Chronic Diseases in Canada

Chronic Diseases in Canada cover of the  PDF version

Volume 28, No. 3, 2008

Full PDF Version (1 610 KB)

Downloadable in PDF format for complete issue or for each article separately. How to download PDF documents

Table of Contents

Feature Articles

1. The effect of bipolar I disorder and major depressive disorder on workforce function
View Abstract
RS McIntyre, K Wilkins, H Gilmour, JK Soczynska, JZ Konarksi, A Miranda, HO Woldeyohannes, D Vagic, M Alsuwaidan, and SH Kennedy

PDF version 114 KB

2. A new population-based measure of the economic burden of mental illness in Canada
View Abstract

K-L Lim, P Jacobs, A Ohinmaa, D Schopflocher, and CS Dewa

PDF version 158 KB

3. The evolution of HPV-related anogenital cancers reported in Quebec – Incidence rates and survival probabilities
View Abstract

R Louchini, P Goggin, and M Steben

PDF version 462 KB

Chronic Diseases in Canada (CDIC) is a quarterly scientific journal focussing on current evidence relevant to the control and prevention of chronic (i.e. non-communicable) diseases and injuries in Canada. Since 1980 the journal has published a unique blend of peer-reviewed feature articles by authors from the public and private sectors and which may include research from such fields as epidemiology, public/community health, biostatistics, the behavioural sciences, and health services or economics. Only feature articles are peer reviewed. Authors retain responsibility for the content of their articles; the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the CDIC editorial committee nor of the Public Health Agency of Canada.


Abstracts from Feature Articles in Chronic Diseases in Canada Volume 28, No 3, 2008

Article 1: The effect of bipolar I disorder and major depressive disorder on workforce function

Authors: RS McIntyre, MD, FRCPC; K Wilkins, MSc.; H Gilmour, MA; JK Soczynska, HBSc.; JZ Konarksi, MSc.; A Miranda; HO Woldeyohannes, HBSc.; D Vagic, MD; M Alsuwaidan, MD; SH Kennedy, MD, FRCPC

Abstract:

This investigation was undertaken to explore and compare the effect of bipolar I disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) on workforce function. The data for this analysis were procured from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS 1.2). The sample consisted of 20 747 individuals (≥ 18 years old and currently working); the proportions screening positive for lifetime BD and MDD were 2.4% and 11.2%, respectively. Individuals with BD or MDD had a signifi cantly lower mean annual income, compared to people without these disorders. Individuals with BD had a signifi cantly lower annual income when compared to MDD (p < 0.05). Results from a multiple logistic regression also indicate that employed individuals with BD had greater odds of reporting one or more mental health disability days in the past two weeks, compared with those with MDD (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.0 to 2.6). Currently employed individuals with BD had lower odds of “good job security” relative to those with MDD (OR = 0.6 95% CI = 0.5 to 0.9). The data herein underscore the pernicious effect of BD on workforce function, and suggest that opportunistic screening for BD in all individuals utilizing employment assistance programs for depression might be warranted.

Article 2: A new population-based measure of the economic burden of mental illness in Canada

Authors: K-L Lim, PhD; P Jacobs, PhD; A Ohinmaa, PhD; D Schopflocher, PhD; CS Dewa, PhD

Abstract:

This paper presents a comprehensive measure of the incremental economic burden of mental illness in Canada which incorporates the use of medical resources and productivity losses due to long-term and short-term disability, as well as reductions in health-related quality of life (HRQOL), for the diagnosed and undiagnosed population with mental illness. The analysis was based on the population-based Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.1 (2003). For all persons, we measured all health services utilization, longterm and short-term work loss, and health-related quality of life and their dollar valuations, with the economic burden being the difference in dollar measures between the populations with and without mental health problems. In total, the economic burden was $51 billion in 2003. Over one-half was due to reductions in HRQOL. The current accepted practice in economic assessments is to include changes in medical resource use, work loss, and reductions in HRQOL.

Article 3: The evolution of HPV-related anogenital cancers reported in Quebec - Incidence rates and survival probabilities

Authors: R Louchini, MSc; P Goggin, MD, MSc; M Steben, MD

Abstract:

Non-cervical anogenital cancers (i.e. anal, vulvar, vaginal and penile cancers) associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), for which HPV is known to be the necessary cause of carcinogenesis, are poorly documented due to their relatively low incidence rate. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence rates of these cancers between 1984 and 2001, and their relative survival probabilities, in Quebec (Canada) between 1984 and 1998. The incidence of these cancers is on the rise, particularly anal cancer in women and, more recently (since 1993-95), vulvar cancer. Between 1984-86 and 1993-95, the 5-year relative survival probability for men with anal cancer decreased from 57% to 46%, while that for penile cancer dropped from 75% to 59%. However, during the same period, the 5-year relative survival probability for women with anal cancer rose from 56% to 65%, and remained stable for cervical and vulvar cancers, at 74% and 82%, respectively.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: