Appendix A: The Chief Public Health Officer's report on the state of public health in Canada 2008 – Acronyms

APPENDIX A: Acronyms

AIDS

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

ASMR

Age-standardized Mortality Rate

BMI

Body Mass Index

CAFB

Canadian Association of Food Banks

CANSIM

Canadian Socio-economic Information Management System

CAPC

Community Action Program for Children

CCHS

Canadian Community Health Survey

CEGEP

Collège d’Enseignement Général et Professionnel

CPHI

Canadian Population Health Initiative

CPHO

Chief Public Health Officer

CPP

Canada Pension Plan

COPD

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

CPNP

Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program

CTUMS

Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey

DAIS

Data Analysis and Information System

FASD

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

GIS

Guaranteed Income Supplement

HIA

Health Impact Assessment

HIV

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

HPV

Human Papillomavirus

HUI

Health Utility Index

LFS

Labour Force Survey

LICO

Low-income Cut-off

NHS

National Health Service

OAS

Old Age Security

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

PHAC

Public Health Agency of Canada

PSA

Public Service Agreement

PYLL

Potential Years of Life Lost

Q

Quintile

QPP

Quebec Pension Plan

RHS

First Nations Regional Longitudinal Health Survey

SARS

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

SPA

Spouse’s Allowance

STI

Sexually Transmitted Infection

U.K.

United Kingdom

WHO

World Health Organization

 

Appendix B:
List of National Collaborating Centres for Public Health

The National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health
University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George

The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health
St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish

The National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health
BC Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver

The National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montréal

The National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases
International Centre for Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg

The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools
McMaster University, Hamilton

Appendix C: Health Goals for Canada – A Federal, Provincial and Territorial Commitment to Canadians

A Federal, Provincial and Territorial Commitment to Canadians108

Overarching Goal

As a nation, we aspire to a Canada in which every person is as healthy as they can be – physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

Health Goals for Canada

Canada is a country where:

Basic Needs (Social and Physical Environments)

Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.

The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and the places we live, work and play are safe and healthy – now and for generations to come.

Belonging and Engagement

Each and every person has dignity, a sense of belonging, and contributes to supportive families, friendships and diverse communities.

We keep learning throughout our lives through formal and informal education, relationships with others and the land.

We participate in and influence the decisions that affect our personal and collective health and well-being.

We work to make the world a healthy place for all people, through leadership, collaboration and knowledge.

Healthy Living

Every person receives the support and information they need to make healthy choices.

A System for Health

We work to prevent and are prepared to respond to threats to our health and safety through coordinated efforts across the country and around the world.

A strong system for health and social well-being responds to disparities in health status and offers timely, appropriate care.

Appendix D: Definitions and Data Sources for Indicators

Population (2006)433

The census enumerates the entire Canadian population, which consists of Canadian citizens (by birth and by naturalization), landed immigrants and non-permanent residents and their families living with them in Canada. Non-permanent residents are persons who hold a work or student permit, or who claim refugee status.

The census also counts Canadian citizens and landed immigrants who are temporarily outside the country on Census Day. This includes federal and provincial government employees working outside Canada, Canadian embassy staff posted to other countries, members of the Canadian Forces stationed abroad, all Canadian crew members of merchant vessels and their families.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2007). Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, 2006 and 2001 censuses – 100% data (table). Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables. 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-550-XWE2006002. Ottawa.

Aboriginal (2006)434

This is a collective name for all of the original peoples of Canada and their descendants. The Constitution Act of 1982 specifies that the Aboriginal Peoples in Canada consist of three groups - Indians, Inuit and Métis. Indians, Inuit and Métis peoples have unique heritages, languages, cultural practices and spiritual beliefs.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2008). Aboriginal Peoples in Canada 2006: Inuit, Métis, and First Nations, 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-558-XIE. Ottawa. Analysis Series, 2006 Census.

First Nations (2006)434

A term which came into common usage in the 1970s to replace Indian. Although the term First Nation is widely used, no legal definition of it exists. Among its uses, the term “First Nations Peoples” refers generally to the Indian Peoples in Canada, both Status and non-Status.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2008). Aboriginal Peoples in Canada 2006: Inuit, Métis and First Nations, 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-558-XIE. Ottawa. Analysis Series, 2006 Census.

Indian434

A term which collectively describes all the Indigenous People in Canada who are not Inuit or Métis. Indians are one of three peoples recognized as Aboriginal in the Constitution Act of 1982, along with Inuit and Métis. Three categories apply to Indians in Canada: Status Indians, non-Status Indians and Treaty Indians.

Métis (2006)434

A term which is used broadly to describe people with mixed First Nations and European ancestry who identify themselves as Métis, distinct from Indian people, Inuit or non-Aboriginal people.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2008). Aboriginal Peoples in Canada 2006: Inuit, Métis and First Nations, 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-558-XIE. Ottawa. Analysis Series, 2006 Census.

Inuit (2006)434

Inuit are the Aboriginal People of Arctic Canada who live primarily in Nunavut, the Northwest Territories and northern parts of Labrador and Quebec.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2008). Aboriginal Peoples in Canada 2006: Inuit, Métis and First Nations, 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-558-XIE. Ottawa. Analysis Series, 2006 Census.

Immigrant (2006)435

A landed immigrant is a person who has been granted the right to live in Canada by immigration authorities.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2007). Immigrant Status and Period of Immigration (9), Knowledge of Official Languages (5), Detailed Mother Tongue (103), Age Groups (10) and Sex (3) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2006 Census - 20% Sample Data (table). Topic-based tabulation. 2006 Census of Population. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-557-XCB2006021. Ottawa. Released December 4, 2007.

By birth place (2006)436

The concept of place of birth applies to the country of a respondent if born outside Canada. Respondents are to report their place of birth according to international boundaries in effect at the time of enumeration not at the time of birth. Countries should be coded according to the most recent ISO codes and it is recommended that they be aggregated into regions according to the most recent United Nations’ standards for the reporting of demographic and social data.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2007). Profile of Language, Immigration, Citizenship, Mobility and Migration for Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 2006 Census (table). 2006 Electronic Profiles. 2006 Census of Population. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 94-577-XCB2006001. Ottawa. Released December 4, 2007.

By years since immigration (2006)435

Year/Period of immigration refers to a person who is a landed immigrant by the period of time in which he or she first obtained landed immigrant status.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2007). Immigrant Status and Period of Immigration (9), Knowledge of Official Languages (5), Detailed Mother Tongue (103), Age Groups (10) and Sex (3) for the Population of Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglo-merations, 2006 Census - 20% Sample Data (table). Topic- based tabulation. 2006 Census of Population. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-557-xcb2006021. Ottawa. Released December 4, 2007.

Urban population (2006)437

An urban area has a minimum population concentration of 1,000 persons and a population density of at least 400 persons per square kilometre, based on the current census population count.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2007). Population and dwelling counts, for urban areas, 2006 and 2001 censuses – 100% data (table). Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables. 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 97-550-XWE2006002. Ottawa. Released March 13, 2007.

Life expectancy at birth (2005)438

Life expectancy is the number of years a person would be expected to live, starting from birth (for life expectancy at birth) and similarly for other age groups, on the basis of the mortality statistics for a given observation period.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0511 - Life expectancy, abridged life table, at birth and at age 65, by sex, Canada, provinces and territories, annual (years), CANSIM (database).

Health-adjusted life expectancy at birth (2001)439

Health-adjusted life expectancy is the number of years in full health that an individual can expect to live given the current morbidity and mortality conditions. Health-adjusted life expectancy uses the Health Utility Index (HUI) to weigh years lived in good health higher than years lived in poor health. Thus, health-adjusted life expectancy is not only a measure of quantity of life but also a measure of quality of life.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0121 - Health-adjusted life expectancy, at birth and at age 65, by sex and income group, Canada and provinces, occasional (years), CANSIM (database).

Infant mortality rate (2005)440

Infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths during a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d). Table 102-0507 - Infant mortality, by age group, Canada, provinces and territories, annual, CANSIM (database).

Excellent or very good self-rated health (2005)441

Population (aged 12 years and over for data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and National Population Health Survey, North component) who rate their own health status as being either excellent, very good, good, fair or poor.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0422 - Self-rated health, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 and over, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

Excellent or very good self-rated mental health (2005)441

Population aged 12 years and over who rate their own mental health status as being excellent, very good, good, fair or poor.

Self-reported mental health provides a general indication of the population suffering from some form of mental disorder, mental or emotional problems, or distress, not necessarily reflected in self-reported (physical) health.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0421 - Self-rated mental health, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 and over, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

Death due to circulatory diseases (2004)442

Death due to circulatory diseases classified as International Classification of Disease Codes: I00-I99.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0529 - Deaths, by cause, Chapter IX: Diseases of the circulatory system (I00 to I99), age group and sex, Canada, annual (number), CANSIM (database).

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 109-5315 - Estimates of population (2001 Census and administrative data), by age group and sex, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, annual (number), CANSIM (database).

Death due to malignant cancers (2004)443

Death due to malignant cancers classified as International Classification of Disease Codes: C00-C99.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0522 - Deaths, by cause, Chapter II: Neoplasms (C00 to D48), age group and sex, Canada, annual (number), CANSIM (database).

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 109-5315 - Estimates of population (2001 Census and administrative data), by age group and sex, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, annual (number), CANSIM (database).

Death due to Respiratory Diseases (2004)444

Death due to respiratory diseases classified as International Classification of Disease Codes: J00-J99.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0530 - Deaths, by cause, Chapter X: Diseases of the respiratory system (J00 to J99), age group and sex, Canada, annual (number), CANSIM (database).

Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 109-5315 - Estimates of population (2001 Census and administrative data), by age group and sex, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, annual (number), CANSIM (database).

Potential years of life lost438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) is the number of years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from any cause – before age 75. A person dying at age 25, for example, has lost 50 years of life.

Premature mortality due to cancer (2001)438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for all malignant neoplasms (ICD-10 C00-C97) and for specific sites [colorectal (ICD-10 C18-C21), lung (ICD-10 C33-C34), female breast (ICD-10 C50) and prostate cancer (ICD-10 C61)] is the number of years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from any cancer – before age 75.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0311 - Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death and sex, population aged 0 to 74, three-year average, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions and peer groups, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Premature mortality due to circulatory diseases (2001)438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for all circulatory disease deaths (ICD-10 I00-I99) and specific causes [ischaemic heart disease (ICD-10 I20-I25), cerebro-vascular diseases (stroke) (ICD-10 I60-I69) and all other circulatory diseases (ICD-10 I00-I02, I05-I09, I10-I15, I26-I28, I30-I52, I70-I79, I80-I89, I95-I99)] is the numberof years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from any circulatory disease – before age 75.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0311 - Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death and sex, population aged 0 to 74, three-year average, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions and peer groups, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Premature mortality due to unintentional injuries (2001)438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for unintentional injuries (ICD-10 V01-X59, Y85-Y86) is the number of years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from unintentional injuries – before age 75.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0311 - Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death and sex, population aged 0 to 74, three-year average, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions and peer groups, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Premature mortality due to suicide and self-inflicted injuries (2001)438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for suicides (ICD-10 X60-X84, Y87.0) is the number of years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from suicide – before age 75.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0311 - Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death and sex, population aged 0 to 74, three-year average, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions and peer groups, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Premature mortality due to respiratory diseases (2001)438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for all respiratory disease deaths (ICD-10 J00-J99) and for specific causes [pneumonia and influenza (ICD-10 J10-J18), bronchitis/emphysema/asthma (ICD-10 J40-J43, J45-J46) and all other respiratory diseases (ICD-10 J00-J06, J20-J22, J30-J39, J44, J47, J60-J70, J80- J84, J85-J86, J90-J94, J95-J99)] is the number of years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from any respiratory disease – before age 75.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0311 - Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death and sex, population aged 0 to 74, three-year average, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions and peer groups, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Premature mortality due to HIV (2001)438

Potential years of life lost (PYLL) for human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) infection deaths (ICD-10 B20-B24) is the number of years of life lost when a person dies prematurely from HIV-AIDS – before age 75.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 102-0311 - Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death and sex, population aged 0 to 74, three-year average, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions and peer groups, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Malignant cancers (2003)186

Indicates the total number of people who are currently living with a diagnosis of cancer in 2003 and are still alive 15 years after their cancer has been diagnosed. These estimates are based on survival rates from Saskatchewan, which are applied to the Canadian incidence data.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control. (2007). Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Diabetes (2004-2005)182

Individuals were counted as having been diagnosed with diabetes when they had at least one hospitalization with a diagnosis of diabetes or had at least two physician visits with a diagnosis of diabetes within a two-year period.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). Diabetes in Canada: Highlights from the National Diabetes Surveillance System 2004/2005. Unpublished data.

Obesity (2005)445

According to the WHO and Health Canada guidelines, the index for body weight classification is: less than 18.50 (underweight); 18.50 to 24.99 (normal weight); 25.00 to 29.99 (overweight); 30.00 to 34.99 (obese, class I); 35.00 to 39.99 (obese, class II); 40.00 or greater (obese, class III).

The index is calculated for the population aged 18 years and over, excluding pregnant females and persons less than 3 feet (0.914 metres) tall or greater than 6 feet 11 inches (2.108 metres).

Body mass index (BMI) is calculated by dividing the respondent’s body weight (in kilograms) by their height (in metres) squared.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0407 - Measured adult body mass index (BMI), by age group and sex, household population aged 18 and over excluding pregnant females, Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS 3.1), Canada, every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

Arthritis/Rheumatism (2005)446

Respondents (aged 12+ years) who report having arthritis or rheumatism, excluding fibromyalgia.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control. (2007). Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Asthma (2005)446

Respondents (aged 12+ years) who report having:

  • asthma;
  • asthma symptoms or attacks in the past 12 months; or
  • taken medicine for asthma such as inhalers, nebulizers, pills, liquids or injections.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Heart disease (2005)446

Respondents (aged 12+ years) who report having heart disease.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

High blood pressure (2005)446

Respondents (aged 20+ years) who report having:

  • high blood pressure;
  • been diagnosed with high blood pressure; or
  • taken high blood pressure medication.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2005)446

Respondents (aged 35+ years) who report having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Schizophrenia (2002)447

Respondents (aged 12+ years) reporting schizophrenia as diagnosed by a health professional.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Major depression (2002)447

A major depressive episode is a period of two weeks or more with persistent depressed mood and loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities, accompanied by symptoms such as decreased energy, changes in sleep and appetite, impaired concentration, and feelings of guilt, hopelessness or suicidal thoughts.

Respondents (aged 15+ years) who reported experiencing the following associated with major depressive episode were considered to fit the criteria for the 12-month period prevalence of major depression:

  • a period of two weeks or more with depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure and at least five additional symptoms;
  • clinically significant distress or social or occupational impairment;
  • the symptoms are not better accounted for by bereavement;
  • meet the criteria for lifetime diagnosis of major depressive episode;
  • report a 12-month episode; and
  • report marked impairment in occupational or social functioning.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Alcohol dependence (2002)447

Alcohol dependence is defined as tolerance, withdrawal, loss of control or social or physical problems related to alcohol use.

A respondent (aged 15+ years) who reported having five drinks or more on one occasion at least once a month during the past 12 months and had five drinks or more during another 12-month period.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Anxiety disorders (2002)447

A respondent (aged 15+ years) who reported experiencing any of the following criteria associated with agoraphobia, panic disorder and social phobia in the past 12 months was considered to meet the criteria for anxiety disorders:

  • a panic attack in the past 12 months;
  • significant emotional distress during a panic attack in the past 12 months;
  • fear or avoidance of social or performance situation(s) in the past 12 months;
  • clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning;
  • anxiety about being in at least two different places or situations from which escape might be difficult or embarrassing, along with fear of having a panic attack; and
  • avoidance of situations associated with agoraphobia; or endurance of situations with marked distress or anxiety; or requiring the presence of a companion in the situations.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Health Status Indicators – Chronic Disease Prevalences.

Alzheimer’s and other dementias (2000)448

Person’s aged 65+ years who have been diagnosed as having Alzheimer’s disease, vascular disease, frontal lobe dementia or Lewy Body disease (ICD10 F01, F03, G30-G31).

Data Source: Mathers, C.E. & Matidle, L. (2002). Global burden of dementia in the year 2000: Summary of methods and data sources.

HIV (2005)210

The number of new HIV infections occurring in 2005.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). HIV/AIDS EPI Updates, November 2007. Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Infectious Disease and Control.

Chlamydia (2004)449

Rate per 100,000 population where Chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) has been identified by a laboratory.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). Reported cases of notifiable STI from January 1 to September 30, 2006 and January 1 to September 30, 2007
and corresponding annual rates for 2006 and 2007.

Gonorrhea (2004)450

Rate per 100,000 population where Gonorrhea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) has been identified by a laboratory.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). Reported cases of notifiable STI from January 1 to September 30, 2006 and January 1 to September 30, 2007
and corresponding annual rates for 2006 and 2007.

Infectious syphilis (2004)451

Rate per 100,000 population where Infectious syphilis (including primary, secondary and early latent stages) has been identified by a laboratory.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). Reported cases of notifiable STI from January 1 to September 30, 2006 and January 1 to September 30, 2007 and corresponding annual rates for 2006 and 2007.

Low-income cut-off (LICO)213

A statistical measure of the income threshold below which Canadians likely devote a larger share of income than average to the necessities of food, shelter and clothing.

Unemployment rate (2006)453

The unemployment rate is the number of unemployed persons expressed as a percentage of the labour force.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). Analyses were performed using Health Canada’s DAIS edition of anonymized microdata from the Labour Force Survey – 3701; Table 282-0004 - Labour Force Survey Estimates (LFS), by Educational Attainment, Sex and Age Group, Annual (Persons Unless Otherwise Noted), prepared by Statistics Canada.

Persons living in low income after tax (2005)452

Below are the low-income cut-off after-tax thresholds for person(s) in varying community sizes for 2005.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (2007). Income in Canada 2005 (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 75-202-XIE). Ottawa.

Rural Areas
Urban Areas
Size of family unit
Less than 30,000
30,000 to 99,999
100,000 to 499,999
500,000
and over

1 person

11,264

12,890

14,380

14,562

17,219

2 persons

13,709

15,690

17,502

17,723

20,956

3 persons

17,071

19,535

21,794

22,069

26,095

4 persons

21,296

24,373

27,190

27,532

32,556

5 persons

24,251

27,754

30,962

31,351

37,071

6 persons

26,895

30,780

34,338

34,769

41,113

7 or more persons

29,539

33,806

37,713

38,187

45,155

People reporting food insecurity (2004)237

A situation that exists when people lack secure access to sufficient amounts of safe and nutritious food for normal growth and development and an active and healthy life.

Data Source: Health Canada. (2007). Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 2.2, Nutrition (2004): Income-Related Household Food Security in Canada. Office of Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Health Products and Food Branch.

Ground-level ozone exposure (2005)251

This indicator uses the seasonal average of daily eight-hour maximum average concentrations, which is population-weighted to calculate trends and averages across monitoring stations located throughout the country.

Data Source: Environment Canada. (2007). Ground-level ozone exposure indicator, Canada, 1990 to 2005.

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure (2005)251

This indicator uses the seasonal average of daily twenty four-hour maximum average concentrations, which is population-weighted to calculate trends and averages across monitoring stations located throughout the country.

Data Source: Environment Canada. (2007). Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure indicator, Canada, 2000 to 2005.

Unable to access acceptable housing (2001)273

Refers to affordable dwellings (costing less than 30% of before-tax household income), adequate dwellings (those reported by their residents as not requiring any major repairs) and suitable dwellings (having enough bedrooms for the size and make-up of resident households according to National Occupancy Standard requirements).

Data Source: Lewis, R.E. Jakubec, L. (April, 2004). 2001 Census Housing Series: Issue 3 Revised; The Adequacy, Suitability, and Affordability of Canadian Housing.Canada Mortgage and Housing Canada. Housing Indicators and Demographics. Policy and Research Division. (Socio-economic Series 04-007).

High school graduates (2006)310

Persons who have received, at minimum, a high school diploma or, in Quebec, a completed Secondary V or, in Newfoundland and Labrador, completed fourth year of secondary.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). [Analyses were performed using the Health Canada’s DAIS edition of anonymized microdata from the Labour Force Survey - 3701; Table 282-0004 - Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by educational attainment, sex and age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), prepared by Statistics Canada.]

Some post-secondary education (2006)310

Persons who worked toward, but did not complete, a degree, certificate (including a trade certificate) or diploma from an educational institution, including a university, beyond the secondary level. This includes vocational schools, apprenticeship training, community colleges, Collège d’Enseignement Général et Professionnel (CEGEP), and schools of nursing.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). [Analyses were performed using the Health Canada’s DAIS edition of anonymized microdata from the Labour Force Survey-– 3701; Table 282-0004 - Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by educational attainment, sex and age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), prepared by Statistics Canada.]

Post-secondary education (2006)310

Persons who have completed a certificate (including a trade certificate), diploma or a minimum of a university bachelor’s degree from an educational institution beyond the secondary level. This includes certificates from vocational schools, apprenticeship training, community colleges, Collège d’Enseignement Général et Professionnel (CEGEP), and schools of nursing.

Data Source: Public Health Agency of Canada. (2007). [Analyses were performed using the Health Canada’s DAIS edition of anonymized microdata from the Labour Force Survey - 3701; Table 282-0004 - Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by educational attainment, sex and age group, annual (persons unless otherwise noted), prepared by Statistics Canada.]

Very or somewhat strong sense of community belonging (2005)454

Population aged 12 years and over who describe their sense of belonging to their local community as very strong or somewhat strong.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0490 - Sense of belonging to local community, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 and over, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

Violent crimes committed (2006)455

Offences that deal with the application or threat of application, of force to a person including homicide, attempted murder, various forms of sexual and non-sexual assault, robbery and abduction, as well as traffic incidents that result in death or bodily harm.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (July 18, 2007).
Crime Statistics, 2006. The Daily. (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 11-001-XIE).

Daily smoking (2006)456

Respondents who have identified themselves as daily smokers and non-daily smokers (also known as occasional smokers).

Data Source: Health Canada. (December, 2006). Smoking status and average number of cigarettes smoked per day, by age group and sex, age 15+ years, Canada 2006.

Engaged in leisure-time physical activity (2005)366

Population aged 12 years and over reporting level of physical activity, based on their responses to questions about the frequency, duration and intensity of their participation in leisure-time physical activity.

Respondents are classified as active, moderately active or inactive based on an index of average daily physical activity over the past three months.

Data Source: Gilmour, H.(August 2007). Physically Active Canadians. Statistics Canada Health Reports. 18(3). (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-003.)

Fruit and vegetable consumption 5+ times a day (2005)374

Population aged 12 years and over who reported that they consume fruits and vegetables five or more times per day.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0449 - Fruit and vegetable consumption, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 and over, Canada, provinces, territories and selected health regions (June 2005 boundaries), every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

Heavy drinking (5+ drinks on one occasion 12+ times in a year)(2005)387

Population aged 12 years and over who reported having five or more drinks on one occasion, twelve or more times a year.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0431 - Frequency of drinking in the past 12 months, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 and over who are current drinkers, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

Illicit drug use (2002)386

Illicit drug use by persons aged 15 years and older, in Canada, excluding the Territories, who have used any illicit drug (including cannabis, cocaine, speed, ecstacy, hallucinogens, heroin, or sniffing solvents).

Data Source: Tjepkema, M. (2004). Alcohol and Illicit Drug Dependence. Supplement to Health Reports, 15, 9-63.

Teen pregnancy (2004)391

Total number of pregnancies (including live births, induced abortions and fetal loss) for women under the age of 20.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 106-9002 - Pregnancy outcomes, by age group, Canada, provinces and territories, annual, CANSIM (database).

Regular family physician (2005)357

Refers to a family or general physician seen for most of an individual’s routine care.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-3024 - Population reporting a regular family physician, household population aged 15 and over, Canada, provinces and territories, occasional, CANSIM (database).

Contact with dental professional (2005)393

Persons who have consulted with a dental professional (including dentists and orthodontists) in the past 12 months.

Data Source: Statistics Canada. (n.d.). Table 105-0460 - Contact with dental professionals in the past 12 months, by age group and sex, household population aged 12 and over, Canada, provinces, territories, health regions (June 2005 boundaries) and peer groups, every 2 years, CANSIM (database).

 

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