ARCHIVED - Chronic Diseases in Canada

 

Chronic Diseases in Canada cover of the  PDF version

Volume 29, No. 2, 2009

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Table of Contents

 

Guest Editorials

1. The role of public health in the health of Canada’s children
Dr. David Butler-Jones, Chief Public Health Officer

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71 KB

2. From rags to genes: mixing research paradigms
Claire Infante-Rivard MD, PhD, James McGill Professor, McGill University, Associate Scientific Editor, Chronic Diseases in Canada

PDF version 60 KB

Feature Articles

1. Health outcomes in low-income children with current asthma in Canada
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T To, PhD; S Dell, MD; M Tassoudji, MSc; C Wang, MD

PDF version 111 KB

2. Deprivation and unintentional injury hospitalization in Quebec children
View Abstract
Mathieu Gagné, MA; Denis Hamel, MSc

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3. Injury data in British Columbia: policy maker perspectives on knowledge transfer
View Abstract
C Mitton, PhD; YC MacNab, PhD; N Smith, MA; L Foster, PhD

PDF version 223 KB

4. Complementary therapies for cancer patients: assessing information use and needs
View Abstract
MJ Verhoef, PhD; L Trojan, BSc; GD Armitage, MA; L Carlson, PhD; RJ Hilsden, PhD

PDF version 121 KB

Cross-Canada Forum

1. The national lung health framework: an opportunity for gender analysis
View Abstract
N Hemsing, MA; L Greaves, PhD

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Chronic Diseases in Canada (CDIC) is a quarterly scientific journal focussing on current evidence relevant to the control and prevention of chronic (i.e. non-communicable) diseases and injuries in Canada. Since 1980 the journal has published a unique blend of peer-reviewed feature articles by authors from the public and private sectors and which may include research from such fields as epidemiology, public/community health, biostatistics, the behavioural sciences, and health services or economics. Only feature articles are peer reviewed. Authors retain responsibility for the content of their articles; the opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the CDIC editorial committee nor of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Abstracts from Feature Articles in Chronic Diseases in Canada Volume 29, No 2, 2009

Article 1: Health outcomes in low-income children with current
asthma in Canada

Authors: T To, PhD; S Dell, MD; M Tassoudji, MSc; C Wang, MD

Abstract: Data collected from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in 1994/95 and 1996/97 were used to measure longitudinal health outcomes among children with asthma. Over 10 000 children aged 1 to 11 years with complete data on asthma status in both years were included. Outcomes included hospitalizations and health services use (HSU). Current asthma was defined as children diagnosed with asthma by a physician and who took prescribed inhalants regularly, had wheezing or an attack in the previous year, or had their activities limited by asthma. Children having asthma significantly increased their odds of hospitalization (OR = 2.52; 95% CI: 1.71, 3.70) and health services use (OR = 3.80; 95% CI: 2.69, 5.37). Low‑income adequacy (LIA) in 1994/ 95 significantly predicts hospitalization and HSU in 1996/97 (OR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.29, 5.59 and OR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.99, respectively). Our results confirmed that both having current asthma and living in low-income families had a significant impact on the health status of children in Canada. Programs seeking to decrease the economic burden of pediatric hospitalizations need to focus on asthma and low-income populations.

Article 2: Deprivation and unintentional injury hospitalization in Quebec children

Authors: Mathieu Gagné, MA; Denis Hamel, MSc

Abstract: Injuries disproportionately affect children from deprived areas. This study examines the links between the material and social dimensions of deprivation and injury hospitalizations in children aged 14 years or under from 2000 to 2004. Hospitalization data are from the Quebec hospital administrative data system, whereas socio-economic characteristics of individuals were estimated based on the smallest geographic areas for which Canadian census data were disseminated. The Poisson regression model was used to calculate the relative risks of hospitalization for seven categories of unintentional injury. A total of 24 540 injury hospitalizations were examined. Hospitalization in children is associated with both dimensions of deprivation. Injuries to pedestrians and motor vehicle occupants and injuries related to burns and poisonings are clearly associated with both dimensions of deprivation. These inequalities should be considered in the development of preventive measures.

Article 3: Injury data in British Columbia: policy maker perspectives on knowledge transfer

Authors: C Mitton, PhD; YC MacNab, PhD; N Smith, MA; L Foster, PhD

Abstract: Provincial and regional decision makers in the injury prevention field were interviewed in British Columbia (B.C.) to obtain their views about best processes for the transfer or dissemination of relevant data. These decision makers (n = 13) indicated that data should provide them with a holistic and comprehensive picture to support their decision processes. In addition, they felt information about injury types and rates should be linked backward to determinants or causes and forward to consequences or outcomes. This complete chain of data is needed for planning and evaluating health promotion interventions. It was also felt that data providers needed to devote more effort to fostering effective receptor capacity, so that injury prevention professionals will be better able to understand, interpret and apply the data. These findings can likely be generalized to other jurisdictions and policy areas, and offer additional insight into the practicalities of knowledge transfer and exchange in researcher/decision maker partnerships.

Article 4: Complementary therapies for cancer patients: assessing information use and needs

Authors: MJ Verhoef, PhD; L Trojan, BSc; GD Armitage, MA; L Carlson, PhD; RJ Hilsden, PhD

Abstract: Many cancer patients seek complementary therapies (CTs) for cancer management; however, relatively little is known about patients’ CT information seeking behaviour. Therefore, we assessed: 1) cancer patients’ use of the types and sources of CT information; 2) their information preferences; and 3) their understanding of the phrase “scientific evidence or proof that a therapy works.” We collected data from 404 patients attending the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC) in Calgary and 303 patients calling the Cancer Information Service (CIS) helpline. In most cases, patients wanted information on the safety of CTs, how CTs work and their potential side effects. Physicians and conventional cancer centres were the most desired sources of CT information, but relatively few patients obtained information via these sources. Although patients were aware of the meaning of scientific evidence, they often used information based on non‑scientific evidence, such as patient testimonials. The creation of a supportive care environment in conventional cancer treatment centres, by providing CT information, may help address cancer patients’ concerns and alleviate some of the stress that may have been caused by the cancer diagnosis.

Cross Canada Forum: The national lung health framework: an opportunity for gender analysis

Authors: N Hemsing, MA; L Greaves, PhD

Abstract: Smoking related respiratory diseases in Canada represent a huge social and economic burden for both women and men. This article addresses the potential impact of the National Lung Health Framework for reducing disparities between women and men in respiratory health and between sub-populations of women and men. A preliminary analysis of the existing framework documents indicates that sex and gender factors, differences and influences have not yet been clearly or sufficiently identified. Yet, there are sex and gender issues related to tobacco prevention and cessation, lung health and lung disease. In particular, we consider the specific respiratory health needs and experiences of women to demonstrate the need for sex and gender-based analysis within the framework. For example, while there is inconsistent evidence regarding quit rates, women and men have different cessation patterns and reasons for smoking. Although creating a Canada-specific approach to lung health is an important initiative, the sex and gender issues associated with respiratory disease and health need to be explicitly addressed in the planning and development stages of the framework in order to have a beneficial and lasting impact on both women and men.

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