Errata: The Chief Public Health Officer's Report on The State of Public Health in Canada 2008

Errata

Please note: revisions to report are current as of October 29, 2008

Chapter 3: Our Population, Our Health and the Distribution of Our Health

Who we are

Page 19, Figure 3.1 — The data for 1971 should overlay the data for 2006. Figure 3.1 should appear as follows:

 

Figure 3.1 Population distribution by age, Canada, 1971 and 2006

Figure 1 - Population distribution by age, Canada, 1971 and 2006

Source: Public Health Agency of Canada using Health Canada's Data Analysis and Information System (DAIS), Statistic Canada. CANSIM Table 051-0001.

Our health

Life expectancy

Page 21, first column, last paragraph — The number of OECD countries referred to in the text was incorrect. The text should read as follows:

Canadians’ life expectancy at birth in 2004 was one of the highest in the world at just over 80 years – about 2.5 years more than the U.S. and 2 years less than Japan (the highest at 82 years). Figure 3.2 shows the steady increase in life expectancy for six OECD countries, including Canada, over the last 25 years. It also shows that Canadian life expectancy is improving, but it is not doing so at the same rate as some other top healthranked countries such as Japan and Australia.

Page 21, Figure 3.2 — A typographical error existed in the source for Figure 3.2. The source should read as follows:

Public Health Agency of Canada using Health Canada’s Data Analysis and Information System (DAIS), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Data, 2007.

Page 22, Figure 3.4 — The symbols in the graph for Q3 and Q5 female values have been switched for years 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001. Figure 3.4 should appear as follows:

 

Figure 3.4 Life expectancy at birth by neighbourhood income and sex, urban Canada, 1971-2001

Figure 3.4 Life expectancy at birth by neighbourhood income and sex, urban Canada, 1971-2001

Q - population divided into fifths based on the percentage
of the population in their neighbourhood below the low-income cut-offs.
Source: Wilkins et al. (2007), Statistics Canada.

Infant mortality

Page 23, Figure 3.6 — A typographical error existed in the source for Figure 3.6. The source should read as follows:

Public Health Agency of Canada using Health Canada’s Data Analysis and Information System (DAIS), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Data, 2007.

Self-reported health

Page 24, second column, first paragraph — Ambiguity existed around the age associated with the survey results. The text should read as follows:

Although measured indicators are important, how people feel about their own health is an important indication of overall health status. Despite the inherent limitations of survey data, such as the subjectivity of individual responses, self-reported data can provide useful information otherwise not available. When Canadians are asked about their health, most indicate that they consider themselves to be healthy. The 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey found that the majority of Canadians age 12 and over, about 16 million (60%) report their health as either excellent (22%) or very good (38%). Even more (73%) report their mental health as excellent (37%) or very good (36%).

Causes of death

Page 27, Figure 3.11 — The outline for Q1 values is missing. Figure 3.11 should appear as follows:

Figure 3.4 Life expectancy at birth by neighbourhood income and sex, urban Canada, 1971-2001

Figure 3.11 Age-standardized mortality rates for ischemic heart disease by neighbourhood income,male, urban Canada, 1971-2001

ASMR − Age-standardized mortality rate.
Q - population divided into fifths based on the percentage of the population in
their neighbourhood below the low-income cut-offs.


Source: Wilkins et al. (2007), Statistics Canada.

 

Chapter 4: Social and Economic Factors that Influence Our Health and Contribute to Health Inequalities

What makes - and keeps - us healthy

Health behaviours

Page 54, Figure 4.6 — The outline for Completed College and Completed University and Y-axis legend are missing. Figure 4.6 should appear as follows: Figure 4.6 Smoking and education, aged 15+ years, Canada, 1999-2006

Figure 4.6 Smoking and education, aged 15+ years,Canada, 1999-2006

Source: Public Health Agency of Canada using Health Canada, Canadian
Tobacco Use Monitoring System

References

Page 87, reference 9 — Reference was missing the associated organization. The reference should read as follows:

Dahlgreen, G. & Whitehead, M. (2006). European strategies for tackling social inequities in health: Levelling up Part 2. World Health Organization.

Page 94, reference 223 — A typographical error existed in the author’s name. The reference should read as follows: Government of Saskatchewan. (2007). 2006-2007 Annual Report: Saskatchewan Community Resources.

Page 94, reference 231 — A typographical error existed in the author’s name. The reference should read as follows:

Wilkins, K. & Mackenzie, SG. (August 2007). Work Injuries. Health Reports, 18(3), 1-18. (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-003).

Page 96, reference 300 — A typographical error existed in the author’s name. The reference should read as follows:

Hertzman, C., McLean, S., Kohen, D., Dunn, J. & Evans, T. (August 2002). Early development in Vancouver: Report of the Community Asset Mapping Project. (CAMP).

 

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