Annex II: Provincial and territorial key actions and collaboration opportunities with the Government of Canada

Introduction

The Paris Agreement and the Vancouver Declaration have set an ambitious course for low carbon growth and climate action in Canada. The Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change will build on the leadership shown and actions taken by the provinces and territories as well as new policies announced by the federal government.

This annex outlines provincial and territorial accomplishments in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and accelerating clean growth, and presents steps that each jurisdiction has taken or is taking to implement carbon pricing.

The annex also outlines areas where the federal government and each provincial and territorial government will work together to implement the Pan-Canadian Framework in order to spur growth and jobs for Canadians, reduce our emissions and adapt to climate change.

Each province and territory is unique and is responding to the urgency of climate change and the opportunity offered by clean growth in its own way. Effective action will require close collaboration between governments. Each provincial and territorial government has identified multiple areas for potential partnerships with the federal government, adapted to their own priorities, circumstances and strengths. Governments are committed to working together on these priorities to support the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework. Governments will also engage the contributions of Indigenous Peoples in advancing shared goals.

This work will be supported by significant new federal investments to drive the transition to a clean growth economy, as outlined in Budget 2016 and the 2016 Fall Economic Statement, including public transit and Green Infrastructure, the Canada Infrastructure Bank, the Low-Carbon Economy Fund, and funding for clean technology and innovation. Federal investments are intended to supplement and accelerate investments by provinces and territories, and will follow applicable program criteria.

British Columbia

Key actions to date for B.C.

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in British Columbia (B.C.) include:

British Columbia’s Climate Leadership Plan

B.C. has proven that it is possible to reduce emissions while growing the economy and creating jobs and it’s important that this balance be maintained. With this in mind, B.C. released its Climate Leadership Plan in the summer of 2016.

Building on the comprehensive foundation established in 2008, the plan lays out a series of targeted, sector-specific actions that will reduce emissions by 25 million tonnes (Mt) of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2eq) and create 66,000 jobs. The plan will be further strengthened in the months and years ahead, as B.C. continues to work with First Nations, the federal government, communities, industry and others. B.C. is committed to reducing GHG emissions by 80% below 2007 levels by 2050. Read B.C.’s Climate Leadership Plan.

Revenue-neutral carbon tax for B.C.

B.C. has the highest broad-based carbon tax in North America. The carbon tax sets a transparent and predictable price on carbon while returning all revenue to B.C. individuals and businesses. The price signal creates a real incentive to reduce emissions across the economy and is the backbone of B.C.’s approach to climate action.

Forestry for B.C.

B.C.’s forests offer potential for storing carbon, so the Province is taking further action to rehabilitate up to 300,000 hectares of Mountain Pine Beetle and wildfire impacted forests over the first five years of the program; recover more wood fibre; and avoid emissions from burning slash.

Clean liquid natural gas (LNG) for B.C.

B.C. has an abundance of natural gas, which is a lower carbon fuel that will play a critical role in transitioning the world economy off of high carbon fuels such as coal. B.C. is developing the resource responsibly, and provincial legislation will make the emerging LNG sector the cleanest in the world. B.C. is also electrifying upstream development of natural gas and will require a 45% reduction in methane emissions by 2025.

100% clean electricity for B.C.

Thanks to significant historical investments, B.C.’s electricity is already 98% clean or renewable and British Columbians have the third-lowest residential rates in North America. Going forward under the Climate Leadership Plan, 100% of the supply of electricity acquired by BC Hydro for the integrated grid must be from clean or renewable sources. The $8.3 billion Site C Clean Energy Project is a major part of B.C.’s clean energy future and will create enough electricity to power 450,000 homes.

Clean transportation for B.C.

B.C. is taking real action to reduce emissions from the transportation sector and help British Columbians make greener choices—initiatives include Zero Emissions Vehicles rebates and funding for more charging stations (which have helped BC become the Canadian leader in clean energy vehicle sales per capita); a scrap-it program; low carbon and renewable fuel standards; and historic investments in transit. B.C.’s actions in the transportation sector have already reduced annual emissions by an estimated 2.5 Mt and combined with the new actions, will reduce annual emissions by up to a further 3.4 Mt by 2050.

Adaptation for B.C.

In 2010, the Province created a comprehensive strategy to address the changes we will see as a result of climate change. It is based on three key strategies: build a strong foundation of knowledge and tools; make adaptation a part of government business; and assess risks and implement priority adaptation actions in key climate sensitive sectors. The Province is now working with the federal government and other Canadian jurisdictions to further improve the management of the risks associated with a changing climate.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution for B.C.

B.C.’s revenue-neutral carbon tax has been in place since 2008. It is set at $30/tonne and covers approximately 75% of the province’s economy. All revenues generated will be returned to tax payers. B.C. will assess the interim study in 2020 and determine a path forward to meet climate change objectives.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change for B.C.

British Columbia and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Growing our forests; reducing our emissions for B.C.

Forests present a unique opportunity to address climate change because trees absorb CO2 when they grow. British Columbia, the Government of Canada and First Nations will work together to reduce GHG emissions through forestry activities, including reforestation, enhanced silviculture techniques, and the salvaging of unmerchantable trees for processing into dimensional lumber and bioenergy. The initiative is expected to reduce emissions by 12 Mt in 2050 and create 20,000 jobs.

Preparing for and adapting to climate change for B.C.

British Columbia and the Government of Canada will support projects across the province to make infrastructure more resilient to a changing climate, and to help communities adapt to a changing climate. Flood mitigation will be an area of focus.

Reduce emissions from natural gas activities for B.C.

British Columbia and the Government of Canada will work together to bring clean grid electricity to natural gas operations in northeast B.C. They will co-fund the construction of new transmission lines and other public electrification infrastructure that could serve up to 760 megawatts of upstream natural gas processing load and avoid up to 4 Mt of emissions per year.

Electricity grid interconnection for B.C.

British Columbia and the Governments of Canada and Alberta will work together to restore the capability of the existing high-voltage electricity grid interconnection with Alberta. This project will improve access to clean electricity in Alberta and will result in lower GHG emissions and air pollution, and improved grid reliability in both provinces.

Clean technology innovation for B.C.

British Columbia and the Government of Canada will work together to spur the development and commercialization of new technologies that will reduce emissions and create jobs for Canadians.

Alberta

Key actions to date for Alberta

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in Alberta include:

Climate Leadership Plan

The Climate Leadership Plan is a made-in-Alberta climate change strategy, specifically designed for Alberta's unique economy. While details of the final strategy are still being developed, the Alberta government has moved forward on a number of key areas.

Clean electricity for Alberta

Alberta will phase-out GHGs from coal-fired power plants and achieve 30% renewable energy by 2030.

Alberta will add 5,000 megawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2030 through the Renewable Electricity Program. To meet this target, investment in Alberta’s electricity system will be solicited through a competitive and transparent bidding process, while ensuring projects come online in a way that does not impact grid reliability and is delivered at the lowest possible cost to consumers.

A new provincial agency, Energy Efficiency Alberta, has been created to promote and support energy efficiency and community energy systems for homes, businesses and communities.

Capping oil sands emissions

A legislated maximum emissions limit of 100 Mt in any year, with provisions for cogeneration and new upgrading capacity, will help drive technological progress.

Reducing methane emissions for Alberta

Alberta will reduce methane gas emissions from oil and gas operations by 45% by 2025.

Innovation and technology for Alberta

Alberta is investing in innovation and technology to reduce GHGs, encourage a more diversified economy and energy industry, and create new jobs, while improving opportunities to get the province’s energy products to new markets. Alberta has created a task force that will make recommendations on a Climate Change Innovation and Technology Framework.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution for Alberta

A carbon levy to be included in the price of all fuels that emit greenhouse gases when combusted, including transportation and heating fuels such as diesel, gasoline, natural gas and propane. The levy will be applied at a rate of $20/tonne on January 1, 2017 and will increase to $30/tonne one year later.

The Climate Leadership Plan is designed for Alberta’s economy. The economic impact of carbon pricing is expected to be small, and every dollar will be reinvested back into the local economy. Reinvesting carbon revenue in our economy will diversify our energy industry by investing in large scale renewable energy, bioenergy initiatives, and transformative innovation and technology. Over the next 5 years:

$6.2 billion will help diversify our energy industry and create new jobs:

  • $3.4 billion for large scale renewable energy, bioenergy and technology
  • $2.2 billion for green infrastructure like transit
  • $645 million for Energy Efficiency Alberta

$3.4 billion will help households, businesses and communities adjust to the carbon levy:

  • $2.3 billion for carbon rebates to help low- and middle-income families
  • $865 million to pay for a cut in the small business tax rate from 3% to 2%
  • $195 million to assist coal communities, Indigenous communities and others with adjustment

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change for Alberta

Alberta and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Clean electricity for Alberta

Alberta and the federal government will to work together to advance renewable energy, coal to natural gas conversion, and potential hydroelectric projects, including pump storage projects. Alberta is committed to developing incentives for renewable generation in a manner that is compatible with Alberta’s unique electricity market.

B.C. – Alberta intertie

Alberta is working with British Columbia and the federal government to explore new and enhanced interties. The Alberta Electric System Operator is currently working with BC Hydro and industry on a key project, the restoration of the B.C.-Alberta 950 MW intertie to its full path rating (expected completion is in 2020). This restoration would allow imports of 1200 MW on the BC-AB intertie.

Innovation and technology for Alberta

Alberta is focused on the opportunity to leverage environmental policies and programs into new manufacturing, innovation, and clean technology businesses. Current opportunities include superclusters, advanced sensor technology for environmental applications including methane monitoring and reductions, and municipal waste diversion. Innovative solutions will result in meaningful GHG reductions across Canada and the export of solutions to promote a lower carbon world.

Disaster mitigation / infrastructure for Alberta

Alberta is undertaking targeted work to address the hazards to which Albertans are vulnerable, including flood, wildfire, heat, drought, landslides, and wind.

While hazards and disaster risks have always been a concern, climate change is driving the need to adapt to more intense and frequent events. Federal support for wildfire mitigation infrastructure will reduce the risk of wildland fires. In addition, flood risk requires immediate mitigation infrastructure such as dykes and dams. Federal partnership on these initiatives will support risk management.

Ontario

Key actions to date

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in Ontario include:

Permanent closure of coal-fired electricity generating stations for Ontario

On April 15, 2014, Ontario became the first jurisdiction in North America to fully eliminate coal as a source of electricity generation. This action is the single largest GHG reduction initiative in North America. On November 23, 2015, Ontario passed the Ending Coal for Cleaner Air Act, permanently banning coal-fired electricity generation in the province.

Ontario’s Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan

On November 24, 2015, Ontario released its Climate Change Strategy setting the framework for the province to meet its long-term 2050 GHG emissions reduction target. The Strategy highlights five key objectives for transformation:

  1. A prosperous low-carbon economy with world-leading innovation, science and technology
  2. Government collaboration and leadership
  3. A resource-efficient, high-productivity society
  4. Reducing GHG emissions across sectors
  5. Adapting and thriving in a changing climate

On June 8, 2016, Ontario released its Climate Change Action Plan to implement the strategy over the next five years and put Ontario on the path to achieve its longer term objectives. Policies and programs identified in the Action Plan include:

  • Transforming how ultra-low and carbon-free energy technologies are deployed in our homes and workplaces, and how we move people and goods
  • Halting rising building-related emissions, with a focus on helping homeowners and small businesses move to low- and zero-carbon energy
  • Making available funding for industries and manufacturers proposing to transform their operations and move off carbon-based fuels and peak electricity
  • Aligning Ontario’s R&D and innovation funding to place a greater emphasis on climate change science and technologies, with a view to making the discoveries that could lead to breakthroughs in zero-carbon technology

Ontario has made measurable progress in reducing GHGs. According to Environment and Climate Change Canada’s 2016 National Inventory Report, from 2005 to 2014, Ontario’s emissions decreased by 41 Mt (-19%), over the same period, Canada-wide emissions fell by 15 Mt (-2%).

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution for Ontario

On May 18, 2016, Ontario passed its landmark Climate Change Mitigation and Low-carbon Economy Act, which creates a long term framework for climate action. The Act creates a robust framework for cap and trade program, ensures transparency and accountability on how any proceeds collected under the program are used and enshrines emission reduction targets in legislation.

Ontario’s approach, including its cap and trade program and associated emissions reduction targets, will exceed the standards of the federal carbon pricing benchmark. Ontario’s targets are:

  • 15% below 1990 levels by 2020;
  • 37% below 1990 levels by 2030; and
  • 80% below 1990 levels by 2050.

Ontario is a founding member of the Western Climate Initiative (WCI), a not-for-profit organization established in 2008 to help member states and provinces execute their cap and trade programs. In 2017, Ontario will link its cap and trade system with those of WCI members Quebec and California to create the largest cap and trade system in North America.

Ontario will set a cap on total emissions from the covered sectors in 2017 based on the forecast emissions for large final emitters, electricity generation and transportation and heating fuels. Allowances will then be created in an amount equal to the cap and either sold or provided free-of-charge to Ontario emitters.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change for Ontario

Ontario and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Invest in zero emission transportation and infrastructure for Ontario

Ontario is committed to increase uptake of zero emission passenger and commercial vehicles, both by providing purchasing incentives and by expanding the EV charging network across Ontario. In its 2016 budget, the federal government committed to support the deployment of alternative transportation fuel infrastructure, including electric charging stations. Ontario and the Government of Canada will work together to support the deployment of EV vehicles through enabling infrastructure.

Invest in Other Zero Emission Transportation

Ontario seeks a partnership with the Government of Canada to support enabling infrastructure that will increase the availability and use of lower carbon fuels, including LNG, increase the use of low carbon trucks and buses and increase the availability of LNG fueling infrastructure. Ontario is dedicating significant resources for these additional transportation initiatives. Expected emissions reductions in the transportation sector overall are 2.45 Mt in 2020.

Assist with Building Retrofits, Energy Audits and Technology Deployment

Ontario seeks a partnership with the Government of Canada as the province develops programs for fuel switching and energy efficiency, such as retrofits for existing residential buildings (including targeted initiatives for low-income households), and clean technologies for industries and small and medium enterprises. Partnership would increase investment in this area, allowing acceleration and scaling up of progress.

Ontario Climate Modelling Services Consortium

Ontario seeks a partnership with the Government of Canada to build regional capacity and support adaptation actions. Ontario plans to establish an Ontario Climate Modelling Services Consortium, which would act as a one window source of data to help the public and private sectors make evidence-based decisions.

The Consortium would operate at arm’s length from government. Ontario would seek partnerships with other governments, non-governmental organizations and the private sector to ensure the organization’s effectiveness and long term success. The Consortium would also be expected to develop service fee revenue streams to contribute to the organization’s fiscal sustainability.

Electricity Transmission

Ontario, in collaboration with the Government of Canada, will work with its regional partners to advance opportunities to expand and upgrade electricity transmission infrastructure to support clean hydroelectric power to displace the production of electricity from fossil fuels.

Ontario will also collaborate with the Government of Canada to accelerate access to clean electricity in remote Indigenous communities. This will lessen dependence on expensive diesel fuel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution.

Québec

Key actions to date

Some of the key measures taken to date by Québec, which has the lowest greenhouse gas emissions per capita between the provinces in Canada, include:

2013-2020 Action Plan on Climate Change (PACC 2013-2020)

PACC 2013-2020 will reduce GHG emissions by 20% below the 1990 level by 2020. Among its other measures, the action plan offers financial help to the different stakeholders of Québec society so they can reduce their energy consumption, improve their practices, innovate and adjust. The work surrounding the development of the actions of Québec after the 2020 period is underway, in particular to reduce GHG emissions of the province by 37.5 % below the 1990 level by 2030.

2016-2030 Energy Policy

The Energy Policy will favour a transition to a low carbon footprint economy, chiefly by improving energy efficiency by 15%, by reducing petroleum consumption by 40%, and by increasing the production of renewable energies by 25%. Québec is one of the world’s main producers of renewable energy, which represents 99.8% of its total electricity production.

2013-2020 Governmental Climate Change Adjustment Strategy

The Strategy will mitigate the impact of climate change on the environment, the economy and the communities, and will strengthen the resiliency of Québec society. The government of Québec has, notably, invested in the Ouranos consortium in order to get a better understanding of the impact of climate change on its territory, and to better inform the decision-making process and the development of solutions.

2015-2020 Transport Electrification Plan

Québec targets 100,000 electric vehicles on the road in 2020 and one million in 2030. The zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) standard adopted in October 2016 will encourage automotive manufacturers to improve their offer of ZEV, and the investments in electrification will allow Québec to build up its available renewable energies, its expertise and its world-class know-how.

These measures represent a major contribution at the Pan-Canadian level.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

Pioneer in the use of cap-and-trade systems for greenhouse gas emissions allowances, Québec`s system has been linked to California’s since 2014, and will soon be linked to that of Ontario. It represents the largest carbon market in North America, and is often referred to as an example of performance and rigour. Because it is based on hard caps to reduce GHG emissions, it is a robust and efficient tool to achieve the ambitious mitigation goals Québec has set for itself for 2020 and 2030.

Furthermore, auction revenues from its cap-and-trade system are entirely reinvested in measures that will spur the transition of Québec’s economy to a more resilient and low-carbon one. This comprehensive approach, tailored to the needs and specificities of Québec, allows Québec to fulfill its leadership role in the fight against climate change in North America and internationally.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

The governments of Québec and Canada intend to collaborate in the following priority areas in order to fight climate change and allow clean economic growth:

Electric and Public Transport

Support the development of the offer and infrastructure of electric and public transport, by completing various projects such as the Metropolitan Electric Network (MEN), the implementation of bus rapid transit (BRT) systems between Montreal and Laval, the extension of the BRT in Gatineau, and the implementation of a BRT in Québec.

Energy Efficiency and Conversion

Speed up the reduction of GHG emissions in Northern communities, as well as on the Lower North Shore and Magdalen Islands, by replacing diesel with renewable energy sources for the electricity supply of their free-standing network.

Promote the implementation of energy performance and efficiency standards for new buildings, as well as for the renovation of existing buildings. Invest in the industrial sector to improve the energy performance of fixed production processes, by providing innovative technologies and reducing the use of gases with high warming potential such as hydrofluorocarbons, which Québec will continue to prioritize.

Recognition of the International Trade of Emission Rights

Contribute to the implementation of Articles 6 and 13 of the Paris Accord, to which the accounting and disclosure principles of the Western Climate Initiative (WCI) can contribute, as well as within a possible agreement between Canada and the United States regarding the accounting and attribution of “internationally transferred mitigation outcomes” as part of the contributions determined at national level (CDN).

Québec will also share with the government of Canada a detailed methodology, developed in collaboration with California and soon Ontario, in order to tabulate in its international reports the emission reductions achieved by Québec thanks to the carbon market.

Innovation and Adjustment to Climate Change

Promote innovation in green technology and GHG emission reduction, and collaborate on increasing the resiliency of the communities affected by climate change, by assessing the vulnerabilities and risks, adjusting land planning and use, and designing sustainable projects.

Québec will provide its expertise to the initiatives of the government of Canada, focusing in particular on joint financing of prevention and protection infrastructure against certain natural disasters linked to climate change.

New Brunswick

Key actions to date

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in New Brunswick include:

Transitioning to a Low-Carbon Economy: New Brunswick’s Climate Change Action Plan

The Climate Change Action Plan outlines a bold vision for New Brunswick and sets renewed GHG reduction targets: 2030 target of 35% below 1990 levels; and 80% below 2001 levels by 2050. The plan also address other commitments, such as the Canadian Energy Strategy, released by the Council of the Federation in 2015, and contains a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy supported by actions to build resilience into New Brunswick communities, businesses, infrastructures and natural resources.

The Action Plan provides a clear path forward to reduce GHG emissions while promoting economic growth and enhancing current efforts to adapt to the effects of climate change.

Locally-owned Renewable Energy Projects that are Small Scale (LORESS)

In May 2015, the province introduced legislation to allow local entities to develop renewable energy sourced electricity generation in their communities. This will enable universities, non-profit organizations, co-operatives, First Nations and municipalities to contribute to NB Power’s renewable energy requirements.

Shifting to renewables in electricity generation

Two fossil fuelled power plants were closed in recent years – one coal and one heavy oil. Also, 300 megawatts of wind energy was installed in the province and biomass fuel use in industry was expanded to displace oil. Solid waste landfills are capturing biogas and some are generating electricity.

These actions are allowing NB Power to achieve the regulated Renewable Portfolio Standard of 40% of in-province sales from renewable energy sources by 2020. This translates to approximately 75% non-emitting by 2020 including nuclear.

Adaptation

The province has developed a progressive Climate Change Adaptation Program including assembling future climate projections, and supporting climate impact vulnerability assessments in communities and for infrastructure. Adaptation projects also focus on solutions building and advanced planning to help reduce or avoid the costs of impacts such as more severe and frequent flooding, coastal erosion and storm events and disease and pest migration.

Several projects are carried out in collaboration with other Atlantic provinces, notably under the Regional Adaptation Collaborative (RAC), which involves federal support, as well as with the Gulf of Maine Council and US partners.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive Pan-Canadian Framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

The province will implement a made-in-New Brunswick carbon pricing mechanism that addresses the requirements of the federal government for implementing a price on carbon emissions by 2018 and that at the same time recognizes New Brunswick’s unique economic and social circumstances. The provincial government will take into consideration the impacts on low-income families, trade-exposed and energy-intensive industries, and consumers and businesses, when developing the specific mechanisms and implementation details, including how to reinvest proceeds.

Any carbon pricing policy will strive to maintain competitiveness and minimize carbon leakage (i.e., investments moving to other jurisdictions). Proceeds from carbon emissions pricing will be directed to a dedicated climate change fund.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

The Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Enhanced Electricity Generation and Transmission System

New Brunswick will work with the other Atlantic provinces and the Government of Canada to advance opportunities for clean electricity generation, transmission, storage and demand management linkages across the region. This will: improve access to non-emitting electricity; support the phase-out of coal-fired electricity generation; improve grid reliability and energy security; and, consistent with fair market principles, help provinces access export markets for clean, non-emitting electricity.

This will contribute to both the Atlantic Growth Strategy and Canadian Energy Strategy and will build on existing regional coordination efforts, leading to an integrated regional electricity strategy.

Energy Efficiency

The Government of New Brunswick, in partnership with the Government of Canada, will seek to enhance energy efficiency programs by targeting GHG emission reduction opportunities across sectors and fuels.

Examples of possible targeted interventions include programs that help: trucking fleets add aerodynamic and other efficiency measures to existing equipment; small- to medium-size industry improve their compressed air systems, boilers and lighting; commercial and institutional facilities invest in heating, lighting and other retrofits; and families retrofitting their homes to reduce energy costs, with special treatment for low- and fixed-income families.

Industrial Emissions Reductions

The Government of New Brunswick and the Government of Canada will work to support industrial emission reduction initiatives through technology and energy efficiency improvements while maintaining productivity. For example, there are significant opportunities to reduce emissions resulting from industrial production in the Belledune area of New Brunswick.

Nova Scotia

Key actions to date

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in Nova Scotia include:

The Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act (2007)

In 2007, Nova Scotia passed legislation outlining principles for sustainable economic growth, including a requirement to reduce GHG emissions in the province to 10% below 1990 levels by 2020. The development and implementation of the Nova Scotia Climate Action Plan led to early action on the electricity sector, the largest source of emissions in the province. As a result, Nova Scotia has not only achieved its target six years early, it has also already met the Canadian 2030 target of 30% below 2005 levels, and is on a track to continue reducing emissions.

Nova Scotia’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations

Nova Scotia was the first province in Canada to place a hard cap on GHG emissions from the electricity sector. These regulations, created in 2009 and enhanced in 2013, required the utility to reduce GHG emissions by 25% by 2020, and 55% by 2030. This is a measured and flexible approach which will enable a transition from coal to clean energy in the province.

Nova Scotia’s Renewable Energy Regulations

In addition to the hard cap on GHG emissions, Nova Scotia also has a renewable energy standard for the electricity sector. This standard established requirements for 25% of electricity to be sourced from renewable energy by 2015, and 40% by 2020.

Energy Efficiency

Nova Scotia has Canada’s first energy efficiency utility, Efficiency Nova Scotia. This independent organization has achieved an annual reduction in electricity demand of over 1% since its creation. It also administers comprehensive energy efficiency programs for low income and First Nations Nova Scotians. These efforts reduce GHG emissions while supporting the growth of the low carbon economy.

Tidal Energy

The Bay of Fundy and Minas Basin are home to the highest tides in the world- every day, more water flows into this bay than the output from all the rivers in the world combined. Nova Scotia has been supporting the development of these tides as a source of clean, predictable and reliable energy for Nova Scotians and as a clean technology export. The Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy (FORCE) now has a grid connected 2MW tidal turbine with plans to install more in the coming years.

Waste Management

Nova Scotia is also making efforts to reduce GHG emissions by diverting organic waste from landfills, recycling and creating a circular economy. Progress on waste diversion is reflected in a 30% reduction in greenhouse emissions from the waste sector since 2002.

These actions are just a snapshot of what Nova Scotians are doing to reduce GHG emissions and provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

As part of the pan-Canadian benchmark for carbon pricing, Nova Scotia has committed to implement a cap and trade program in the province that builds on our early action in the electricity sector.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

The Government of Nova Scotia and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following priority domains to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Energy Efficiency

Nova Scotia and the Government of Canada are committed to partnering to enhance the existing provincial energy efficiency programs for homes and businesses with the objective of reducing energy use and saving energy costs. This could include expanded energy efficiency programs, efforts to accelerate the electrification of homes and businesses through heat pumps and smart meters, district energy systems, as well as electric vehicle infrastructure.

Renewable Energy Generation, Transmission and Storage

Nova Scotia, in partnership with the Government of Canada, will work together to advance opportunities for renewable energy generated from sources such as wind, tidal and solar, as well as the enabling transmission and storage infrastructure to ensure growth beyond current technical limits. Research and development capacity will continue to be strengthened.

Planning and Implementing Adaptation Infrastructure

Nova Scotia and the Government of Canada will work together and invest in projects to make infrastructure more resilient to a changing climate, and to help communities increase their capacity to adapt to a changing climate.

Regional Electricity Grid Connections

Nova Scotia will work with the other Atlantic provinces and the Government of Canada to advance opportunities for clean electricity generation, transmission, storage and demand management linkages across the region.

This will: improve access to non-emitting electricity; support the phase-out of coal-fired electricity generation; improve grid reliability and energy security; and, consistent with fair market principles, help provinces access export markets for clean, non-emitting electricity. This will contribute to both the Atlantic Growth Strategy and Canadian Energy Strategy and will build on existing regional coordination efforts, leading to an integrated regional electricity strategy.

Prince Edward Island

Key actions to date

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in Prince Edward Island include:

Climate Change Policy Framework

Prince Edward Island’s primary areas of strategic focus for climate change fall into the themes of built environment, transportation, agriculture, conservation and adaptation. Prince Edward Island is in the process of developing new climate change strategies that will result in further actions and initiatives to reduce GHG emissions across the province, increase our resilience to a changing climate, and advance measures to strengthen and grow a prosperous green economy in the province.

Prince Edward Island does not have a legislated provincial emissions reduction target but does contribute to the regional target set by the Conference of the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers (NEG-ECP). The targets are 10% reductions from 1990 by 2020, 35% - 45% below 1990 levels by 2030, and 75-85% reduction from 2001 levels by 2050. PEI has realized a 9% reduction in GHG emissions since 2005.

PEI Wind Energy

Prince Edward Island is a world leader in producing clean electricity from wind. Prince Edward Island boasts the highest penetration of wind in Canada and 2nd highest in the world next to Denmark. The Government of Prince Edward Island has demonstrated a long-term commitment and investments of $119 million to wind energy.

The first commercial wind farm in Atlantic Canada was developed by the PEI Energy Corporation at North Cape in 2001. North Cape was expanded in 2003, doubling in size. In January 2007, the PEI Energy Corporation commissioned its second wind farm at East Point. In 2014, the Island's newest wind farm was commissioned at Hermanville/ Clearspring. As a result, Prince Edward Island now has a total installed wind capacity of 78% of peak load, which supplies almost 25% of the province’s total electricity requirements.

Biomass

Prince Edward Island is home to Canada’s longest-running, biomass-fired district heating system. Operating since the 1980s, the system has expanded to serve over 125 buildings in the downtown core of Charlottetown, including the University of Prince Edward Island and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. It has contributed to the establishment of a local waste-wood fuel-supply market. The system burns approximately 66,000 tons of waste materials annually.

Coastal Erosion

Prince Edward Island has partnered with the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) Climate Research Lab to study coastal vulnerability, including the award-winning Coastal Impacts Visualization Environment (CLIVE). CLIVE is an innovative 3D platform for visualizing the potential future impacts of coastal erosion and coastal flooding at local community scales, on PEI and elsewhere, using past data and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change models.

The province has also invested in UPEI in its development of an expansive, cutting-edge coastal erosion monitoring network. This research includes the use of drone and GIS technology to quantify and assess erosion volume of shoreline disappearance along Prince Edward Island’s coastline.

Environmental Awareness in Agriculture

As a key industry for Prince Edward Island, agriculture is of particular consequence for climate change and green growth. In recent years, PEI farmers, watershed groups and the fertilizer industry have been implementing a 4R Nutrient Stewardship program to encourage the efficient use of fertilizer and help reduce related emissions.

Island farmers have been making advances in crop diversification, including testing potato varieties that require less fertilizer and adding nitrogen-fixing pulse crops which improve the environmental sustainability of annual cropping systems. The further use of robotics in dairy farming and food additives in livestock production is being employed to reduce methane emissions.

Prince Edward Island is also the first and only jurisdiction in Canada with a provincially-supported Alternative Land Use Services program. Currently, the program has converted almost 4,000 hectares of marginal land from annual crop production to perennial or permanent cover.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework and are helping facilitate the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

Prince Edward Island will introduce a made-in-PEI approach to carbon pricing which positively contributes to climate change action while benefitting Prince Edward Islanders and ensures optimal conditions for continued growth of the provincial economy. Prince Edward Island will focus on measures that will meaningfully decrease our GHG emissions and recognize the particular elements of our economy.

Our approach will ensure consistent and competitive alignment with efforts being made across the country, including mitigation and price initiatives in all provinces, especially those in our region. PEI is committed to an approach that will directly enhance provincial adaptation and mitigation efforts.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

Prince Edward Island and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Energy Efficiency

Prince Edward Island, in partnership with the Government of Canada, will pursue improved energy efficiency for all sectors in the province as outlined in the 2016 PEI Energy Strategy. The Strategy and forthcoming Climate Change Action Plan are key policy tools in reducing GHGs, driving economic growth and creating jobs locally and in the region.

Prince Edward Island is committed to engaging in incremental actions through solutions for the built environment, including businesses and homes, as well as in new building construction. It has been clearly illustrated by research in the region that investing in efficiency is one of the most effective means of delivering jobs and economic growth widely – across sectors and regions – while reducing emissions and providing savings to consumers.

With a predominantly rural population and some of the highest electricity rates in the country, particular consideration will be given to low-income Island families, and sectors that may find the transition to a lower-carbon environment challenging.

Clean Energy

Energy resilience and security and a move to greater electrification are key priorities for the province. Prince Edward Island, in partnership with the Government of Canada, will work to expand its world-class wind resource, invest in solar, and enable greater integration of renewable energy through storage. Prince Edward Island will work with the other Atlantic Provinces and the Government of Canada to advance opportunities for clean electricity generation, transmission, storage and demand management linkages across the region.

This will: improve access to non-emitting electricity; support the phase-out of coal-fired electricity generation; improve grid reliability and energy security; and, consistent with fair market principles, help provinces access export markets for clean, non-emitting electricity. This will contribute to both the Atlantic Growth Strategy and Canadian Energy Strategy and will build on existing regional coordination efforts leading to an integrated regional electricity strategy.

Adaptation

With its 1100 km of coastline, Prince Edward Island is uniquely vulnerable to climate impacts and is positioned to advance innovative solutions to make infrastructure more resilient to a changing climate.

Prince Edward Island and the Government of Canada will work together to act on findings from disaster risk reduction planning and coastal infrastructure assessment, and to improve decision-making capacity to adapt to climate change through planning, training and monitoring.

Research and Development

Prince Edward Island and the Government of Canada will work together to support research and development on promising practices and innovation in the areas of agriculture, marine industries, and smart grid and micro-grid/ storage. Prince Edward Island provides an ideal demonstration site for development in these areas.

This research will advance better understanding of influences on emissions and opportunities for clean growth in key sectors of the Prince Edward Island economy.

Transportation

Prince Edward Island relies on exports for continued economic growth. The Prince Edward Island economy is heavily reliant on ground transportation for the movement of goods to markets across Canada and around the world, and the movement of people across the province. The province has no rail system, large container ports, or robust public transit. As the most rural province in Canada, mitigation in transportation is a difficult challenge.

Prince Edward Island and the Government of Canada will work together on methods to support an eventual move to greater electrification in transportation, including corresponding work with other jurisdictions in Canada. Proposed specific areas of work include installation of public charging infrastructure across the province and in collaboration regionally where possible.

Newfoundland & Labrador

Key actions to date

Newfoundland and Labrador is making significant investments to increase the use of clean and renewable hydroelectric power in the province. The Muskrat Falls hydroelectric development, with capital costs of over $9 billion, will result in 98% of electricity consumed in the province coming from renewable sources by 2020.

Muskrat Falls will facilitate advancing by more than a decade the decommissioning of the largest thermal oil-fired electricity generation facility in the province, reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by about 1.2 Mt annually (equivalent to more than 10% of the province’s total emissions in 2015), and assisting other jurisdictions to meet their GHG reduction targets.

To focus the province’s efforts to tackle climate change, Newfoundland and Labrador has adopted GHG emission reduction targets of 10% below 1990 levels by 2020 and 75-85% below 2001 levels by 2050, and has endorsed, on a regional basis, the Conference of New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers’ reduction marker range of at least 35-45% below 1990 levels by 2030.

To make progress towards these targets Newfoundland and Labrador released a Climate Change Action Plan in 2011 identifying 75 actions to reduce GHG emissions and adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change. Building on this work, Newfoundland and Labrador passed the Management of Greenhouse Gas Act in June 2016, creating a legislative framework for reducing GHGs from large industry, and has completed public consultations to inform new provincial actions on climate change.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive Pan-Canadian Framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada continue to collaborate to ensure that Newfoundland and Labrador’s climate change plan, including carbon pricing, is consistent with the goals in the Pan-Canadian Framework to reduce GHG emissions, improves resilience to climate impacts, and accelerates innovation and job creation.

This made-in-Newfoundland and Labrador plan will address the province’s particular social, economic, and fiscal realities. This includes sensitivity to the particular circumstances facing Labrador communities, and the need to consider impacts on all remote and isolated communities, vulnerable populations, consumers and trade-exposed industries, as well as the need to take account of the province’s reliance on marine transportation and the absence of lower carbon alternatives.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada intend to explore collaboration in the following priority domains to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Renewable Energy

Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada intend to jointly explore opportunities to develop renewable energy, including such actions as enhancing hydroelectric capacity, increasing transmission infrastructure, and offsetting diesel use in small-scale off-grid electricity systems.

These efforts will also seek to maximize collaboration with other Atlantic provinces in the electricity sector, contributing to both the Atlantic Growth Strategy and Canadian Energy Strategy, and will build on existing regional coordination efforts, leading to an integrated regional electricity strategy.

Transportation

Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada intend to jointly explore opportunities to reduce GHG emissions in all parts of the transportation sector, including electric vehicles and associated infrastructure, on- and off-road freight and industrial transportation, marine vessels, and public transit.

Energy Efficiency

Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada intend to jointly explore opportunities to develop energy efficiency programming, improve energy codes, and support fuel switching in all sectors reliant on fossil fuels.

Adaptation

Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada intend to jointly explore opportunities to expand climate monitoring and adaptation product and information development, as well as best management practices.

Green Innovation

Newfoundland and Labrador and the Government of Canada intend to jointly explore opportunities in research and development in green technology, including fostering innovation networks and initiation of pilot projects.

Yukon

Key actions to date

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in Yukon include:

Yukon Government Climate Change Action Plan

The Yukon government Climate Change Action Plan has four goals: reducing GHG emissions; addressing the impacts of climate change; leading Yukon action on climate change; and enhancing our knowledge and understanding of climate change.

Key actions

Work to date in achieving Climate Change Action Plan goals includes:

Reducing GHG emissions (mitigation)
  • Setting nine sector-specific targets in the areas of transportation, heating buildings, electricity, and industrial operations.
  • Completing a study of Yukon’s transportation sector, and launching a Ride Share program in partnership with the City of Whitehorse.
  • Supporting Yukon homeowners with the Good Energy Residential Incentives Program, which provides incentives to purchase high efficiency wood stoves, boilers and pellet stoves.
  • Carrying out detailed energy audits of seven high-consumption Yukon government buildings.
  • A Yukon Biomass Strategy to guide the development of a biomass energy sector in the territory.
Addressing the impacts of climate change (adaptation)
  • Completing ten adaptation projects in the areas of permafrost impacts to highways, buildings, hydrological responses, and agricultural capacity; flood risk mapping; forestry implications including the encroachment of mountain pine beetle in lodgepole pine forests; and bioclimate shifts.
  • With the Pan-Territorial Adaptation Strategy, territorial governments are collaborating on practical adaptation measures for the north. Permafrost thaw has been a key focus.
Leading Yukon action on climate change
  • Participating in international and national climate change efforts that impact Yukon, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP) meetings, including a developmental opportunity for a Yukon youth ambassador.
  • Currently supporting the Yukon College to develop a climate change policy course to be offered by Yukon College.
Enhance our knowledge and understanding of climate change
  • Supporting development of the Climate Change Indicators and Key Findings report, an important source of independent information that will guide action and research on climate change in Yukon.
  • Provide ongoing funding for the Northern Climate Exchange at Yukon College.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

The Government of Yukon recognizes the role of carbon pricing in the pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change.

Given Yukon’s particular circumstances, the Government of Canada and the Government of Yukon will work together to assess the implications of carbon pricing in the territory for its economy, communities and people including energy costs, and to develop solutions together.

The Government of Yukon and the Government of Canada will also work together to assess the implications of carbon pricing in Canada on the cost of living in Yukon. This will be an important consideration for future policy development.

As outlined in the federal government's benchmark, 100% of the revenues from carbon pricing will be retained by Yukon. Yukon government will distribute these revenues back to individual Yukoners and businesses through a rebate.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

Yukon and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Advancing Renewable Energy

Yukon government and the Government of Canada will partner in advancing renewable energy projects in Yukon. This will improve the energy infrastructure in Yukon, including developing new renewable energy sources to provide clean energy for current and future electricity needs.

It will also support remote communities in diminishing their reliance on diesel for electricity and will support the expanded use of biomass as a cleaner option for heating in Yukon.

Energy Efficiency

Yukon government, in partnership with the Government of Canada, will support energy efficiency through the retrofitting of existing buildings. Sound investments in retrofits and new energy efficiency projects will be supported by expanding the capacity for collecting, analyzing, and reporting emissions data that will help identify the areas of greatest opportunity for reducing emissions.

Adaptation: Building Resilient Yukon Communities

Canada’s Northern jurisdictions and the Government of Canada are working together to develop the Northern Adaptation Strategy. The Government of Canada will partner with Yukon to help build climate-resilient Yukon communities.

Research collaboration will build the knowledge necessary for evidence-based decision-making in community planning. Investments in infrastructure will address known risks such as infrastructure built on thawing permafrost.

Green Innovation and Technology

Yukon government and the Government of Canada will partner on new research and pilot projects that will explore promising areas for climate action in the north, such as seasonal energy storage, cleaner transportation options, and community-level renewable energy generation.

Northwest Territories

Key actions to date

NWT Climate Change Strategic Framework

The Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) has committed to develop a climate change strategy that takes northern energy demands and the cost of living into account. It will reflect commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, explore carbon pricing systems and how to develop local alternatives such as hydro, biomass, wind and solar.

NWT Energy Strategy

The GNWT is currently working on a new 10 year Energy Strategy. The Energy Strategy will focus on the affordability, reliability and environmental impacts of energy in the NWT and will promote energy efficiency, renewable and alternative energy in the electricity, heating and transportation sectors.

The GNWT continues to take the following territorial adaptation actions:
  • Support adaptation decision-making with knowledge, information collection and sharing
  • Build capacity to translate adaptation knowledge into action
  • Build climate-resilience through investments in infrastructure
  • Invest in land use planning, management plans and building adaptation capacity and expertise
  • Support most vulnerable regions, conducting risk assessments and completing hazard mapping
  • Reduce climate-related hazards and disaster by developing disaster risk management plans
  • Adapt renewable energy options and solutions for cold regions
The GNWT continues to take the following territorial emissions mitigation actions:
  • Work with our federal, provincial indigenous partners and others to find solutions to address diesel use in remote off-grid communities including to develop the NWT’s hydroelectricity potential to reduce GHG emissions in the electricity sector.
  • Implement policies to support the adoption of lower carbon and energy efficient technologies.
  • Implement policies to support industry and large emitters in the adoption of lower carbon and energy efficient technologies.
  • Continue biomass initiatives and work towards the development of a local forest and wood product industry and develop local wood pellet manufacturing as an alternate local fuel source.
  • Addressing energy use and GHG emissions in government buildings and operations.

These actions provide a strong contribution to a comprehensive pan-Canadian framework.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

Through the Climate Change Strategic Framework, the GNWT is exploring potential impacts and opportunities that may arise from pursuing different carbon pricing systems in the territory.

The GNWT recognizes the role of carbon pricing in the pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change. Given the NWT’s particular circumstances, the Government of Canada and the GNWT will work together to assess the implications of carbon pricing in the territory for its economy, communities and people including energy costs, and to develop solutions together.

The GNWT and the Government of Canada will also work together to assess the implications of carbon pricing in Canada on the cost of living in the NWT. This will be an important consideration for future policy development.

As outlined in the federal government's benchmark, 100% of the revenues from carbon pricing will be retained by the NWT.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

The NWT will work with the Government of Canada, in collaboration with regional partners, to advance opportunities for clean electricity generation, transmission, storage and demand management linkages across the region.

This will: improve access to non-emitting electricity; support the phase-out of coal-fired electricity generation; improve grid reliability and energy security; and, subject to fair market principles, help the region access export markets for clean, non-emitting electricity.

The NWT and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following priority areas to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Taltson Hydro Expansion and Transmission Links

The proposed Taltson hydro expansion is a small scale run of river hydro project that could be developed with little environmental impact next to the existing power plant, on an already developed river, and combined with a transmission link to provide a green energy corridor to our southern neighbours.

The expansion of the Taltson hydro facility would help reduce Canada’s GHG emissions by 360,000 tonnes annually for 50-plus years. The 60 MW expansion of the Taltson hydro facility could be built in partnership with NWT Indigenous governments, creating economic opportunities for Indigenous-owned businesses across the North. The NWT and Government of Canada will undertake technical and feasibility studies as a first step, including the NWT launching the environment assessment process.

Renewable Solutions for Off-Grid Diesel Communities

The Government of Canada and the GNWT will explore opportunities for reducing reliance on diesel in off-grid communities. For example, the Inuvik Wind Project could produce between 2 and 4 megawatts of wind energy for the Town of Inuvik. The project would reduce GHG emissions by 4,300 tonnes per year and eliminate the need for 1.3 million litres of diesel annually in the largest diesel community in the NWT, and help reduce the cost of living for residents.

For other off-grid diesel powered communities of the NWT, a suite of renewable solutions such as solar and wind in combination with energy storage systems and variable generators could reduce diesel use and emissions by 25 percent, an annual GHG elimination of nearly 3000 tonnes.

All-Weather Road Infrastructure for Adapting to Climate Impacts

The safety and reliability of winter roads is being impacted by climate change. Construction of the Mackenzie Valley Highway from Wrigley to Norman Wells would provide safe, secure, and reliable access into the Sahtu region, helping decrease the high cost of living in communities and support the development of resources in the region.

The Great Bear River is a priority as the seasonal ice crossing is increasingly vulnerable to impacts of climate change. Climate change is also limiting access to existing diamond mining operations in the Slave Geological Province.

Construction of an all-weather Slave Geological Province Access Corridor would reduce costs for industry exploration and development in a region that holds world-class deposits of natural resources and continues to be a major contributor to the Canadian and NWT economy.

Nunavut

Key actions to date

Some of the key actions taken to date or under development in Nunavut include:

Energy efficiency upgrades

The Nunavut Energy Retrofit Program was piloted in Iqaluit in 2007, and addressed all of the government of Nunavut’s Iqaluit Government of Nunavut-owned buildings. The one-time project investment of $12.8 million has led to annual savings in excess of $1.6 million and 1,594 tonnes of GHG reductions.

In combination with the conversion of three of our facilities to residual heat, our GHG reduction is approximately 4,100 tonnes, which is roughly 20% of those buildings’ total emissions.

Development of a Climate Change and Adaptation strategy

Upagiaqtavut was developed in 2011 and serves as a guiding document for the impacts of climate change in Nunavut

Climate change databank

The Government of Nunavut is developing and uses information technology to centralize and increase the access to climate change information, such as permafrost data and landscape hazards maps. The information is used to improve infrastructure planning and help mitigate the effects of climate change across Nunavut.

Climate Change Secretariat

The Government of Nunavut is establishing a Climate Change Secretariat (CCS), which will be the central point within the government to address both climate change adaptation and mitigation issues.

Action on pricing carbon pollution

The Government of Nunavut recognizes the role of carbon pricing in the pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change. Given Nunavut’s particular circumstances, the Government of Canada and the Government of Nunavut will work together to assess the implications of carbon pricing in the territory for its economy, communities and people including energy costs, and to develop solutions together.

The Government of Nunavut and the Government of Canada will also work together to assess the implications of carbon pricing in Canada on the cost of living in Nunavut. This will be an important consideration for future policy development.

As outlined in the federal government's benchmark, 100% of the revenues from carbon pricing will be retained by Nunavut.

Collaboration partnership opportunities for clean growth and climate change

Nunavut and the Government of Canada intend to collaborate in the following domains of priority to address climate change and advance clean growth:

Nunavut and the Government of Canada will assess the economic and technical feasibility of electrification through hybrid power generation in Nunavut’s communities. Hybrid power generation would significantly reduce emissions while at the same time ensure that Nunavut’s isolated communities have reliable power.

Nunavut and the Government of Canada will work together to develop a retrofit program to increase the energy efficiency of public and private housing. Investment in safe and energy efficient housing is a key component of building strong resilient communities in the Arctic.

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