Appendix C1 - Benchmark Index by Function - Intergovernmental

Executive Group Benchmark Number: 10-D-1

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing advice on the evolution of fiscal and economic federalism in Canada, including tax sharing, tax collection arrangements and equalization payments; providing advice on the expenditure level in the Social Development envelope and the Justice and Legal Affairs envelope; providing advice on the financial, fiscal and economic implications of the broad range of policy and program components of these envelopes; overseeing the preparation of legislation; and promoting the establishment of an environment conducive to harmonious intergovernmental and interdepartmental relations.

Organization Structure

This is one of five positions at the first level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The other four are Assistant Deputy Minister, Fiscal Policy and Economic Analysis; Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance; Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic Programs and Government Finance; and Assistant Deputy Minister, Tax Policy and Legislation.

Specific functions of the three positions reporting directly to the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy, are as follows:

Director General, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy, (staff of 19) provides specialized policy advice and analysis; is accountable for the operation of the Conference Organization Unit and for the Intergovernmental Taxation Centre; and assists the ADM in the management and planning of Branch activities.

Director, Federal-Provincial Relations, (staff of 14) manages research and analysis and provides policy advice on the operation of Canadian federalism and federal-provincial fiscal arrangements; administers several provincial transfer programs; and negotiates those arrangements.

Director, Social Policy, (staff of 12) manages the research and development of policy alternatives in cooperation with the provinces; undertakes major studies; and provides policy advice relating to the overall economic, fiscal and financial objectives of government programs relating to income security, direct employment, cultural and labour policies.

Nature And Scope

The Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy Branch is the main channel of communication and advice between the Department and the provincial and territorial departments of finance with respect to financial and fiscal arrangements between the two levels of government; between the Department and other departments and agencies with respect to financial, fiscal and federal-provincial implications of their policies and programs; and between the Department and the Privy Council Office (PCO), the Department of Justice and the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) on all fiscal and financial aspects of constitutional reform.

The incumbent is accountable for developing policy advice on ways to strengthen the Canadian economic union through unimpeded mobility of people, goods, services and capital; the prevention of discriminatory laws and treaties by governments; and mechanisms to harmonize the fiscal and economic policies of the two levels of government. The incumbent is also accountable for developing policy advice on the fiscal and economic aspects of constitutional reform, providing that advice to the Minister of Justice and the Prime Minister, and for negotiating constitutional fiscal policies with the provinces on behalf of the Minister of Justice and the Prime Minister.

The exercise of these responsibilities requires a high degree of judgment and sensitivity to current economic conditions and the ability to determine the best combination of elements and formulate acceptable solutions. The ADM is accountable for the soundness of the analyses provided, which have a significant impact on the allotment of funds to the envelope, and in turn, on the health of federal-provincial relations and the social and economic well-being of Canadians.

The ADM is responsible for providing advice and analysis to the Minister and senior management on the government's broad social agenda, especially from the perspective of the relationship between social policy and economic policy. The incumbent provides advice on overall expenditure levels in the Social Development envelope, which directly impact the nature, scope and affordability of new social programs and the government's social policy agenda. The incumbent represents the Department on the Board of Directors of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and directly influences the development and administration of housing policy in Canada.

The incumbent carries out these responsibilities while keeping in mind the existence of fiscal and economic disparities among people and provinces and the inevitable disagreements and tensions, both among provinces, territories and federal departments, and between the two levels of government, on how these fiscal resources should be used. In this context, one of the greatest challenges for the incumbent is to develop and maintain an effective network of contacts in departments and at the provincial and territorial levels to be able to anticipate and prevent problems from emerging and to facilitate their resolution if they do emerge.

The incumbent is accountable for undertaking negotiations with provinces on the revision of federal-provincial fiscal arrangements. Several important considerations need to be taken into account during these negotiations, such as the fiscal and financial positions of the federal and provincial governments, the need to strengthen the economic union, and the need to balance what is technically desirable and economically feasible with the need to meet the federal government's economic and social policy objectives.

In carrying out these duties, the incumbent has contact with a broad range of senior federal government officials and provincial and territorial officials. The purpose of these contacts is to resolve problems, find agreement on policy issues and balance divergent interests involving a number of federal departments and provincial governments. The incumbent also chairs federal-provincial and interdepartmental committee meetings.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 49
Operating budget: $150,000
Social Development envelope: $3.86 billion
Program policy, equalization, tax collection: $2.03 billion
Justice and Legal envelope: $0.19 billion
Total: $6.08 billion

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Promotes stability in the Canadian economy and the social union by formulating and negotiating a wide range of policies, legislation and funding programs affecting major sectors of the economy that have a significant impact on federal-provincial and territorial relations.
  2. Advises the Deputy Minister and the Minister of Finance on the timing and content of meetings of federal-provincial and territorial Ministers of Finance.
  3. Represents the Minister at Cabinet committee meetings to ensure that the Department's position is communicated properly, and chairs a variety of federal-provincial and interdepartmental committee meetings.
  4. Advises the Minister of Justice and the Prime Minister on the economic and fiscal aspects of constitutional reform.
  5. Represents the Department as a member of the Board of Directors of CMHC.
  6. Manages the operations of the Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy Branch to ensure that they are effectively coordinated with the operations of the Department as a whole.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy

Know-How

G
Mastery of concepts, theories, techniques and practices in the fields of economics, finance, social policy and related constitutional reform matters; comprehensive knowledge of economic and social conditions in the provinces and territories, broad government objectives and the range of constitutional, political, social, environmental, economic and financial factors impacting the social and economic union.
IV
Coordination and integration at a government-wide level of policy formulation and the provision of advice on a wide range of government programs, federal-provincial fiscal arrangements and social policies.
3
Achievement of objectives requires providing advice and recommendations on strategic directions; and leading and participating in discussions and negotiations with the federal, provincial and territorial governments.
1056
Highest number indicates mastery in the fields of economics and fiscal and social policy in directing the development of the government's global fiscal and social policy strategy and maintaining effective federal-provincial and territorial relations in support of the government's broad social and fiscal agenda and priorities.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking is done within general federal policy frameworks and goals in an environment of rapid economic and social change, involving a wide range of government policies and programs, including fiscal transfers to provinces and broad social policy initiatives.
4
Analytical, constructive thinking is needed to provide advice and formulate recommendations involving the development of new concepts and imaginative approaches on a wide variety of complex and significant matters, such as the formulation of new fiscal arrangements with the provinces.
(66) 700
Higher percentage reflects a tendency toward creative thinking that requires the application of more innovative approaches, usually under some pressure, in formulating government social policy and successfully promoting and maintaining federal-provincial relations.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Deputy Minister of Finance, is subject to general guidance in formulating recommendations and providing advice on the broad social, fiscal and financial implications of government transfer payments to the provinces and territories, and the effective coordination of other government policies and programs on the social union of Canada.
6C
Position has a contributory impact on the Social Development envelope, Program Policy and Payment Administration and the Justice and Legal envelope. The proxy selected consists of activities reflected by the three envelopes valued at $6.08 billion (constant).
920
Highest number reflects the size of the envelopes and transfer payments, and the impact on the Canadian economy and social union.

Summary

GIV3 1056
G4(66) 700
G6C 920
Total = 2676 A2
Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations And Social Policy - Number: 10 - D - 1
Org Chart - FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS AND SOCIAL POLICY
Figure: 10 – D – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 10 – D – 1

Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations And Social Policy

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 4 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy are 2 Directors and 1 Director General.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Fiscal Policy and Economic Analysis
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic Programs and Government Finance
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Tax Policy and Legislation
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy
    • Director General, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy
    • 2 Directors for :
      • Social Policy
      • Federal-Provincial Relations

Executive Group Benchmark Number: 7-D-1

Position Title: Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs

General Accountability

Is a corporate focal point for formulating and managing the Department's federal-provincial-territorial (FPT) relations framework, priorities and objectives aimed at defining and advancing its role in the Social Union Framework Agreement intended to help Canadians maintain and improve their health.

Organization Structure

This is one of eight positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Policy and Communications. The others are the Director General, Health Care; the Director General, Policy, Planning and Priorities; the Director General, International Affairs; the Director General, Communication and Consultation; the Director, Women's Health Bureau; and the Executive Director, Nursing Policy.

Specific functions of the position reporting to the Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs, are as follows:

Director, Federal-Provincial Relations, (staff of 12) is responsible for providing the departmental strategic policy and program analysis, as well as recommendations on policies, programs and issues affecting FPT relations and on matters related to the Social Union Framework Agreement and the Social Union.

Director, Canada Health Act, (staff of 38) is responsible for directing the administration of the Canada Health Act (CHA); overseeing the development of legislative refinements and policy options to enhance and revitalize the administration and interpretation of the Act; overseeing the monitoring and assessment of provincial and territorial programs and proposed policy and legislation for compliance with the Act; managing the preparation of the CHA Annual Report to Parliament; developing and sustaining the legislative and regulatory frameworks to preserve Medicare; and overseeing the design, implementation and maintenance of a national CHA information infrastructure and information system.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mission is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Its mandate, underpinned by a solid information and knowledge base, covers three broad areas: national health policy and systems, including health care; health promotion and protection, including disease, illness and injury prevention; and First Nations and Inuit health.

The CHA is the key legislation governing the conditions for annual transfer of Canada Health and Social Transfer monies to the provinces and territories. The Director General is the recognized expert on the Act and is responsible for monitoring and ensuring compliance with the Act and recommending action in the event of non-compliance.

The Director General is responsible for providing department-wide support and coordination in articulating and advancing the Department's strategic framework for managing FPT relations related to health care issues. The incumbent is also the lead advisor to the Minister, the Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister and the Assistant Deputy Minister on implications of, and strategies for managing, the Department's participation in the Social Union Framework Agreement, which defines the main principles governing federalism in Canada. A major challenge for the Director General is to provide leadership in establishing an atmosphere in dealings with the provinces, which is non-adversarial and which facilitates the identification of solutions and the avoidance of disputes where there may be divergence between provincial and federal government policy and where considerable compromise may be necessary.

In meeting this challenge, the Director General acts as a corporate catalyst and strategist for developing new approaches to renewing existing and traditional FPT arrangements and agreements with a proactive orientation on the health system renewal process. This challenge also requires the incumbent to lead the coordination of the Department's contacts with provincial authorities, because there are over 100 FPT points of contact (committees, working groups and others) within the Department.

The Director General oversees the analysis of national health care issues and the development of CHA-related policy options that support the multi-staged federal strategy to advance health care renewal issues. The incumbent is responsible for developing and advancing strategies, approaches and options in order to keep the Department and the federal government in the best position possible. The incumbent must steer a course for the Department through the current FPT political, public and media environment, in which there are many divergent views on the appropriate approach to health care issues. The challenge is to ensure that, as provisions of the CHA become more defined, their interpretations do not constrain the provinces within an antiquated model of health care delivery that impedes necessary and appropriate renewal efforts. In meeting this challenge, the incumbent must ensure that the Directorate has the capacity to identify and address all professional, technological, social and political developments that bear upon such financing and the criteria and conditions of the CHA.

The Director General is responsible for developing a framework to monitor and enforce provincial compliance with the program criteria and conditions of payment under federal legislation. In addition, the incumbent provides the Assistant Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister, the Deputy Minister, and the Minister with monitoring, issue analysis, briefings, strategies and activities that support the federal government's role as national leader in the health field and as guardian of Medicare. The incumbent also recommends to the Minister the appropriate deductions to take from the transfer payments to provinces that are considered to be in contravention of the Act, and administers the imposition of discretionary non-compliance penalties on these provinces.

The Director General establishes and maintains extensive consultative linkages with the corporate Branches and the Regions to ensure the maximal flow of information and data between all components of the national FPT relations portfolio. The incumbent is called upon to develop strategies, approaches and initiatives to establish coherence in the Department's strategic FPT relations policy and program orientation and effort. The incumbent, as the recognized expert, acts as a senior federal spokesperson and representative at all national health care fora and maintains effective liaison with the leadership and senior staff of organizations, such as the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Nurses Association and the Canadian Hospital Association, as well as with provincial Ministers, Deputy Ministers and other senior officials, in ensuring that the federal position is fully and properly set forth and explained in evolving health care issues.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 53
Operating budget: $1.2 M
Federal contribution to the health care system: $2.4 Billion

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Acts as the corporate champion for the Department's overall FPT relations and CHA portfolio and, as such, provides a single window for corporate advice, guidance, intelligence (gathering and dissemination) and expertise for the Minister, the Assistant Deputy Ministers, senior departmental management, central agencies, other government departments and other clients and stakeholders in the context of FPT relations, networks and activities.
  2. Plans, organizes and directs the ongoing administration of the CHA and the provision of support to legal council; and leads the development of interpretations under the Act.
  3. Develops and implements a framework for monitoring and enforcing provincial compliance with the program criteria and conditions of payment under federal legislation.
  4. Creates and manages the strategic framework for FPT relations policy and program activities, including extensive interface with the corporate program groups and regional offices; and takes the lead role on specific FPT policy files and initiatives to negotiate agreements and accords.
  5. Develops and maintains the Department's repository of FPT agreements; and provides a corporate analysis and information capacity related to historical progression, current strategic indicators and evolving developments and trends for the FPT portfolio.
  6. Oversees the monitoring and analysis of issues flowing from the Social Union Framework Agreement, including interdepartmental collaboration in support of a common Government of Canada position.
  7. Makes recommendations to the Minister on the appropriate deductions to take from the transfer payments to provinces that are considered to be in contravention of the Act, and administers the imposition of discretionary non-compliance penalties on these provinces.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs

Know-How

G
Mastery of jurisdictional, cultural and technical aspects of the CHA and FPT relations and issues; expert professional knowledge of policy and regulatory development; expert professional knowledge of the policy positions and priorities of provinces and territories with respect to the delivery of health services; professional knowledge of the Established Programs Financing Act; and in-depth knowledge of professional, technical, social and political trends and developments that affect the financing and functioning of the national health care system.
III
Operational and conceptual management of the development of strategies and tactics relating to direct linkages with provincial, regional and territorial governments and organizations to further the Department's corporate, strategic FPT relations and objectives.
3
Critical human relations skills required to represent the government's interests and concerns related to the funding of health care with provinces and territories and at all national health insurance fora.
700
Mid-range number recognizes the breadth and depth of professional knowledge and the operational and conceptual management expertise to administer the CHA and to champion associated FPT relations.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within broad objectives for health care funding that takes place in a changing and often difficult public policy environment as the national health system undergoes significant adaptation, evolution and renewal.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking is required to identify, analyse and manage issues to support and advance the federal government's role as national leader in the health field and as guardian of Medicare. Innovative thinking is required to search for legislative and policy improvements that can continue to support the principles embodied in the Act.
(57) 400
Higher percentage reflects the lack of guidance or precedence available to the incumbent and the rapidly evolving socio-political environment. The position works within a general framework to achieve the Department's objectives in dealings with the provinces and the private sector, and faces numerous interest groups and diverse issues relating to health care.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Policy and Communications, the Director General works within broadly defined Branch goals with limited direction to ensure the integrity of the national health care system. The incumbent makes recommendations to the Minister on the appropriate deduction to take from the transfer payments to provinces that are considered to be in contravention of the Act, and administers the imposition of discretionary non-compliance penalties on these provinces.
6C
Contributory impact on federal support provided to the national health care system. The proxy selected to represent these activities is the annual federal contribution to funding the national health care system, based on the CHA, of approximately $2.4 billion (constant dollars) in cash and tax credits.
460
Low number reflects the tendency toward indirect for the proxy selected, recognizing the relative contribution to federal health care funding decision making.

Summary

GIII3 700
F4(57) 400
F6C 460
Total = 1560 A1
Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs - Number: 7 - D - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS
Figure: 7 – D – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 7 – D – 1

Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Policy and Communications Branch, and there are 6 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs are 2 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Policy and Communications Branch

  • Director General, Health Care
  • Director General, Policy, Planning and Priorities
  • Director General, International Affairs
  • Director General, Communication and Consultation
  • Director, Women's Health Bureau
  • Executive Director, Nursing Policy
  • Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs
    • 2 Directors for :
      • Federal-Provincial Relations
      • Canada Health Act

Executive Group Benchmark Number: 5-D-1

Position Title: Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing strategic policy and program analyses and recommendations on policies, programs and issues affecting federal/provincial/ territorial (FPT) relations within the Department and on matters related to the Social Union Framework Agreement and the Social Union.

Organization Structure

The Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations, is one of two managerial positions at the third level reporting to the Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs. The other is the Director, Canada Health Act.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director, Federal/Provincial/ Territorial Relations, are as follows:

FPT Relations Policy Analysts (staff of 8) are responsible for providing strategic, corporate and integrated advice on the nature and substance of FPT policy, programs and issues with regard to health, cross-sectoral and social union issues for the purpose of advancing federal health and intergovernmental policy objectives.

FPT Planning and Logistics Officer (staff of 2) is responsible for providing comprehensive logistical support and organizational and diplomatic liaison with senior officials in the Department, the central agencies and the provinces, for major FPT meetings.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mission is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Its mandate, underpinned by a solid information and knowledge base, covers three broad areas: national health policy and systems, including health care; health promotion and protection, including disease, illness and injury prevention; and First Nations and Inuit health.

In this context, the Director develops a comprehensive FPT agenda that combines all current and emerging health system issues and provides advice and input to headquarters, branches and regions on FPT relations. The incumbent provides the senior departmental officials with monitoring, issue analysis, briefings, strategies and advice that support the federal government's role as the national leader in the health field and the guardian of Medicare, through positive FPT relations.

The Director ensures that the Department has the capacity to develop and advance a strategic, integrated and coherent approach to health policy matters from an FPT perspective to address important health system renewal issues. The incumbent provides leadership in developing and promoting overall coordination within the Department and with other government departments regarding major corporate and national health-related policy and program interaction with the provinces. The Director provides the directorate with a corporate FPT focus to facilitate Ministerial direction for FPT relations across the Department and the federal government. This role is essential to developing a truly integrated and strategic FPT relations agenda.

The Director provides expert advice on FPT relations and associated health issues. A number of sensitive issues, including the pressure in the national Medicare system resulting from escalating health service costs and past reductions in the federal share of funding, have raised the Department's profile domestically and internationally. A major challenge is to balance the demands for fiscal restraint and the implementation of major intergovernmental agreements and arrangements intended to foster and support the renewal of the Canadian health system.

The Director provides strategic advice and recommendations on policy decisions made by senior management, and consequently has a substantial influence on the directions taken by the federal government on FPT issues related to the national health care system. The incumbent is called upon to develop and recommend strategies, approaches and initiatives to balance the diverse and often disparate interests of a number of parties in achieving consensus on defining, developing and implementing solutions to common health care problems. Another challenge is the need to provide professional support by establishing an atmosphere, in dealings with the provinces and territories, that is non-adversarial and that facilitates the identification of solutions, where there may be divergence between provincial, territorial and federal government policy and where considerable compromise may be necessary.

The Director develops and maintains extensive linkages and consultation processes with clients, partners and stakeholders, including departmental senior management, provincial and territorial governments and other private and public sector organizations involved in the Canadian health system. In this capacity, the Director plays a key role as advocate, negotiator and representative in bringing both the federal government's and Department's perspective to the examination and development of FPT health policies, programs and issues, especially those addressing the renewal of the health system.

A major challenge for the Director is to acquire and maintain a current knowledge of the federal government's objectives and policies on health issues as well as the government's overall FPT agenda, and the priorities of the Minister as they relate to health and health system renewal. The Director must also keep abreast of the FPT implications resulting from the implementation of the Canada Health and Social Transfer to the provinces and territories, the enforcement and interpretation of the Canada Health Act and emerging major FPT files, such as assisted human reproduction, primary health care reform and tobacco.

In meeting this challenge, the Director oversees the development of a corporate knowledge base for the Department's FPT relations that facilitates and sustains the flow of information among the provinces and territories, the Department and other federal departments. The incumbent must ensure that this knowledge base supports informed decision making for senior corporate and regional management, other federal departments and the provinces or territories related to the Department's vast FPT relations network and activities at this critical time in the health system renewal process, while meeting the information needs of over 100 departmental federal-provincial points of contact (committees, working groups, etc.).

The Director provides functional support for the Department's FPT relations portfolio. This responsibility requires the incumbent to ensure that sound strategic advice and guidance are provided to the branch at headquarters and in the regions. The Director is also responsible for planning, organizing and managing the strategic and logistical arrangements for FPT meetings and conferences involving federal and provincial or territorial Ministers and Deputy Ministers, senior officials from the Department, other government departments, provincial and territorial governments and the private and other public sectors, including the development of agendas, strategy and briefing notes, position papers, logistics and schedules.

The Director must establish and maintain consultative and intelligence-gathering linkages and interfaces with senior officials in the Department, other government departments, senior officials of provincial and territorial governments and national and international health institutions and organizations, and must also be recognized as a credible and strong advocate for the Department's interests and concerns with respect to the national health care system.

Dimensions(Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 12
Operating budget: $220,000
Federal contribution to the health care system: $2.4 billion

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for the development of the Department's FPT agenda and corporate strategic framework to support FPT relations, policy and program activities.
  2. Develops and maintains extensive consultative networks with senior officials from internal and external organizations and establishes direct linkages across the federal government and with provincial and territorial governments and other key public and private sector health institutions and organizations to support the Department in its corporate strategic FPT relations and health policy agendas.
  3. Provides expert advisory services and briefings to the Minister, Deputy Minister, Associate Deputy Minister and other senior government officials on FPT relations, associated health issues and social union issues.
  4. Plays a corporate and federal health policy advisory role for the Department in order to support FPT mechanisms and processes for the achievement of health policy and program goals and objectives.
  5. Directs environmental scanning activities to provide continual intelligence gathering and monitoring of provincial and territorial governments, health departments and interprovincial activities of relevance to the federal health agenda. Ensures integration and coordination with the Directorate's overall information gathering and monitoring.
  6. Directs the planning, organization and management of strategic and logistical arrangements for FPT meetings and conferences involving federal and provincial or territorial Ministers and Deputy Ministers, senior officials from the Department, other government departments, provincial and territorial governments and the private and other public sectors, including the development of agendas, strategy and briefing notes, position papers, logistics and schedules.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations

Know-How

F
Extensive specialized knowledge of jurisdictional, cultural and technical aspects of the Canada Health Act and associated FPT relations and issues; in-depth professional knowledge of policy and regulatory development; in-depth knowledge of the policy positions and priorities of provinces and territories and their mandated responsibilities with respect to the delivery of health services; professional knowledge of the Established Programs Financing Act; and in-depth knowledge of professional, technical, social and political trends and developments that affect the financing and functioning of the national health care system.
III
Operational and conceptual integration of priorities and issues to provide corporate leadership for the development of the department's FPT agenda and corporate strategic framework.
3
Critical human relations skills required to provide leadership in developing and promoting overall coordination within the Department and with other government departments regarding major corporate and national health-related policy and program interaction with the provinces and territories.
528
Mid-range number reflects the depth of professional knowledge required to represent and advance the Department's objectives pertinent to developing FPT relations, when providing strategic advice on corporate health agenda and relations in general and on the conduct of multilateral and bilateral meetings.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Position works within the departmental and governmental frameworks and policies and within the Social Union Framework Agreement for the development of the Department's FPT relations in connection with the renewal of the Canadian health system.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking is required to analyse issues and to prepare briefings, strategies and activities that support the federal government's role as national leader in the health field and guardian of Medicare.
(50) 264
Solid number reflects the challenges associated with developing strategies, approaches and initiatives that foster a cooperative atmosphere that supports the FPT partnership in the definition, management, delivery and administration of Canada's national health care system.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs, the position provides senior departmental officials with monitoring, issue analysis, briefings, strategies and advice that support the federal government's role as the national leader in the health field.
6I
The position provides leadership for the Department's FPT agenda and corporate strategic framework. The proxy selected to represent these activities is the federal contribution to the health care system of $2.4 billion (constant).
230
The low number indicates that policy advice is provided within a defined framework.

Summary

FIII3 528
F4(50) 264
E6I 230
Total = 1022 P1
Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations - Number: 5 - D - 1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR FEDERAL / PROVINCIAL / TERRITORIAL RELATIONS
Figure: 5 – D – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 5 – D – 1

Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs, and there is 1 peer position at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations are several Analysts and 1 Officer.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, Intergovernmental Affairs

  • Director, Canada Health Act
  • Director, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations
    • Federal/Provincial/Territorial Planning and Logistics Officer
    • Federal/Provincial/Territorial Relations Policy Analysts

Executive Group Benchmark Number: 4-D-1

Position Title: Chief Negotiator

General Accountability

Is accountable for representing the Government of Canada and the Department in negotiating comprehensive self-government agreements with designated Aboriginal groups across Canada in order to implement government policy on the inherent right of self-government; and serves as principal advisor in planning and executing the overall strategy for achieving comprehensive self-government agreements.

Organization Structure

This position is one of four Chief Negotiator positions at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Self-Government. Because of the nature and exigencies of self-government negotiation activities, the Branch is structured as a matrix organization, so that teams of negotiating specialists are formed and deployed as negotiation processes commence. In support of the Chief Negotiator, the team provides analysis, review and recommendations on all aspects of self-government agreements that are raised during negotiations, including jurisdiction with respect to land management, health, education, social services and other matters, as well as the related implementation plans and funding agreements.

During the preparation for and the carrying out of negotiations, a team normally composed of the following positions reports to the Chief Negotiator:

Assistant Negotiator is responsible for developing mandates and negotiation options and assisting the Chief Negotiator in the conduct of negotiations by coordinating consultations with agencies and governments, and managing the conduct of research and issues analysis.

Negotiation Analyst is responsible for analysing negotiation and policy issues, developing negotiating position options and alternatives, and drafting advisory reports/recommendations and research reports on specific issues.

Research Officer is responsible for providing research support and conducting related special studies and projects to facilitate negotiation processes.

Additional officers are assigned, as required, by the Director General of the region involved in the negotiations.

Nature And Scope

The Government of Canada has placed a high priority on assisting Aboriginal peoples in achieving self-sufficiency through self-government. Public, political and media interest in Aboriginal self-government has raised the profile of the process nationally and, in some instances, internationally. In order to effectively meet the federal government's commitment to placing authority, accountability and jurisdiction in the hands of the First Nations, comprehensive self-government negotiations with Aboriginal groups across Canada are managed by the Director General, Self-Government, subject to mandates and instructions to each Chief Negotiator from the Federal Interdepartmental Steering Committee and the Assistant Deputy Minister.

Negotiations are conducted against a backdrop of pressure for Aboriginal political evolution, development of non-renewable resources, protection of the environment and preservation of traditional Aboriginal pursuits. The implementation of agreements requires measures ranging from constitutionally protected treaties, legislation and the establishment of corporate management structures to the development of program delivery and funding agreements between governments.

In this context, the Chief Negotiator is responsible for negotiations and is expected to manage three to four self-government files at any one time, proposing suitable bargaining strategies and drafting documents that bind negotiating parties to a settlement. Operating within the federal government's policy approach for implementing the inherent right and negotiations under the self-government policy, the incumbent must ensure that settlement of self-government agreements focusses on achieving a new economic, social, cultural and political contract between Aboriginal peoples and governments at the federal, provincial and territorial levels. This requires the incumbent to develop and promote complex and interrelated jurisdictional and program changes that impact on federal government structures and resources and on third parties with interests in the areas under negotiation. Leading negotiations requires the incumbent to develop and pursue innovative approaches to interpreting policy, particularly at the bargaining table, where commitments must be made within the broad parameters set out by Cabinet. The incumbent works within critical timelines in concluding agreements, which are subject to approval by Cabinet, followed by the passage of legislation.

The Chief Negotiator is called upon to factor funding arrangements into each agreement. The incumbent must not only reconcile the interests and concerns of the large number of parties to the agreements, but also address the fiscal constraints experienced by those parties. The incumbent negotiates funding levels and cost-sharing arrangements that are equitable, minimize the federal requirement for new funds, ensure that all federal obligations are met, recognize the real fiscal constraints of the other parties and provide for full and effective implementation.

As the leader of interdepartmental multi-disciplinary negotiating teams, the Chief Negotiator must ensure that both the original and adjusted negotiating positions are supported with timely and trenchant analysis that can withstand the scrutiny of a highly professional and critical audience from other departments, central agencies, the provinces and territories, and Aboriginal groups.

Representing the interests of other federal organizations at the negotiating table, the Chief Negotiator establishes and maintains personal credibility among a network of federal and provincial/territorial contacts and generates sustained confidence in the professionalism and integrity of the Department among management and key players from all parties. The incumbent faces the challenge of establishing a non-adversarial negotiating atmosphere that facilitates the identification of solutions, even when considerable compromise may be necessary. At the same time, in situations where the negotiations become confrontational, the incumbent must defend the federal government's position.

The Chief Negotiator provides authoritative advice, generally to departmental colleagues and management, the Minister, and other government departments and agencies, on the status of the negotiations and on the practicality and immediate and long-term implications of negotiating positions. The incumbent also provides policy advice on self-government agreements to the Assistant Deputy Minister.

The Chief Negotiator develops appropriate public communications explaining and supporting the negotiation process and manages the highly public nature of these negotiations by developing communications strategies and dealing effectively with the media, politicians and third-party and public interest groups.

Managing the negotiations requires the incumbent to work in an environment that encompasses major industrial interests, such as oil, gas and mining; political forces in the form of territorial aspirations for provincial status; cultural forces, such as the Aboriginal desire for self-determination and cultural survival; municipal government interests; and environmental interests, such as the movement to preserve the Arctic eco-system. The incumbent must ensure that the negotiating teams have the right mix and level of knowledge in a broad spectrum of program areas, including forestry, fisheries, land use planning and environmental protection procedures, Indian Act administration, health and social services and education, financial management in the public sector, tax policy, constitutional law, the machinery of government, parliamentary processes, the Cabinet-mandated responsibilities of other government departments, and the content of various self-government agreements and plans, all in the context of the goals and aspirations of Canada's Aboriginal peoples.

The Chief Negotiator is involved in senior-level consultations with other federal departments, such as Justice, Environment, Natural Resources, Fisheries and Oceans and Finance, and with the provincial, territorial and municipal governments, for the purpose of joint resolution of problems relating to self-government negotiations.

The Chief Negotiator ensures that daily contact is maintained with the program and policy branches of the Department for the purpose of preparing ministerial responses to public and parliamentary concerns and joint positions for negotiation. Problems that appear to have the potential to set precedents for other self-government negotiations are referred to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Claims and Indian Government, and to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy and Strategic Direction.

The Chief Negotiator maintains daily to weekly contacts with the First Nations to plan negotiation meetings and schedules and to address day-to-day problems. The incumbent also maintains regular contact with a variety of public agencies, media and social interest groups for the purpose of disseminating information and maintaining a favourable climate for negotiations.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 3 from the Department + 12 on assignment
Operating budget: $45,000
Program jurisdiction transfer (annually): $27 million
Cost-sharing agreements: $17 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Conducts negotiations within approved mandates, within the departmental policy framework and the government's agenda for Aboriginal self-government, managing three to four sets of negotiations at any one time.
  2. Manages the conduct of substantive research and analysis of matters relating to the self-government agreements under negotiation.
  3. Makes recommendations on the mandate of self-government negotiations, taking into consideration all legal, social, political and any other ramifications, including the implications for other concurrent negotiations.
  4. Provides expert advice to departmental colleagues and management, the Minister and other government departments and agencies on the practicality of negotiating positions and on immediate and long-term policy implications.
  5. Establishes and maintains consultative networks with senior departmental officials, other government departments and provincial/territorial governments to develop integrated negotiating positions and to discuss the implementation of settlements.
  6. Liaises with First Nations and provincial/territorial negotiators to plan meeting schedules for negotiations and to solve day-to-day problems.

Evaluation Rationale

Chief Negotiator

Know-How

F
Seasoned professional knowledge of the goals and aspirations of Canada's Aboriginal peoples, legislation, constitutional law and government priorities; in-depth knowledge of the Cabinet-mandated responsibilities of other government departments and a broad spectrum of federal and provincial program areas, including forestry, fisheries, land use planning, environmental protection, health and social services, education, financial management in the public sector, and tax policy; and specialized professional knowledge of jurisdictional negotiation, funding agreements and transfer payment mechanisms.
III
Operational planning, management and coordination of up to four interdepartmental and intergovernmental multi-faceted teams engaged in planning and negotiating self-government agreements, researching related issues, drafting legislative proposals and developing funding arrangements; and development of public communication plans.
3
Critical human relations skills are required to collaborate and consult with a network of federal and provincial/territorial representatives to obtain support on negotiation positions, defend the federal government's position at the negotiation table and respond to questions from the media, politicians, third parties and public interest groups on the negotiation process and related issues.
460
Low number reflects the degree of coordination required to lead multi-disciplinary groups in various individual files and the tendency of end results to be related.

Problem Solving / Thinking

E
Thinking within the Department's policy approach for implementation of inherent rights and negotiations of self-government, seeks the attainment of a new economic, social, cultural and political contract between Aboriginal groups and the federal and provincial/territorial governments; proposes bargaining strategies; and drafts documents to bind negotiating parties to a settlement.
4
Analytical and evaluative thinking is required to adjust negotiating positions to reach agreement, while satisfying the scrutiny of highly professional and critical audiences from the different levels of government and Aboriginal groups. Analytical skills are required to plan communications strategies to manage the public nature of self-government negotiations.
(50) 230
High percentage indicates a strong requirement to identify issues and develop solutions to deadlocks in negotiations in order to resolve issues through research, presenting agreements-in-principle and ensuring progressive negotiations for the attainment of a new economic, social, cultural and political contract between Aboriginal groups and the federal and provincial/territorial governments.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Director General, Self-Government, works within the objectives of achieving self-government agreements between governments and Aboriginal people, proposes bargaining strategies and drafts documents to bind negotiating parties to a settlement, leads multi-disciplinary teams of government representatives in negotiations, prepares implementation plans and drafts proposals for funding arrangements and legislation to seal agreements.
4C
Contributory impact on the federal initiatives to forge a new relationship with First Nations as represented by program transfer and federal/ provincial cost-sharing arrangements estimated at $44 million (constant) annually.
230
High number represents the latitude of the position at the negotiation table in advancing the negotiating mandate to secure self-government agreements, and the significance of program jurisdiction and resources transferred to Indian bands.

Summary

FIII3 460
E4(50) 230
E4C 230
Total = 920 0
Chief Negotiator - Number: 4 - D - 1
Org Chart of  the CHIEF NEGOTIATOR
Figure: 4 – D – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – D – 1

Chief Negotiator

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Self-Government, and there are 3 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Chief Negotiator are 1 Assistant Negotiator, 1 Analyst, 1 Officer and additional Officers as needed.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, Self-Government

  • Director, Self-Government Policy
  • Director, Fiscal Policy
  • Director, Fiscal Relations
  • Chief Negotiator
    • Assistant Negotiator
    • Negotiation Analyst
    • Research Officer
    • Additional Officers as needed

Executive Group Benchmark Number: 4-D-2

Position Title: Regional Director, Intergovernmental Affairs and Operational Policy

General Accountability

Is accountable for managing the Region's interface with its stakeholders, including the development and negotiation of self-government agreements and comprehensive claims settlements implementation frameworks, and all aspects of the Region's formal framework of relationships with the First Nations and their organizations, other government interests and the private sector.

Organization Structure

This position is one of eight at the third managerial level reporting to the Regional Director General. The others are Director, Funds Services; Director, Lands and Trust Services; Director, Land Entitlement / Claims Implementation; Director, Economic Development; Director, Communications and Executive Services; Director, Corporate Services; and Director, Human Resources.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director, Intergovernmental Affairs and Operational Policy, are as follows:

Seven (7) Policy Analysts / Negotiators, each responsible for analysing, developing and interpreting operational policies, strategies and relationship frameworks in the Region; and for negotiating the implementation framework of agreements and claims settlements.

One (1) Manager, Program Support, (staff of 2) is responsible for providing administration and program support for the Division.

Nature And Scope

The Department is responsible for two separate yet equally important mandates: meeting the federal government's constitutional, treaty, political and legal responsibilities to First Nations, Inuit and Northerners; and supporting First Nations and Inuit in developing healthy, sustainable communities and achieving their economic and social aspirations.

Treaty claims settlements, enhanced local control by First Nations bands and councils, closer relationships with other departments and other governments, and the establishment of a government-to-government relationship between the federal government and First Nations are critical to achieving Canada's Aboriginal agenda and First Nations aspirations.

The Director addresses these challenges by managing the Region's federal / First Nations, federal/provincial, tripartite and multiparty relations and directs the development and negotiation of self-government agreements and comprehensive claims settlements implementation frameworks to further First Nations' progress toward autonomy.

The Director plays a pivotal role in the attainment of the government's objectives for First Nations by serving as the Region's focal point for the analysis, development and evaluation of regional operating strategies and policies and the provision of advice and support on these matters to the Region's other branches/offices, national headquarters and First Nations organizations.

The Director manages the Region's overall strategic direction and the framework of agreements that give effect to government policy objectives with respect to First Nations. Agreements are with other government departments, provincial and territorial departments and agencies, municipal agencies, private sector organizations, bands, councils and other First Nations organizations. Negotiations cover programs, services, land claims, third-party rights, dispute resolution, and self-government accountability structures and systems, and relate to a wide variety of areas, 9 such as governance, economic and commercial development, funding, cost-sharing, culture, social services, policing and justice administration, education and labour force development.

Negotiations are complicated by the multi-jurisdictional nature of many of the issues; the differing degrees of stakeholder readiness; the pressure to find timely, appropriate solutions within a context of severe fiscal constraints; the number, range and complexity of the policy issues involved; their public visibility and political sensitivity; and the fundamental reviews taking place, which can have a significant impact on the resolution of operational issues and arrangements.

In addition to leading or participating in the negotiation of major, precedent-setting agreements, the Director advocates on behalf of and promotes the interests of First Nations to other federal, provincial, municipal and private sector stakeholders, which may have divergent interests and priorities.

The Director contributes regional intelligence and positioning to the assessment, development and negotiation of national and federal strategies and policies on intergovernmental and constitutional matters, and international issues concerning the situation and rights of Aboriginal peoples throughout the world, not only in Canada. The incumbent develops, recommends and implements the overall strategy, priorities and consultative agenda, which give regional effect to national initiatives in these areas. The challenge for the Director is to effectively analyse and synthesize a myriad of environmental factors and then provide convincing and astute advice to regional and headquarters management and staff.

The Director is responsible for the overall development of a multi-faceted, coherent, integrated framework of policies, which supports the Region's priorities and evolving operations; takes into account federal objectives, the view of stakeholders, the reality of the Aboriginal situation, and the multi-jurisdictional nature of Aboriginal affairs; and ensures that plans and strategies for devolution are carried out as intended.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 11
Operating budget: $425,000
Grants and contributions: $790,000

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for the development of strategies and the management of the Region's overall governmental tripartite, federal/provincial, federal / First Nations operational policy and interdepartmental and sectoral relationships to ensure that government policies and priorities are actively, consistently and successfully pursued in the Region; and manages the development of region-specific operational strategies, policy positions and program frameworks that are compatible with national policy directions and regional priorities.
  2. Leads or serves as the Regional representative in negotiations with other governments and coordinates the implementation and monitoring of framework documents, comprehensive claims and other agreements required to implement Aboriginal self-government and discharge broad federal responsibility vis-à-vis First Nations; and resolves major interdepartmental, federal/provincial and sectoral issues.
  3. Advocates on behalf of regional First Nations interests and promotes government objectives and policies concerning First Nations in dealings with the provinces, municipalities, other federal departments and agencies, and the private sector.
  4. Advises regional and headquarters management and the Minister on all aspects of the Region's self-government, comprehensive claims, operational policy, intergovernmental relations activities and related issues.
  5. Acts as the regional focal point for liaison, consultation and coordination with First Nations, the provincial government, other federal interests, municipalities and the private sector in the development of a regional information base and in intergovernmental relations and negotiation strategies.

Evaluation Rationale

Regional Director, Intergovernmental Affairs and Operational Policy

Know-How

F
In-depth professional knowledge of the government agenda, objectives and obligations with respect to First Nations relations and the Department's mandate, policy and program initiatives and activities at the corporate and regional levels; professional knowledge of the relevant legislation and of the economic, political and cultural conditions of Aboriginal groups and of the priorities, positions and policy issues of clients, stakeholders and partners in the Region; professional knowledge of negotiation approaches and processes in order to resolve broad and politically sensitive issues, and of representational and advocacy approaches in order to facilitate the acceptance of the federal position and harmonize activities and approaches for the resolution of outstanding issues; and professional knowledge of strategic planning and policy formulation processes and communication strategies and approaches in order to act as the federal government's representative and spokesperson in the Region.
II
Conceptual and operational management of the Region's operational policy, strategic and program activities and their integration into the Department's overall policy and program delivery frameworks.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to negotiate solutions and to present federal government and departmental initiatives and activities to external clients, stakeholders and partners in the Region.
460
High number reflects the degree of expertise required to develop a coherent and integrated framework of policies to support the Region's priorities and evolving operations in areas such as commercial and economic development, resource development and management, social legislation and policy, education programs and institution funding services, and policing and justice in meeting the Department's overall objectives.

Problem Solving / Thinking

E
Thinking within the Department's policies and objectives in discharging regional obligations with respect to implementation frameworks for self-government agreements and comprehensive claims settlements.
4
Analytical, interpretative and constructive thinking is required to adapt national policies and programs to the Region's clientele and operating circumstances and to the interests and concerns of a broad range of communities of interest, including First Nations, provincial and territorial governments, the media and the general public, on highly complex and politically sensitive issues that have a strong socio-economic impact.
(50) 230
High percentage reflects the thinking required to resolve multi-jurisdictional issues, some of which are the result of precedent-setting negotiations on agreement implementation issues and arrangements.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Regional Director General, the position operates within the parameters of national policies, practices and procedures established for dealing with claims and claims agreements.
2P
Primary impact on the activities of the Division as represented by an operating budget of $425,000 (constant).
230
High number reflects the scope of the activities on which the position has an impact and the freedom to act in discharging the Region's intergovernmental responsibilities within national policies, practices and processes.

Summary

FII3 460
E4(50) 230
E2P 230
Total = 920 0
Regional Director, Intergovernmental Affairs And Operational Policy - Number: 4 - D - 2
Org Chart of the REGIONAL DIRECTOR INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS AND OPERATIONAL POLICY
Figure: 4 – D – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – D – 2

Regional Director, Intergovernmental Affairs And Operational Policy

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Regional Director General, and there are 7 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Regional Director, Intergovernmental Affairs and Operational Policy are 7 Analysts / Negotiators and 1 Manager.

Linear Organisation Chart:

Regional Director General

  • Director, Funds Services
  • Director, Lands and Trust Services
  • Director, Land Entitlement / Claims Implementation
  • Director, Economic Development
  • Director, Communications and Executive Services
  • Director, Corporate Services
  • Director, Human Resources
  • Regional Director, Intergovernmental Affairs and Operational Policy
    • 7 Policy Analysts / Negotiators
    • Manager, Program Support

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