Appendix C1 - Benchmark Index by Function - Public Service Direction and Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 10-H-1

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property

General Accountability

Is accountable for developing innovative, cost-effective and responsive national policies, strategies and management frameworks to guide the federal government's centre of excellence in real property, including federal office and common-use facilities, national treasures, other heritage assets and various engineered public works; and directing the delivery of property and facilities services to more than 100 client departments and agencies.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 13 executive positions at the first level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The others are Associate Deputy Minister; Assistant Deputy Minister, Service Integration; Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy, Risk Management and Communications; Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking, Compensation and Senior Financial Officer; Assistant Deputy Minister, Acquisitions; Assistant Deputy Minister, Information Technology Services; Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau; Chief Executive Officer, Consulting and Audit Canada; Assistant Deputy Minister, Human Resources; Executive Director, Real Property Major Crown Projects; Director General, Audit and Ethics; and Senior General Counsel.

Specific responsibilities of the four positions reporting directly to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property, are as follows:

Director General, Resourcing and Strategic Management, (staff of 131) is responsible for providing market intelligence and policy research; promoting innovation and new business opportunities; developing recruitment and professional development strategies and action plans; managing national and inteFrnational key stakeholder relationships; managing custodial responsibilities for engineering assets and the regulatory frameworks for the divestiture or disposal of assets; and leading the Branch's information and knowledge management initiatives.

Director General, Accommodation and Portfolio Management, (staff of 307) is responsible for providing real estate services; administering payments in lieu of taxes; developing and implementing accommodation policies, strategies, processes, standards and systems; developing innovative approaches to managing the custodial responsibilities of the Department with respect to office and non-office real property assets, including bridges, training facilities, dams, highways, housing, dry docks and shipyards.

Director General, Property and Facilities Management, (staff of 892) is responsible for developing the policies, strategies, processes, procedures, standards and systems for operating and managing federal buildings and facilities; and developing and implementing strategies and initiatives to provide the technical support and expertise for the effective costing and delivery of property and facilities services to client departments and agencies.

Director General, Architectural and Engineering Services, (staff of 538) is responsible for managing a national program of professional services for the design, fit-up, re-capitalization, commissioning, operation and maintenance of federal buildings, civil engineering structures and other facilities and heritage assets; contributing to the development of government-wide real property, environmental management and sustainable development regulations, policies and standards; and providing related functional direction through the development, implementation and monitoring of national program strategies, policies, standards and best practices.

Nature And Scope

The Department has been established as a common and central service provider with a mandate to provide departments and agencies with mandatory and optional services on a fee-for-service basis. Services include construction, maintenance and repair of public works and federal real property; office accommodation and related facilities services; architectural and engineering advice and services; planning and acquisition of supplies and services; planning and coordination of telecommunications and informatics services; centralized accounting and cash management services; consulting and auditing services; translation and related services; the Receiver General for Canada function; and administrative and other services in relation to employee benefits, superannuation and pension plans, and the disbursement of pay to Public Service of Canada employees.

As the recognized government expert in real property management, the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) is responsible for providing national leadership to support the Department in two principal functions: as custodian of federal office, common use, heritage and engineered public works facilities; and as provider of real property services to support departments and agencies in achieving their respective programs.

In its custodian role, the Branch is responsible for managing its real estate holdings effectively and efficiently to ensure the provision of productive work environments for some 180,000 federal public servants located in over 100 departments and agencies. This covers an inventory of more than six million square meters, valued at approximately $7 billion, and resulting in an annual gross expenditure of approximately $2 billion.

The ADM directs the development of long- and short-term strategies and management frameworks to provide direction for the cost-effective management of a large, complex, diverse and geographically dispersed real property inventory. The incumbent ensures that the inventory is managed in an integrated, strategic manner with consideration for the future growth and structural changes of the Public Service; the aging of the inventory itself; and the federal government's urban agenda and relevant policies, such as the sustainable cities agenda, the good neighbour policy, and the workplace of choice agenda. This challenge requires innovative and conceptual thinking to arrive at models and solutions to complex real property problems. In arriving at effective integrated solutions to multi-dimensional problems, the incumbent must consult and seek input from a wide variety of government and non-government stakeholders.

To maintain the Department's leadership role, the ADM is responsible for assessing potential changes or new directions in the public sector that may affect the requirement for new services and products in real property; and directing research and analysis to identify innovative approaches to ensure that public servants have safe, healthy, secure, affordable and environmentally sustainable workplaces that provide the best value for the Crown and the taxpayers of Canada.

As the co-champion of the Sustainable Development in Government Operations initiative, the ADM is responsible for advancing and promoting the federal government's and the Department's agenda on managing environmental issues and sustainable development by ensuring the development of sound management frameworks, policies and standards, and encouraging sound environmental management practices in these areas.

The ADM is responsible for building effective and productive partnerships with other government departments and other levels of government to market the Department's expertise nationally and internationally. The incumbent also develops and maintains contact with senior representatives of industry, including property development firms, professional associations, academic institutions and international agencies, to ensure that the Department is well represented in the real property community, nationally and internationally; to share professional knowledge; and to promote the government's urban agenda.

As a member of the Department's Executive Committee, the incumbent provides strategic advice to the Minister, the Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister and departmental colleagues in other branches and special operating agencies. The ADM also provides functional direction to the Client Services Branch and the Real Property Major Crown Projects Branch to assist them in addressing and resolving complex, sensitive and controversial real property management issues. As a member of the departmental Executive Committee, the ADM participates with other members in contributing to the overall effectiveness of departmental programs, including decisions related to the future direction of the Department.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 1,894
Operating budget: $26.9 million
Departmental real property expenditures: $384 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Develops government and departmental strategic frameworks and policies to support the Department's corporate leadership role as custodian of federal government office accommodation and various engineered works to ensure the cost-effective management of these assets and the maintenance of their value.
  2. Directs the government's real property centre of excellence through the introduction of new and innovative techniques, tools, products, services and systems; the application of new technologies; and the use of alternative forms of delivery. Contributes to the recruitment, learning and professional development of the Department's and the Public Service's real property community.
  3. Directs the development, implementation and monitoring of national policies, standards, procedures, performance criteria and quality assurance systems, consistent with the concepts of modern comptrollership and integrated risk management.
  4. Directs the management and delivery of national programs for payment in lieu of taxes appraisal and valuation of real property for the Government of Canada.
  5. As co-champion of Sustainable Development in Government Operations, directs the application of sound life-cycle management of federal buildings and facilities and advances the government's management of environmental issues and the sustainable development agenda.
  6. Manages and coordinates the Branch's financial and human resources effectively and efficiently.
  7. Provides strategic advice to the Minister, the Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister and to departmental colleagues in other branches and special operating agencies.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property

Know-How

G
Mastery of concepts, techniques, processes and theories relating to real property stewardship and custodial responsibilities, and to the management and delivery of real property services for departments and agencies both nationally and internationally; knowledge of client real property requirements, including mastery of the necessary architectural, environmental and engineering specialized knowledge; and in-depth knowledge of environmental protection and sustainable development as they pertain to building management practices.
IV
Manages and coordinates the formulation of long-range objectives, strategies and policies that directly influence other functions of the Department and client agencies; initiates policy and program change
with input from clients, other levels of government and the private
sector; and directs a national program of real property services for over 100 departments and agencies.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to advise the Minister and the Deputy Minister on strategic directions; and to convince officials at other levels of government, peers and senior officials to adopt appropriate courses of action.
1056
High number reflects the extensive skill, knowledge and expertise required to manage and deliver the real property program throughout the government, including providing policy leadership to the government's sustainable development and environmental protection agendas.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Work is performed within the broadly defined principles and goals of developing management frameworks and policies, conducting consultations and defining strategic directions, to guide the Department in its relationships with other departments and with other levels of government concerned with the development of environmentally friendly real property development and management programs.
4
Conceptual, analytical, interpretive and constructive thing is required to interpret the government's directions and translate them into effective national real property program policies, standards, procedures and best practices; and to provide strategic and operational advice in order to ensure consistency in program delivery.
(66) 700
Higher percentage represents the leadership requirement of the position to identify, recommend and support new real property policy and program directions for the Department, client departments and government as a whole, including contributing to the government's urban and sustainable development agenda.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Deputy Minister, is subject to broad guidance and ensures that the Department has a coherent, cost-effective policy and service delivery business direction for optimizing the federal government's real property program.
4P
The position has a primary impact on all activities undertaken by the Branch. The proxy used to represent these activities is a budget of $26.9 million (constant).
800
Mid-range number reflects the strong influence of the position in providing national leadership in the development of strategic and business objectives and directions, as custodian of all federal real property, and in providing national leadership in the provision of cost-effective real property services.

Summary

GIV3 1056
G4(66) 700
G4P 800
Total = 2556 A1
Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property- Number: 10 - H - 1
Org chart of the ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER REAL PROPERTY
Figure: 10 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 10 – H – 1

Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 12 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property are 4 Directors General.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Associate Deputy Minister
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Service Integration
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy, Risk Management and Communications
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking, Compensation and Senior Financial Officer
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Acquisitions
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Information Technology Services
  • Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau
  • Chief Executive Officer, Consulting and Audit Canada
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Human Resources
  • Executive Director, Real Property Major Crown Projects
  • Director General, Audit and Ethics
  • Senior General Counsel
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property
    • 4 Directors General for :
      • Resourcing and Strategic Management
      • Accommodation and Portfolio Management
      • Property and Facilities Management
      • Architectural and Engineering Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 10-H-2

Position Title: Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance

General Accountability

Is accountable for developing policies and programs, and for providing advice to advance Canada's interests in the areas of international trade and finance, including tariffs, international assistance, international financial institutions (IFIs), participation in international groups, such as the G7 and the G20, economic and financial relations with other countries, and the effective functioning of the international financial and monetary system.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 10 positions at the first level reporting to the Deputy Minister (DM). The others are: G7 Deputy; Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic and Fiscal Policy; Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic Development and Corporate Finance; Assistant Deputy Minister, Consultations and Communications; Assistant Deputy Minister, Law Branch and Counsel to the Department; Assistant Deputy Minister, Tax Policy; Assistant Deputy Minister, Financial Sector; Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy; and Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services.

Specific responsibilities of the positions reporting directly to the Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance, are as follows:

General Director, International Trade and Finance, is responsible for providing senior-level policy advice and recommendations to the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM), the G7 Deputy, the DM and the Minister of Finance on a broad range of international economic, financial and trade issues; serves as Canada's Alternate Governor for the regional development banks; and represents the Department in other international forums, such as Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

General Director, International Trade Policy Division, (staff of 33) is responsible for developing policy and providing advice and recommendations on Canada's trade and foreign investment policies, with particular reference to tariffs, import policy, trade remedies, trade disputes and the relevant domestic legislation and regulations, international trade and investment negotiations, Canada-United States relations, and border and security issues; and managing relations with the Canadian International Trade Tribunal.

Director, International Finance and Development Division, (staff of 26) is responsible for developing policy and providing advice and recommendations on economic and policy developments in overseas economies. The Director is also responsible for overseeing advice on budget issues involving international assistance and debt, Canada's financial relations with developing countries, international financial institution policy toward developing countries and export financing.

Director, International Policy and Institutions Division, (staff of 15) is responsible for managing Canada's relations with IFIs, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD); managing Canada's participation in a range of international groups, such as the G7, G10 and G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors; and for policy research on a range of international issues, including reforms of the international financial architecture, to improve crisis prevention and resolution and governance of the IFIs, as well as to meet the challenges of globalization.

Nature And Scope

The Department is primarily responsible for providing the government with analysis and advice on Canada's broad economic and financial affairs. Its responsibilities include preparing the federal budget, developing tax and tariff policy and legislation, managing federal borrowing on financial markets, administering major federal funding transfers to the provinces and territories, developing regulatory policy for the country's financial sector and representing Canada's interests within international financial and economic institutions.

Canada is a major global trading nation, so its economy is heavily dependent on the international trading environment and on the proper functioning of the international financial and monetary system. Consequently, Canada's economic relations with its trading partners and the global economic community are crucial to the country's prosperity.

The ADM plays a major role in ensuring the health of Canada's economy with regard to international trade and finance. The ADM serves as the Minister's chief adviser on international trade and finance issues and directs the Department's activities on these issues in dealings with foreign governments, international financial organizations, other federal and provincial departments, the Bank of Canada, Canadian financial institutions and Canadian business and labour.

The ADM has primary responsibility for strategic policy formulation on international economic and financial matters; economic and financial relations with other countries; participation in international financial groups, such as the G7 and the G20; Canada's relations with the IMF, World Bank, EBRD and other IFIs; renegotiation of international debts owed to Canada; and Finance Canada's general trade and investment policy agenda, including the Customs Tariff and the Special Import Measures Act.

The ADM is responsible for developing policies and proposing initiatives for Canada's participation in international financial organizations, such as the G7, G10 and G20 Finance Ministers' groups. This is of particular importance as the Minister of Finance chairs the G20 and the G7 Finance Ministers' Summit on a rotating basis. The ADM acts as the Finance Sous-Sherpa for the annual G8 Summits. The incumbent is also responsible for Canada's participation in the APEC, Commonwealth and Western Hemisphere Finance Ministers' fora. The ADM is also responsible for Finance Canada's relations with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

The ADM is responsible for proposing initiatives, developing strategies and overseeing negotiations on trade and tariff issues, debt renegotiation, crisis prevention and resolution, and international assistance issues.

The ADM is responsible for formulating Canadian export financing policies in support of Export Development Canada (EDC) and the Canadian Wheat Board. The incumbent ensures that export finance decisions taken by these organizations are consistent with government policy and meet financial and fiscal standards. The ADM is also responsible for providing advice on the international financial activities of the Canadian Commercial Corporation.

The incumbent is responsible for providing advice to the Minister of Finance and, on occasion, to the Prime Minister and other Ministers on international missions dealing with economic and financial issues.

The ADM is responsible for the Department's involvement in Canada-United States economic issues. These include US trade and investment issues; border and border security issues; discussions and negotiations on North American economic cooperation and integration; and other related matters, including relations between Finance Canada, the US Treasury and other agencies. The ADM also plays a key role in security policy issues by coordinating the efforts of other branches.

The incumbent is responsible for making recommendations on appointments to Finance Counsellor positions at posts abroad and on those to the Canadian offices at the IMF, the World Bank, the EBRD, other regional development banks and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal. The ADM also evaluates the performance of Heads of Missions (Ambassadors and High Commissioners) who have important economic responsibilities.

The ADM accompanies or represents the Minister at Cabinet committee meetings. The incumbent also acts for the DM, in his or her absence, at DM committees dealing with international trade and finance. The incumbent is also responsible for leading government delegations to international meetings of the IMF, World Bank, World Trade Organization and OECD.

The ADM ensures that the Branch cultivates and maintains close working relationships with international organizations; foreign governments, particularly with their finance, trade and aid ministries; provincial governments on trade matters; and other federal government agencies, such as the Bank of Canada, the Canadian International Development Agency, Industry Canada, Foreign Affairs Canada, International Trade Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Natural Resources Canada. This involves participation in a variety of international, federal-provincial and interdepartmental meetings and requires frequent and extended travel.

The incumbent, on behalf of the DM, is responsible for providing instructions to the Bank of Canada to issue demand notes to meet Canada's payment obligations to the IMF, World Bank and regional development banks.

The ADM, as a member of the Departmental Executive Committee, is responsible for providing advice on the establishment of the Department's policies, programs and objectives, including fiscal, monetary and budgetary policies. He or she also contributes to the management of the Department by participating in the development and implementation of Department-wide initiatives, such as the Department's Human Resources Plan.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 79
Operating budget: $1.024 million
Major impacts:
Tariff policy on imports: Total import trade value $59 billion (import of goods and services)
Tariff revenue: $3.1 billion
Payment authorization to IFIs: $63 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Ensures that Canadian government policies and initiatives on tariffs, trade and international finance effectively represent Canada's interests and are comparable with and advance domestic economic, industrial and government economic policy priorities and objectives.
  2. Directs the preparation of legislation, regulations and instruments giving effect to government policies in the areas of international trade and finance to ensure that these instruments contribute to Canada's international trade policy objectives.
  3. Accompanies or represents the Minister at Cabinet committee meetings and the Minister or Deputy Minister at various national and international meetings to ensure that Canada's economic interests and the Department's concerns are effectively represented and advanced.
  4. Serves as Canada's lead in negotiating increases to capital subscriptions, as well as the provision of funds for use in the World Bank Group and in the regional development banks.
  5. Directs and manages the operations of the International Trade and Finance Branch and ensures effective coordination with the Department's objectives and operations.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance

Know-How

G
Mastery of concepts, techniques, processes and theories in international trade and finance; in-depth knowledge of the international economy, the international economic and financial institutions and their respective mandates, organization structures, roles and decision-making processes; comprehensive knowledge of the Bank of Canada, EDC and related domestic financial and economic institutions; and knowledge of the machinery of government, in order to guide the preparation of legislation and regulations as the authority within government on international trade and economic matters.
IV
Coordination of government-wide policy on international trade and finance and the continual monitoring of and advising on the economic health of the international trading community.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to advise the DM, the Minister and parliamentary committees on international trade and finance issues; and to negotiate in Canada's best interests with international institutions.
1056
Highest number reflects the breadth and depth of expected mastery in the fields of international economics, finance and trade, in directing the development of the government's global trade and finance strategies, policies and related legislation.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking within the broadly defined principles and goals and government trade priorities, provides advice and makes recommendations on government programs, such as trade, tariffs, and financial and monetary systems that involve Canada's economic relations with its trading partners and the global economic community in a rapidly evolving international environment.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking required to provide advice and to formulate recommendations on complex and significant government policy matters, such as strategic policy on international monetary matters, including the Department's general trade, customs and tariff policy agenda.
(66) 700
Higher percentage represents the requirement of the position to identify and recommend original proposals, in a dynamic and complex environment, in order to develop new concepts and approaches affecting the government's global economic and international trade policies and objectives.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the DM, is subject to general guidance in formulating recommendations and providing advice on government programs and strategies that have an impact on the government's international trade and monetary policies and relationships with international economic and financial institutions and foreign governments.
7I
The position has an indirect impact on international trade policies and programs undertaken by the Department. The proxy used to represent these activities is $59 billion (constant)–the total value of all Canadian imports in goods and services.
920
High number reflects the freedom to act, the magnitude of the dollars involved and a pull towards contributory impact in terms of the effect of policies and programs on the proxy selected.

Summary

GIV3 1056
G4(66) 700
G7I 920
Total = 2676 A2
Assistant DeputyMinister, International Trade And Finance - Number: 10 - H - 2
Org chart of the ASSISTANT DEPUTY MINISTER INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE
Figure: 10 – H – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 10 – H – 2

Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade And Finance

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 9 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance are 2 General Directors and 2 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • G-7 Deputy
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic and Fiscal Policy
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic Development and Corporate Finance
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Consultations and Communications
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Law Branch and Counsel to the Department
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Tax Policy
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Financial Sector
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Federal-Provincial Relations and Social Policy
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, International Trade and Finance
    • 2 General Directors for:
      • International Trade and Finance
      • International Trade Policy Division
    • 2 Directors for:
      • International Finance and Development Division
      • International Policy and Institutions Division

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 9-H-1

Position Title: Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing strategic leadership and directing business approaches to ensure the commercial viability of a special operating agency (SOA) tasked with providing translation, terminology and interpretation products and services to the Parliament of Canada and to all federal government departments and agencies, in both official languages, and in other languages, as required by other levels of government and international organizations.

Organization Structure

This is 1 of 13 positions at the first managerial level reporting to the Deputy Minister. The other positions are Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations; Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Policy and Infrastructure; Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking and Compensation; Assistant Deputy Minister, Telecommunications and Informatics Program; Assistant Deputy Minister, Acquisitions Program; Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property Program; Assistant Deputy Minister, Human Resources; Chief Executive Officer, Consulting and Audit Canada; Director General, Communications; Director General, Audit and Ethics; Senior General Counsel; and Chief of Staff.

The specific functions of the positions reporting to the Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau, are as follows:

Vice-President, Operations, (1,150 employees) is responsible for developing and managing a business environment conducive to promoting the Bureau's financial viability through the sale and delivery of translation and linguistic services in the federal government, other levels of government and international organizations; directing the development and implementation of business strategies, projects and operational plans to establish and maintain the Bureau's pre-eminence as a supplier of translation and related services; and designing and implementing strategies and approaches to establish partnerships with private sector suppliers.

Vice-President, Client Services, (26 employees) is responsible for maximizing revenues by promoting the Bureau's role and presence as a centre of expertise and enhancing the Bureau's reputation as a preferred provider of linguistic products and services; establishing pricing strategies that ensure the Bureau's financial soundness in the context of optionality; extending the Bureau's vertical market to encompass provincial and municipal governments and international organizations; and directing promotion, research, sales and marketing activities.

Vice-President, Technology Management and Corporate Services, (49 employees) is responsible for developing and managing service procedures and processes, including human resources, finance and administration, contracting, information systems and technologies management, accommodation and equipment management, and communications, in the context of a cost-recovery organization; and developing and implementing infrastructures and strategic frameworks to increase the Bureau's relevance and contribution.

Director, Terminology and Standardization, (107 employees) is responsible for developing and implementing strategies, plans and initiatives to formulate and provide a comprehensive and professional program of terminology research, management and dissemination in the federal Public Service; and representing Canada internationally in terminology and language planning.

Director, Parliamentary Translation and Interpretation Services, (207 employees) is responsible for developing and implementing policies, strategies and methods aimed at producing Parliamentary publications in the other official language; delivering strategic and technical linguistic services to the Parliament of Canada; delivering interpretation services in the official, foreign and visual languages for all federal departments and agencies; establishing and maintaining partnerships; and negotiating service agreements.

Nature And Scope

The Department is recognized as a supplier of common central services. It is mandated to provide the departments, boards and agencies of the federal government with mandatory and optional services at cost in support of their programs.

The Translation Bureau is an SOA whose mission is to support the Government of Canada in its efforts to provide linguistic services to and to communicate with Canadians in the official language of their choice.

Translation and linguistic services for departments and agencies are financed through a revolving fund and are provided on a cost-recovery basis. Therefore, the Bureau must adopt business approaches designed to establish, maintain and broaden market standards, to sustain competition and to generate enough revenue to deliver its programs and remain at the leading edge of technology.

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is responsible for establishing the organization's principles of enhanced accountability, innovation and entrepreneurship aimed at raising the Bureau's profile and improving its economic viability. To this end, the CEO directs the development of strategies, plans and policies to maintain the Translation Bureau's financial viability as an optional service operating from a revolving fund, whose survival depends on its ability to attract, satisfy and retain clients. He or she is responsible for directing the operational plans that promote and strengthen the Bureau's position as a leader in the language market.

Technology, globalization and multiculturalism are key factors in the Bureau's increasingly important role in government programs. The CEO must therefore work toward a fundamental transformation in the orientation of its service delivery methods, organizational structures, partnerships and strategic investments in order to deal with the government's constantly diversifying program and service delivery methods and to communicate with Canadians in the official language of their choice, and to deal with an environment where service delivery and communications are increasingly complex and technically demanding. The incumbent must also ensure constant renewal of the organization's language professionals to meet growing demand and diverse client expectations.

The CEO is responsible for ensuring that the Bureau's marketing strategy promotes the Bureau as the supplier of choice for linguistic products and services, while maintaining and enhancing current client relations and seeking to exploit new opportunities to achieve the objectives of self-financing by generating revenue. Thus, the incumbent defines the new strategies and initiatives that help the Bureau achieve its business objectives and enhance its credibility and reputation as a supplier of choice for linguistic products and services to other levels of government both nationally and internationally. He or she must also direct the design of pricing policies and structures for Bureau services billed to clients, and ensure that these prices are comparable to and competitive with those charged in the private sector for services of equivalent quality and level.

A particularly complex challenge faced by the CEO relates to the Bureau's human resources. Canada's translation industry as a whole is now experiencing a serious shortage. As head of the largest employer of language professionals in the country, the CEO is responsible for protecting and increasing the pool of language professionals available to provide linguistic services. The CEO is also responsible for renewing the Bureau's workforce through intensive recruitment. The CEO ensures that partnerships are formed with Canadian universities and colleges to promote careers in linguistic service delivery. In so doing, the incumbent helps recruit students for the language programs at those institutions and helps increase the number of graduate language professionals.

With the growth of electronic commerce in the private sector and on-line services in the public sector, the CEO must also ensure that the Bureau keeps up to date with new technologies and technological tools. To that end, the CEO directs investment in the development or purchase of technolinguistic tools adapted to new realities and to training translators and language technology experts to meet the many different client requirements.

The CEO continually consults senior management in the departments and central agencies to discuss government policy and priority changes and linguistic service requirements, prepare demand projections, study opportunities for cooperation, obtain advice on linguistic service quality and help raise linguistic standards in Canada and abroad. The CEO communicates with senior management in other levels of government in Canada and abroad to review opportunities for providing linguistic services, establish programs and discuss policy and program applications to solve problems. He or she also consults senior managers who represent business, industrial and professional associations in order to exchange information, solve problems and negotiate linguistic service delivery terms under the Treasury Board's Common Services Policy.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 1,784
Operating budget: $27.5 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Oversees the development of strategic frameworks, plans and policies designed to position the Translation Bureau as a leading supplier of translation, interpretation and terminology services for Canada's Parliament, all federal departments and agencies, other levels of government and international organizations.
  2. Directs the preparation and implementation of product development and marketing strategies designed to maintain and expand the Bureau's client pool and ensure that the organization remains competitive.
  3. Establishes the Bureau's principles of enhanced accountability, innovation and partnership, in order to raise the Bureau's profile and improve its economic viability so that it can respond proactively to the steadily growing and increasingly diverse demand for linguistic services.
  4. Ensures that information management and information technology needs meet requirements, and that appropriate strategies and initiatives are developed and implemented to promote operational objectives.
  5. Ensures that Bureau professionals have high-level skills that enable them to provide top-quality services, by directing the development, implementation and upholding of standards for the required training and development.
  6. Directs Translation Bureau service delivery by ensuring that clients obtain consistently high-quality services; and developing and implementing criteria, guidelines and performance standards that promote the principles of quality management and continuous service improvement.

Evaluation Rationale

Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau

Know-How

G
Mastery of the principles, concepts, techniques, practices, trends and developments related to the delivery of translation, terminological and interpretation services; mastery of the business principles and marketing strategies and practices related to supplying services in a cost-recovery environment; and in-depth professional knowledge of the principles and practices of planning, resource allocation and human resources management.
IV
Conceptual and operational management of a program that operates within three general sources of funds and is the focal point for providing linguistic services to numerous and diverse clients. Corporate business leadership is required to maintain and expand a revenue-generating operation.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires critical human relations skills to direct a large decentralized staff in the national delivery of services and to foster and establish client relations in both the private and public sectors.
920
Mid-range number reflects the solid mastery of a specialized field, which is required to manage a decentralized SOA that has three general funding sources and delivers national services to federal and other levels of governments and to international organizations; the requirement to establish and retain a competitive position in the marketplace; and the leadership role in setting professional standards in the delivery of specialized services.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking is done within government-wide policies and general principles governing linguistic services, and within the broad business and strategic priorities and objectives of the government and the Department.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking is required to provide superior service to clients, as a leader in linguistic services in Canada. The position is required to develop innovative marketing strategies and methods in a fee-for-service environment for the delivery of competitive products and services to support the ongoing management of the organization.
(66) 608
Higher percentage recognizes the provision of strategic leadership in directing the development and implementation of marketing strategies and new product lines to develop an expanded client base, while reflecting the management scope and intricacies of managing an SOA in a competitive business environment based on cost-recovery and a revolving fund.

Accountability / Decision Making

G
Reporting to the Deputy Minister, provides corporate leadership in structuring business strategies, processes and practices required to ensure a commercially sound SOA engaged in the delivery of translation, terminology and interpretation services throughout the Public Service and to clients in all levels of government and international organizations.
4P
Primary impact on the Bureau's operations as represented by an operating budget of $27.5 million (constant).
700
Standard number reflects the size of the budget and the impact of the position in developing and implementing strategies and initiatives to deliver linguistic services to client departments and agencies within the context of revenue dependency.

Summary

GIV3 920
G4(66) 608
G4P 700
Total = 2228 A1
Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau - Number: 9 - H - 1
Org chart of the CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER TRANSLATION BUREAU
Figure: 9 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 9 – H – 1

Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau

The subject position is at the first managerial level reporting to the deputy head, and there are 12 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau are 3 Vice-Presidents and 2 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Minister (Departmental deputy head)

  • Associate Deputy Minister
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Policy and Infrastructure
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking and Compensation
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Telecommunications and Informatics Program
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Acquisitions Program
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property Program
  • Assistant Deputy Minister, Human Resources
  • Chief Executive Officer, Consulting and Audit Canada
  • Director General, Communications
  • Director General, Audit and Ethics
  • Senior General Counsel
  • Chief Executive Officer, Translation Bureau
    • 3 Vice-Presidents for:
      • Operations
      • Client Services
      • Technology Management and Corporate Services
    • 2 Directors for:
      • Terminology and Standardization
      • Parliamentary Translation and Interpretation Services

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 8-H-1

Position Title: Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel and Special Projects

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing leadership as the government authority on Public Service management issues related to human resources management priorities and initiatives; and managing and terminating Governor-in-Council (GiC) and Deputy Minister (DM) appointments across the Public Service.

Organization Structure

This is one of four positions reporting at the second managerial level to the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet. The others are Visiting Assistant Deputy Minister; and Special Advisor, Management Priorities.

Specific functions of the four positions reporting directly to the Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel and Special Projects, are as follows:

Director, Human Resources Management Policies and Priorities, (staff of 8) is responsible for managing a centre of policy expertise engaged in developing, promoting and advancing strategic advice and guidance for identifying and addressing corporate issues related to the sustainable renewal of human resources in the Public Service; and providing support to the Clerk of the Privy Council-the Head of the Public Service-in promoting and advancing the government's agenda for Public Service reform and in developing strategies and initiatives to address priority issues related to Public Service renewal.

Director, Talent Development and Human Resources Planning, (staff of 4) is responsible for providing professional advice and assistance to the Assistant Secretary in the management of a centre for assisting the DM community in addressing career management issues; developing policies and processes to enhance the leadership and performance management of the senior executive cadre (EX-4 and EX-5 levels); researching and analysing trends and developments in the management of senior level human resources; and providing secretariat services for the Committee of Senior Officials (COSO).

Director, Appointments, Recruitment and Succession Planning, (staff of 7) is responsible for the development and implementation of operational policies, processes and systems for recruiting and appointing GiC and DM appointees; developing and implementing innovative approaches to the recruitment of talent from the private sector; providing advice on the appropriate terms and conditions of GiC appointments; managing a comprehensive program on conflict of interest, and values and ethics for senior personnel; and providing support to the Prime Minister's Office in the management of the GiC selection and appointment process.

Director, Compensation Policies and Programs, (staff of 4) is responsible for the development and implementation of operational policies, programs and systems for the GiC, as well as terms and conditions of appointment, and compensation and benefits programs; and maintains an effective working relationship with the Prime Minister's Office.

Nature And Scope

The Privy Council Office is primarily responsible for providing information, advice and services to the Prime Minister in relation to the Prime Minister's responsibilities as Head of the Government and the Federation. Functioning as the interface between Ministers and the permanent administrative structure of government, the Office ensures that the government's priorities and objectives are transmitted for implementation and administration and provides Secretariat services, support for decision-making processes, and policy advice to the Cabinet and to the Chairs of Cabinet committees.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for formulating and advancing the human resources management agenda for the Public Service and for initiating policy development and implementation strategies covering corporate senior human resources management.

The Assistant Secretary provides professional and managerial advice and policy leadership related to the senior appointment system, succession planning, leadership development, performance management, compensation and benefits, and conflict of interest matters for senior officials, such as Associate Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers and GiC appointees.

Within this mandate, the Assistant Secretary is responsible for monitoring and reporting on various aspects of the renewal agenda, including concepts and approaches required for supporting various initiatives under the umbrella of Results for Canadians, including modernization of the comptrollership function, portfolio management and DM accountability.

The incumbent is also accountable for monitoring government-wide corporate support and the impact of human resources modernization plans and initiatives on recruitment, staffing, classification, labour relations, collective bargaining, pay and benefits, values and ethics, and employment equity matters impacting the workforce of the future and the government's ability to attract and retain a skilled workforce.

The Assistant Secretary directs the management of the classification, annual performance and salary review, and compensation process for the GiC community; DMs; chairs and chief executives of Crown corporations; and heads of agencies, boards and commissions. The incumbent is responsible for directing the GiC appointment process, including interviews, selection and appointment recommendations to the Prime Minister's Office and Cabinet. The incumbent is also responsible for directing the high-flyer review undertaken by COSO, and integrating these results into the senior officer succession management process. The incumbent works closely with the Public Service Commission and with Foreign Affairs Canada to identify key positions in the Public Service or with international organizations (the United Nations, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Bank) to ensure the placement of highly qualified Canadians.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for supporting the work of the Advisory Committee on Senior Level Retention and Compensation as it applies to the GiC community. This includes preparation of research, briefings and recommended courses of action for the Committee Chair. A key challenge is to remain aware of current national and international trends in executive compensation in both the private and public sectors in order to analyse and make recommendations on Treasury Board Secretariat and other compensation data submitted to the Advisory Committee.

One of the key challenges is to provide advice to the Clerk and Prime Minister as to appropriate individuals to fill the highest government positions as well as advice on appropriate compensation, benefits and relevant career and succession management matters. In meeting this challenge, the Assistant Secretary provides advice to the Prime Minister and the Chair of the COSO, who is the Clerk of the Privy Council, on managing meetings and resolving potential conflicts, based on the knowledge of the differing opinions of key stakeholders.

In carrying out these duties, the incumbent has contact with a broad range of senior officials in the federal government, including the Secretary of the Treasury Board, the DM of Justice, other DMs and the Heads of Crown corporations, agencies and government boards, such as the Public Service Commission, the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency and the Canada School of Public Service, as well as in private consulting firms, on issues affecting the general direction of human resources management reform initiatives, and senior appointments and compensation

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 28
Operating budget: $335,000

Policy advice for human resources management policy affecting the federal Public Service represented by the Public Service payroll of $1.3 billion.

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides leadership in identifying critical public administration management issues and develops options for resolving them by recommending courses of action or negotiating approaches to ensure the most effective solutions to broad management issues.
  2. Directs the development of major policy initiatives and proposals, briefing materials and recommendations for the consideration of the Clerk of the Privy Council or the Prime Minister to ensure that the government's priority of improving corporate human resources management policies and practices maintains its momentum across the Public Service.
  3. Leads the planning, development and implementation of human resources management policies, practices and strategies. This involves the recruitment and appointment, career management, performance assessment, compensation and termination processes for the GiC population to ensure the proper appointment process and the effective career management of the most senior leaders in government.
  4. Provides advice and recommendations to the Clerk, the COSO and the Prime Minister to facilitate the appointment and compensation of senior officials.
  5. Assists in the coordination of the operations of the Advisory Committee on Senior Level Retention and Compensation with a view to providing the Committee with the best advice on compensation data and practices that affect the compensation of the GiC population.
  6. Manages the Branch by establishing managerial objectives, targets and standards of performance, as well as staff development requirements.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel and Special Projects

Know-How

G
Mastery of concepts, theories, techniques and practices in the field of human resources management; in-depth knowledge of all aspects of Public Service operations, including the roles and interrelationships of departments, Crown agencies, boards and commissions, with particular emphasis on knowledge of organizational structures, departmental responsibilities and specific mandates; and in-depth professional knowledge of senior management competencies, selection practices, performance evaluation processes, and compensation and benefits practices in the public, quasi-public and private sectors.
III
Coordination of policy formulation and advice on a range of related human resources management programs and issues impacting the GiC population and the Public Service as a whole.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires developing effective interpersonal relationships in dealings with peers and superiors by presenting advice, and leading and participating in discussions with senior officials up to the Prime Minister level.
800
Highest number indicates the tendency toward a broad managerial know-how in integrating and managing policy issues and operational programs affecting the government's broad management agenda.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within the government's broad policy and program agenda to articulate long-term human resources management issues across the Public Service.
4
Analytical, constructive thinking is needed to provide advice and formulate recommendations on a wide variety of complex and significant matters, such as recommendations on new government human resources management practices and policies.
(57) 460
Higher percentage reflects a tendency toward creative thinking requiring the application of more imaginative approaches, usually under some pressure, in the formulation of government human resources management policy and in successfully promoting new human resources corporate management practices.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Deputy Secretary at the second level, is subject to only general direction in formulating recommendations and providing advice on human resources management practices and for decisions impacting the appointment, compensation and career management of the GiC community.
6C
Position has a contributory impact on the provision of human resources management advice and services government-wide. The proxy selected to represent these operations is the payroll for the core Public Service of $1.3 billion (constant).
608
Highest number reflects the strong freedom to act, the position's impact on corporate policy and on the selection and professional development of the DM and GiC appointee community, as well as the position's advisory role on the direction of human resources management practices in the Public Service.

Summary

GIII3 800
F4(57) 460
F6C 608
Total = 1868 A2
Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel And Special Projects - Number: 8 - H - 1
Org chart of the ASSISTANT SECRETARY SENIOR PERSONNEL AND SPECIAL PROJECTS
Figure: 8 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 8 – H – 1

Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel And Special Projects

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet, and there are 2 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel and Special Projects are 4 Directors.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet

  • Visiting Assistant Deputy Minister
  • Special Advisor, Management Priorities
  • Assistant Secretary, Senior Personnel and Special Projects
    • 4 Directors for:
      • Human Resources Management Policies and Priorities
      • Talent Development and Human Resources Planning
      • Appointments, Recruitment and Succession Planning
      • Compensation Policies and Programs

Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 8-H-2

Position Title: Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government)

General Accountability

Is accountable for providing leadership in identifying, addressing and resolving a broad range of strategic and operational issues associated with the governance and operational structures of the Canadian parliamentary and cabinet system of government and the Public Service of Canada to ensure the effective resolution of issues and the introduction of innovative and modern approaches affecting the machinery of government.

Organization Structure

This is one of two positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Deputy Secretary. The other is the Assistant Secretary, Legislation and House Planning / Legal Counsel.

Specific responsibilities of the positions reporting directly to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government) are as follows:

Director, Operations, is responsible for directing the analysis of machinery of government issues, developing proposals and providing advice on those issues and assisting the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government) with the internal management of the Machinery of Government Secretariat.

Director, Strategic Policy, is responsible for directing the development and analysis of strategic policy issues and providing advice on the principles and operations of the Canadian system of parliamentary and cabinet government.

Privy Council Officers are responsible for advising and supporting the Assistant Secretary on matters relating to the principles and operations of the Canadian system of parliamentary and cabinet government in assigned portfolio areas; and conducting work on legal and constitutional issues related to non-departmental bodies, such as agencies, boards, Crown corporations and tribunals.

Nature And Scope

The Privy Council Office (PCO) is primarily responsible for providing information, advice and services to the Prime Minister in relation to the Prime Minister's responsibilities as Head of the Government and the Federation. Functioning as the interface between Ministers and the permanent administrative structure of government, the PCO ensures that the government's priorities and objectives are transmitted for implementation and administration and provides Secretariat services, support for decision-making processes, and policy advice to the Cabinet and to the Chairs of Cabinet committees.

It is in this context that the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government), as the government authority on the workings of the Canadian system of government, is accountable for providing professional and managerial leadership on machinery of government matters. The incumbent provides the creative and intellectual focal point for the development of a coherent approach to managing machinery of government issues and challenges by identifying, analysing and prioritizing these issues, and providing appropriate advice and recommendations to the Prime Minister and the Cabinet.

The Assistant Secretary is also responsible for providing authoritative advice to the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet and the Clerk of the Privy Council on the structure, decision-making procedures and operations of Cabinet and its committees. The incumbent conducts analysis and provides advice on the cohesion of the government ministry as a whole regarding the relations of the government with Parliament and the Crown, the roles and responsibilities of Ministers, and on the organization and structure of government.

In meeting this challenge, the Assistant Secretary is called upon to identify and provide advice on solving any problems with respect to the distribution of responsibilities among Ministers and on the organization of government. The incumbent directs the analysis of and makes recommendations on the structure and organization of government, including possible changes to the mandates of departments, agencies, Crown corporations and other federal institutions. To exercise this responsibility, the incumbent must find innovative solutions that require an understanding of the changing relationship between the government and its citizens, innovations occurring in other levels of government, policy imperatives of the government's agenda, and rapidly evolving forms of program and service delivery.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for developing and implementing approaches and processes to ensure continuity when governments change. This responsibility involves advising departing Prime Ministers, advising incoming Prime Ministers on establishing their administration, and developing and delivering briefings for new Ministers and advising them on their obligations for complying with the ministerial ethical standards and guidelines.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for providing oversight during the creation, wind-up and consolidation of departments, agencies and other federal institutions. In this context, the incumbent plays a stewardship role in that he or she ensures that the creation of an institution or an alternative agency for delivering programs and services does not dilute the integrity of the "public good" responsibility that must be exercised by government. The incumbent is accountable for informing the Prime Minister and the Clerk on progress, providing leadership and facilitating the work of the officials charged with creating those institutions, including identifying implementation issues and providing appropriate solutions to address them.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for managing legislation that is within the Secretariat's jurisdiction, such as the bill governing the ethical behaviour of parliamentarians. The incumbent is responsible for managing the entire legislative process-from advising the Prime Minister on the scope of the legislation, providing instructions to drafters in the Department of Justice and guiding the passage of the bill through both chambers of Parliament to royal assent and proclamation.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for providing corporate policy and program leadership for managing the horizontal coordination of files across the Public Service by addressing issues that cut across departmental responsibilities or that require the participation of a number of government stakeholders. In meeting this challenge the incumbent oversees the analysis, preparation and presentation of recommendations on such matters to the Deputy Secretary and, through him or her, to the Prime Minister.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for contacting Deputy Ministers and other senior officials directly to resolve machinery of government issues. A major challenge is to develop collaborative working relationships with the senior officials at PCO and in line departments in order to address difficult and politically sensitive matters that in most cases touch directly on the responsibilities of Ministers and their relations with one another.

The Assistant Secretary is responsible for representing the PCO at national and international meetings, as Vice-Chair of the Governance Committee. The incumbent is called upon to provide leadership on the international scene for articulating and advancing innovative views on modern public governance. The incumbent also provides advice and secretariat services to the Clerk during the Clerk's annual meeting with his or her provincial colleagues. The incumbent supervises the preparation of speeches and papers for the Prime Minister, the Clerk and the Deputy Secretary on matters related to the structure and operations of Canadian government.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 12
Operating budget: $110,000

The position can impact any component of the government's expenditures, as represented by an operating budget of $27 billion.

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Provides advice on the roles and responsibilities relating to parliamentary and cabinet government, the division of responsibilities among the Prime Minister and Ministers, and the values and ethics to be promoted within the Parliamentary system in order to ensure the effective operation of the various components of the parliamentary and cabinet system.
  2. Provides advice and recommendations to the Deputy Secretary and the Clerk in developing and managing broad, cross-cutting strategies to identify and implement the best possible approaches to address jurisdictional differences among Ministers in order to ensure cohesion in the Cabinet decision-making process.
  3. Provides leadership and advice on the creation, wind-up and consolidation of government departments, agencies and other federal institutions to ensure the smooth and efficient introduction of new program and service delivery organizations to serve Canadians.
  4. Provides advice on the role and accountabilities of Ministers, Secretaries of State and Deputy Ministers to ensure a good understanding of roles and responsibilities among these elected and appointed officials.
  5. Directs the development of policies and provides advice and oversight for the development and implementation of legislation related to the integrity of the government and the Public Service in order to ensure that conflict of interest legislation and policies for politicians and Ministers remain responsive to the needs of the government and the Public Service.
  6. Directs the PCO liaison with the Auditor General and provides advice to the Clerk and the Prime Minister on the work of the Auditor General with respect to the operations of the PCO and the Public Service as a whole.

Evaluation Rationale

Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government)

Know-How

G
Mastery of concepts, techniques, processes and theories related to the executive branch of government (the Crown, represented in Canada by the Governor General), Cabinet operations and the Public Service of Canada; in-depth knowledge of their respective mandates, organizational structures, roles, decision-making processes, responsibilities and legislation; and comprehensive knowledge of the conflict of interest policies and guidelines for government members in order to serve as the authority and responsibility centre on those matters within government.
IV
Coordination at the policy level of the machinery of government and the continual monitoring of and advising on the principles and operations of parliamentary and cabinet government in Canada.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the incumbent to advise the Deputy Secretary, Clerk and Prime Minister on machinery of government issues; and to advise senior members of the government and the bureaucracy on machinery and conflict of interest matters.
800
Number reflects the degree of knowledge and expertise required to manage and provide leadership across the Public Service for a specialized strategic central agency function.

Problem Solving / Thinking

G
Thinking is done within the broadly defined government priorities and goals to provide expert advice and make recommendations on government-wide strategic directions to guide the executive level of government in its relationships with Parliament, the Cabinet, Ministers and heads of departments and agencies.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking is required to provide advice and formulate recommendations on a wide range of complex and significant matters, such as the development of new conflict of interest legislation for Cabinet Ministers or recommending new organizational government structures or alternative service delivery strategies.
(66) 528
Higher percentage represents the leadership requirement of the position to identify and recommend original proposals in order to develop new concepts and governance approaches affecting the most senior levels of government.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Deputy Secretary, is accountable for the effective functioning of the Machinery of Government Secretariat and for critical analysis of and advice on issues relating to the principles and operations of cabinet government.
7C
The position has a contributory impact on all activities undertaken by the Secretariat. The proxy used to represent these activities is the federal expenditure budget of $27 billion (constant).
608
Low number reflects the tendency toward indirect impact and the lower dollar amount for magnitude.

Summary

GIV3 800
G4(66) 528
F7C 608
Total = 1936 A1
Assistant Secretary To The Cabinet (Machinery Of Government) - Number: 8 - H - 2
Org chart of the ASSISTANT SECRETARY TO THE CABINET (MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT)
Figure: 8 – H – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 8 – H – 2

Assistant Secretary To The Cabinet (Machinery Of Government)

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Deputy Secretary, and there is 1 peer position at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government) are 2 Directors and several Privy Council Officers.

Linear organisation chart:

Deputy Secretary

  • Assistant Secretary, Legislation and House Planning / Legal Counsel
  • Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Machinery of Government)
    • 2 Directors for:
      • Operations
      • Strategic Policy
    • Privy Council Officers


Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 7-H-1

Position Title: Director General, Banking and Cash Management

General Accountability

Is accountable for planning, organizing and directing the management of Receiver General functions involving government-wide administration of the flow of all public money and disbursements to ensure that the Government of Canada manages its cash resources economically and effectively.

Organization Structure

This is one of five positions at the second level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking and Compensation. The others are the Director General, Central Accounting and Reporting; the Director General, Compensation; the Director General, Superannuation, Pension Transition and Client Services; and the Director, Cheque Redemption Control.

Specific responsibilities of the six positions reporting to the Director General, Banking and Cash Management, are as follows:

Director, Payment Products and Services, (staff of 73) is responsible for the delivery of all of the government's payments issued on behalf of the Receiver General; providing corporate direction for research, design, development, implementation and delivery of payment products and services.

Director, Banking Arrangements, (staff of 17) is responsible for directing the development, implementation and administration of management frameworks, business approaches and information systems to support the government's banking facilities; and managing private sector banking service arrangements to support Consolidated Revenue Fund cash transactions.

Director, Strategic Systems Management, (staff of 15) is responsible for leading and facilitating the conceptualization, development, maintenance and enhancement of mission-critical systems used to control all payments and banking transactions.

Manager, Cash Management Operations, (staff 15) is responsible for planning, developing and implementing approaches, processes and procedures for cash monitoring and control, Receiver General banking operations, zero-balance accounts and settlement control, cash reports, and maintenance of systems and procedures for departments and agencies operating from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Manager, Business Infrastructure Support, (staff of 7) is responsible for managing the operations of business infrastructure support facilities, including budget planning, training and advisory services; and identifying human and equipment requirements and service delivery strategies and plans.

Manager, Payment Standards, (staff of 6) is responsible for developing payment, receipt, reconciliation and redemption standards for all disbursements made from the Consolidated Revenue Fund; and providing functional direction on public money banking to regional offices.

Nature And Scope

The Department is a common and central service provider with a mandate to provide other departments and agencies with mandatory and optional services on a fee-for-service basis. Services include construction, maintenance and repair of public works and federal real property; provision of office accommodation and other facilities; provision of architectural and engineering advice and services; planning for and acquisition of supplies and services; planning and coordination of telecommunications and informatics services; provision of centralized accounting and cash management services; provision of consulting and auditing services, and translation and related services; performance of the Receiver General of Canada function; and provision of administrative and other services in relation to employee benefits, superannuation and pension plans, and disbursement of pay to public servants.

It is within this context that the Director General, Banking and Cash Management, is accountable for planning, organizing and directing the management of those functions of the Receiver General relating to the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the Government of Canada as a whole. These activities are governed by a number of acts, including the Canada Act, the Financial Administration Act, the Bank Act, the Trust and Loans Act, the Bills of Exchange Act, the Currency and Exchange Act, the Canadian Payments Act and the Appropriations Acts.

The Director General is accountable for developing longer-term, strategic approaches, policies and plans for improving the Receiver General treasury function by identifying future business requirements and ensuring the integration of broader government-wide initiatives, such as Government On-Line. A major challenge is the increasing number of horizontal initiatives and emerging technologies that are impacting the Receiver General business line and require the development of partnerships with key stakeholders in other government departments, other levels of government and the private sector in order to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the government's treasury and cash management operations.

The Director General is responsible for all Receiver General payment operations, including the cost-effective delivery of socio-economic and other non-personnel payments. In carrying out these responsibilities, the incumbent directs the program design and the operational planning, development and implementation of new processes and systems in order to enable the end-users, client departments and agencies to assume greater accountability for their business payments. By increasing the functionality of the payment systems and processes, the incumbent is expected to achieve significant financial savings.

The Director General is accountable for directing negotiations with financial institutions and other service providers in Canada and abroad to secure banking services and to determine the fees to be paid for the services rendered. The incumbent also directs the payment of compensation to financial institutions for services rendered.

The Director General is responsible for ensuring that client departments are supported in the most cost-effective manner, that payments are accurate, and that recipients receive their payments quickly. The challenge is to find cost-effective payment solutions for client departments that address all of their banking needs while balancing their individual requirements with the benefits of introducing common systems to reduce government payment processing costs.

The Director General is responsible for ensuring that the Directorate maintains sufficient knowledge and expertise of modern financial management banking and accounting standards, practices and policies to be able to provide expert advice to clients, functional advice to regional operations staff and policy leadership to the senior management team for implementing new policies, standards, systems and business practices.

The Director General represents the Department and maintains effective working relationships with officials in the Office of the Auditor General, the Treasury Board Secretariat, other departments and agencies, and the private sector to discuss, resolve, negotiate and agree upon a wide range of issues associated with treasury-systems development, related government policies, and banking and accounting requirements. There are frequent contacts with provincial governments regarding payments to and from the federal government and regarding matters of common interest, such as deposit processes and emerging technologies.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 133
Operating budget: $13.2 million
Revenues: $2.2 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Directs the development, implementation and management of a comprehensive framework of banking and cash management policies, systems, procedures and processes, based on modern principles, practices and standards of accountancy and expenditure management, in order to ensure that appropriate financial cash management and control mechanisms are operating in the federal government, in accordance with relevant government legislation and policies.
  2. Directs the delivery of payment operations to ensure the accurate and timely disbursement of funds on behalf of the Receiver General. This accountability includes directing the negotiation of banking service agreements with financial institutions.
  3. Provides strategic policy and functional advice and direction to departmental managers at headquarters and in the regions, and senior officials in other government departments and other levels of government to ensure the consistent and appropriate application of policies and regulations.
  4. Directs a client service and liaison program with senior-level clients in other government departments, involving private sector service providers, to ensure the development of comprehensive long-range plans and strategies for introducing and improving payment processes and systems.
  5. Is accountable for leading change management processes during the implementation of new payment practices, systems and procedures to ensure that the new processes are accepted and embedded in government departments.

Evaluation Rationale

Director General, Banking and Cash Management

Know-How

G
Mastery of the policies, concepts, principles, techniques and processes in the field of banking, financial management and accounting; in-depth professional knowledge of the policies, approaches and processes for the development of integrated cash management systems and procedures to meet the government's banking needs; thorough knowledge of acts and legislation related to the management of the Consolidated Revenue Fund; and in-depth knowledge of central agency initiatives, information management / information technology business strategies, and financial institution policies and regulations pertaining to the management of public money.
III
Conceptual and operational management of the approaches, processes and procedures for managing all public money passing through the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the Government of Canada as a whole.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires dealing with the Department of Finance, the Office of the Auditor General, other government departments and agencies, and provincial governments regarding banking issues; and frequent contacts with the Bank of Canada and financial institutions in Canada and abroad to discuss banking arrangements and services.
700
Mid-range number reflects the solid expertise and knowledge required in providing strategic advice, guidance and recommendations, at a government-wide level, to ensure secure daily operations of banking services with due regard for economy and good cash management practices.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking is done within broadly defined policies, objectives and practices in cash management, banking arrangements and fund transfers.
4
Analytical, constructive and evaluative thinking is required to identify and asses new ideas to develop new banking arrangements, policies, systems and procedures involving a large number of organizations and stakeholder groups and implementing cost-effective systems and business process improvements.
(57) 400
Higher percentage reflects the role of the position in the Department to identify and solve complex problems involving a wide variety of cash management issues impacting a number of financial institutions, and to identify, recommend and support new banking and cash management policy and systems directions for the government.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking and Compensation, within broad practices, procedures and objectives, is accountable for the coordination and development of the government's internal banking policies to ensure that the government has coherent and sound banking and cash management policies, systems and practices.
4P
The position has a primary impact on all activities undertaken by the Sector. The proxy used to represent these activities is a budget of $13.2 million (constant).
460
Low number is consistent with the degree of autonomy exercised by the position in deciding on the policies, processes and systems for the government's cash management function and the scope of the activities managed.

Summary

GIII3 700
F4(57) 400
F4P 460
Total = 1560 A1
Director General, Banking And Cash Management - Number: 7 - H - 1
Org chart of the DIRECTOR GENERAL BANKING AND CASH MANAGEMENT
Figure: 7 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 7 – H – 1

Director General, Banking and Cash Management

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking and Compensation, and there are 4 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director General, Banking and Cash Management are 3 Directors and 3 Managers.

Linear organisation chart:

Assistant Deputy Minister, Accounting, Banking and Compensation

  • Director General, Central Accounting and Reporting
  • Director General, Compensation
  • Director General, Superannuation, Pension Transition and Client Services
  • Director, Cheque Redemption Control
  • Director General, Banking and Cash Management
    • 3 Directors for:
      • Payment Products and Services
      • Banking Arrangements
      • Strategic Systems Management
    • 3 Managers for :
      • Cash Management Operations
      • Business Infrastructure Support
      • Payment Standards


Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 6-H-1

Position Title: Director, Research, Strategic Planning and Policy Development

General Accountability

Is accountable for researching, developing, formulating, implementing and monitoring progress on all official language policies that extend to all government departments, agencies, Crown corporations and federal institutions, with the exception of the House of Commons and the Senate.

Organization Structure

This is one of five senior positions at the second managerial level reporting to the Vice President, Official Languages Program. The other positions are Director, Performance Measurement and Government Affairs; Director, Programs and Liaison; Director, Social Marketing, Promotion and Products; and Manager, Executive Secretariat.

Specific responsibilities of the positions reporting to the Director, Research, Strategic Planning and Policy Development, are as follows:

Analysts (8), each is responsible for conducting studies and analyses, planning, organizing and recommending new policies and providing strategic advice and recommendations to senior officials on initiatives to further the federal government's agenda for official languages.

Nature And Scope

The Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada (PSHRMAC) is responsible for ensuring that the government's agenda for the renewal of human resources management throughout the Public Service is carried out, with particular focus on the implementation of the Public Service Modernization Act, classification reform, human resources planning and accountability, leadership development, official languages, employment equity, and values and ethics.

The Agency is responsible for issuing government-wide policies and directives on how organizations are to meet the obligations of the Official Languages Act, and subsequently, is responsible for monitoring organizational implementation and achievement of those obligations. It is in this context that the Director is responsible for directing the planning, research, analysis and stakeholder

consultations necessary to ensure the development and implementation of a long-term, strategic policy framework for official languages in Canada. The Director is responsible for determining the areas where new policies are required or where existing policies require modification to support a renewed vision and culture for linguistic duality in Canada, in keeping with the federal government's objectives for Public Service renewal.

The Director is responsible for establishing a comprehensive research, intelligence gathering and environmental scanning capacity to acquire authoritative knowledge about trends, developments and issues in the public environment that contribute to or inhibit the achievement of the federal government's official languages objectives and priorities. The incumbent plays a leadership role in identifying the methods to be used in conducting research, developing a strategic policy framework and promoting innovative approaches to guide the strategic orientation of the federal government's long-term official languages policy agenda.

In this environment, the Director is responsible for developing legislation, regulations and policies that identify and support the federal government's strategies, objectives and priorities for a renewed vision and culture for linguistic duality in Canada. The incumbent prepares memoranda to Cabinet, submissions to the Treasury Board, and memoranda to the President of the Agency to recommend changes to existing legislation, regulations or policies.

A major challenge in this respect is the requirement for extensive consultation and negotiations with senior Agency managers to achieve consensus on a wide range of emerging official languages issues and priorities, and on proposed options that must be continually refined to reflect the evolving Public Service environment.

The Director is expected to maintain close working relationships with senior officials (usually at the Assistant Deputy Minister or Director General level) in a number of government organizations in order to develop mutually acceptable policy positions. These positions have a direct impact on the quality of official language services offered to the public in bilingual regions, the language rights of public servants, the Public Service Employment Act and the application of the merit principle. Effective working relationships are required with the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), the Department of Justice, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, the Privy Council Office (PCO), the Public Service Commission (PSC), and the Federal-Provincial Relations Office (FPRO).

A challenge for the Director is to exercise leadership in order to represent the employer's interests and policy positions in major interdepartmental policy development processes, particularly with the senior officials of key departments whose activities are closely linked to the Agency's official languages mandate. The development of policy options requires evaluating and reconciling divergent interests, such as those of the public and the media, and those of the Minister on the nature of any required change and its appropriateness, the possible effects of policy options on other areas of employee/employer relations, the possible reactions of the bargaining agents, and the human and financial resources constraints that impact the implementation of policy decisions.

The Director's policy advice and decisions have an impact on the quality of official language services offered to the Canadian public and all employees and institutions for which the employer is accountable, as prescribed in the Official Languages Act. This includes all government departments, agencies, Crown corporations and federal institutions, with the exception of the House of Commons and the Senate.

The Director is a member of the Branch Senior Management Committee and represents the Agency at meetings of the Parliamentary Committee on Official Languages. The incumbent provides technical support and advice to the Vice President, Official Languages Program, who sits on the policy forum involving the PCO, the PSC and the TBS, and on the Interdepartmental Committee on Broad Policy Issues involving the FPRO, Canadian Heritage, the PCO, the PSC and the Department of Justice.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 8
Operating budget: $200,000
Official Languages Program annual expenditures:

$39.4 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Establishes strategic priorities and directions for official languages policy renewal to ensure consistency with government-wide renewal initiatives for the Public Service.

  2. Provides authoritative policy advice and recommendations to Agency executives and key external partners and stakeholders on ways to optimize the availability and quality of linguistic services in the Public Service workplace and in the delivery of programs and services to the public in order to further the federal government's agenda for official languages.

  3. Directs qualitative and quantitative research, analysis and environmental scanning activities to ensure that this information can be used as a basis for the development of official languages legislative and policy initiatives and reforms.

  4. Identifies current legislative amendments or policy alternatives for Treasury Board or Cabinet consideration following in-depth analysis and broad-based consultations with stakeholder organizations to ensure that legislation and policies remain relevant and effective.

  5. Establishes partnerships and provides leadership in consultations and negotiations with officials of key federal government departments and agencies to ensure that the strategic objectives and management values reflected in the legislation and policy are applied and supported.

  6. Produces guidelines and directives for federal institutions on government decisions related to new or revised policies and to Treasury Board or Cabinet decisions in order to ensure that these changes are communicated and applied effectively in government organizations.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Research, Strategic Planning and Policy Development

Know-How

G
Mastery of the concepts, theories and techniques of policy planning and evaluation and all aspects of management in order to implement government official languages policy including policy on service to the public, language training, recruitment and program implementation. Position requires extensive knowledge of the environment and special interest groups; and experience in providing policy advice and preparing government-wide guidelines, directives and legislation.
III
Operational coordination and guidance of a strategic policy function that affects the entire federal Public Service.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires motivating staff organized in a matrix structure, developing effective relationships with peer organizations and superiors, and consulting with various stakeholder departments and central agencies in order to achieve stated objectives.
608
Low number reflects the focussed specialized expertise required in a relatively predictable environment to amend legislation and to evaluate, revise and coordinate official languages policy throughout government.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within a general frame of reference of legislative and government-wide directions from Cabinet and the Treasury Board in planning and developing policies and directives on official languages matters, which are necessary for developing responsive government policies.
4
Analytical and constructive thought is required to interpret and solve problems, and to develop policies and propose policy amendments.
(57) 350
Higher percentage indicates a tendency toward the uncharted, given the broad nature of direction, the complexity of situations across government, and the need to reconcile the divergent interests of a wide variety of stakeholders in policy development.

Accountability / Decision Making

F
Reporting to the Vice President, Official Languages Programs, acts within functional policies and goals under general direction in order to make recommendations on official languages policy matters affecting all departments, Crown corporations and federal institutions.
4C
The position has a contributory impact on the Official Languages Program. The proxy selected to represent the program is $39.4 million (constant) in language-related costs.
304
Mid-range number reflects the position's latitude to influence priorities, directions and policy issues across the Public Service.

Summary

GIII3 608
F4(57) 350
F4C 304
Total = 1292 P2
Director Research, Strategic Planning And Policy Development - Number: 6 - H - 1
Org chart of the DIRECTOR RESEARCH, STRATEGIC PLANNING AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT
Figure: 6 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 6 – H – 1

Director, Research, Strategic Planning and Policy Development

The subject position is at the second managerial level reporting to the Vice President, Official Languages Program, and there are 4 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Research, Strategic Planning and Policy Development are 8 Analysts.

Linear organisation chart:

Vice President, Official Languages Program

  • Director, Performance Measurement and Government Affairs
  • Director, Programs and Liaison
  • Director, Social Marketing, Promotion and Products
  • Manager, Executive Secretariat
  • Director, Research, Strategic Planning and Policy Development
    • 8 Analysts


Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 5-H-1

Position Title: Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews

General Accountability

As a member of a central agency centre of excellence, is accountable for providing government-wide direction and expert advice regarding internal audit policies, standards, methodologies and tools to government departments and agencies in order to enhance the internal audit management function in government.

Organization Structure

This is one of four positions at the third managerial level reporting to the Executive Director, Centre of Excellence for Internal Audit. The other three are Director, Analysis and Liaison; Director, Professional Development; and Director, Project Coordination.

Specific functions of the positions reporting to the Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews, are as follows:

Analysts (8), each of whom is responsible for policy development and analysis; providing advice and interpretations to departments and agencies regarding the application of policies, guidelines, methodologies and audit assessments; conducting directed audits; assessing new audit frameworks; and supporting client departments and agencies in developing their own internal audit performance criteria and methodologies.

Nature And Scope

As an administrative arm of the Treasury Board, the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) has a dual mandate to support the Treasury Board as a committee of Ministers and to fulfill the statutory responsibilities of a central government agency. More specific to the mandate of the Program Sector's responsibilities, the Secretariat provides advice and support to the Treasury Board in its role of ensuring value for money and overseeing financial management functions in departments and agencies.

The Internal Audit Centre of Excellence supports the Board in its role as a management board by providing analysis, support and advice on internal audit practices in departments and agencies. In fulfilling this role, the Centre provides advice on the effective use of management strategies and internal audit policies, standards, guidelines and methodologies.

It is in this context that the Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews, is accountable for consulting with departments and agencies on internal audit; directing the development, implementation and review of internal audit processes; and ensuring compliance within those policies for which the Treasury Board has management responsibility. Such consultations and direction must provide departments with objective direction for the design and operation of their management practices, control systems and information holdings, in keeping with modern controllership principles and practices, and thereby contributing to government's continuous management improvement program and to ensuring better accountability for results.

As part of this process, the Director is also responsible for assisting departments in the development of their performance criteria and performance results by providing advice, guidance and support when required. The incumbent actively promotes the aims and objectives of good management practices and encourages departments and agencies to use internal audit as a critical management function. To accomplish this, the Director engages in extensive consultation with departments to identify their needs and capacities, and to assist them in establishing effective departmental internal audit policies. The incumbent is also expected to provide guidance and support in areas such as risk assessment.

The Director is responsible for the review of audit frameworks of key Treasury Board policies. The incumbent determines the adequacy of proposed frameworks, suggests changes or proposes alternative approaches. The framework within which the audits of these policies will be conducted, particularly in areas such as grants and contributions, determines the effectiveness of the audit and its recommendations. The Director is challenged to find a balance between excessive program control, which may render such policies and programs ineffective, and lax control, which could lead to concerns over the disbursement of funds and the validity of client claims and entitlements.

The Director is also responsible for planning, managing and reporting on directed internal audits and other special reviews or investigations, as determined by the Secretary of the TBS or the Deputy Comptroller General. Typically, such audits or special reviews examine specific issues, problems or government concerns, or are commissioned to examine central agency policies and oversight activities.

In this context, the Director is responsible for developing the audit plan and directing specific departments or agencies to conduct internal audits on particular problems or issues. Once appropriate discussions respecting findings have taken place with various senior officials of departments and central agencies, and draft recommendations have been made, the Director presents the audit report to the Secretary of the Treasury Board or the Deputy Comptroller General, as appropriate.

The Director is responsible for coordinating a peer review process of audit staff in departments. Because of the Director's close involvement with audit staff and audit management in all government departments and agencies, the incumbent is in a unique position to provide interdepartmental peer review coordination and to ensure that the reviews are effective. Central coordination of peer reviews also permits the development and implementation of common performance standards government-wide. The purpose of such reviews is to assess the individual accomplishments of internal auditors and their contribution to the internal audit function in the Public Service. Overall results of the reviews may also be used to identify training and other professional development requirements.

The Director is responsible for providing leadership in the ongoing development of the federal government's internal audit function. The development of policy and program management options requires evaluating and reconciling divergent needs and interests across a wide variety of departments and agencies. In this context, the Director is responsible for monitoring various internal audit practices within departments, assessing their effectiveness and promoting the best of these for adoption or adaptation by other departments. Consequently, the Director represents an essential link between departments and the TBS at the Assistant Deputy Minister, Director General and equivalent levels in sharing information on best practices, policies and guidelines and encouraging further improvements in internal audit management.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 8
Operating budget: $159,000
Government operations budget: $7.7 billion

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Develops, assesses and implements TBS policies and standards on internal audit practices to improve management processes, practices and controls in government departments, agencies and Crown corporations.
  2. Provides guidance and support to departments and agencies on the application of internal audit policies, guidelines, best practices and methodologies to ensure consistent, professional management practices.
  3. Conducts reviews of departmental internal audit practices to ensure compliance with central agency policies, standards and recommended practices.
  4. Leads the planning and management of TBS-directed internal audits and other special reviews or investigations in government organizations to investigate and report on certain management practices to resolve management concerns.
  5. Is accountable for the review and assessment of audit frameworks and risk management matters to ensure that appropriate TBS policies and standards are maintained.
  6. Coordinates the peer review of audit staff in departments to assess the current performance of internal audit groups and identify learning and other professional development requirements to improve internal audit activities in government organizations.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews

Know-How

F
Extensive knowledge and skill is required of the policies, concepts, theories and techniques of internal audit and related management components to develop and implement internal audit policy, standards and best practices; extensive knowledge of internal audit practices in the Public Service and the private sector; and in-depth knowledge of the consultation, development, assessment and implementation approaches and processes related to government-wide policies, standards and directives.
III
Operational coordination and integration of, as well as guidance on, the development and implementation of government-wide internal audit policy, professional standards and management practices.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires motivating staff, promoting new internal audit standards and methods in government departments, and developing and maintaining effective consulting relationships with other central agencies, government departments, staff and superiors to achieve service-wide objectives.
528
Mid-range number indicates a solid knowledge of internal audit principles and practices and the expertise required to coordinate the development and implementation of a specialized program focussed on related activities across the Public Service.

Problem Solving / Thinking

F
Thinking within a general framework of service-wide directions from the Treasury Board in planning and developing policies and making recommendations regarding the internal audit function.
4
Analytical and constructive thinking is required in identifying and addressing multi-dimensional policy and program issues, and developing policies and proposing audit processes involving all government departments and agencies.
(50) 264
Solid percentage reflects the thinking required for policy development in a specialized function, the complexity of situations across a wide variety of government organizations, and the need to reconcile divergent interests and concerns of departments and agencies.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Executive Director, acts within defined goals and direction to make recommendations on program management and internal audit policy matters that have an impact on a specialized service-wide function.
6I
The position has an indirect impact on government operations as represented by a budget of $7.7 billion (constant).
264
Mid-range number reflects the degree of latitude inherent in recommending new policy directions for consideration by senior TBS management and by the Treasury Board, and the adoption of audit practices that have an impact on the entire internal audit community in federal departments and agencies.

Summary

FIII3 528
F4(50) 264
E6I 264
Total = 1056 0
Director, Internal Audit Policy And Special Reviews - Number: 5 - H - 1
Org chart of the DIRECTOR INTERNAL AUDIT POLICY AND SPECIAL REVIEWS
Figure: 5 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 5 – H – 1

Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Executive Director, Centre of Excellence for Internal Audit, and there are 3 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews are 8 Analysts.

Linear organisation chart:

Executive Director, Centre of Excellence for Internal Audit

  • Director, Analysis and Liaison
  • Director, Professional Development
  • Director, Project Coordination
  • Director, Internal Audit Policy and Special Reviews
    • 8 Analysts


Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 4-H-1

Position Title: Director, Seized Property Management

General Accountability

Is accountable for planning, developing and implementing policies, procedures, systems and processes for the management, protection, disposal or release of assets seized as a result of criminal investigations.

Organization Structure

This is one of eight positions at the third level reporting to the Director General, National Programs. The others are Director, Traffic Management; Director, Canadian Standards Board; Director, Crown Assets Distribution; Director, Space Station; Director, Forensic Audit and Accounting; and two Cost and Price Analysis Specialists.

Specific responsibilities of the three positions reporting to the Director, Seized Property Management, are as follows:

Manager, Operations, (staff of 35) is responsible for planning and managing the delivery of services to law enforcement agencies, including pre-seizure advice and planning, seizure and management of assets, and asset disposal.

Manager, Finance and Systems, (staff of 17) is responsible for planning, organizing and managing the preparation and analysis of accounts, reports and financial statements related to the seizure, management, disposal, settlement and accounting of associated funds; designing, developing and implementing the financial framework and standards for financial operations, reporting and control; and developing and managing the operation and maintenance of the Seized Property Management Information System.

Manager, Business Management, (staff of 13) is responsible for developing business strategies and plans, client strategies, and resourcing and training plans to support the delivery of the program to police agencies and justice representatives; and developing and implementing policies, procedural standards, statements of requirements for suppliers, and directives and procedures for the management and control of all assets seized.

Nature And Scope

The Department has been established as a common and central service provider with a mandate to provide other departments and agencies with mandatory and optional services on a fee-for-service basis. Services include construction, maintenance and repair of public works and federal real property; office accommodation and provision of other facilities; architectural and engineering advice and services; planning for and acquisition of supplies and services; planning and coordinating of telecommunications and informatics services; centralized accounting and cash management services; consulting and auditing services; translation and related services; the Receiver General for Canada function; and administrative and other services related to employee benefits, superannuation and pension plans and the disbursement of pay to persons employed in the federal Public Service.

It is in this context that the Director, Seized Property Management, is responsible for the ongoing review, planning, organizing and directing of the development and implementation of innovative policies, procedures and management practices, in conformance with the Seized Property Management Act, for the management of property and other assets seized by federal, provincial, territorial and municipal authorities where prosecution is conducted federally and where forfeiture is sought.

The Director is responsible for managing the collection, storage, protection, maintenance, and either disposal or return to owners of the seized property, depending on court and other rulings. Much of the seized property and physical assets cannot be easily collected, stored and maintained because of factors such as size (e.g. large ships or vehicles), immovability (e.g. buildings), value and fragility (e.g. works of art) and security. The incumbent directs the development of appropriate management policies and procedures to ensure that the necessary standards of security, care and maintenance are in place and enforced, that anticipated asset or property revenue-generation targets are achieved, and that seized financial assets retain their value.

The Director leads the planning, development and management of performance monitoring and review programs to assess the degree of compliance in the management and protection of seized property. This information is also used as a basis for the development of innovations and improvements to management practices to enhance the management of the seized property program.

The Director is responsible for providing expert advice on logistical planning for seizure for the purpose of identifying property or assets for seizure, evaluating their value and making a determination as to the continuing viability of their value. The challenge for the Director is to ensure that the Directorate plays an impartial custodial role, which means refraining from making any pre-judgments on the guilt or innocence of the individuals involved in criminal investigations.

As the Department's recognized authority on seized property, the Director is responsible for providing authoritative advice and recommendations to senior departmental executives and the Office of the Minister on controversial seized property issues that generate public interest or involve relations with other levels of government or foreign governments.

When a foreign government asks the Government of Canada to seize assets or property in Canada, the Director is responsible for negotiating with the foreign government all asset management and disposal issues associated with international criminal files in which Canada accepts management responsibility on a cost-recovery basis. The Director is also responsible, when requested, for sharing best practices with foreign governments by providing asset management advice and training to foreign government personnel.

The Director is responsible for planning, developing, maintaining and enhancing the Seized Property Management Information System, which is used to capture, store and report on seized-property-related information under the control of the Directorate. The Director is challenged to establish a system development framework of the highest quality that ensures that the unique legal, business and information requirements of the various stakeholder groups are respected. The incumbent consults during system upgrades and negotiates cost-sharing arrangements with external system users, such as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Department of Justice (DOJ), the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canada Border Services Agency and participants at other levels of government in Canada.

The Director contacts senior law enforcement officials with DOJ, the RCMP and other levels of government to negotiate cost-sharing agreements; to promote the development and harmonization of strategies and policies to minimize opportunities for criminal activity related to the management of seized property and assets; and to provide expert advice, analysis, and assistance related to seized property issues. The incumbent is responsible for consulting and advising officials in the Department and in other relevant departments when reviewing changes to legislation, policy or procedures and when leading major government-wide initiatives.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 70
Operating budget: $1.9 million
Average annual value of seized property portfolio: $15.4 million

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Directs the review, development and implementation of policies, strategies, procedures and processes that constitute the framework for the collection, storage, maintenance, ongoing operation and either disposal or return of seized property to ensure the appropriate management, protection, disposal or release of assets seized as a result of criminal investigations.
  2. Develops and implements a formal accountability structure and operational procedures to ensure that anticipated revenue-generation targets are achieved and that assets are controlled with due care; and investigates any losses of seized property or assets as a result of criminal activity or administrative error.
  3. Directs the development and implementation of management procedures to ensure that firms contracted to provide seized property services fulfill their contractual responsibilities.
  4. Directs the development and maintenance of the Seized Property Management Information System to ensure that data meet users' requirements and are of the highest quality, and that inputs and reports are completed without undue delay.
  5. Negotiates memorandums of understanding, cost-sharing arrangements and agreements with users from other departments and other levels of government and with foreign governments to ensure the proper management, disposal or return of assets and to recover costs.
  6. Develops and continuously enhances networks and relationships with government departments and agencies engaged in law enforcement, and those in other levels of government and with foreign governments to promote partnerships, share best practices and harmonize operational policies, strategies and procedures related to the management of seized property.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Seized Property Management

Know-How

F
Extensive knowledge of concepts, principles, techniques and processes in the field of seized property and asset management; in-depth knowledge and skill in the development of integrated management information systems and procedures; thorough knowledge of acts and legislation related to the management of seized property; and extensive knowledge of government law enforcement programs, legal requirements, financial administration of assets, forensic science, law enforcement agencies and institutions at the provincial and municipal levels, and foreign government-related policies and regulations.
II
Policy and operational integration and coordination for planning, organizing, and directing the development and implementation of approaches, processes and procedures for managing and controlling seized property to protect the interests of the Crown.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the provision of service and advice by successfully working with officials in other government departments, central agencies, and provincial and foreign governments.
460
High number reflects the in-depth expertise and knowledge required to be the government expert in developing and implementing policies and procedures; to provide expert advice, guidance and recommendations to ensure the best management of seized assets involving private sector stakeholders and multiple levels of government; and to share best practices with foreign governments.

Problem Solving / Thinking

E
Thinking within the Seized Property Act and defined policies, objectives and management practices of the Directorate, the Department and related law enforcement agencies. The incumbent is expected to develop new management frameworks and policies to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the seized property management program.
4
Analytical, constructive and evaluative thinking is required to develop new management control and reporting arrangements, systems and procedures involving a large number of seized assets, organizations and stakeholder groups.
(50) 230
High percentage reflects the role of the position in identifying, recommending and supporting new policy frameworks and systems directions for the government involving a large number of external stakeholders, clients and partner law enforcement agencies.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Director General, is accountable for developing management practices and procedures, as well as coordinating, managing and monitoring the government's seized property program's policies, procedures and systems to ensure that the government has an effective program that ensures that the value of assets entrusted to the temporary care of the Department is maintained and protected.
3P
The position is responsible for managing, protecting, disposing of or releasing assets seized by the government as a result of criminal investigations. The proxy used to represent these activities is an operating budget of $1.94 million (constant).
264
The mid-range number reflects the latitude that the position has in developing policies, procedures and management practices that influence seizure decisions and management of assets with a fluctuating, but significant, dollar value.

Summary

FII3 460
E4(50) 230
E3P 264
Total = 954 A1
Director, Seized Property Management - Number: 4 - H - 1
Org chart of the DIRECTOR SEIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Figure: 4 – H – 1 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – H – 1

Director, Seized Property Management

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, National Programs, and there are 7 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Seized Property Management are 3 Managers.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, National Programs

  • Director, Traffic Management
  • Director, Canadian Standards Board
  • Director, Crown Assets Distribution
  • Director, Space Station
  • Director, Forensic Audit and Accounting
  • 2 Cost and Price Analysis Specialists
  • Director, Seized Property Management
    • 3 Managers for :
      • Operations
      • Finance and Systems
      • Business Management


Executive Group Benchmark - Number: 4-H-2

Position Title: Director, Central and Public Accounting

General Accountability

Is accountable for planning, developing, implementing and monitoring national government-wide accounting practices and systems to ensure sound accounting practices and financial reporting for the production of the Public Accounts of Canada.

Organization Structure

This is one of four positions at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Central Accounting and Reporting. The others are the Director, Financial Reporting Products; the Director, Central Accounting Systems; and the Special Advisor to the Director General.

Specific responsibilities of the four positions reporting to the Director, Central and Public Accounting, are as follows:

Chief, Accounts of Canada Analysis, (staff of 3) is responsible for the management, analysis and reporting of the Accounts of Canada; and for the establishment of standards, schedules and procedures for closing the annual government-wide accounting cycle for all departments and agencies.

Chief, Statements and Analysis, (staff of 3) is responsible for the management and analysis of the Government of Canada's financial transactions in order to present the government's position in special reports and in the Audited Financial Statements included in the Public Accounts of Canada.

Chief, Government-Wide Classification Analysis, (staff of 5) is responsible for managing the Extended National Accounts Reporting System for the purpose of international reporting of financial transactions, and manages the preparation and reconciliation of the economic analysis of transaction services.

Chief, Financial Operations Analysis, (staff 2) is responsible for the preparation, production and analysis of the government-wide monthly, quarterly and preliminary financial statements to reflect the Government of Canada's financial results and position.

Nature And Scope

The Department has been established as a common and central service provider with a mandate to provide other departments and agencies with mandatory and optional services on a fee-for-service basis. Services include construction, maintenance and repair of public works and federal real property; office accommodation and provision of other facilities; architectural and engineering advice and services; planning for and acquisition of supplies and services; planning and coordinating of telecommunications and informatics services; centralized accounting and cash management services; consulting and auditing services; translation and related services; the Receiver General for Canada function; and administrative and other services related to employee benefits, superannuation and pension plans and the disbursement of pay to persons employed in the federal Public Service.

It is within this context that the Director, Central and Public Accounting, is responsible for planning, organizing and directing the development and implementation of innovative approaches to managing the tracking, monitoring, analysis and reporting on the Government of Canada's finances. These responsibilities include the development of new accounting policies, processes and procedures, as well as control mechanisms and reporting systems, in order to report on the federal government's financial position.

With the move to accrual accounting practices in government, the Director is responsible for developing new accounting processes and procedures that depart from traditional government practice and are unique to government. The incumbent is also responsible for managing the transition to the new accounting system by taking a leadership role in ensuring the development of appropriate human resources plans, learning strategies and skills development initiatives to help employees adapt to these changes both in the Department and throughout the government financial community.

The Director is responsible for leading the planning, development and management of performance monitoring and review programs in order to assess the degree to which departments' accounting practices comply with legislative requirements and central agency and private sector accounting policies, principles and practices.

The Director is responsible for directing the development of appropriate analytical methodologies and tools and ensuring that these tools are both effective and consistent with the requirements of the Financial Administration Act and related legislation, policies and accounting principles.

The Director is responsible for directing the selection and compilation of financial information for analysis and reporting in the Extended National Accounts Reporting System, in accordance with the requirements of the United Nations' International System of National Accounts. The Director is also responsible for ensuring the preparation of quarterly and annual reports on Crown corporation financial activities, the government's contingent liabilities, the Public Accounts, and the Annual Report on Crown Corporations, which is tabled in Parliament by the President of the Treasury Board.

The Director contacts senior finance officials in government departments and agencies and Crown corporations to provide expert advice, analysis and assistance on the financial data requirements for government accounts. The incumbent is responsible for consulting and advising officials in the Treasury Board Secretariat and other departments when reviewing changes to legislation or policy and when leading major government-wide public accounting initiatives.

Dimensions (Constant Dollars)
FTEs: 24
Operating budget: $200,000

Specific Accountabilities

  1. Directs the development and maintenance of a centre of expertise in government accounting principles, practices and methodologies for the assembly and analysis of statistical and financial information in order to ensure that information, advice and guidance are provided to officials of departments, agencies and Crown corporations.
  2. Provides departmental input on the development of legislation and policy to ensure their proper development and implementation.
  3. Directs the monitoring and analysis of accounting information and the preparation of the main financial statements of Canada, and defends these statements to ensure their acceptance by the Minister of Finance and the Auditor General.
  4. Establishes and maintains the Chart of Accounts to ensure that they reflect sound accounting principles and meet the reporting requirements of Parliament, client departments, central agencies and the Auditor General.
  5. Contributes to the effective management of the Central Accounting and Reporting Sector and participates in inter-branch committees and working groups.

Evaluation Rationale

Director, Central and Public Accounting

Know-How

F
In-depth knowledge of concepts, principles techniques and processes in the field of financial management and accounting; extensive knowledge and skill in the development of integrated financial information systems and procedures to meet the government's accounting needs; thorough knowledge of acts and legislation related to the management of the Consolidated Revenue Fund; and in-depth knowledge of central agency initiatives, and financial institution policies and regulations pertaining to the accounting and reporting of public money.
II
Policy and operational integration and coordination for planning, organizing and directing the development and implementation of approaches, processes and procedures for accounting activities that are relatively similar in nature for the Government of Canada as a whole.
3
Successful achievement of objectives requires the provision of service and advice by dealing with officials in other government departments, central agencies, provincial governments, the Department of Finance and the Auditor General's Office.
460
High number reflects the solid expertise and knowledge required as the government expert in providing coherent advice, guidance and recommendations at a government-wide level to ensure reliable and accurate accounting information and analysis for the Government of Canada.

Problem Solving / Thinking

E
Thinking is done within relatively well-defined policies, objectives and practices in public accounting and reporting.
4
Analytical, constructive and evaluative thinking is required to develop new accounting and reporting arrangements, systems and procedures in order to accommodate the reporting needs of Parliament and the entire Public Service.
(50) 230
Higher percentage reflects the role of the position as the government expert in providing advisory services to a broad clientele and in identifying, recommending and supporting new public accounting policy and systems directions for the government.

Accountability / Decision Making

E
Reporting to the Director General, within broad practices, procedures and defined objectives, is accountable for the coordination, monitoring and development of the government's public accounting policies, procedures and records to ensure that the government has coherent and accurate financial records and monitoring practices.
2P
The position has a primary impact on all financial activities undertaken by the sector. The proxy used to represent these activities is a budget of $200,000 (constant).
230
The high number is consistent with the amount of freedom to act in introducing new accounting policy and procedural changes, including the level of advice given at senior levels across a number of jurisdictions, as the government expert on public accounting policy and procedural matters that impact the integrity of the Public Accounts of Canada.

Summary

FII3 460
E4(50) 230
E2P 230
Total = 920 0
Director, Central And Public Accounting - Number: 4 - H - 2
Org chart of the DIRECTOR CENTRAL AND PUBLIC ACCOUNTING
Figure: 4 – H – 2 - Text version

Benchmark Number: 4 – H – 2

Director, Central and Public Accounting

The subject position is at the third managerial level reporting to the Director General, Central Accounting and Reporting, and there are 3 peer positions at the same reporting level.

Reporting to the Director, Central and Public Accounting are 4 Chiefs.

Linear organisation chart:

Director General, Central Accounting and Reporting

  • Director, Financial Reporting Products
  • Director, Central Accounting Systems
  • Special Advisor to the Director General
  • Director, Central and Public Accounting
    • 4 Chiefs for :
      • Accounts of Canada Analysis
      • Statements and Analysis
      • Government-Wide Classification Analysis
      • Financial Operations Analysis

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