022-23 follows.

Plans at a glance

New department

After 34 years of helping the people and economy of western Canada, Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) split into two separate Regional Development Agencies (RDA).Footnote 2 On August 6, 2021, Prairies Economic Development Canada (PrairiesCan) and Pacific Economic Development Canada (PacifiCan) were officially created to better recognize the unique economic drivers of the Prairies and British Columbia and to create a more focused approach to each region. Because of these differences, both regions will now be served by its own regional development agency.

PrairiesCan will continue to build on the foundation and existing relationships created by WD and improve its work across Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.

New offices, coverage, and services

Headquartered in Edmonton, PrairiesCan will expand its existing locations, coverage, and service in the Prairies. New locations will open in: Brandon and Thompson, Manitoba; Prince Albert and Regina, Saskatchewan; and Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, and Lethbridge, Alberta. Existing locations will continue in Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary (expanded), Edmonton, and Ottawa.

These new locations will allow PrairiesCan to assist more people where they live and work with local and regional knowledge. The department will help businesses, communities, and not-for-profit groups across the Prairies achieve job growth, diversification, competitive and innovative businesses, and thriving communities.

How will Prairies Economic Development Canada help?

PrairiesCan will strengthen its support in the following areas:

Priorities for 2022-23

As mentioned above in the messages from the Minister and President, Canada and the Prairies have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is also still dealing with sharply fluctuating commodity prices, trade issues, severe weather, and labour market challenges. The Government of Canada and PrairiesCan will continue its work to build a resilient economy. The department will assist businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and communities by focusing on the following three priorities: 1) Recovery, 2) Growth and Transformation, and 3) Inclusivity.

News releases, Success Stories, and Impact

To read more about PrairiesCan work, click on these links below.

PrairiesCan is excited to start its first full year in 2022-23 by building on WD’s strong foundation, and by improving the way we do things in the future. We are proud to be able to assist the people of the Prairies to recover, grow, transform, and achieve long-term success.

For more information on Prairies Economic Development Canada’s plans, see the “Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks” section of this plan.

Core responsibilities: Planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains information on the department’s planned results and resources for its core responsibility. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

Core responsibility: Economic development in the Prairies

Description

Prairies Economic Development Canada (PrairiesCan) promotes growth and diversification in the economy of the Prairies (Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba) by:

Planning highlights

The PrairiesCan mandate is to grow and diversify the Prairie economy and advance its interests in Ottawa. The department will achieve this mandate by working with clients and partners in our four roles as investor, advisor, pathfinder, and convenor.

The department’s clients are businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and communities such as, Indigenous groups, women-led businesses, academic institutions, municipalities, business accelerators, and incubators.

Expanding presence of PrairiesCan

With the creation of Prairies Economic Development Canada (PrairiesCan) in August 2021, came the commitment to increase coverage, locations, and service across the three Prairie provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. The department will soon have 12 locations where it once only had five. This increased presence and being closer to our clients and partners, will help PrairiesCan employees better serve more communities. They will use knowledge of the local and regional economy to advise clients and partners on programs, policy, advocacy, and coordination information, publications,Footnote 7 and data.

PrairiesCan programs

PrairiesCan invests in businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and communities through long-term core programs and time-limited programs.

Core programs

PrairiesCan’s core programs are:

Time-limited programs

PrairiesCan also delivers one-time or short-term programming to respond to urgent regional and community needs, including economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Some examples of PrairiesCan time-limited programs are:

More details of all PrairiesCan programsFootnote 9 can be found on the department website.

Aerospace, defence, and marine opportunities

An example of PrairiesCan advocacy and coordination activities is our work to facilitate access to aerospace, defence, and marine opportunities. PrairiesCan supports organizations by connecting Prairie companies and research institutions to defence related business and investment opportunities through the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy. Read more about how the PrairiesCan team does its work on the website.Footnote 10

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Prairies Economic Development Canada (PrairiesCan) and the Government of Canada are committed to the advancement of gender diversity and inclusion. One of PrairiesCan’s priorities is inclusivity and we will always consider GBA+ goals when looking at new and existing programs and services.

PrairiesCan specialists will integrate GBA+ into decision-making processes for policy, programs, services, and initiatives. The department develops all projects and services with consideration of the impacts on groups such as, women, youth, and Indigenous peoples.

For more information on the PrairiesCan GBA+ activities, please see our GBA+ supplementary information table on the website.

United Nations’ (UN) 2030 Agenda for sustainable development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals

PrairiesCan supports Canada’s efforts to address the UN 2030 Agenda and the UN Sustainable Development GoalsFootnote 11 (SDGs). This includes investment in clean technology and clean resources projects, helping communities transition their economies away from coal-fired electricity generation, and adopting practices that promote sustainable development in the department’s internal operations. PrairiesCan’s inclusivity priority is fundamental in department policies and programs that are committed to increasing the economic participation of underrepresented groups such as Indigenous people, women, and youth.

The department’s programs and services advance the following UN Sustainable Development Goals:

Experimentation

PrairiesCan, like WD before it, is a creative place to work. PrairiesCan employees and leaders continually explore ways to improve internal processes and service to our clients. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced the department to be even more innovative in how we work as we continue to deliver high quality service and improve the economy of the Prairies.

PrairiesCan will continue to improve on many of its existing experiments such as:

PrairiesCan will enable people of the Prairies to access local service more easily. We look forward to reporting back on our improved client service and performance results.

Key risks

Difficult economic conditions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, trade challenges, and low commodity prices, have made it difficult for communities and businesses to be successful. Prairie firms must adapt to compete in an economy shaped by increased online shopping, limited tourism, supply chain problems, and trade disruption.

PrairiesCan must be nimble and responsive to the needs of our clients. To help mitigate these risks, the department will focus on our three priorities to increase growth and diversification in the Prairies.

  1. Recovery
  2. Growth and Transformation
  3. Inclusivity

Based on our priorities, PrairiesCan will take the following actions to help mitigate these risks:

Long-term approach for results

PrairiesCan often takes a patient approach to economic development in the Prairies. Many investments are multi-year in duration and require several years to realize our ultimate long-term results and economic outcomes. Consequently, there is more information available about activities and outputs than concrete outcomes and economic impacts. For some of our indicators, analyzing historical data over a year-by-year basis may not be an accurate way to forecast or compare results. PrairiesCan’s independent studies, to understand the longer-term impacts of investments in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors, confirm that economic development, and particularly the realization of results, is a long-term game.

The department uses several sources of data to monitor progress against its performance indicators. Due to the frequency of some surveys and the availability of data, there may be a time lag of up to three years in results for some indicators.

The following table shows, for Economic Development in the Prairies, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022–23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Planned results for Economic Development in the Prairies
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 actual result 2019–20 actual result 2020–21 actual result
Businesses are innovative and growing in the Prairies Value of exports of goods from the Prairies $197.8B March 31, 2023 $207.8B $209.5B $179.7B
Revenue growth rate of firms supported by PrairiesCan programs 9.0% March 31, 2023 12.3% 6.4% 20.3%
Value of exports of clean technologies from the Prairies $2.0B March 31, 2023 Not available* $3.5B $3.5B
Number of high-growth firms in the Prairies 2,310 March 31, 2023 3,680 3,440 3,780
Communities are economically diversified in the Prairies Percentage of SMEs that are majority-owned by women, Indigenous people, youth, visible minorities and persons with disabilities in the Prairies** Women: 12.9%
Indigenous: 2.9%
Youth: 17.4%
Visible minorities: 10.3%
Persons with disabilities: 0.3%
March 31, 2023 Women: 15.1%
Indigenous: 2.2%
Youth: 15.7%
Visible minorities: 15.1%
Persons with disabilities: 0.4%
Women: 15.1%
Indigenous: 2.2%
Youth: 15.7%
Visible minorities: 15.1%
Persons with disabilities: 0.4%
Women: 15.1%
Indigenous: 2.2%
Youth: 15.7%
Visible minorities: 15.1%
Persons with disabilities: 0.4%
Amount leveraged per dollar by PrairiesCan in community projects 1.1 March 31, 2023 1.1 1.1 1.08
Businesses invest in the development and commercialization of innovative technologies in the Prairies Value of business expenditures in research and development by firms receiving PrairiesCan program funding $56.8M March 31, 2023 $21.3M $15.8M $50.5M
Percentage of professional jobs (including science and technology) in the Prairies 33.6% March 31, 2023 32.8% 35.1% 35.0%
Percentage of companies engaged in collaborations with higher education institutions in the Prairies 8.8% March 31, 2023 8.8% 8.8% 10.2%

* Actual results data were not available for this year.
** Actual results are based on the latest available data from 2017 Statistics Canada survey on financing and growth of SMEs. The latest survey was conducted from April to August 2021. Results are expected in June of 2022.

The financial, human resources and performance information for the Prairies Economic Development Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.Footnote 12

The following table shows, for Economic Development in the Prairies, budgetary spending for 2022–23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Planned budgetary spending for Economic Development in the Prairies
2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending 2024–25 planned spending
$408,443,940 $408,443,940 $224,171,136 $166,730,953

Financial, human resources and performance information for Prairies Economic Development Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.Footnote 13

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022–23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Planned human resources for Economic Development in the Prairies
2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents 2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
259 232 222

Financial, human resources and performance information for Prairies Economic Development Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.Footnote 14

Internal services: planned results

Description

Internal services are the services that are provided within a department so that it can meet its corporate obligations and deliver its programs. There are 10 categories of internal services:

The following table shows, for internal services, budgetary spending for 2022–23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Planned budgetary spending for internal services
2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending 2024–25 planned spending
$15,024,743 $15,024,743 $13,410,507 $12,769,131

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to carry out its internal services for 2022–23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

Planned human resources for internal services
2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents 2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
115 103 98

Planned spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three fiscal years and compares planned spending for 2022–23 with actual spending for the current year and the previous year.

Planned spending

The following graph presents planned spending (voted and statutory expenditures) over time.

Figure 1: Departmental spending 2019–20 to 2024–25
Figure 1: Departmental spending 2019–20 to 2024–25
Text version: Departmental spending graph
Fiscal year 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24 2024–25
Statutory $4,414 $477,776 $7,527 $5,404 $4,520 $4,073
Voted 304,666 429,722 533,563 418,065 233,062 175,427
Total $309,080 $907,498 $541,090 $423,469 $237,582 $179,500

The overall decrease in statutory spending from 2020-21 to 2021-22 relates to the conclusion of the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund as part of the Government of Canada’s COVID 19-Economic Response Plan. The overall decrease in voted spending in year 2022-23 relates to the completion of the Regional Relief and Recovery Program and the sunsetting of previous program initiatives such as the Regional Economic Growth Initiative Top Up announced in Budget 2018 and Budget 2019.

The following table shows information on spending for Prairies Economic Development Canada’s core responsibility and for its internal services for 2022–23 and other relevant fiscal years.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and internal services
Core responsibilities and internal services 2019–20 actual expenditures 2020–21 actual expenditures 2021–22 forecast spending 2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending 2024–25 planned spending
Economic development in the Prairies $295,440,866 $892,802,350 $523,079,463 $408,443,940 $408,443,940 $224,171,136 $166,730,953
Internal services 13,639,563 14,695,596 18,010,407 15,024,743 15,024,743 13,410,507 12,769,131
Total $309,080,429 $907,497,946 $541,089,870 $423,468,683 $423,468,683 $237,581,643 $179,500,084

PrairiesCan planned spending in 2022-23 is $423.5 million, compared to the 2021-22 forecast spending of $541.1 million. This represents a net decrease in spending of ($117.6 million), which includes a net decrease in contributions and other transfer payments of ($108.5) million and a decrease in operating costs of ($9.1) million. Factors contributing to the net decrease in spending in 2022-23 include:

Planned human resources

The following table shows information on human resources, in full-time equivalents (FTEs), for Prairies Economic Development Canada’s core responsibility and for its internal services for 2022–23 and the other relevant years.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and internal services
Core responsibilities and internal services 2019–20 actual full‑time equivalents 2020–21 actual full‑time equivalents 2021–22 forecast full‑time equivalents 2022–23 planned full‑time equivalents 2023–24 planned full‑time equivalents 2024–25 planned full‑time equivalents
Economic development in the Prairies 237 284 259 259 232 222
Internal services 97 102 115 115 103 98
Total 334 386 374 374 335 320

The overall decrease in FTEs from 2020–21 to 2022–23 mostly relates to the conclusion of the Regional Relief and Recovery Fund as part of the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 Economic Response Plan. The base human resource levels continue to be stable. Fluctuations that occur at the program level reflect resource realignment in support of priorities and projects. The department will continue to achieve its results by allocating its human resources to best support its programs.

Estimates by vote

Information on Prairies Economic Development Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2022–23 Main Estimates.Footnote 15

Future-oriented condensed statement of operations

The future‑oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of Prairies Economic Development Canada’s operations for 2021–22 to 2022–23.

The forecast and planned amounts in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The forecast and planned amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future‑oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations with the requested authorities, are available on Prairies Economic Development Canada’s website.Footnote 16

Future‑oriented condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2023
Financial information 2021–22 forecast results 2022–23 planned results Difference
(2022–23 planned results minus
2021–22 forecast results)
Total expenses $424,410,184 $394,008,760 ($30,401,424)
Total revenues 428 314 (114)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers $424,409,756 $394,008,446 ($30,401,310)

PrairiesCan’s total expenses are expected to be $394.0 million in 2022–23, compared to $424.4 million in 2021–22. There is an overall net decrease of $30.4 million primarily based on the following factors:

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Daniel Vandal, P.C., M.P.
Institutional head: Dylan Jones
Ministerial portfolio: Prairies Economic Development Canada
Enabling instrument(s): Western Economic Diversification Act,Footnote 17 R.S.C. 1985, c.11, (4th Supplement)
Year of incorporation / commencement: 2021
Other:
Headquarters – Edmonton, Alberta
Offices – Edmonton, Calgary, Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, and Lethbridge, Alberta
Saskatoon, Prince Albert, and Regina, Saskatchewan
Winnipeg, Brandon, and Thompson, Manitoba
Ottawa, Ontario

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Information on Prairies Economic Development Canada’s raison d’être, mandate and role is available on the PrairiesCan website.Footnote 18

Information on Prairies Economic Development Canada’s mandate letter commitments is available in the Minister’s mandate letter.Footnote 19

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on the PrairiesCan website.Footnote 20

Reporting framework

Prairies Economic Development Canada’s approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2022–23 are as follows.

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Prairies Economic Development Canada’s program inventoryFootnote 21 is available on GC InfoBase.Footnote 22

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tablesFootnote 23 are available on Prairies Economic Development Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

Prairies Economic Development Canada’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government‑wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote 24 This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis plus.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address
Prairies Economic Development Canada
Suite 1500, 9700 Jasper Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4H7

Telephone: (780) 495-4164 / Toll-free: 1 (888) 338-9378
Teletypewriter (TTY): 1 (877) 303-3388
Fax: (780) 495-4557
Email: WD.contactus-contactez-nous.DEO@prairiescan.gc.ca
Website: https://www.prairiescan.gc.caFootnote 25

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A document that sets out a department’s priorities, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three‑year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)

A change that a department seeks to influence. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on a department’s actual performance in a fiscal year against its plans, priorities and expected results set out in its Departmental Plan for that year. Departmental Results Reports are usually tabled in Parliament each fall.

experimentation (expérimentation)

The conducting of activities that explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform decision-making and improve outcomes for Canadians. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from, innovation. Innovation is the trying of something new; experimentation involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, introducing a new mobile application to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new application and comparing it against an existing website or other tools to see which one reaches more people, is experimentation.

full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA Plus) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS Plus])

An analytical tool used to support the development of responsive and inclusive policies, programs and other initiatives; and understand how factors such as sex, race, national and ethnic origin, Indigenous origin or identity, age, sexual orientation, socio-economic conditions, geography, culture and disability, impact experiences and outcomes, and can affect access to and experience of government programs.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2022-23 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities are the high-level themes outlining the Government’s agenda in the 2021 Speech from the Throne: building a healthier today and tomorrow; growing a more resilient economy; bolder climate action; fighter harder for safer communities; standing up for diversity and inclusion; moving faster on the path to reconciliation and fighting for a secure, just, and equitable world.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within a department and that focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)

An inventory of a department’s programs that describes how resources are organized to carry out the department’s core responsibilities and achieve its planned results.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead, they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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