Appendix C1 - Benchmark Index by Function - Program/Service Delivery to Canadians - Executive Group Benchmark (10-A-1)

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 10-A-1

Position Title: Vice-President, Operations

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing corporate leadership for the development and implementation of strategies, approaches and programs to ensure that the Agency has the capacity to deliver a suite of services across the country consistently and effectively so as to facilitate the orderly movement of people and goods across international borders.

Organization Structure

This is one of seven positions at the first managerial level reporting to the President. The others are Vice-Presidents of Admissibility and Recourse; Intelligence and Enforcement; Business Solutions and Information Technology; Strategic Direction Planning and Public Affairs; Human Resources; and Finance and Administration.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Vice-President, Operations, are:

Eight Regional Directors General, (Atlantic, Quebec, Northern Ontario, Fort Erie/Niagara, Windsor/St. Clair, Toronto, Prairie and Pacific) (total staff of 8,700) each of whom is responsible for developing and implementing approaches and processes to manage the integrated delivery of the Agency's suite of programs and services at all border crossing points in the assigned geographical area.

Director General, Programs and Operational Services, (staff of 50) is responsible for providing linkages between headquarters and the regions in identifying, defining and implementing key operational requirements and files; overseeing regional financial planning, analysis, support, and service delivery activities.

Nature And Scope

The Agency is responsible for managing the nation's borders by administering and enforcing domestic laws that govern trade and travel, and international agreements and conventions. The Agency brings together all the major players involved in facilitating legitimate cross-border traffic and supporting economic development while stopping people and goods that pose a potential risk to Canada.

It is within this context that the Vice-President, Operations, provides corporate leadership for ensuring that the Agency develops and implements national operational policies, approaches and programs that foster and promote consistency in the delivery of border services. The incumbent provides the operational focal point for the integrated delivery of all Agency programs and services. This responsibility requires the incumbent to provide an operational lens to corporate headquarters branches in the development of policy innovations and national protocols for program transfer, and strong functional direction to regional operations. In meeting the Agency's strategic objectives and operational goals, the incumbent is called upon to lead the development, implementation and monitoring of operational priorities and plans, service levels and cost-recovery practices required to ensure cost-effective delivery of border services. The incumbent plays a leadership role in establishing a risk assessment and risk management framework for the Agency and plays a key role in managing the Agency's response to national crisis situations in the context of its broader public safety and emergency preparedness (PSEP) portfolio obligations and responsibilities.

A significant challenge facing the Vice-President is to integrate a wide range of operational responsibilities delivered at over 1,300 service points across Canada and abroad. The incumbent is called upon to identify and address operational requirements and expectations from a broad range of communities of interest that include national organizations and associations, commercial importers and exporters, immigrants and visitors. The incumbent is called upon to address the issues raised by these communities of interest, in compliance with Canadian law and international agreements and conventions and respecting the often pressing time constraints raised by commercial and personal interests, while maintaining consistency and fairness in the delivery of Agency programs.

The Vice-President provides a corporate focal point for integrating operational requirements to meet the Agency's responsibilities with respect to the delivery of programs and services for partners within the PSEP portfolio, the entry of immigrants, and the development of strategies and approaches to deal with chemical, biological, radioactive and nuclear emergencies and crises at border points. The incumbent provides national leadership in developing effective liaison between corporate headquarters branches responsible for program and policy development and geographically dispersed regional operations responsible for delivering, monitoring and reporting on integrated Agency programs. The incumbent is also responsible for negotiating and implementing agreements with other federal departments and agencies, and with other levels of government within Canada and the United States with respect to these matters.

As an agent of change, the Vice-President is responsible for the development and implementation of management principles and practices that provide for clear accountabilities and interdependencies between headquarters and regional authorities. The incumbent is responsible for integrating the regional perspective into the Agency's strategic directions, policies and major projects, including identifying and meeting portfolio and Agency operational requirements for priority items such as the Smart Border Initiative.

The Vice-President's representational responsibilities involve developing relationships with multiple stakeholders to discuss and resolve concerns and issues that cross several program areas or deal with national or inter-regional concerns. The incumbent represents the Agency and the federal position, policies and interests in areas of real or potential conflict with senior public and private sector representatives.

The Vice-President provides the President, senior officials and the Minister with authoritative, informed advice on national delivery of the Agency's programs and serves as the key advisor to the Executive Committee on all regional operational issues. The incumbent establishes and manages the national operational monitoring, measurement and reporting regime to address the Agency's responsibilities, ensuring the establishment of an evaluative capacity to report on the progress of programs and to make immediate adjustments to program delivery, as required, while ensuring prudence and probity in the management of public resources.

The Vice-President plays a key role in melding diverse organizational cultures into one service delivery Agency, and plays a leadership role in resolving contentious labour and other human resource management issues.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 8,760
Operating budget: $77.9 million

Staff operate approximately 1,370 service points across Canada and in nearly 40 locations abroad, serving some 170,000 commercial importers and more than 98 million travellers each year.

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides corporate leadership for developing and implementing strategies, approaches and initiatives to ensure the integrity of the Agency's service delivery function at all border crossing service points across the country.
  2. Provides the President, senior officials and the Minister with authoritative, informed advice on regional delivery of the Agency's programs and services with respect to the Agency's operational capacity for meeting portfolio responsibilities and obligations.
  3. As an agent of change, ensures the implementation of priorities and plans, as well as the allocation and expenditure of resources and the establishment of service levels and cost-recovery goals to enhance the Agency's capacity to meet its strategic directions and operational goals.
  4. Provides leadership and coordination for the delivery of regional programs and services to ensure consistency and effectiveness across all service delivery points; ensures that the regional perspective is considered in the development of corporate and program policies and procedures.
  5. Establishes protocols with other corporate responsibility areas to ensure effective transfer of program and policy innovations to regional operations; negotiates and manages agreements with other federal departments and agencies and with other levels of government and the United States to deal with chemical, biological, radioactive and nuclear emergencies and crises at all border crossing points.
  6. Acts as a conduit for regional issues and interests and ensures that these are considered to be an integral component to the development of all Agency policy frameworks and individual policies.
  7. Provides Agency leadership in establishing an evaluative capacity to report on the progress of programs and make immediate adjustments to program delivery, as required, and in building a risk assessment and risk management capacity within the Agency.

Evaluation Rationale

Vice-President, Operations

Know-How

G
Mastery of legislation, policy and programs affecting border service operations; in-depth knowledge of the interrelationships between the Agency and the PSEP portfolio, other federal, provincial and international stakeholders' and partners' policies and programs to address inter-jurisdictional concerns and issues and contribute to consistent and effective management of the nation's borders.
IV
Coordinates the integration of a wide range of program delivery functions; sets operational priorities and develops plans to ensure national consistency at Canadian and international service points.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to integrate diverse organizational cultures into a cohesive service delivery organization; build relationships across the Agency and the portfolio to ensure that regional issues are represented; and build relationships with multiple commercial and governmental stakeholders
1056
The high number reflects the expertise required to manage a large decentralized operational organization delivering multiple programs and the leadership skill required to resolve contentious issues involving multiple organizations across the Agency and the portfolio with conflicting priorities and perspectives.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking within generally defined Agency program policies and objectives to develop national consistency in the operational delivery of a wide range of programs and services.
4
Significant analytical, interpretative, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to respond to conflicting operational requirements, develop national operational priorities and establish accountability frameworks.
(66) 700
The high percentage reflects the challenges associated with integrating a wide range of programs and services into a cohesive national operational delivery approach that meets Agency needs in a consistent and effective manner

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the President, the incumbent is subject to general guidance and direction and develops national delivery strategies and priorities. Headquarters corporate branches develop programs for regional implementation. The incumbent participates as a member of the Executive Management Committee and contributes to the formulation of departmental objectives, policies and plans.
4P
Primary impact on the national delivery of Agency programs and services. The proxy selected to represent these activities is the Branch budget of $77.9 million (constant).
800
Reflects the position's decision-making authority for planning and managing national delivery activities, and the overall contribution to the achievement of Agency objectives.

Summary

GIV3 1056
G4(66) 700
G4P 800
Total = 2556 A1
Vice-president operations number: 10 - a - 1
Org Chart of Vice-president operations
Figure: 10 – A – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 10 – A – 1

Vice President, Operations

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 6 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Vice President, Operations are 8 Regional Directors General and 1 Director General.

Linear organisation chart:

President (Departmental deputy head)

  • Vice President, Admissibility and Recourse
  • Vice President, Intelligence and Enforcement
  • Vice President, Business Solutions and Information Technology
  • Vice President, Strategic Direction, Planning and Public Affairs
  • Vice President, Human Resources
  • Vice President, Finance and Administration
  • Vice President, Operations
    • 8 Regional Directors General for :
      • Atlantic
      • Quebec
      • Northern Ontario
      • Fort Erie/Niagara
      • Windsor/St. Clair
      • Toronto
      • Prairie
      • Pacific
    • Director General, Programs and Operational Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 9-A-1

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister / Regional Executive Head, Ontario

General Accountability

Is accountable for the overall integrated regional delivery of programs and services for two departments; for leading the implementation of central agency initiatives and strategies affecting the Region; for acting as a change agent for the Region; for directing the development and implementation of forward-looking and holistic strategies, policies, management frameworks, programs and processes; for overseeing, both directly and through partnership, co-management and other third-party service delivery arrangements; for establishing the performance measurement and accountability frameworks for all involved delivery agents; and for creating and strengthening intergovernmental relations and partnerships in the Region.

Organization Structure

The position is 1 of 18 positions at the first managerial level reporting to the Deputy Minister (DM). The others are Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), Strategic Policy and Planning; ADM, Employment Policy and Program Design; ADM, Employment Insurance Operations; ADM, Employment Program Operations; ADM, Workplace Skills Development; ADM, Labour and Homelessness; ADM, Learning; ADM, Communications and Ministerial Affairs; and the 9 other Regional Executive Heads (REHs) of British Columbia and Yukon, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland.

Specific functions of the management positions reporting to the ADM/REH, Ontario, are as follows:

Associate Regional Executive Head (staff of 60) is responsible for providing operational support to the ADM/REH in the development and ongoing relevance of the two departments' corporate visions, strategic agendas, business priorities and policy and service delivery frameworks; and for acting for the ADM as needed.

Three Directors General, Service Delivery, (total staff of 3,512) are responsible in their respective sub-regional geographical zones for facilitating activities that encourage field staff to conform to the departmental culture and management philosophy and to implement a citizen-centred Service Delivery Network (SDN) and other innovative business applications; for representing national and regional corporate priorities and initiatives; and for being the channel for the effective advocacy of the affiliated Human Resource Centres of Canada.

Director General, Programs and Services, (staff of 461) is responsible for developing and implementing labour market adjustment interventions, including counselling, labour exchange, human resources planning, training, employment development, community capacity building and income support; for negotiating federal-provincial Labour Market Development Agreements; for fostering increased public, private and voluntary sector partnerships and joint ventures; for managing the Region's Employment Insurance (EI) activities, including the investigation and control of fraudulent claims and the various adjustment and development programs; for delivering Fire Protection Engineering Services and Injury Compensation under Parts II and III of the Canada Labour Code; and for managing Aboriginal partnerships in the labour market section of the homelessness and disabilities files.

Director General, Income Security Programs (ISP), (staff of 1,215) is responsible for managing the delivery of the Old Age Security (OAS) and Canada Pension Plan (CPP) programs for the Region; for leading the provision of input to the corporate ADM, ISP, on developing new national policies and programs and on specific operational approaches; and for taking the leadership role for the Region in developing policy to address issues related to an aging society.

Director General, Finance, Administration and Information Technology; Director, Human Resources; and Director, Communications, (total staff of 425) each is responsible for planning, directing, monitoring and evaluating the delivery of assigned regional corporate management programs and services; for liaising with internal clients and external service providers; for conducting representational activities with clients, stakeholders and partners; and for consulting with the corporate functional authorities to process non-delegated transactions, to represent the Region's interests and to ensure input to and consistency with national policies and standards.

Nature And Scope

The organization is accountable for regional and local delivery of all programs and services of two distinct departments involved in socio-economic and other fields related to optimal employment and social and economic development of Canada's human resources capital through labour market and social programs and activities, workplace skills development, lifelong learning and income benefits and security.

The ADM/REH provides a regional leadership role for the delivery of both departments' programs and services to and with clients, stakeholders and partners at the regional and local levels, with accountability to the DMs and the management committees of the two client departments. The incumbent provides strong support on regional and national issues and plays a challenging management role in fulfilling the corporate visions, business lines and programs of the two departments.

The ADM/REH addresses corporate issues facing both departments and balances their respective service delivery mandates. The incumbent provides regional perspective in determining optimal strategic directions, policies, plans and priorities for each department and in resolving policy and program issues. The ADM/REH leads the resolution of Region-specific issues that have corporate implications and provides authoritative support to the Ministers and their respective Deputy Heads, and to Cabinet and federal and provincial elected officials. The incumbent assumes a corporate leadership role with respect to national or cross-regional files, and policy, program, administrative or operational issues specifically assigned to him or her by the Minister, the DM or the Management Board of one or both client departments. As such, the incumbent chairs national committees and working groups, leads major special projects and participates in national or inter-regional studies led by other ADMs and REHs.

The ADM/REH provides leadership to bring both departments' corporate visions alive in the Region and to make them an integral part of the Region's overall service delivery orientation, frameworks and processes. The incumbent directs the development of coordinated and cohesive forward-looking plans, policies and processes that reflect corporate, strategic and operational goals for the integrated delivery of the departments' programs and services and ensures a coordinated response to the human resources development needs of clients, stakeholders and partners, as well as to the social and economic goals of the government.

Due to the relative size and importance of the programs and resource allocations in the Region, the ADM/REH is a major player in coordinating the federal effort in the Region and plays a key role on the Federal Regional Council. The Council operates under the guidance of the Privy Council Office, which places a strong emphasis on federal program integration and harmonization at the national and regional levels. The incumbent often chairs the Council, or acts in an executive capacity, and is called to lead projects that produce cohesiveness in federal policy orientations and strategies and in the delivery of federal programs in the Region.

The ADM/REH must ensure that the social development priorities and objectives of both departments are harmonized with those of provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal government concerns within the Region's strategic vision and business plans. This is a key role for the incumbent, because the mandates of both departments designate them as the federal points of contact with other levels of government, and because both cover policy and program areas affecting their jurisdictions.

The ADM/REH faces a continuing challenge to balance and harmonize the service delivery mandates of both departments. The incumbent guides the development of new policy and program regimes and service delivery, performance measurement and accountability frameworks, which often involve other external partners and service providers. The incumbent negotiates bilateral agreements with the provinces, territories, municipalities and Aboriginal governments or bands in the Region and recommends strategies on related initiatives, issues and evolving relations. The incumbent formulates and implements evolving intergovernmental relations with regard to national human resources and social development systems in the Region and has a major impact on the federal linkage with these levels of government.

This role is gaining prominence and complexity as a result of ongoing devolution, co-management and Alternative Service Delivery (ASD) arrangements with other levels of government and other key partners and stakeholders in the Region. These responsibilities must be conducted authoritatively, because both departments have an enormous impact on the provincial, municipal and Aboriginal government or band society and economy concerned, because their programs supply a major share of revenues, support the income security of citizens, indirectly stabilize their economies and affect important areas of these partners' and stakeholders' jurisdictions and activities.

The incumbent provides regional leadership in developing working relationships and in negotiating agreements, partnerships and co-locations; in arranging cooperation and capacity building; and in coordinating policies and programs with a variety of public, private and voluntary sector parties. The incumbent harmonizes the program orientation, as well as the resource and expenditure planning and implementation of all involved parties; resolves conflicts; and provides the Region's support to organizations that support the government's strategic socio-economic priorities and goals. The incumbent develops, negotiates and directs the implementation of strategies and initiatives that encourage the harmonization of often conflicting objectives and positions with provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal governments or organizations, private sector businesses, labour entities and voluntary sector agencies.

The ADM/REH directs ongoing improvements of delivery mechanisms and processes to maximize the outreach and service capacity of both departments, and establishes the performance measurement frameworks for third-party delivery agents. The ADM/REH oversees the strategic orientation and development of changes to existing SDNs, and interfaces with the corporate Branches to ensure consistency with corporate priorities and plans. The incumbent ensures that SDNs respond to the needs of regional clients, stakeholders and partners and that they support cohesive and integrated programming across all business lines, including labour, employment, labour market, income security, social development and education and learning. The incumbent also identifies needs in developing leading-edge technological support and information products and systems to optimize the service delivery capacity; to facilitate work activities; and to enhance the interface with clients, stakeholders and partners.

The ADM/REH is the direct link between the respective DMs and all activities in the Region and consults with corporate and program ADMs and with other ADM/REHs on issues of mutual concern and interest. The incumbent advises on major regional issues and plays a major representational role with federal, provincial, municipal and Aboriginal officials on issues involving these levels of government. As the federal manager responsible for the probity, effectiveness and efficiency of program and service delivery, the incumbent interfaces with new partners in devolution, co-management and ASD arrangements.

The ADM/REH is a member of the Senior Management Committee, the National Management Board and joint committees. The incumbent advises on regional program issues, major national and federal-provincial consultations and representational activities, such as Cabinet and parliamentary committees and First Ministers' Conferences. The ADM/REH is the primary regional liaison for coordinating with a variety of provincial, municipal, community and Aboriginal leaders and officials, Chief Executive Officers and business, labour, non-governmental and voluntary leaders.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs:

5,679

Operating budget:

$48 million

Labour market programs:

$115 million

Program payouts:
EI:

$611 million

OAS:

$1.5 billion

CPP:

$1.75 billion

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Manages the delivery and integration of the policies, programs and services of both departments in the Region, balancing the departments' and the Region's priorities and objectives; oversees the probity and integrity of the management of allocated departmental assets and resources; and establishes associated performance measurement and accountability frameworks.
  2. Advocates and negotiates the federal priorities, positions and interests of the departments with officials of other government departments (OGDs); agencies; provincial, territorial, municipal and Aboriginal governments; non-governmental and voluntary organizations; and communities. He or she acts as a catalyst to harmonize the strategic orientations, program applications and resource efforts of partners and other organizations involved in integrated service delivery arrangements in the Region.
  3. Develops, directs and monitors the management, accountability and reporting frameworks required to foster and maintain working agreements with a variety of private, public, voluntary and non-governmental sector organizations, including devolution, co-management, co-location, partnership and ASD arrangements; provides authoritative recommendations to the program branches of both departments to commit them to action; and oversees the reporting to Parliament and to the public on shared implementation activities.
  4. Provides a strong and key federal presence in the Region; plays an integrative role in harmonizing federal strategies and priorities and in developing new public administration machinery to enhance holistic federal policy and program delivery in the Region.
  5. Establishes and maintains strong linkages and partnerships with senior management in the program branches of both departments to alert them to any sensitive issues, to provide input on regional issues identified through service delivery activities, to provide strategic and innovative options on operational delivery issues, to report on discrepancies associated with the risk management framework and to ensure that the Region's requirements and priorities are considered in all areas of program design and implementation.
  6. Leads special and pilot projects of national, inter-regional and interdepartmental significance to address issues and requirements, such as the relevance and effectiveness of programs; to gather local and regional economic and social information; to develop, test and validate program parameters and accountabilities in the Region; and to develop position papers on specific regional issues.
  7. Provides expert advice affecting the Region or having corporate implications; participates on Management Board and in various cross-departmental committees; and contributes to the corporate strategic vision, policy and business priorities and overarching management processes and frameworks of both departments.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister/Regional Executive Head, Ontario

Know-How

G
Mastery of socio-economic theories and principles and related fields on the optimal employment and social and economic development of national human resources capital. Mastery of provincial labour market, employment, workplace skills, health and safety, employer-employee relations, employment equity, occupational and career development, Aboriginal socio-economic development, employment benefits, lifelong learning, youth employment, human resources partnerships, social development, disability and rehabilitation, income security and community, family and child development. Extensive policy and program development, business, executive and management expertise and skills. Thorough understanding of the divergent agendas and positions of clients, stakeholders and partners involved in the Region's sphere of programs and activities.
IV
Conceptual coordination and operational management of a large and dispersed Region with diversified policy and program issues, operational program and service delivery, corporate management challenges and clientele, and of the Region's partnership and ASD initiatives with OGDs and other provincial client, stakeholder and partner organizations.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to lead changes in the Region's service delivery orientations, to represent the Region with the DMs and ADMs of both departments, and to gain the input and acceptance of clients, stakeholders and partners.
920
The mid-range number is representative of the multiple major program and service delivery roles of the position in a large and highly operationally dispersed region.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking is done within broad policies, goals, priorities and service delivery support needs of the two departments and the macro-strategic agenda, in devising leading-edge approaches monitored by other levels of government and private and voluntary sector organizations for possible application in their jurisdictions.
4
Analytical, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to integrate socio-economic contexts with legislative, policy, program and service delivery frameworks, and to develop consensus at various corporate committees with other levels of government and with private, public and voluntary sector organizations.
(66) 608
High percentage reflects the magnitude and composition of the client bases; the complexity of the policy, program delivery and federal-provincial relations aspects of the portfolio; and the challenge of managing multi-faceted program and service delivery in a large, diversified and geographically dispersed region.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the DM of both departments, operates within general priorities with substantial independence in negotiating program and service delivery agreements and modus operandi with provincial, regional, private and voluntary sectors and interest groups.
5P
The position has a primary impact on the service delivery and associated operating resources of the Region. The proxy selected is the regional operating and program expenditures budgets totalling $163 million (constant).
920
The number selected reflects the size of the proxy, the latitude of the incumbent in representing the departments and in determining regional objectives and priorities, and the influence on federal program disbursements in the Region.

Summary

GIV3 920
G4(66) 608
G5P 920
Total = 2448 A3
Assistant Deputy Minister / Regional Executive Head, Ontario Number: 9 - A - 1
Org chart of the Assistant Deputy Minister / Regional Executive Head, Ontario
Figure:  9-A-1 - Text version

Benchmark Number:  9-A-1

Assistant Deputy Minister / Regional Executive Head, Ontario

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 17 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister / Regional Executive Head, Ontario are 6 Directors General, 1 Associate Regional Executive Head and 2 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Planning
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Employment Policy and Program Design
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Employment Insurance Operations
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Employment Program Operations
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Workplace Skills Development
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Labour and Homelessness
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Learning
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Communications and Ministerial Affairs
  • 9 Regional Executive Heads of
    • British Columbia and Yukon
    • Alberta
    • Saskatchewan
    • Manitoba
    • Quebec
    • New Brunswick
    • Nova Scotia
    • Price Edward Island
    • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Assistant Deputy Minister / Regional Executive Head, Ontario
    • 6 Directors General for:
      • Service Delivery (3)
      • Programs and Services
      • Income Security Program
      • Finance, Administration and information Technology
    • Associate Regional Executive Head
    • 2 Directors for
      • Communications
      • Human Resources

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 8-A-1

Position Title: Deputy Commissioner, Prairies

General Accountability

Is accountable for developing and implementing the Service's operations in the Prairies Region to actively encourage and assist offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 15 positions at the first managerial level reporting to the Commissioner. The others are Senior Deputy Commissioner; four other Regional Deputy Commissioners (Atlantic, Quebec, Ontario and Pacific); Deputy Commissioner, Women; Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs; Assistant Commissioner, Performance Assurance; Assistant Commissioner, Communications; Executive Director, Corporate Secretariat; Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services; Assistant Commissioner, Human Resources; Assistant Commissioner, Policy, Planning and Coordination; and Senior General Counsel.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the incumbent are as follows:

Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations, (staff of 52) is responsible for the efficient and effective direction of regional operations and programs that affect inmates and parolees.

Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Corporate Services, (staff of 66) is responsible for providing leadership in developing and delivering regional corporate services (financial and materiel management, human resources, facilities and accommodation, information management and electronic information technologies).

Thirteen (13) Institutional Wardens / Executive Directors (combined staff of 2,700), each is responsible for managing the operation of federal correctional facilities providing security (minimum, medium and maximum) and for delivering a wide variety of correctional programs to approximately 3,500 offenders to prepare them for release into society as law-abiding citizens of the community.

Four (4) District Directors (combined staff of 280), each is responsible for managing the supervision of community corrections (approximately 1,600 offenders conditionally released) in their respective geographic area.

Director, Operations CORCAN, (staff of 6) is responsible for developing and delivering the regional offender employment and skills development program; for developing certification agreements with colleges; and for developing marketing opportunities for products.

Regional Administrator, Performance Assurance, (staff of 4) is responsible for reviewing, reporting and recommending improvements to achieve Service and regional goals and objectives.

Regional Administrator, Communications and Executive Services, (staff of 4) is responsible for providing executive staff support to the Deputy Commissioner and for directing communications program activities, including media, public relations and public consultation.

Regional Infectious Disease Coordinator is responsible for developing regional policies, procedures, standards and guidelines to protect the health of offenders and departmental staff in response to the high number of offenders who have, or have been exposed to, infectious diseases.

Nature And Scope

CSC, as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to the protection of society by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

CSC operates under three levels of management: national, regional and institutional / district parole office. National headquarters in Ottawa performs overall planning and policy development, while each of the five regional offices implements departmental activities in facilities in its respective region.

The Deputy Commissioner, Prairies, assumes primary responsibility for the administration of sentences and the protection of the public within the Region. The Deputy Commissioner manages the organization by adapting national plans and programs to meet unique regional needs, developing and implementing regional objectives, plans and priorities that enhance the overall effectiveness of the organization within the framework of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and Regulations, and legislation respecting privacy, human rights, etc., as well as the Department's mission statement, core values, guiding principles, commissioner's directives, and operating standards.

A major challenge facing the Deputy Commissioner is to ensure consistent quality of service to incarcerated and conditionally released offenders across a vast geographic area. The incumbent oversees the 24-hour operation of multiple classes of institutions, parole districts and highly specialized facilities, such as the Psychiatric Centre, which is jointly managed with the Province of Saskatchewan. The incumbent ensures operational and administrative effectiveness through inspections and performance reviews and direct intervention to resolve problems as they emerge. The incumbent ensures the ongoing cooperation of police agencies and the military to ensure adequate responses to crisis situations.

The evolving needs of the offender population present significant challenges to the Deputy Commissioner in managing the delivery of regional operations, such as the aging offender population and the associated medical services. Modernizing programs to address specific offender community needs, such as Aboriginal initiatives, women offender programs, greater mobility of Canadians and the associated increase in international transfer of offenders, provides additional challenges for the incumbent. Improved programs for victims present another growing client group, which needs to be consulted. In this demanding environment, operational decisions made by the incumbent are coming under scrutiny more and more, resulting in court challenges by offenders under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The Deputy Commissioner participates as a decision-making member of the CSC Executive Committee and provides comments, critical advice and expertise in the identification, development and implementation of priorities, plans, policies and operating standards. The incumbent also chairs the Regional Management Committee and controls regional policy and direction.

The Deputy Commissioner meets with senior officials of other government departments, such as the National Parole Board and Citizenship and Immigration Canada, to address common concerns. The Prairies Region provides departmental services across three provinces and two territories, which requires the Deputy Commissioner to develop and maintain cooperative working relationships, to negotiate federal-provincial exchanges of service agreements and to resolve policy issues. The incumbent negotiates a diverse range of specialized agreements with non-governmental organizations to support the operational needs of the Region, including the affiliation agreement for the University of Saskatchewan's participation in the secure forensic Psychiatric Centre. The Deputy Commissioner also participates in regional meetings with the union, with citizens' advisory committees and with volunteers to solicit input or support in the identification, development or implementation of programs and services.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 3,145
Regional budget: $65.6 million

There are approximately 3,500 offenders incarcerated at any given time and 1,600 offenders under supervision in the community on conditional or mandatory release programs.

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Develops plans, policies and strategic direction for the Prairies Region, in keeping with the mission and applicable legislation, regulations and corporate direction.
  2. Provides advice and support to the Commissioner and the Executive Committee on the management and direction of the Department.
  3. Ensures operational effectiveness through frequent inspections, performance reviews and timely interventions when problems emerge.
  4. Directs the negotiation, development, implementation and evaluation of federal-provincial cooperative ventures, including exchange of service agreements.
  5. Promotes the aims, objectives and achievements of CSC to, among others, the public, other federal agencies, provincial governments, municipalities, universities and private agencies through a wide range of speaking engagements, meetings and events.

Evaluation Rationale

Deputy Commissioner, Prairies

Know-How

G
Mastery of the legislative framework, government and CSC policies and priorities related to incarceration and rehabilitation, conditional release, criminal justice and criminal cultural diversity; in-depth professional knowledge of the interrelationships between federal and provincial policies, priorities and programs and the priorities and programs of criminal justice systems partners.
IV
Conceptual and operational leadership and coordination of significant and diverse programs and services across a large geographic area.
3
Successful achievement of results requires working cooperatively with national headquarters staff on all aspects of departmental policies and programs delivered at the regional level, representing federal interests in areas of real or potential conflict with senior representatives of public and private sector organizations, as well as ensuring that regional staff are motivated to achieve results.
800
Low number reflects the breadth of managerial expertise required to deliver major programs, recognizing the corporate role in developing CSC-wide policies and programs and the tendency of the programs to be related.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking is guided by CSC's mission and corporate objectives, as well as by general objectives set by the Commissioner. The Deputy Commissioner adapts national programs and services to meet regional needs.
4
Analytical and creative thinking is required to provide the regional perspective at the executive level, to participate in developing CSC-wide plans and priorities and to resolve problems arising in the Region.
(57) 460
Solid percentage reflects the challenges associated with developing regional operational and administrative goals and objectives and with managing the adaptation of national programs to meet regional needs.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Commissioner, is subject to general guidance and direction and manages the delivery of programs and services developed at the corporate level.
4P
The position is responsible for the delivery of regional programs and services and for their effective management and administration. The proxy selected to represent these responsibilities is the regional budget of $65.6 million (constant).
700
The lower number reflects the impact of functional policies and goals on the position's freedom to act.

Summary

GIV3 800
G4(57) 460
G4P 700
Total = 1960 A3
Deputy Commissioner Prairies Number: 8 - A - 1
Org Chart of DEPUTY COMMISSIONER PRAIRIES
Figure: 8 – A – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 8 – A – 1

Deputy Commissioner Prairies

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 14 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Deputy Commissioner, Prairies are 4 District Directors, 2 assistant Deputy Commissioners, 13 Institutional Wardens / Executive Directors, 2 Regional Administrators, 1 Director and 1 Regional Coordinator.

Linear organisation chart:

Commissioner (Departmental deputy head)

  • Assistant Commissioner, Operations and Programs
  • Assistant Commissioner, Performance Assurance
  • Assistant Commissioner, Communications
  • Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services
  • Assistant Commissioner, Human Resources
  • Assistant Commissioner, Policy, Planning and Coordination
  • Deputy Commissioner, Women
  • Executive Director, Corporate Secretariat
  • 4 Regional Deputy Commissioners
  • Senior Deputy Commissioner
  • Senior General Counsel
  • Deputy Commissioner, Prairies
    • 4 District Directors
    • 13 Institutional Wardens / Executive Directors
    • Director, Operations CORCAN
    • Regional Infectious Disease Coordinator
    • 2 Assistant Deputy Commissioners for :
      • Operations
      • Corporate Services
    • 2 Regional Administrators for :
      • Performance Assurance
      • Communications and Executive Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 7-A-1

Position Title: Executive Director, Canada Business Service Centres

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing executive leadership in advancing the government's agenda on connectedness through the development and management of a national network of Canada Business Service Centres (CBSCs) and the Student Connection Program (SCP); and for developing and managing innovative working relationships with a variety of partners and stakeholders within the Department, central agencies, other federal departments and entities, such as Service Canada, and provincial departments and agencies within the context of the Government On-Line (GOL) initiative to enhance the capacity of the government to serve Canadian business using advanced technologies.

Organization Structure

This is one of five executive positions reporting at the second managerial level to the Chief Information Officer. The others are Director General, Information Management and Business Services; Director General, Infrastructure Services; Director General, GOL, Policy and Planning; and Director General, Client Services.

The Executive Director, Canada Business Service Centres, exercises general managerial authority delegated by the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) Committee of Managing Partners made up of ADMs from Industry Canada (IC), the Western Economic Diversification Agency (WED), Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec Regions and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA).

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Executive Director are as follows:

Manager, Planning and Partnership Development, (staff of 6) is responsible for developing and implementing strategies, approaches and initiatives to develop and maintain productive working relationships with partners, such as Team Canada Inc., the Aboriginal Business Service Network (ABSN) and Public Works and Government Services Canada; developing and monitoring the implementation of national plans, specifications, operating guidelines and services standards for the CBSCs; and providing secretariat support to the ADM Committee of Managing Partners and the Operations Committee.

Manager, Information Technology and Planning, (staff of 12) is responsible for planning, coordinating and implementing national information technology projects to support and enhance the CBSC network; providing ongoing design, maintenance, advice and help desk support; providing ongoing design support and maintenance of the national Internet presence; and providing secretariat support to a number of technical committees.

Manager, Information Products, (staff of 17) is responsible for managing the development, update and maintenance of the information products suite; addressing information product policy issues; providing secretariat support to a number of information management committees; and providing the linkages with the GOL initiative.

Manager, New Product Development and Student Connection Program, (staff of 4) is responsible for directing projects to design, develop and introduce new products to enhance the capacity of the network to assist Canadians in obtaining business information using advanced technologies; and managing the Student Connectedness Program.

Nature And Scope

The Department is mandated to foster Canadian business development, fair and efficient markets and Canadian competitiveness and economic growth by integrating key levers of economic development, providing strategic intelligence and analysis to business, regulating trade, reducing internal barriers to trade and increasing productivity and competitiveness while protecting the interests of consumers.

The CBSC initiative is the result of cooperative arrangements among 36 federal business-related departments, along with provincial government departments and the private sector, associations and academic and research communities. They serve as a single access point for information and for reliable referrals to appropriate experts or program delivery points to help entrepreneurs and small business obtain quick, accurate and comprehensive business information.

Within this context, the Executive Director provides corporate leadership, through the authorities delegated by the ADM Committee of Managing Partners, for the development, implementation and strategic management of the CBSCs as a national network comprising 13 CBSCs (one in every province and territory). The network includes 340 regional access sites, a 1-800 service on behalf of Trade Team Canada and 200 sites for the ABSN. In cooperation with the managing partners, WED manages the centres in the western and prairie provinces; IC manages the centres in Ontario, the Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories; CED manages the Quebec centres; and ACOA manages the centres in the Atlantic region.

The Director develops and implements strategies and approaches to increase the network's capacity to play a leadership role in GOL and Business Portal initiatives. Those initiatives include a sub-portal for business start-up to serve as an integrated access point for on-line business transactions; and a client-centred, one-stop sub-portal for federal and provincial regulations pertaining to business. The challenges associated with those initiatives require the incumbent to develop appropriate access, information and transaction processes within the CBSC network and Web site to evolve into a comprehensive, integrated business-to-government service provider.

The primary role and major challenge of the Executive Director is to ensure the effectiveness of the CBSC network within a collaborative partnership environment, by developing and implementing policies, program initiatives and innovative practices to steer CBSC network evolution. This challenge includes strategically positioning the CBSC initiative as a key player in the GOL strategy, as well as developing and negotiating memoranda of understanding to ensure the seamless delivery of business services to clients and access sites across Canada.

The Executive Director ensures that the CBSCs are flexible enough to evolve along with salient trends in the business world. The inherent management challenge is to establish and orchestrate a new service delivery model, and to implement creative and ambitious partnerships among organizations that may have never worked together in the past. The incumbent is called upon to develop innovative solutions using integrated computer and telephony technologies to support information delivery by organizations and by on-line transactions with federal and provincial partners.

The Executive Director chairs the Operations Managers Committee, comprised of CBSC site managers, and the Director General's Committee of Federal Managing Partners as a means of overseeing federal interests and ensuring national network management coordination in relation to program operations and service delivery. The incumbent is required to build national consensus within the CBSC network in relation to the overall strategic direction, the interpretation and application of policies, and the attainment of operational efficiencies, while respecting regional operational variations based on client requirements and program delivery partnerships.

The Executive Director directs the identification and coordination of government and private sector business information and provides information in a practical and highly focused fashion to assist the network in effectively delivering leading-edge information products and services. The incumbent oversees the development, maintenance and coordination of the Business Information System (BIS) to provide the network with information and products on government business programs, services, regulations and expertise. Because the BIS contains federal, provincial, municipal and private sector information, the Executive Director is responsible for overseeing data collection and structuring activities, and for developing innovative information management tools, such as customized search software and pathfinders, to identify multi-jurisdictional subjects.

The Executive Director also manages the SCP, which is a partnership between the government, the post-secondary institutions of Canada and the Canadian information technology industry, aimed at introducing the power of the Internet to small businesses across Canada. Under the program, Canadian youth will train small and medium-sized business owners in the use of on-line business information services in order to create new jobs and opportunities for growth. It also gives Canadian university and college students, hired as small business advisors, the opportunity to gain valuable work experience.

As the corporate voice and focal point for the CBSC network and the SCP, the Executive Director maintains a wide range of working relationships and contacts with federal departments; central agencies; the Advisory Committee on Information Management; provincial, municipal and foreign government officials; SCP regional administrative centres; business and academic associations; small business entrepreneurs; Youth Employment Strategy initiative stakeholders; the Student Connection Advisory Board and sub-committees; and representatives of the Canadian information technology industry. Through these working relationships, the Executive Director promotes the CBSC and SCP networks and concepts, establishes collaborative frameworks, forges partnerships and strategic alliances, assesses the adequacy of services and products, and discusses and negotiates issues related to the operation and further development of networks and programs. The incumbent represents CBSCs and the SCP at international meetings, fora and conferences to explore new and creative directions in government, public sector and multi-jurisdictional service delivery concepts, and to articulate CBSC and SCP initiatives, which are recognized internationally as leading-edge service delivery models.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 41
Operating budget: $1.4 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Leads the development of a strategic vision for the national CBSC network, and provides advice to the ADM Committee of Managing Partners and the Chief Information Officer on the network's development, operation and evolution.
  2. Leads the development of policies, position papers and memoranda to Cabinet to guide network growth and development, and to ensure the integrity and national consistency of information products and services across jurisdictions.
  3. Conceives innovative network cost-sharing, cost-recovery, delivery and management frameworks and approaches for policy and funding issues management, and implements unique program delivery partnerships and operational mechanisms to achieve network economies of scale and to eliminate effort duplication.
  4. Develops network systems management activities, including the identification of innovative information technology and systems infrastructure, and development and procurement requirements, and the technical resolution of information access, interface, interconnectivity and software integration.
  5. Directs the development, management and continuous enhancement of service delivery, information technology, innovative product development, procurement, human resources, training, communications and marketing and promotion policies, strategies and plans.
  6. Ensures the effective stewardship of SCP funding; directs the development, implementation and management of related promotional and sponsorship strategies and evaluation frameworks; makes recommendations regarding the modification or implementation of new program elements; and directs secretariat, research and policy advice services to the Student Connection Advisory Board and assigned sub-committees.
  7. Represents the CBSCs in international, governmental and business consultations and negotiations, as well as in other for a, to promote the network; establishes collaborative frameworks; forges partnerships; and discusses and negotiates issues related to the operation, enhancement and growth of the network.

Evaluation Rationale

Executive Director, Canada Business Service Centres

Know-How

G
Mastery of the principles and practices of delivering multi-modal services across all levels of government; professional expert knowledge of principles, policies, concepts, techniques and practices related to the design, development, installation, operation and maintenance of information management and information technology; professional knowledge of government policy on enhancing access to government information and services; expert professional knowledge of the policies, procedures and practices for managing networks of partners and stakeholders in all sector levels, including the private sector; expert knowledge of the policies, programs, regulations and practices of the Department and other public and private partner jurisdictions related to managing access to Web sites; and professional knowledge of business principles and practices.
III
Conceptual and operational management of a network of offices and technological infrastructure to enhance the access of Canadian business to government information, programs and services.
3
Human resources skills are critical in fostering multi-jurisdictional partnerships and in managing a highly distributed network of access sites across federal, provincial and private sector jurisdictions.
700
Mid-range number reflects the organizational relationships and the professional and managerial expertise required to develop, maintain and upgrade a variety of multi-modal client-oriented services made available to the Canadian business community in order to provide access to information, services and programs of all levels of government, private sector associations and associated non-government organizations.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done beyond the Department's information management / information technology policies to include portfolio, partner and stakeholder approaches to information management, information technology and access to information.
4
Position develops policies and plans and implements strategic initiatives to identify and integrate opportunities among partners to enhance the nature and level of in-person, telephone and computer-telephony integrated services and Web-based information products provided to the Canadian business community.
(57) 400
High percentage is representative of the challenges inherent to integrating partner and stakeholder priorities with government policies and objectives toward business client needs and priorities.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Chief Information Officer and the ADM Committee of Managing Partners, is subject to general guidance and policies in planning and directing the development and implementation of strategies to enhance client services through a collaborative network, and in negotiating and concluding agreements to maintain and expand the network.
3P
Primary impact on Branch operations, as represented by a budget of $1.4 million (constant).
460
The high number reflects the level of freedom to act on behalf of the ADM Committee of Managing Partners and the contribution made, as the leader of the network, through partnership arrangements, to a national program to enhance the capacity of Canadian business to grow on both the domestic and international fronts. It is consistent with the strong impact, through management of the network, on federal, provincial, municipal and non-government organizations in the provision of information, services and programs.

Summary

GIII3 700
F4(57) 400
F3P 460
Total = 1560 A1
Executive Director Canada Business Service Centres Number: 7 - A - 1
Org chart of Executive Director CANADA BUSINESS SERVICE CENTRES
Figure: 7 – A – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 7 – A – 1

Executive Director, Canada Business Service Centres

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Chief Information Officer, and there are 4 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Executive Director, Canada Business Service Centres are 4 Managers.

Linear organisation chart:

Chief Information Officer

  • Director General, Information Management and Business Services
  • Director General, Infrastructure Services
  • Director General, Client Services
  • Director General, GOL, Policy and Planning
  • Executive Director, Canada Business Service Centres
    • 4 Managers for:
      • Planning and Partnership Development
      • Information Technology and Planning
      • Information Products
      • New Product Development and Student Connection Program

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 7-A-2

Position Title: Director General, Regional Operations

General Accountability

Is accountable for directing and managing regional operational functions essential to conducting the agency's statistical programs, and for developing the overall strategic framework and business plans for the regional operations to enhance the agency's capacity to provide Canadians with statistical information.

Organization Structure

This is one of three positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Chief Statistician, Communications and Operations; the other two are the Director General, Operations and Administrative Support, and the Director General, Marketing and Information Services.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director General, Regional Operations are as follows:

Director, Survey Operations, (staff of 150) is responsible for developing, implementing, and coordinating approximately 100 national sample surveys for the collection and processing of economic and social data undertaken by regional offices; providing associated training programs, manuals and advanced information technology infrastructure; and providing liaison between headquarters subject matter specialists and the regions.

Manager, Census Collection, (staff of 25 with an additional 14 in a census year) is responsible for planning, developing, implementing, coordinating, monitoring and evaluating the collection and processing undertaken by regional offices for the Census of Population and Agriculture conducted every five years; and for managing the conduct of research, the preparation of logistics, census manuals and training materials, and the negotiation of budgets on behalf of the regions.

Director, Advisory Services, (staff of 28) is responsible for managing the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of regional dissemination and marketing of products and services, account executive programs, and information and advisory services to data users; the conduct of proactive outreach programs and market research; and the promotion of product sales and respondent, public and community relations, including census communications.

Director, Eastern Region, (staff of 28 and 800 Statistics Act employees in a non-census year; 175 and 16,500 Statistics Act employees in a census year).

Director, Central Region, (staff of 96 and 700 Statistics Act employees in a non-census year; 160 and 15,800 Statistics Act employees in a census year).

Director, Western Region, including the Northwest Territories and the Yukon Territory, (staff of 72 and 1,000 Statistics Act employees in a non-census year; 196 and 16,800 Statistics Act employees in a census year) each is responsible for designing and managing agency programs at the regional level, including the organization and implementation of a large number of surveys; the national census; regional communications plans; marketing goals, plans and strategies; the dissemination of statistical information; programs to improve and cultivate respondent and client relations; and the overall representation of the agency at the regional level.

Manager, Management Services, (staff of 20) is responsible for developing and managing human resources policies and procedures; negotiating collective agreements for Statistical Survey Operations employees; settling grievances and lawsuits brought by all Branch employees; and coordinating and providing advice on the delivery of financial, personnel, administrative and logistics services for headquarters and regions.

Nature And Scope

The agency's mandate is to collect, compile, analyse, publish and disseminate statistical information on the economic, social and general conditions of Canada and its citizens. This requires surveying households, individuals, businesses, institutions and governments to obtain data on the economic and social conditions of Canadians.

The Regional Operations Branch, through its network of regional offices, is the agency's main organization for data collection, respondent follow-up, ultimate data dissemination, advisory services and marketing and sales of products and services. Because the regions represent the agency at the provincial level, they can provide critical input into the design, planning and conduct of surveys, in terms of respondent reaction, communications, the needs of data users and the operational feasibility of surveys, as well as the surveys' methodological underpinnings.

In this context, the Director General, Regional Operations, is responsible for planning and developing the management framework for collecting, processing, disseminating, marketing and selling statistical information and services through the regional offices. This includes the development of appropriate policies, guidelines, support systems, organizational mandates, structures, informatics systems and human and financial resources allocations, as well as the development and implementation of objectives and goals within a highly automated and decentralized environment. The incumbent ensures the ongoing monitoring, assessment and management of regional performance.

A major challenge for the Director General is to build national consensus for the implementation of policies and procedures that respond to the changing needs of clients. In meeting this challenge, the incumbent must balance increasing demands for quality information with public and political concerns regarding invasion of privacy, response burden, voluntary participation and respondent refusal or mistrust. The incumbent is called upon to establish broad policy guidelines that advance cost recovery and sales objectives, while respecting the public good in conducting more than 100 surveys per year, contacts with over 3.8 million respondents and responses to over 300,000 inquiries.

A major and recurring challenge for the Director General is to plan the five-year national Census of Population and Agriculture. Although the census is conducted in five-year cycles, the undertaking is sufficiently massive to necessitate continuous planning. As soon as one census is completed and the post-census review is conducted to assess the results and to recommend changes and improvements, planning for the next census must begin. Each census requires a large and well-trained organization, as well as considerable advance planning and testing of material and development of public communication strategies and programs. The incumbent develops the overall management framework for the collection of the census, including the negotiation of resources, the development of census organization and management structures, human and financial resources allocation, quality control mechanisms and pre- and post-census assessments.

The Director General leads the development and maintenance of cooperative working relationships between the regions and headquarters organizations, between the agency and national and international statistical organizations and with public and private partners and stakeholders.

The agency recruits a large number of interviewers under the Statistics Act. As these employees are outside of the regular federal public service, the agency is the legal employer. This requires the Director General to exercise direct responsibility for all aspects of human resources management for this group, including collective bargaining, dispute resolution, development of policies and guidelines respecting human resources management. The incumbent develops and maintains working relationships with senior officers of the central agencies on a broad range of human resources and staff relations issues.

The Director General is in frequent contact with Directors General and Assistant Chief Statisticians regarding strategic directions and operational plans and results.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
  (Non-Census Year) (Census Year)
Public Service employees: 512 545
Statistics Act employees: 2,500 49,100
Annual budget: $12.6 million $30.3 million
Annual sales: $1.2 million  

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for developing the overall strategic framework for departmental regional operations to ensure that the agency has the capacity to meet statutory requirements and client needs for statistical data and information.
  2. Provides overall direction and coordination of regional operations. This involves developing appropriate policies, guidelines, support systems, organizational mandates, structures, informatics systems, and human and financial resources allocations, as well as developing and implementing objectives and goals within a highly automated and decentralized environment to ensure that the requirements of survey sponsors, data users, government and department policies are met within appropriate quality, cost and time constraints.
  3. Directs the collection of the five-year Census of Population and Agriculture, from developing the planning and management frameworks to negotiating resources and conducting post-census assessments to ensure the cost-effectiveness of census operations.
  4. Develops cooperative working relationships between headquarters specialist divisions and regional operations for survey testing and methodology, survey cost analysis, financial negotiations, respondent reactions, issues of survey coverage and respondent burden and for the dissemination, marketing and sales of their products and services to enhance the management of the agency's expertise and knowledge.
  5. Directs the ongoing monitoring, assessment and management of regional performance and the representation of regional issues and concerns (including respondents, clients and public reaction to agency activities) to various senior management committees in order to provide the infrastructure for the continuous improvement of the agency's operations.
  6. Represents the Minister as the separate employer of Statistical Survey Operations employees in all aspects of human resources management.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Regional Operations

Know-How

G
Mastery of principles, concepts and methodology in several statistical fields; extensive knowledge of regional economic, social and political differences and requirements; and in-depth knowledge of departmental operating policies, practices and clients.
III
Operation of a large geographically dispersed unit involved in the specification, collection and processing of statistical data.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires motivation of a large staff of professional, technical, administrative and clerical employees and negotiations with the public, other governments and unions.
700
Mid-range number recognizes the size and national scope of the organization and the specialized knowledge required.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within a general frame of reference provided by departmental and general government policy.
4
The work requires analytical, interpretive and evaluative thinking to identify and resolve issues concerning data collection and processing, project priorities, technological change, cost recovery and other matters relating to the management of the organization.
(57) 400
Higher percentage reflects the requirement to develop new and imaginative approaches to data collection and processing to generate revenue.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Assistant Chief Statistician, Communications and Operations, the Director General is accountable for ensuring the cost-effective operation of the agency's network of regional offices.
4P
The position has a primary impact on regional operations. The proxy selected to represent these regional operations is an operating budget fluctuating over a period of five years of between $12 million and $30 million (constant).
528
The proxy selected warrants the low number; however, a push to the mid-range number is given to reflect the size of the regions and the degree of latitude required to develop and carry out major data collection and dissemination programs across Canada, and the latitude the position has in establishing broad policy guidelines to advance cost-recovery and sales objectives.

Summary

GIII3 700
F4(57) 400
F4P 528
Total = 1628 A2
Director General Regional Operations Number: 7 - A - 2
Org Chart of DIRECTOR GENERAL REGIONAL OPERATIONS
Figure: 7 – A – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 7 – A – 2

Director General, Regional Operations

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Chief Statistician, Communications and Operations, and there are 2 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Regional Operations are 5 Directors and 2 Managers.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Chief Statistician, Communications and Operations

  • Director General, Operations and Administrative Support
  • Director General, Marketing and Information Services
  • Director General, Regional Operations
    • 5 Directors for:
      • Survey Operations
      • Advisory Services
      • Eastern Region
      • Central Region
      • Western Region
    • 2 Managers for:
      • Census Collection
      • Management Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 6-A-1

Position Title: District Director - Metropolitan Montreal

General Accountability

Is accountable for the direction and management of operations for a district parole office that is responsible for, among other things, the preparation of inmates' cases and the supervision of offenders on conditional release in order to contribute to the protection of society.

Organization Structure

This position is 1 of 17 positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Deputy Commissioner, Quebec Region. The 16 others are Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations; Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Corporate Services; Director, Communications and Executive Services; Secretary of the Deputy Commissioner; 11 Wardens (Archambault, Donnacona, Port-Cartier, Leclerc, Cowansville, Federal Training Centre, Drummond, La Macaza, Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines, Montée Saint-François, Regional Reception Centre); and 1 District Director (Quebec East/West).

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the District Director are as follows:

Manager, South Shore Community Operations, and three (3) Area Managers (Ville-Marie, Lafontaine and Langelier) (combined staff of 106) are responsible for operations of parole offices in a geographically defined area.

Four (4) Community Correctional Centre Managers (Martineau, Hochelaga, Ogilvy and Sherbrooke) (combined staff of 23) are responsible for the operation of halfway houses, private home supervision and contracted supervision.

Coordinator, Community Resources, (staff of 9) is responsible for developing strong linkages with local communities, developing the volunteer program in the District, and integrating all community strategies and plans to support safe release.

Coordinator, Correctional Programs, (staff of 23) is responsible for providing advice and interpretation related to correctional programs that affect parolees.

Psychologist is responsible for providing professional psychological advice and services.

Regional Chaplain is responsible for delivering spiritual counselling services and providing leadership in the development and maintenance of volunteer networks across the Quebec Region.

Offender Management System Expert User is responsible for providing systems training and support for district staff.

Administrative Officer (staff of 7) is responsible for providing administrative support to the District Director and the district management team.

Nature And Scope

Correctional Service Canada (CSC), as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to the protection of society by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

CSC operates under three levels of management: national, regional and institutional / district parole office. The national headquarters in Ottawa performs overall planning and policy development, while each of the five regional offices implements departmental activities in facilities in its respective region.

The District Director reports to the Regional Deputy Commissioner on any district parole-related matter. The Metropolitan Montreal District normally handles over 2,000 supervision cases (day parole, full parole, statutory release), primarily on Montreal Island. Other cases are spread out along the South Shore of the St. Lawrence River. In addition to the parole supervision function, the District also prepares cases for presentation to the Parole Board (over 700 cases annually). The District Director reports to the National Parole Board Chair on any matter relating to the exercise of delegated authority to suspend offenders' paroles, including to suspend or revoke parole for offenders unlawfully at large.

The District Director plans and manages the delivery of a broad range of services. The incumbent sets goals and objectives, plans and allocates resources in response to fluctuating offender populations, ensures effective recruitment and training of staff, implements risk assessment measures, monitors results and compliance with legal and policy frameworks, and promotes the parole concept in the community to encourage public support for projects and programs and to assist offenders on parole in the area. The Director is the only person in charge of District Office operations on a 24-hour basis and has the delegated authority and responsibility to suspend an offender's parole when necessary.

Major challenges faced by the District Director include offering enough community programs and residential services to meet the needs of offenders on conditional release in accordance with CSC standards; balancing offenders' rights with public protection; managing resources within budget limits despite unforeseeable requirements and increasingly complicated administrative requirements; accepting and supporting conditional release programs that are often seen by some interest groups and organizations as a threat to the public; developing information-sharing systems among the various agencies in the penal system; and performing a complete evaluation of the degree of risk in relation to offenders on conditional release. The incumbent must also address the changing needs of offenders, which involves adapting local programs and services to provide a specialized focus, for example, on substance abuse treatment, behavioural therapy, psychiatric care or special services, to meet the needs of aging offenders.

The District Director oversees the operation of halfway houses, Community Residential Centres (CRCs) and Community Accommodation Centres (CACs), as well as a few private homes that have housing agreements with CSC. The increased privatization of many services adds a new complexity to the incumbent's parole oversight responsibilities. The incumbent must ensure that CSC objectives are met in contracts for housing and/or supervision with agencies such as the John Howard Society, the Maison Saint-Laurent and the Société Emmanuel Grégoire.

The District Director oversees the Metropolitan Montreal district, which has a high number of offenders under intensive supervision. Because this type of supervision is reserved for individuals who have already shown a potential for violence or who have committed a sexual offence and display a high risk for failure and violence, the incumbent ensures that effective follow-up mechanisms are in place and that effective risk management is provided. To that end, the Director manages and allocates resources effectively to allow for the required level of supervision and contribute to ensuring public protection.

The incumbent is required to establish and maintain effective working relationships with officials and representatives of other federal departments, provincial departments, non-government organizations, Aboriginal groups, ethnic groups, religious groups, local community services groups, private organizations, educational facilities and volunteer groups to manage operational services.

Community correctional services are a matter of high interest for the media. The District Director develops public relations and information strategies in order to communicate effectively with the media and respond to the community's diverse interests represented by victim rights groups, inmate rights groups and civil liberties groups.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 174 person-years
Operating budget: $3.4 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Develops operational plans and objectives for the District Office, allocates resources and directs the activities of a team of managers and correctional specialists providing offender supervision and Parole Board case preparation services.
  2. Ensures the development of intensive supervision measures for certain classes of offenders at risk, while increasing the number of information exchange mechanisms with various organizations, including district police forces, in order to initiate appropriate intervention measures as soon as behavioural deterioration is apparent.
  3. Sets up community programs adapted to offenders' individual needs in order to give them every possible chance of successfully reintegrating.
  4. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with officials and representatives of other federal departments, provincial departments, non-government organizations, Aboriginal groups, ethnic groups and religious groups, local community services groups, private organizations, educational facilities and volunteer groups.

Evaluation Rationale

District Director - Metropolitan Montreal

Know-How

F
In-depth knowledge of policies, practices and processes related to corrections, with special emphasis on policies and mechanisms related to conditional release programs; sound knowledge of CSC's mandate, policies and programs; sound knowledge of the mandates and programs of other organizations involved in the administration of the Canadian criminal justice system.
III
Operational management of a broad range of programs and services through numerous and various service delivery points.
3
Successful achievement of results requires working cooperatively with peers at the national and regional levels; establishing and maintaining effective working relationships with representatives of federal and provincial departments, non-government organizations, Aboriginal groups, ethnic groups and religious groups, local community services groups, private organizations, educational facilities and volunteer groups.
608
High number reflects expert knowledge of multiple departmental programs and services and the associated legal framework in order to ensure compliance with sentence requirements and respect of offender needs and rights, and the high level of integration in the delivery of services at different levels through a number of service delivery points.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is guided by CSC's corporate objectives, the application of legal requirements and the objectives set by the Deputy Commissioner.
4
Analytical and creative thinking is required in the identification and commitment of resources, the development of plans and alternatives and the requirement for innovation in an area where both staff and offender interests must be addressed.
(50) 304
Solid percentage reflects the constraints imposed by legal requirements, departmental policies and procedures, and direction from the Deputy Commissioner.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Regional Deputy Commissioner, is subject to guidance and direction in ensuring that corporate and regional policies and goals are met, required services are performed, and budgetary requirements and expenditures are controlled.
3P
The position has a primary impact on district operations. The proxy selected to represent these operations is a salary and operating budget of $3.4 million (constant).
350
Number reflects the size of the budget and the guidance available.

Summary

FIII3 608
F4(50) 304
F3P 350
Total = 1262 A1
District Director Metropolitan Montreal Number: 6 - A - 1
Org Chart of DISTRICT DIRECTOR METROPOLITAN MONTREAL
Figure: 6 – A – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 6 – A – 1

District Director, Metropolitan Montreal

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Deputy Commissioner, Quebec Region, and there are 16 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the District Director, Metropolitan Montreal are 3 Area Managers, 2 Coordinators, 4 Community Correctional Centre Managers, 1 Manager, 1 Psychologist, 1 Regional Chaplain, 1 Offender Management System Expert User and 1 Administrative Officer.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Commissioner, Quebec Region

  • Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations
  • Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Corporate Services
  • Director, Communications and Executive Services
  • Secretary of the Deputy Commissioner
  • 11 Wardens
  • District Director
  • District Director, Metropolitan Montreal
    • 3 Area Managers
    • 2 Coordinators for:
      • Community Resources
      • Correction Programs
    • 4 Community Correctional Centre Managers
    • Manager, South Shore Community Operations
    • Psychologist
    • Regional Chaplain
    • Offender Management System Expert User
    • Administrative Officer

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 6-A-2

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations

General Accountability

Is accountable for the efficient and effective direction of regional operations and programs that are designed to assist inmates and parolees in their reintegration into civil society.

Organization Structure

This is one of 23 positions at the second managerial level reporting directly to the Deputy Commissioner, Prairies. The other positions are the Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Corporate Services; Regional Advisor, Performance Assurance; Director, Operations CORCAN; 13 Wardens/Executive Directors of federal institutions; 4 District Directors, Parole; Regional Advisor, Communications and Executive Services; and Regional Infectious Disease Coordinator.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the incumbent are as follows:

Regional Manager, Reintegration, (staff of 19) is responsible for developing strategies and policies to actively encourage and assist offenders in becoming law-abiding citizens, and for ensuring their safe reintegration into the community.

Regional Administrator, Correctional Programs, (staff of 12) is responsible for overseeing the academic and vocational education programs for offenders; overseeing inmate employment strategies and pay programs; ensuring the provision of essential life support services and social, cultural and leisure programs; and negotiating with special interest groups and private agencies on community resources and facilities.

Regional Administrator, Aboriginal Programs, (staff of 5) is responsible for providing spiritual and cultural programs and services for Aboriginal offenders and promoting active participation by the Aboriginal community in the provision of programs and services.

Regional Administrator, Security, (staff of 6) is responsible for implementing policies, procedures, standards and systems in support of security operations; and for providing general security investigation services and resulting strategy and policy recommendations and advice on managerial techniques to institutions and parole offices in the Region.

Regional Manager, Health Care Services, (staff of 4) is responsible for ensuring that the required medical, dental, surgical and nursing care is provided to inmates. The position negotiates contracts for specialist medical and support services (physicians, psychiatrists, pharmacists) and evaluates the effectiveness and efficiency of institutional health care activities.

Regional Psychologist is responsible for coordinating professional psychological services and coordinating the delivery of sex offender program services.

Regional Administrator, Spiritual and Cultural Services, (staff of 4) is responsible for providing spiritual services and programs to offenders and staff in the Region.

Regional Elder is responsible for the provision of policy advice, direction and guidance on matters of Aboriginal spirituality, culture and holistic healing processes and services to senior managers and elders working in Correctional Service Canada (CSC) units.

Nature And Scope

CSC, as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to the protection of society by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control.

CSC operates under three levels of management: national, regional and institutional / district parole office. National headquarters in Ottawa performs overall planning and policy development, while each of the five regional offices implements departmental activities in facilities in its respective region.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations, assists and advises the Deputy Commissioner by analysing and evaluating regional and operational problems, recommending strategies and policies to achieve regional correctional objectives and standards and to improve operations and programs, developing implementation plans and overseeing the implementation of new policies and programs.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner oversees the provision of a variety of operational support functions composed of professional, specialized, technical and administrative components organized to support and facilitate the care and security of incarcerated and conditionally released offenders. The incumbent develops the best operational plans, alternatives and administrative controls for the Deputy Commissioner to consider in achieving departmental objectives.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner leads the cooperative development of innovative programs with community support organizations or spiritual and cultural leaders to help offenders benefit from a broad range of programs and services and to assist them in successfully reintegrating into the community.

These services and activities consist of physical planning and technical advice on the acquisition and maintenance of electronic and telecommunications equipment; physical and dynamic security; psychological, psychiatric and religious counselling; medical and health care treatment; and industrial, educational and social programs. These activities are governed by a wide variety of legislative and administrative control procedures, both at the provincial and federal levels, and are particularly sensitive to public reaction and to the pressure of civil rights and minority group concerns.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations, works closely with the Wardens and District Directors in the administration of offender populations. This entails consultation on intra- and inter-regional transfers and escorted temporary absences and on the review and monitoring of segregated inmates. The incumbent administers, along with line managers, a population of approximately 3,500 inmates and approximately 1,600 offenders on conditional release under supervision in the community.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations, is responsible for functional administration and provision of professional orientation, advice and guidance to Wardens and District Directors in the Region on offender employment, activities, work opportunities, agribusiness and academic and vocational programs. The creation of work opportunities is required to maximize the use of productive offender labour and thereby reduce overall operating costs and provide offenders with valuable skills and work experience.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations, must work effectively within the framework of the criminal justice system and be open to the public, while maintaining guarantees and safeguards as prescribed by legislation. The incumbent directs policy applications and procedures that deal with the national and regional media, as well as the public, and inform them about correctional programs, events and problems in order to meet public expectations regarding the safe management and protection of offenders within the provisions of the law.

The Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations, liaises with police agencies, defence and prosecution attorneys, the judiciary, aftercare and professional organizations (academic, vocational, industrial, medical and media), other federal departments and provincial officials to enlist support, resolve common problems and initiate preventive procedures relating to offenders, staff and contractual matters.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
Regional Resources
FTEs: 3,145
Operating budget: $65.6 million
Directorate
FTEs: 52
Operating budget: $438,500

Specific Accountabilities

Makes recommendations to assist the Deputy Commissioner in resolving operational problems and advises on alternatives and implications of all facets of regional operations.

Contributes to regional operational effectiveness, policy development and application by developing operational plans and strategies.

In conjunction with the Deputy Commissioner, directs resources by setting policy objectives, priorities and performance standards in the major aspects of operations, and implements policy to ensure that minority rights are respected.

Ensures that regional headquarters operations fully facilitate the efficient and effective achievement of departmental objectives by monitoring standards of professional and technical competence and conduct; adherence to personnel, financial and branch policies; and the establishment and effective use of management strategies and techniques.

Develops policy and program implementation plans and resource allocation control strategies to meet changing needs and a variety of operational and emergency situations by anticipating and ensuring careful analysis and planning, and intervenes in unusual or crisis situations to assist institutional and parole District Managers.

Negotiates the resolution of complex problem areas in overlapping jurisdictions, deals with critical problems relative to the incarceration of offenders and the administration of their sentences and with inmate grievances at the regional level, consults on special cases of temporary absence and monitors all administrative segregation cases over 90 days.

Identifies and pursues opportunities for enhancing the effectiveness of regional operations through contacts with aftercare agencies, the police, the judiciary, provincial corrections services, legal and other professional groups, and works with provincial counterparts to negotiate exchange of service agreements.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations

Know-How

F
Extensive knowledge at the operational level of policies, practices and processes related to corrections programs; in-depth knowledge of policies, principles and practices related to the management of financial and non-financial resources.
III
Operational management of all correctional programs: security offender programs, case management, education and training, facilities, planning, industries and health care. Conceptual management includes setting operational policy objectives, priorities and performance standards, as well as planning, controlling and evaluating the effectiveness of regional operations.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires motivating regional specialists and institutional staff, promoting public and provincial authorities' acceptance of departmental objectives and programs and dealing with private and governmental executives regarding various offender services and activities.
608
Highest number reflects near mastery of the interrelationships between a large number of specialized fields at the operational level.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within broadly defined corporate policies in the provision of a complete range of diverse but interdependent operational programs, as well as assistance to Wardens and District Directors in the solution of a variety of program and service problems.
4
Analytical and creative thinking is required in the identification and commitment of resources, the development of plans and alternatives and the requirement for innovation in an area where both staff and offender interests must be addressed.
(50) 304
Standard percentage reflects the requirement to adapt corporate policies to the delivery of a broad range of regional programs.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Regional Deputy Commissioner, is subject to guidance and direction in ensuring that corporate and regional policies and goals are met, that adequate correctional services are performed and that budgetary requirements and expenditures are controlled.
2P
The position has a primary impact on regional headquarters operations. The proxy selected to represent these operations is a salary and operating budget of $438,500 (constant).
350
Reflects the degree of latitude that the position has in determining the nature and levels of service, the influence on the delivery of programs in institutions and parole districts, and the contribution to the achievement of the Region's operational goals.

Summary

FIII3 608
F4(50) 304
F2P 350
Total = 1262 A1
Assistant Deputy Commissioner Operations Number: 6 - A - 2
Org Chart of ASSISTANT DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OPERATIONS
Figure: 6 – A – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 6 – A – 2

Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Deputy Commissioner, Prairies, and there are 22 peer positions at the same reporting level.
Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations are 4 Regional Administrators, 2 Regional Managers, 1 Regional Psychologist and 1 Regional Elder.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Commissioner, Prairies

  • Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Corporate Services
  • Regional Advisor, Performance Assurance
  • Director, Operations CORCAN
  • 13 Wardens/Executive Directors of Federal Institutions
  • 4 District Directors, Parole
  • Regional Advisor, Communications and Executive Services
  • Regional Infectious Disease Coordinator
  • Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Operations
    • 4 Regional Administrators for:
      • Correctional Programs
      • Aboriginal Programs
      • Security
      • Spiritual and Cultural Services
    • 2 Regional Managers for:
      • Reintegration
      • Health Care Services
    • Regional Psychologist
    • Regional Elder

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 5-A-1

Position Title: Regional Director, Health Products and Food

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing a regional lens in the conception, development and delivery of national programs to promote good nutrition and informed use of drugs, food and natural health products, and to maximize the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical drugs, food, natural health products, medical devices, biologics and related biotechnology products in the Canadian marketplace and health system to promote and protect the health of Canadians.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 17 positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food Branch; the others are Directors General for Food, for Therapeutic Products, for Biologics and Genetic Therapies, for Natural Health Products, for Policy and Strategic Planning, and for Nutrition Policy and Promotion; Director General, Office of Consumer Affairs and Public Involvement; Director General, Office of Biotechnology and Science; Director General, Inspectorate; Director General, Regulatory and International Affairs; Director, Management Services, Health Products and Food Litigation Secretariat, and four other Regional Director positions.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Regional Director, Health Products and Food, are as follows:

Head, Food Program, (staff of 13) is responsible for managing the development of leading-edge projects, validating analytical chemistry methods and performing national surveys on foods and human blood for the presence of contaminants; and providing scientific and technical advice.

Program Manager, Inspectorate, (staff of 9) is responsible for developing and managing the delivery of enforcement and information inspection programs related to manufacturing, importing, distributing and selling regulated health products for human and veterinary use; providing emergency response contact (24/7) for the region; supporting international activities; and serving as the designated Canadian contact for selected United States-based manufacturers and exporters of regulated products into Canada.

Public Involvement and Outreach Officer is responsible for planning and implementing regional public involvement through consultation and other mechanisms.

Food Liaison Officer is responsible for developing and implementing consultation and liaison strategies between federal interests and provincial and territorial governments, health professionals, consumer associations and special interest groups; and providing regulatory advice on food safety and risk communication.

Chief, Program Management Support Services, (staff of 6) is responsible for providing financial and human resources management, administrative and business management, and planning systems and material management services, as well as accommodation and laboratory facilities, security and business continuity planning; and managing the services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada for facility management.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mission is to help the people of Canada maintain and improve their health. Its mandate, underpinned by a solid information and knowledge base, covers three broad areas: national health policy and systems, including health care; health promotion and protection, including disease, illness and injury prevention; and First Nations and Inuit health.

In this context, the Regional Director provides professional leadership for representing, advancing and delivering, across the Region, the promotion and regulatory programs that are central to the management of risks to the health of Canadians with respect to the regulation and control of food, drugs, medical devices, natural health products and therapeutic products. The incumbent also provides leadership with respect to developing strategies, approaches and initiatives for promoting and fostering good nutrition and informed use of drugs, food and natural health products.

The Regional Director manages Branch programs and operations delivered in the Region. The incumbent works closely with the Regional Director General in managing horizontal issues and in promoting departmental coherence in the Region, strengthened local communications and enhanced linkages with other regional departmental activities, as well as local communities, provincial governments and other stakeholders. The incumbent establishes and maintains productive working relationships with industry associations and other non-governmental organizations to promote and foster positive attitudes and initiatives with respect to the safety of the general public.

The Regional Director prepares, executes, monitors and evaluates regional business plans for the effective and efficient delivery of Branch programs and services; and plans, organizes and implements compliance programs that provide for the efficient and effective inspection of the producers of those products. The incumbent brings regional issues to bear in the formulation of national policies and program initiatives.

The Regional Director hears appeals from the regulated industry against the proposed actions of staff under the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations and has the sole delegated authority of the Minister in the Region to deliver information developed by staff to the Department of Justice, permitting charges to be laid in court against individuals or companies found to be in violation of the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations.

The Regional Director negotiates and implements comprehensive collaborative agreements; exercises delegated authority to sign memorandums of understanding with two provinces, other levels of government, as well as non-governmental organizations; and negotiates, develops and implements frameworks. The incumbent fosters a spirit of cooperation, collaboration, teamwork and partnership between the department and the communities, through contacts with senior officials, such as the Deputy Minister or Minister, Assistant Deputy Ministers, Presidents or Directors in provincial health, social services and education departments or agencies. International contacts include regional and local United States Food and Drug Administration officials dealing with regulatory and policy issues of common concern and with U.S. senior industry officials on regulatory and information matters. A major challenge for the incumbent is to incorporate the interests and concerns of all stakeholders when contributing to the development of national frameworks.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 32
Operating budget: $310,000

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for representing, advancing and delivering promotion, regulatory and compliance programs related to the health and safety risk in the manufacture and sale of foods, drugs, medical devices, biologics and biotechnology, therapeutic and natural health products.
  2. Fosters the formation of innovative, cost-effective partnerships and initiatives; and maintains productive working relationships with other federal departments, other levels of government and agencies, the private sector and international contacts in order to share regulatory and policy issues of common concern.
  3. Provides relevant regional input into national policy development and program priorities.
  4. Provides authoritative interpretations of departmental programs, legislation and policies to regional staff and to officials outside of the Department.
  5. Manages the regional food laboratory facility.

Evaluation Rationale

Regional Director, Health Products and Food

Know-How

F
Professional knowledge of the objectives, policies and multi-disciplinary programs of the Branch and Region; professional knowledge of the chemical and biological sciences related to the assessment and management of risk associated with health products; and professional knowledge of approaches and techniques required to consult with stakeholders and to assess and address the concerns of a broad range of communities of interest.
III
Operational and conceptual management of integrated strategies, approaches and programs to deliver a variety of regulatory and promotional programs across the Region.
3
Establishment of effective working relationships across a broad spectrum of communities of interest is critical to developing teamwork and cooperation among multiple partners with overlapping roles and interests and to bringing regional issues to bear in the formulation of national policies, regulations and program initiatives.
528
Mid-range number reflects the depth of knowledge required to manage the delivery of a regional program that integrates scientific disciplines with the Department's agenda for protecting Canadians against hazardous food, drugs, medical devices, biological and biotechnology dangers, therapeutics and natural health products, including the promotion of the safe use of these products.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within the framework of the Branch's broad strategic objectives and the Region's strategic business plans.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking is required to adapt national strategies, approaches and initiatives for regional implementation and to bring regional issues to bear in the formulation of national policies and program initiatives.
(50) 264
Solid percentage indicates that a noticeable degree of functional direction is available.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food, is subject to broad direction and is accountable for the regional conception, development and delivery of national programs and initiatives.
2P
The position has a primary impact on the delivery of the regional activities of the Department's health products regulatory and promotional programs. The proxy used to represent these activities is an operating budget of $310,000 (constant).
304
Mid-range number reflects the size of the budget, the latitude that the position has in the design and implementation of regional program initiatives and the impact that the position has on the commercial interests of the health products sector in the Region.

Summary

FIII3 528
F4(50) 264
F2P 304
Total = 1096 A1
Regional Director Health Products And Food Number: 5 - A - 1
Org Chart of the REGIONAL DIRECTOR HEALTH PRODUCTS AND FOOD
Figure: 5 – A – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 5 – A – 1

Regional Director, Health Products And Food

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food Branch, and there are 16 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Regional Director, Health Products and Food are 2 Officers, 1 Chief, 1 Head and 1 Program Manager.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, Health Products and Food Branch

  • Director General, Food
  • Director General, Therapeutic Products
  • Director General, Biologics and Genetic Therapies
  • Director General, Natural Health Products
  • Director General, Policy and Strategic Planning
  • Director General, Nutrition Policy and Promotion
  • Director General, Office of Consumer Affairs and Public Involvement
  • Director General, Office of Biotechnology and Science
  • Director General, Inspectorate
  • Director General, Regulatory and International Affairs
  • Director, Management Services
  • Director, HPF Litigation Secretariat
  • 4 Regional Directors
  • Regional Director, Health Products and Food
    • 2 Officers for :
      • Public Involvement and Outreach
      • Food Liaison
    • Chief, Program Management Support Services
    • Head, Food Program
    • Program Manager, Inspectorate

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 4-A-1

Position Title: Director, Human Resources Centre Canada

General Accountability

Is accountable within the assigned geographic zone for the delivery of the full range of programs and services within the Department's national Service Delivery Network (SDN), through a Human Resources Centre of Canada (HRCC), Local Human Resources Centres (LHRCs), kiosks, itinerant services and a wide range of partnership arrangements; for contributing to the formulation of regional and national legislative, policy and management frameworks; for implementing changes to the Department's priorities, business product or service lines and their delivery and management and resources regimes; and for conducting senior-level advisor and representational services.

Organization Structure

This is one of twenty-nine (29) Directors, Human Resources Centre Canada (HRCC) positions in the Region at the third managerial level reporting to the Regional Director General, Service Delivery.

Specific functions of the positions reporting directly to the Director are as follows:

Six (6) Senior Service Delivery Advisors (total staff of 10) are responsible, in their specialized area(s) (e.g. employment; income support; Employment Insurance (EI); Canada Pension Plan, Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement; labour market planning, forecasting and information; labour standards; occupational health and safety; student loans; Aboriginal labour market opportunities or adjustment; pay equity), for a continual analysis of issues that could affect the service delivery of the HRCC and/or Region; for the formulation of new or modified approaches to meet specific client and local requirements; for the provision of expert advisory services to the management and staff of the HRCC and the satellite LHRCs; for ensuring linkage with the Region's SDN support groups for the assigned specialized area(s); and for consultation with client groups, stakeholders and partners in the SDN for the HRCC's geographic zone.

Ten (10) Service Delivery Managers (total staff of 95) are responsible for the prioritization, planning, implementation, monitoring and reporting of their assigned components (e.g. a business line in an HRCC or all business lines at the LHRCs level) of the SDN for the HRCC's geographic zone; for contributing to the planning, policy, procedural and management frameworks of the HRCC; for the provision of advice; and for the performance of external consultative and representational services with clients, stakeholders and partners.

One (1) Chief, Management Services, (staff of 8) is responsible for the provision of all management services (e.g. administration, human resources, finance, planning, informatics, security) for the HRCC and for the coordination of these activities with the LHRCs in the geographic zone, as well as with the Region's functional groups.

Nature And Scope

The Region is accountable for the regional and local delivery of all programs and services of two distinct departments involved in socio-economic and related fields concerning the optimal employment and the social and economic development of Canada's human resources capital through labour market and social programs and activities, workplace skills development and lifelong learning, and income benefits and security.

To respond to one of the government's priorities to improve service delivery to Canadians and to enhance their access to the full range of services, regional programs and services are delivered through an SDN. The SDN fundamentally affects both the service vision and philosophy of departments, their business lines and approaches, structures, partnership arrangements, employee orientation and utilization, and management and accountability frameworks. The SDN stems from the integration of segmented service delivery points into a network of full-service HRCCs, supplemented by electronic kiosks (self-service access for clients through enhanced electronic and informatics applications), partnership arrangements with provincial and municipal levels of government, private sector entities, NGOs, community associations and other third-party delivery agents.

It is in this context that the Director, HRCC, develops the policy and accountability frameworks and the strategic, business and operational plans and associated resource requirements for the HRCC and its geographic zone. The incumbent interfaces proactively and extensively with client groups and officials of provincial, territorial and municipal governments; private sector entities; NGOs; community associations; and other stakeholders and partners. In this role, the Director promotes federal and departmental priorities and approaches, and educates and informs stakeholders about evolving delivery orientations and activities. It is crucial to the success of the SDN that it is understood and accepted by all partners, clients and key stakeholders, and that their involvement in policy and program formulation or revision is obtained to ensure their buy-in, especially for those program areas where co-delivery through partnerships is sought or where there is devolution of delivery through arrangements with other stakeholders.

Operating in a mini-Region context, the Director plays a key role as the departmental local "change agent" for the HRCC and the assigned zone. He or she exercises leadership in ensuring the successful transition to new service delivery approaches and business lines and to new ways of doing business when necessary. This requires the strategic use of informatics and electronic communication, which are essential for the successful implementation of the interactive kiosks and other self-service access mechanisms involving the telephone, television and computers?all part of the SDN. The incumbent has significant accountability for responding to enquiries on all aspects of service delivery, communicating with the HRCC's publics and the media, and delivering the full range of management services within the assigned HRCC and zone.

The Director conceptualizes, negotiates, develops and implements an accountability framework within the HRCC's geographic zone, including the development of results-based reciprocal accountability agreements, optimum program delivery service levels, and performance indicators. The incumbent plans and manages the work of the HRCC and the satellite LHRCs, with particular emphasis on creativity and innovation to ensure the credibility of service delivery and policy or program proposals.

The Director is a member of the Regional Management Team and is responsible for raising all issues concerning the operation of the SDN concept in the assigned geographic zone. He or she shares with the other Directors best practices and the results of new service delivery and partnership arrangements. All members of the Team must agree on the general principle governing the implementation of national and regional priorities. The Director is expected to sponsor and seek consensus on policy and program initiatives that have regional or national implications.

The Director represents the departments on interdepartmental, intergovernmental and other federal fora concerning issues related to the assigned portfolio. There are regular contacts with officials of other government departments (OGD) (e.g. the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, Western Economic Diversification, Canada Economic Development for the Quebec Regions, the Department of Finance Canada, the Privy Council Office, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Industry Canada) and from provincial, territorial and municipal governments regarding the development and implementation of new policy and program activities that cross jurisdictions, or the harmonization of business activities and approaches. The Director has extensive contact with the Department's clients, partners and stakeholders and third-party service delivery agents in the zone to seek their input with respect to corporate priorities, service standards and performance indicators; to influence their priorities and overall planning; and to harmonize short-, medium- and long-term strategic approaches, perspectives and objectives.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 115
Operating budget: $960,000

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides leadership and management for all policy and program activities associated with the management of the SDN concept and other service delivery arrangements for the assigned HRCC, its geographic zone, and for satellite LHRCs and kiosks. Contributes to the development of departmental policies affecting the SDN.
  2. Develops innovative and cost-effective partnership and service delivery arrangements, establishes proactive consultation networks to communicate the Department's strategic orientation and to provide feedback on service delivery issues from officials and representatives of client groups, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, the private sector, NGOs, community associations and other interest groups.
  3. Develops and implements dynamic and flexible strategic, business and operational plans for the HRCC, its geographic zone and other service delivery components, and contributes to formulating these plans for the Region, as well as to influencing the development of national priorities and plans at the corporate level.
  4. Develops, implements and monitors policy, procedural, performance measurement and accountability frameworks that reflect national and regional macro-service delivery goals, including performance indicators and service agreements, to review and measure the achievement of program and service delivery objectives by the HRCC, its satellite LHRCs, partners and other third parties in program components of the SDN.
  5. Inculcates in the HRCC and its assigned geographic zone the departmental service vision and philosophy, business approaches and service delivery principles, and manages the changes in structures, programs, services, employee orientation and utilization, and resource management.
  6. Leads or participates in regional or national projects and represents the departments on a number of high-profile committees, task forces and working groups in areas such as employment, labour market research, planning and forecasting, labour standards, occupational health and safety, income support, pensions, EI and a variety of loan programs.
  7. Provides advisory services, strategic options, position papers and briefing material for senior management in the Region and for the corporate executive offices.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Human Resources Centre Canada

Know-How

F
Extensive knowledge of the provisions and regional and departmental applications of income support, pensions, labour and occupational health and safety legislation and regulations and directives; in-depth knowledge of labour standards, labour market planning, forecasting, adjustments and information, and of local and Aboriginal labour force, market and opportunities, as well as of socio-economic conditions and factors affecting the labour market in the assigned geographic zone; and the techniques and skills to establish effective business linkages and interfaces with OGDs, provincial and territorial governments, labour associations and other external clients, stakeholders and partners.
III
Operational planning, coordination and management of the full range of departmental programs and services for the assigned geographic zone and its satellite operations and services; harmonization of new service initiatives and regional files with other HRCCs in the specific sub-regional geographic zone.
3
Achievement of objectives requires acting as an agent of change in the internal culture and orientation of the assigned programs and employees, and conducting representational activities with OGDs, other levels of government, the private sector, educational institutions, and external clients and partners.
460
The number selected reflects the operational role of the position in a specific geographic zone within the larger regional context, and the tendency of objectives and end results to be related.

Problem Solving / Thinking

E
Thinking within advisory parameters established for sub-regional initiatives in several fields of social and economic relevance, requiring adaptation to local labour market conditions and to economic, social and cultural pressures and diversity.
4
Analytical, interpretive, evaluative and constructive thinking is required to determine new service delivery and management frameworks and processes that must meet the requirements of two distinct departments and factor in the positions, policies, processes and priorities of their respective partners and clients.
(50) 230
High percentage reflects the wide span of program activities and services and the need to establish and deliver mechanisms, processes and systems with a particular emphasis on partnerships and third-party delivery.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the DG, Service Delivery, from whom advisory services are received on issues of a sub-regional nature or for national or regional files involving several HRCCs, is accountable for consistent and timely day-to-day service delivery and related systems and processes of the assigned HRCC.
2P
The position has a primary impact on the activities of the HRCC as represented by a proxy of $960K (constant dollars)
230
High number reflects the proxy selected and the latitude of the position in establishing the strategic, business and operational plans for the HRCC's geographic zone.

Summary

FIII3 460
E4(50) 230
E2P 230
Total = 920 0
Director Human Resources Centre Canada Number: 4-A-1
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR HUMAN RESOURCES CENTRE CANADA
Figure: 4 – A – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – A – 1

Director, Human Resources Centre Canada

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Regional Director, General Service Delivery, and there are 29 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Human Resources Centre Canada are 6 Senior Advisors, 10 managers and 1 Chief.

Linear organisation chart:

Regional Director, General Service Delivery

  • 29 Directors, Human Resources Centre Canada
  • Director, Human Resources Centre Canada
    • 6 Senior Service Delivery Advisors
    • 10 Service Delivery Managers
    • Chief, Management Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 4-A-2

Position Title: Director, Housing and Equipment

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing professional and managerial leadership for the development and delivery of a variety of programs related to the promotion of energy efficiency and for ensuring that those programs have the desired climate change-related outputs and outcomes.

Organization Structure

This position is one of six positions at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Office of Energy Efficiency. The others are Director, Transportation Energy Use Division; Director, Demand Policy and Analysis Division; Director, Program Delivery Analysis; Director, Industrial Programs Division; and Director, Building Programs Division.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director, Housing and Equipment, are as follows:

Chief, Equipment Standards and Labelling, (staff of 21) is responsible for the development and management of incentive and regulatory initiatives to promote and assist sustainable economic development related to the energy-consuming equipment manufacturing sector and for the management of complex research and analysis of markets, technologies and trade patterns of the energy-using equipment industry, and of trade and regulatory issues.

Chief, Housing Programs, (staff of 23) is responsible for the conception, design, planning, organization and management of energy-efficient housing initiatives for the residential construction, renovation and related manufacturing and retail sectors, and for the promotion of the Department's sustainable development and climate objectives.

Coordinator, Aboriginal and Northern Communities Energy Efficiency, is responsible for the development and management of initiatives to promote energy efficiency activities that address climate change in Aboriginal and northern communities.

Nature And Scope

The Department's mandate is to advance the development of Canada's economy by providing expert scientific and economic knowledge to Canadians and by promoting both the sustainable development and use of the country's natural resources and the competitiveness of the energy, forest, mining, geomatics and geoscience sectors, working in partnership with all levels of government, universities, research institutes, the private sector and international organizations.

It is in this context that the Director, Housing and Equipment, provides leadership in increasing the efficiency of energy use in Canada, thereby contributing to the limitation of greenhouse gas emissions, the achievement of other environmental improvements, the expansion of the domestic supply of related products and services, and the competitiveness of Canadian industry through the use of regulations and standards and the promotion of energy efficiency in the residential construction and renovation sectors, in energy-using equipment and in Aboriginal and northern communities.

The Director maintains the inventory of related minimum energy efficiency performance and labelling requirements and manages the creation of regulations regarding requirements for additional products. The incumbent maintains enforcement and monitoring capabilities to ensure that current product standards on energy efficiency are respected. The Director develops and implements promotional and information material in support of regulatory and labelling programs.

The Director plays an important role in improving the energy efficiency of energy-using equipment in the residential sector through the regulation of energy performance and through energy performance labelling by ensuring that the performance standards developed are met and yet do not economically disadvantage consumers. The Director regulates energy performance levels for certain energy-using equipment in the commercial/industrial sector, where the equipment is less standardized than in the residential sector. The incumbent develops and manages the delivery of a variety of programs related to energy efficiency for equipment and for new and existing houses and ensures that they have the desired climate change-related outputs and outcomes.

The Director directs the development of effective regulatory instruments, policies, standards, processes and procedures related to the housing construction and housing renovation sectors by working in partnership with the National Research Council and with other jurisdictions to develop the Model National Energy Code for Houses, which provides for minimum levels of energy efficiency. The Director acts as a catalyst to encourage provincial and local authorities to adopt the Code.

A challenge for the Director is to achieve results in areas for which demand greatly exceeds the funds available. Furthermore, because the regulation of housing construction is also a provincial responsibility, partnerships must be forged with the provinces and territories, as well as with other stakeholders, such as the National Research Council, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, trade associations, municipalities and non-government organizations, to make energy efficiency programs a success. Other challenges for the Director are to augment regulatory programs with information outreach or education programs and incentive programs in order to achieve energy efficiencies and the need to rely on voluntary programs in order to achieve results.

The Director must build partnerships with the provinces and territories to harmonize regulations in order to ensure that they are consistent across Canada and with the regulations of trading partners. A challenge for the Director is to maintain good relations between the Department and influential associations, such as the Canadian Home Builders' Association, the Canadian Gas Association, the Canadian Electricity Association and the Canadian Window and Door Manufacturers Association.

The Director lays the groundwork for achieving climate change objectives by negotiating partnerships with stakeholder groups, such as provincial utilities, provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal authorities, builders' associations, manufacturing associations, consumer groups, non-government organizations and private companies, and by leading them toward the achievement of enhanced energy efficiencies. The incumbent must meet climate change objectives while fostering the economic development of energy-consuming industries by developing minimum performance regulations governing imports and interprovincial trade so that industry is supplied with products that meet economic efficiency criteria.

The Director sits on several committees, such as the government-industry housing builders' committee, the Canadian Electricity Association Task Group on Energy Management and the Canadian Gas Association Demand Side Management Workgroup. The Director, as a member of the Interdepartmental Public Education and Outreach Working Group, contributes to the development of consumer and residential public outreach initiatives on energy efficiency.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 47
Operating budget: $2.2 million
Grants and contributions: $1.0 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides professional and managerial leadership for the development of broad strategies to increase the penetration and use of energy efficiency technologies and practices in the housing and energy-using equipment sectors in order to contribute to achieving Canada's climate change objectives.
  2. Develops and manages the delivery of a variety of programs related to energy efficiency for equipment and for new and existing houses, and ensures that they have the desired climate change-related outputs and outcomes.
  3. Manages the conceptualization and implementation of regulations and standards on energy efficiency and manages industry compliance with them; oversees the effort to encourage the adoption of the Model National Energy Code for Houses; and ensures harmonization of provincial, territorial, federal and international regulations.
  4. Negotiates agreements and forges partnerships with provinces and territories, Aboriginal authorities, utilities, industry associations, retailers and other stakeholders to leverage federal money; and uses the federal presence to promote energy efficiency with respect to energy-using equipment and housing construction and renovations and to obtain input during the formulation of regulations and initiatives.
  5. Manages the development of content for publications about the programs and plays a policy and advisory role in outreach and education activities.
  6. Leads or participates in a number of committees to achieve increased energy efficiency in consumer and industrial products, in the construction of houses and in the renovation of homes.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Housing and Equipment

Know-How

F
Extensive professional knowledge of policies, theories and practices related to science and technology in the area of energy efficiency; in-depth professional knowledge of the Department's mandate, objectives and programs with respect to energy efficiency, climate change and sustainable development; in-depth knowledge of policies, principles and practices relating to the energy-using equipment, housing and building construction and renovation industries; and in-depth professional knowledge of housing standards and energy incentive programs, and of the development and management of energy efficiency programs and outreach initiatives.
III
Conceptual and operational management of the development and implementation of programs, standards and outreach and education initiatives requiring coordination across provinces, among Aboriginal and northern communities and municipalities, as well as with the construction industry, building associations and consumers groups.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires forging partnerships with all levels of government, research institutes, the housing and industrial sectors and consumer groups to promote energy efficiencies, to encourage them to enforce energy consumption standards and regulations and to secure their commitment to and ensure consistency in the achievement of energy efficiency goals.
460
Lowest number reflects the focus on the end result and the relatedness of the activities managed.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within broad government policy and industry objectives and practices to achieve energy efficiency objectives while preserving the sustainable economic development of industries and contributing to climate change priorities and objectives.
4
Analytical thinking is required to develop housing and energy-using equipment standards, codes and programs, including incentive programs, harmonized with provincial and territorial standards and regulations to promote energy efficiencies in support of climate change and sustainable objectives.
(50) 230
Percentage reflects the requirement to integrate the housing and equipment fields of activities into the broader energy efficiency, climate change and industry economic sustainability objectives, as well as the analytical and evaluative thinking required to develop new standards and codes and to promote their use by all provincial, territorial, municipal and industry stakeholders.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Director General, Office of Energy Efficiency, works within defined direction. Is accountable for collaborating with peers in the energy efficiency portfolio to harmonize activities under provincial or territorial jurisdiction.
3P
Primary impact on the Division's activities. The proxy selected is represented by an operating budget of $2.2 million (constant).
264
Middle number is representative of the budget size and of the solid contribution of the position's areas of activities to the overall Energy Efficiency Program.

Summary

FIII3 460
F4(50) 230
E3P 264
Total = 954 A1
Director, Housing And Equipment Number: 4-A-2
Org Chart of the DIRECTOR, HOUSING AND EQUIPMENT
Figure: 4 – A – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – A – 2

Director, Housing And Equipment

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Office of Energy Efficiency, and there are 5 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Housing and Equipment are 2 Chiefs and 1 Coordinator.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, Office of Energy Efficiency

  • Director, Transportation Energy Use Division
  • Director, Demand Policy and Analysis Division
  • Director, Program Delivery Analysis
  • Director, Industrial Programs Division
  • Director, Building Programs Division
  • Director, Housing and Equipment
    • 2 Chiefs for :
      • Equipment Standards and Labelling
      • Housing Programs
    • Coordinator, Aboriginal and Northern Communities Energy Efficiency

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: